Current Exhibitions & Events | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/show en-us 40 Matt Johnson - 303 Gallery - January 12th - February 25th <p style="text-align: justify;">303 Gallery is proud to present our second solo exhibition of new work by Matt Johnson.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> For this occasion, Johnson will exhibit a selection of sculptures in carved, bent, and painted wood. The objects depicted in his new works are the casual detritus of art studios or building sites, whose forms are the result of usage and discarding. Crumpled cardboard boxes, shards of cut drywall, a discarded cup, pizza box, and rolls of blue painter&rsquo;s tape are preserved in stasis, forms that would normally be realized only in the temporality between utility and refuse. These simple moments of dispossession become the generators of their own poiesis, as their incidental elegance is preserved through replication as sculpture. In a conceit to the transient fragility of sculpture proffered by artists like Fischli &amp; Weiss, a certain lack of the essential qualities that confer existence upon an object is imbued in Johnson&#39;s forms. This impermanent nature is borne out by the sculptural constructions themselves, as their wooden armatures form the supports for objects that you would usually expect to see crumble in front of you.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Johnson&#39;s approach to display lends the exhibition a scientific quality, as objects are arranged in constellations that seem to hint at a gravitational attraction created by their masses and the spaces between them. Long concerned with creating rifts in the negotiation between expectation and reality, Johnson&#39;s sculptures are arranged to communicate with each other, and seem to morph according to their imposed relations. The rubble of production, artistic, commercial and otherwise, is used to create a new type of codification, one in which objects between states and materials in flux become their own profligate and surreptitious communicators. An incorporeal form of predicate dualism begins to take hold, wherein an object can be both itself and signify a potential beyond both form and function.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Matt Johnson has exhibited widely in such international venues as The Serpentine Gallery, London (2005); The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2005, 2009); The Mori Art&nbsp;Museum, Tokyo (2007); The Hydra Workshop, Hydra, Greece (2011); The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2012). A series of the artist&#39;s <em>Lautner Beams</em>, inspired by cast-offs from John Lautner&rsquo;s demolished Shusett House was installed in the lobby of the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood in 2015. His site-specific work&nbsp;<em>Untitled (Swan)</em> was unveiled as part of Wanderlust, a group exhibition installed along New York&rsquo;s Highline in 2016, where it is on view until March 2017.&nbsp; Born in&nbsp;New York, Johnson currently lives and works in Los Angeles.</p> Sun, 29 Jan 2017 18:01:02 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel - February 4th - March 4th <p style="text-align: justify;">It&rsquo;s that time of the year for the gallery&rsquo;s annual Winter Salon.&nbsp; This show features new works by Gustavo Acosta, Bernard Ammerer, Paul Behnke, Bergman &amp; White, Marcy Brafman, Kathy Bruce, Marie Dolma, Reynier Ferrer, John A. Parks, Ian Hughes, Ilyan Ivanov, Julie Langsam, Nadja Marcin, Darrell Nettles, Alastair Noble, Eva O&rsquo;Leary, Tanja Selzer.&nbsp; Across media, including painting, photographs, mixed media, video, these artists pursue the addiction of art from varying and unique points of view.&nbsp; Their vibrant works brought together create a space for seductive engagement and thoughtful perceptions.</p> Sun, 29 Jan 2017 18:04:10 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Rita McBride - Alexander and Bonin - January 12th - March 4th <p style="text-align: justify;">Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435973-threshold" target="_blank">Jorge Macchi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435969-premium-new-markers" target="_blank">Rita McBride</a>,<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435971-eye-of-the-beholder" target="_blank"> Paul Thek</a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/436962-o-caseiro-the-housekeeper" target="_blank">Jonathas de Andrade </a>on Thursday, January 12, 2017.