Bigindicator

Continuum of Ceaseless Change

Event  |  Reviews  |  Comments
20140919090846-unnamed
© Courtesy of the Artist and APT Gallery
Continuum of Ceaseless Change

Harold Wharf, 6 Creekside
Deptford
SE8 4SA London
GB
September 25th, 2014 - October 12th, 2014
Opening: September 26th, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://aptstudios.org
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
greenwich/west village
EMAIL:  
amy@aptstudios.org
OPEN HOURS:  
Thu-Sun 12-5
TAGS:  
painting, drawing

DESCRIPTION

Continuum of Ceaseless Change is an exhibition featuring the work of twelve London-based artists working in a variety of media, selected by painter Laura Smith. The exhibition is based around the idea that actions are left exposed when works of art are created.  Each of the works on show will testify to some past impulse or physical happening, or else will contain within itself an ongoing force.
.
Ninna Bohn Pedersen will show drawings, perhaps the most direct traces of gesture that an artist makes. Tensions between chance and order, intention and intuition, emerge in the differing approaches to abstract painting of Sheenagh B. Geoghegan and Nicholas John Jones, while Liz Elton’s works begin as gestural paintings before undergoing transformation into digital print. Sarah Pettitt disguises things with unsettling emotional resonance. Other processes will range from the ‘organic’ growth of Niamh Riordan’s virtual animation to the physical collapse of a sculpture by Mollie Anna King; and concerns will vary from the poetic, in the paintings of Laura Smith to the absurd, in a film collaboration by Sarah Pager and Poppy Whatmore. In works made separately, Whatmore evokes human sensation in sculpture created from everyday materials, while Pager shows an anthropomorphised ‘breathing box’: a machine without a ghost. Elsewhere, a site-specific piece by Robert Rivers will respond to the physical space of the gallery, while Sam Mould’s work will use earth materials gathered on journeys made across entire countries.

Uniting these disparate works is a common tactility, inviting the viewer to consider each as the physical trace of a creative act. Sometimes this will be overt, through the way the hand has responded to a material and left evidence of an encounter; in other works this will be subtler but will broaden the discussion. Smith and Whatmore challenge us to imagine these works as moments in what they describe as a ‘continuum of ceaseless change’, and to think about how they relate to wider issues, such as the primitive desire for touch in a post-digital culture or artists’ practices relating to the body.

ArtSlant has shutdown. The website is currently running in a view-only mode to allow archiving of the content.

The website will be permanently closed shortly, so please retrieve any content you wish to save.