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Americana

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20120811055319-06--81012
Nuclear Family , 2012 Ink on Mylar 38" X 32" © Courtesy of the artist and Spinello Gallery
Americana

7221 NW 2nd Ave.
33150 Miami
Florida

September 8th, 2012 - October 6th, 2012
Opening: September 8th, 2012 7:00 PM - 12:00 AM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://spinelloprojects.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Other (outside main areas)
EMAIL:  
info@spinelloprojects.com
PHONE:  
+1 786.271.4223
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Sat 12-5

DESCRIPTION

Spinello Projects announces the opening of its new gallery on Saturday, September 8th, 2012. Located West of Wynwood, the two-floor converted 1940′s warehouse is destined to become the new playground for unorthodox and experimental artists. Spinello Projects’ highly anticipated 3,000 square-foot space will enable an enriched program — progressing the gallery’s primary mission of initiating groundbreaking change in Miami’s cultural landscape and beyond. To inaugurate the expansion, Spinello Projects presents a solo exhibition by Nicaraguan self-taught painter Farley Aguilar, Americana, running September 8th to October 6th, 2012. This is the artist’s second solo exhibition with the gallery.

Americana features a suite of ink on mylar paintings which depict the struggle of the American psyche. Aguilar explains, “There is a very tense relationship between individuals and the society, community, or subculture they belong to. Even though the paintings are dated by a historical period, they show traces of their past and point to the future.” Characters are awkward, grotesque and disfigured; many times a violent act has just happened or is about to occur. Elements of classical mythology are selectively inserted throughout Aguilar’s work, nodding to stylistic modes of German Expressionism.

Aguilar’s work communicates sensations of danger, dread and emotional volatility filtered through the psychological wavelengths of the ‘mob mentality’. “American culture is obsessed with violence and the images in this new body of work reflect this notion,” states Aguilar. “Violence is a clear eruption of frustration, fear and anxiety within an American moral, conservative, psyche that explodes in terror when confronted with the unknown.”

In a constant state of searching for truth, Aguilar highlights the possibilities of attaining ultimate knowledge: like Faust, enlightenment leads to self-destruction while ignorance remains blissful. His colors and subjects reflect the full scale of human mortality, destined for a glorious demise.