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Gagosian Gallery - Britannia Street

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Much to do about Nothing

by Philippa Snow
Rarely does an artist invoke thoughts of Nothing like Rachel Whiteread (that’s capital N nothing, by the way – the greater idea of nothing, rather than nothing at all. The loudest negative silence within all possible comprehension, effectively; it is the kind of nothing that fills the silences in Pinter plays). Her famous House – made, some might be shocked to recall, in 1993, with the artist herself turning fifty this year – was a screaming grey-block slab of Nothing; her Judenplatz Holocaust Memorial, with its secondary title of Nameless Library, is the biggest Nothing to ever evoke – no doubt... [more]
Posted by Philippa Snow on 4/21/13
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Damien Hirst: The Complete Spot II

by Daniel Barnes
The idea of one spot painting is mystifying enough, but the idea of hundreds of them in eleven galleries across the world is frankly preposterous. But this is exactly what is happening:  Gagosian is presenting ‘The Complete Spot Paintings 1986-2011’ simultaneously in all his galleries as a kind of survey ahead of Hirst’s retrospective at Tate Modern later this year. The result is surprisingly moving; whether it moves one to wonder or fury, this cacophony of spots offers an opportunity to reconsider some of the most iconic canvases of the last twenty-five years. The moment you enter the galler... [more]
Posted by Daniel Barnes on 1/15/12
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Mike Kelley at Gagosian Britannia Street

by Mike Tuck
In the current exhibition at the Brittania Street Gagosian we are told that Mike Kelley expands on two previous major projects—the Kandor series and the Extracurricular Activity Projective Reconstruction (EAPR) – combining them into one mega installation. Lost? Well so was I! It turns out that this bizarrely titled installation is based on a rather arcane conceit and may need a little explanation: the Kandors, apparently, are representations of Superman’s city of birth, the only remaining part of his home planet, Krypton. In the well-known comic books Superman saved the miniaturised city in... [more]
Posted by Mike Tuck on 10/10/11
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k.364

by Joyce Cronin
On entering the Gagosoian Gallery in King’s Cross for Douglas Gordon’s new exhibition, k.364 is carved into the wall.  It is the title of the exhibition and that of Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante in E flat major. There is something quite brutal and permanent about this sophisticated graffiti, and although this is a sophisticated exhibition, the content fails to leave such an impact. K.364 is made up of several elements including an installation of the burnt pages of a music score, framed and mounted on mirrors and a room of the artist’s ephemera. From Cranach postcards to personal notes... [more]
Posted by Joyce Cronin on 2/20/11
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Look at it this way

by Gary McLeod | Visual Artist
I used to find the sunroof of my Dad's car fascinating because there was something alluring to a rectangle of natural blue light. I find a similar fascination with James Turrell's ‘sky spaces’, enclosed rooms large enough for 10-15 people where visitors sit on benches and simply look up. These over-sized skylights have always struck me as walking a fine line between intervention and leaving things be, and I could spend hours looking up through them. Ultimately this is Turrell's goal; to slow people down and make them contemplate more, and I have always had respect for that appr... [more]
Posted by Gary McLeod | Visual Artist on 10/31/10
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Picasso: The Mediterranean Years

by Nicholas James
Gagosian Gallery is the flagship of modern art. With a chain of international spaces, it has the power and expertise to frame areas of significance with focus and impact  that museums such as Tate Modern are unable to match. At Britannia Street, the gallery has mounted an exceptional survey of Picasso's post war works: The Mediterranean Years, stunning in its range and provocative invention. The exhibition presents many works, previously unseen, drawn from the family of the artist. It covers the period 1949 to 1962, when the artist set up in the south of France, with the release from... [more]
Posted by Nicholas James on 7/11/10
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Crash: Homage to J.G.Ballard

by Nicholas James
‘The choreography of mediatised reality’   --Will Self, ‘The Bounds of Inner Space’ Gagosian Gallery Catalogue 2010 We are not living in the real world, but merely exist in a virtual dimension, held like flies in aspic by shifting screens and filters which drip feed sensations of experience: violence, pleasure, the monstrous, the curious. These filters are precisely created episodes of a world theatre, a continuous and totally involving soap opera. ‘CRASH: Homage to J.G.Ballard’ makes a generous slice of postmodern culture. This fantastic wedge of art includes some... [more]
Posted by Nicholas James on 3/14/10
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Glenn Brown at Gagosian Gallery, Britannia Street

by Nicholas James
                The new show of Glenn Brown at Gagosian Gallery, Britannia Street, presents work made in the past two and a half years. It marks a transition from the mid-career survey at Tate Liverpool earlier in 2009, with an  intensification of his highly individual vision . Brown came to prominence in the second wave of the YBAs in the 1990s, with intricately  plotted mutations of artworks;  from the wild panoramas of 19th century seer John Martin to expressionist portraits  by  Frank Auerbach.  He continues to draw from history and the exhibition includes revisions of  F... [more]
Posted by Nicholas James on 10/30/09
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Cy Twombly, 'infinitely at ease'.

  It seems to me that Cy Twombly has achieved a kind of epiphany in this new work. Following on from the Blooming series of 2007, The Rose series, painted last year in Gaeta and now showing at Gagosian London, not only embodies the late flowering of a long and complex career but also represents the most dramatic kind of affirmation of painting’s continuing power and promise. Jonathan Jones (in The Guardian 2/2/09) compares the impact of seeing them with the experience of encountering Titian’s late work for the first time. It must have been the same too with Monet and his last great waterlily... [more]
Posted by Luke Elwes on 3/24/09