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Premium New Markers </em>, a series of sculptures by<strong> Rita McBride</strong> will be shown in the entrance gallery . The works are inspired by Joseph Beuys&#39; 7,000 Oaks project, inaugurat ed in 1982 at Documenta 7. Beuys&rsquo; plan called for the planting of 7,000 trees, each paired with a basalt marker. Sixteen of these tree/ marker pairs can be found on West 22nd Street, close to DIA Chelsea. Deriving their shape from those basalt totems, McBride&#39;s <em>Premium New Markers</em> are clad in Abet laminate, a material emblematic of post -modern architecture and design of the 1980s. With an eye trained on modern objects and architecture, McBride&rsquo;s sculptures toy with the formalism and functionalism of public structures and their oft-overlooked role as mainstays in public space.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For press inquiries contact Laura Braverman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com</p> Mon, 09 Jan 2017 15:07:22 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Paul Thek - Alexander and Bonin - January 12th - March 4th <p style="text-align: justify;">Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435973-threshold" target="_blank">Jorge Macchi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435969-premium-new-markers" target="_blank">Rita McBride</a>,<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435971-eye-of-the-beholder" target="_blank"> Paul Thek</a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/436962-o-caseiro-the-housekeeper" target="_blank">Jonathas de Andrade</a> on Thursday, January 12, 2017.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Eye of the Beholder</em>, an exhibition of works on paper and small paintings by <strong>Paul Thek</strong> includes a pencil triptych executed in 1970 while he was living and working in Amsterdam. The three pages are filled with rows of vertical marks with a tender drawing of a lamb in the center , which points to Thek&rsquo;s continued engagement with Christian iconography and Dutch Baroque painting . The exhibition title is taken from a turquoise watercolor which was included in Thek&rsquo;s final lifetime installation</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For press inquiries contact Laura Braverman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> Mon, 09 Jan 2017 15:06:57 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Jorge Macchi - Alexander and Bonin - January 12th - March 4th <p style="text-align: justify;">Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435973-threshold" target="_blank">Jorge Macchi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435969-premium-new-markers" target="_blank">Rita McBride</a>,<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435971-eye-of-the-beholder" target="_blank"> Paul Thek</a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/436962-o-caseiro-the-housekeeper" target="_blank">Jonathas de Andrade</a> on Thursday, January 12, 2017.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Jorge Macchi</strong> is considered one of Argentina&rsquo;s leading artists. Although Macchi has worked in a wide range of mediums from installation, sculpture, and works on paper to video and performance art, he has recently directed his efforts to painting, the discipline in which he was initially trained. The exhibition at Alexander and Bonin includes ten oil paintings made over the past three years. Departing from the ordinary and coincidental, his paintings alter scale and context, employing a system of layered visual complications and interruptions that offers a sensorial, disconcerting, and contemplative experience. Macchi&rsquo;s paintings have been termed &ldquo;anti-iconic&rdquo;<sup>1</sup> by curator and art historian Cuauht&eacute;moc Medina, in that they seek to escape an overcoded, predictable interpretation of the medium and move toward an understanding of painting tied to individual experience and ambiguity.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Premium New Markers </em>, a series of sculptures by<strong> Rita McBride</strong> will be shown in the entrance gallery . The works are inspired by Joseph Beuys&#39; 7,000 Oaks project, inaugurat ed in 1982 at Documenta 7. Beuys&rsquo; plan called for the planting of 7,000 trees, each paired with a basalt marker. Sixteen of these tree/ marker pairs can be found on West 22nd Street, close to DIA Chelsea. Deriving their shape from those basalt totems, McBride&#39;s <em>Premium New Markers</em> are clad in Abet laminate, a material emblematic of post -modern architecture and design of the 1980s. With an eye trained on modern objects and architecture, McBride&rsquo;s sculptures toy with the formalism and functionalism of public structures and their oft-overlooked role as mainstays in public space.