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The Abstract and the Very Real

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20130806173538-upwards__downwards__45x51cm_hr
Upwards | Downwards , 2013 Mixed Media on Wood and Paper 45 Cm X 51 Cm © Courtesy of the Artist and Lazarides Rathbone Place
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© Courtesy of the Artist and Lazarides Rathbone Place
The Abstract and the Very Real

11 Rathbone Place
London W1T 1HR
United Kingdom
August 2nd, 2013 - August 31st, 2013
Opening: August 1st, 2013 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.lazinc.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
fitzrovia, bloomsbury
EMAIL:  
info@lazinc.com
PHONE:  
+ 44 (0) 207 636 5443
OPEN HOURS:  
Tuesday by appointment, Wed-Sat 11-7
TAGS:  
assemblages, installation

DESCRIPTION

This August, Tel Aviv-based artist Know Hope makes his solo debut at Lazarides Rathbone with a new exhibition, The Abstract and The Very Real.

Addressing the human condition and its collective social existence through a series of unique works and a site-specific installation, the exhibition questions the ubiquitous notion of the '"abstract and the very real", the weight and burden of which though universally apparent is often unidentifiable to most.

Appropriating found objects, vintage frames and old papers, Know Hope will fill the exhibition with assemblages that visually embody abstract concepts of memory and temporality. Reclaimed materials will come together breaking free from the confines of canvas or frame, his archetypal character crawling from one to the next with the frames representing the empty spaces in our lives and our undying struggle to fill them.

Continuing his examination of the various things that stand between us – the borders, fences, flags and walls that dictate our lives – the artist draws parallels with the collective human condition, interpreting them as an emotional mechanism. The political implications of these objects are intended to trigger feelings of separation and our begrudging acceptance of such universally experienced forces of segregation within quotidian existence.