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Eye of the Beholder</em>, an exhibition of works on paper and small paintings by <strong>Paul Thek</strong> includes a pencil triptych executed in 1970 while he was living and working in Amsterdam. The three pages are filled with rows of vertical marks with a tender drawing of a lamb in the center , which points to Thek&rsquo;s continued engagement with Christian iconography and Dutch Baroque painting . The exhibition title is taken from a turquoise watercolor which was included in Thek&rsquo;s final lifetime installation</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Selected Works 1987-1988</em> at Brooke Alexander, New York. In the video gallery is<strong> Jonathas de Andrade</strong>&rsquo;s <em>O Caseiro/ The Housekeeper </em>(2016), a work constructed symmetrically in two narratives with synchronized shots. On the left, Joaquim Pedro de Andrade&rsquo;s 1959 film, O Mestre de Apipucos shows the daily life of Gilberto Freyre in his home in Recife. Freyre is the historicist who wrote the remarkable 1933 book<em> Casa Grande e Senzala (The Masters and the Slaves)</em>. On the right, Jonathas de Andrade constructs a mirroring of Pedro de Andrade&rsquo;s film, substituting Freyre with a fictional caretaker of the aristocratic residence. The parallel between the two characters establishes a tension that underlines aspects of class and race, two of the main subjects that Freyre dealt with&nbsp; in his work.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For press inquiries contact Laura Braverman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><sup>1</sup> Cuauht&eacute;moc Medina, &ldquo;A Renewable Opacity,&rdquo; in Jorge Macchi &ndash; Prestidigitador (Mexico City: MUAC, Museo Universitario Arte Contempor&aacute;neo, 2014): 18.</p> Mon, 09 Jan 2017 15:07:26 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Jonathas de Andrade - Alexander and Bonin - January 12th - March 4th <p style="text-align: justify;">Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435973-threshold" target="_blank">Jorge Macchi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435969-premium-new-markers" target="_blank">Rita McBride</a>,<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435971-eye-of-the-beholder" target="_blank"> Paul Thek</a>, and Jonathas de Andrade on Thursday, January 12, 2017.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Selected Works 1987-1988</em> at Brooke Alexander, New York. In the video gallery is<strong> Jonathas de Andrade</strong>&rsquo;s <em>O Caseiro/ The Housekeeper </em>(2016), a work constructed symmetrically in two narratives with synchronized shots. On the left, Joaquim Pedro de Andrade&rsquo;s 1959 film, O Mestre de Apipucos shows the daily life of Gilberto Freyre in his home in Recife. Freyre is the historicist who wrote the remarkable 1933 book<em> Casa Grande e Senzala (The Masters and the Slaves)</em>. On the right, Jonathas de Andrade constructs a mirroring of Pedro de Andrade&rsquo;s film, substituting Freyre with a fictional caretaker of the aristocratic residence. The parallel between the two characters establishes a tension that underlines aspects of class and race, two of the main subjects that Freyre dealt with&nbsp; in his work.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For press inquiries contact Laura Braverman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> Mon, 09 Jan 2017 15:05:16 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - American Folk Art Museum - October 6th, 2016 - February 26th <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Securing the Shadow </em>is a contemplation of American self-taught portraiture through the lens of memory and loss. Humanity demands that no life should pass without some recognition, whether it is in the form of a marked grave, a portrait painted after death, or a postmortem photograph. Such tokens were once proof of life&mdash;one last opportunity to secure a shadow that would survive beyond the limit of individual memories.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">American gravestones offer standing testimony to the changing social structure of dying from the colonial period through the nineteenth century as portraits of the deceased slowly replaced stark memento mori of winged death heads, hourglasses, and the like. In painted portraiture, the transition from frank mortuary depictions to living images coincided with a cultural shift as the individual came to be privileged over the community and a redemptive view of death replaced a more intractable belief in original sin. Posthumous portraits and the postmortem daguerreotypes that ultimately replaced them are memories fixed in colored pigments on canvas and vapors on silver. We cannot help but hear them whisper through the years, &ldquo;remember me,&rdquo; because, as photographer Mathew Brady warned in 1856, &ldquo;you cannot tell how soon it may be too late.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Stacy C. Hollander, Exhibition Curator</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and Chief Curator, American Folk Art Museum</p> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 19:24:56 +0200 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Elliott Hundley - Andrea Rosen Gallery - February 10th - March 11th <p style="text-align: justify;">Elliott Hundley&rsquo;s intricate and immersive works evolve from his historical research on theater, literature, and film, emerging in this exhibition from an exploration of Antonin Artaud&rsquo;s enduringly imperative play &ldquo;There Is No More Firmament.&rdquo; Written in the 1930s and set in an imagined year 2000, the script recounts a society&rsquo;s frenetic response to an imminent cataclysmic event. Replete with cacophonous sound, jarring light and fitful movement&mdash;a mesmerizing intimation of synesthetic experience&mdash;the text conveys a sense of anxiety and uncertainty.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">With dense accumulations of imagery and painted gestures adjoining three-dimensional elements puncturing and protruding from the surface, Hundley&rsquo;s vibrant works appear alive and volatile. These teeming, insidious canvases impose a state of disquiet and hint at underlying violence with depictions of internal organs, crowds, ants, taxidermied animals, and a sculpture of the Fall of the Rebel Angels and The Last Judgment. Mediated by the processes of reproduction and re-presentation, it is difficult to locate these things in time and substance; the works resist attempts at deciphering. Echoing the improvisational approach of Artaud&rsquo;s text, explicit meaning becomes elusive. Here, Hundley reinforces an awareness of the mutability of material and the subsequent need for alert and active viewing.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Previously engaging with translations of plays from antiquity, Hundley has sustained his interest in translation over time with &ldquo;There Is No More Firmament.&quot; Moving from translation of language to translation of form, Hundley&rsquo;s works perform the unfinished script throughout the exhibition. In this encounter with Artaud&rsquo;s play&mdash;written in the past, projecting into a future that has now passed&mdash;time folds in on itself. Part science fiction, part political satire, the text&rsquo;s inherent ambiguity allows it to remain eternally relevant; the unknown impending disaster could represent a number of contemporary threats. This ability to extend into perpetual reinterpretations expresses an innate accessibility at the core of Hundley&rsquo;s sources, reinforced by his use of collage to open the experience and undermine an overwhelming&nbsp;seriousness.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Orchestrating a spectrum of perspectives, vignettes emerge from the swarm in these complex and exuberant works. Conflating color, language, sound, and motion, they approach a liminal sphere, conjuring visceral reactions. Like dialing between radio frequencies, Hundley lingers in the static between lucid signals and sporadic staccato transmissions, where dissolving is another type of becoming.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Elliott Hundley (b. 1975) lives and works in Los Angeles. Dust Over Everything is Hundley&rsquo;s fourth solo exhibition with the gallery. His series The Bacchae was the subject of his 2011-2012 traveling museum solo exhibition at the Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas and the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus. His work is held in numerous prominent public institutions including the Armand Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Broad Foundation, Los Angeles; Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humblebaek, Denmark; Miami Art Museum, Miami; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For media and press inquiries, please contact Brittni Zotos at b.zotos@rosengallery.com.</p> Sun, 29 Jan 2017 18:06:52 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Martha Friedman - Andrea Rosen Gallery 2 - February 10th - March 11th <div class="content-block block-medium selected" id="press-release"> <p style="text-align: justify;">Performances of &ldquo;Two Person Operating System&rdquo;<br /> by Susan Marshall &amp; Company:<br /> February 18, 2017, 2-6pm<br /> March 4, 2017, 2-6pm</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Andrea Rosen Gallery 2 is pleased to announce Dancing Around Things, an exhibition of work by Martha Friedman. Friedman&rsquo;s work presents the processes and materials of sculpture vis-a-vis the materiality of the body, manipulating substance, subject matter, and scale to highlight the familiar as well as the surreal aspects of everyday things. Friedman&rsquo;s work manifests a visceral intensity arising from her mastery of material, but simultaneously retains a footing in language&nbsp;and communication. Her works have an inherent wit and humor, blurring the lines between material and verbal engineering. In this exhibition, Friedman has created an installation of works that play out the slippage between the abstract and the erotic in commonplace objects and materials. In doing so, they rouse viewers&rsquo; consciousness of the tension between risk and pleasure that arises from encountering bodies and inhabiting one&rsquo;s own.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Rubber and metal feature frequently in the exhibition as sculptural material, a continuation of Friedman&rsquo;s interest in industrial objects and their potential to reference and implicate the body. In the entryway of the gallery, a video made collaboratively by Friedman and New York-based choreographer and dancer Silas Riener is projected onto a large, creamy white rubber flap cascading from the ceiling. The footage shows both artists moving amidst and through a small forest of giant hand-cast rubber bands knotted together and stretched from ceiling to floor in Friedman&rsquo;s studio. Shot from a variety of angles, Riener&rsquo;s movements range from quotidian and leisurely to soaringly acrobatic. At one tense stage in the video, the bands are freed from the floor and Riener propels himself using the elasticity of the hanging loops, his feet finding dangerous push-off points on the floorboards amidst a grid of metal hooks.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Made up of a latticed metal screen variously woven and penetrated with soft rubber tubes in hues referencing the four humors &ndash; black bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood&nbsp;&ndash; and metal spikes, Friedman&rsquo;s sculpture Two Person Operating System, situated in the center of the gallery, channels both threat and attraction. Conceived for the artist&rsquo;s recent exhibition at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, the project&rsquo;s form also alludes to work and labor, from contemporary circuit boards to the archaic telephone switchboards operated by large workforces of women. The piece will be activated by a dance performance conceived by Friedman and Susan Marshall and performed by Susan Marshall &amp; Company. In Marshall&rsquo;s choreography, the dancers navigate the sculpture&rsquo;s dangerously sharp elements with careful attention to precision, speed, and force, further implicating the viewer to think about the sensory experience of inhabiting a body and touching or navigating bodies outside their own.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">These works confound our expectations of the form and substance of the most ubiquitous of objects and materials, drawing parallels with the material condition of the body, beckoning viewers to contemplate their own corporeal situatedness.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Martha Friedman (b. Detroit, MI) lives and works in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. She earned her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1998 and her MFA from Yale University School of Art in 2003. Solo exhibitions of her work have been held at the Institute of Fine Arts New York University, New York (2016-17); Locust Projects, Miami (2015-16); Wallspace, New York (2012, 2009, 2007); the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, MI (2010); DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, MA (2010); and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago, IL (2010). Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions, nationally and internationally. Select examples include Frieze New York Sculpture Park, curated by Tom Eccles, New York (2013) and Museum on the Seam, Jerusalem, Israel (2013). Friedman is Assistant Professor of Sculpture at Princeton University. A&nbsp;solo exhibition of Friedman&rsquo;s work is forthcoming at the Henry Museum, Seattle in 2018.&nbsp;</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For media and press inquiries, please contact Brittni Zotos at <a href="mailto:b.zotos@rosengallery.com">b.zotos@rosengallery.com</a>.</p> </div> Sun, 29 Jan 2017 18:12:40 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Annie Dunning, Aganetha Dyck, William Eakin, Nina Katchadourian, Alison Reiko Loader, Christopher Plenzich, Michael Anthony Simon - Apexart - January 19th - March 18th <p style="text-align:justify">A well-known humanist truism states that there is no art in the non-human world. Indeed, when it comes to defining art, the notion that it constitutes a uniquely human activity often serves as a reassuring rock in a storm of contestation. Laurie Schneider Adams&rsquo; classic introductory text, <em>The Methodologies of Art: An Introduction</em> (1996), uses this assumption to exclude animal creations such as bird&rsquo;s nests, ant hills, and beaver dams from the category of art.<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn1" id="_ftnref1" name="_ftnref1" title="">(1)</a> &ldquo;Spiders, unlike humans, are not inspired by aesthetic or narrative ideas,&rdquo; she writes. &ldquo;They neither observe the environment nor make a conscious choice to create the abstract geometry of their webs.&rdquo;<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn2" id="_ftnref2" name="_ftnref2" title="">(2)</a>More recently, French literary theorist Alain Vaillant has advanced an anthropocentric theory of art and laughter, which ties them both to humanity&rsquo;s ability to liberate itself from the exigencies of &ldquo;reality&rdquo; and play with representations.<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn3" id="_ftnref3" name="_ftnref3" title="">(3)</a> At the heart of such theories lies a notion of human superiority strangely at odds with the prevailing tenor of much contemporary art theory and criticism, which typically embraces otherness and encourages subversions of normative categories.<br /> <br /> While the spectrum of difference celebrated by contemporary art remains stubbornly anthropocentric,<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn4" id="_ftnref4" name="_ftnref4" title="">(4)</a> few would argue that animals have no place in this world. Indeed, traditional art history narratives begin with depictions of animals &ndash; usually the iconic horses of Lascaux Caves &ndash; as well as objects made from their bodies, such as etched shells, or carved bones and teeth. While our relationship with non-humans may have changed more under capitalism than in all of human history, they continue to play an important role in art, usually as symbols of a social imaginary or as indexes of the real. In the first case, they tend to embody positive and negative attitudes towards shared cultural mores, institutions, and values. In the second, their actual bodies &ndash; documented, confined, taxidermied &ndash; confront us with the limits of this imaginary and its failure to grasp their otherness. While the goal of such art is usually to shock us, or make us question the status quo, its treatment of animals as media or mere things to be represented is far from innovative.<br /> <br /> In his anti-Darwinian theory of biological origins, French philosopher Henri Bergson observed: &ldquo;It would be as absurd to refuse consciousness to an animal because it has no brain as to declare it incapable of nourishing itself because it has no stomach.&rdquo;<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn5" id="_ftnref5" name="_ftnref5" title="">(5)</a> Assuming that the practices of non-humans are not imaginative or artistic simply because they lack human organization seems equally absurd. We know that certain animals decorate themselves and their dwellings, collect and arrange objects, make symbolic gestures, and fashion tools. Humanism dismisses these activities as genetically programmed instinct, devoid of conscious creativity. But we also know that animals play, and play involves metacommunication, improvisation, and stylistic flourishes belonging to the realms of the aesthetic and the comic.<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn6" id="_ftnref6" name="_ftnref6" title="">(6)</a><br /> <br /> Although contemporary art continues to be defined by human agency, the notion of animal culture now serves as a point of departure for a range of artistic practices focused on multispecies aesthetics and interspecies communication. The exhibition <em>Animal Intent</em> explores this trend through the work of seven artists who partner with non-humans in the creation of unique artistic projects. Rather than merely representing animals, using them as surrogates, or politicizing their bodies as part of a broad social critique, these artists treat animal instinct as a form of stylistic invention in its own right.<br /> <br /> <em>Sapsucker Sounds</em>, Annie Dunning&rsquo;s playful &ldquo;conflation of woodpecker and human culture,&rdquo; is a good example of interventions used by artists in this exhibition. At its heart lies a pattern of holes dotting the surface of a log cut from a Manchurian walnut. These are the drill holes of a yellowbellied sapsucker, a North American woodpecker known both for boring into young deciduous trees and drumming on them and other surfaces as a means of declaring its territory. Dunning borrows these marks, which she treats as the residue of a specific cultural practice, and translates them into a series of quirky, interactive sound sculptures. <em>Music Box </em>(2014), for instance, features a negative cast of the pattern of holes that have been reconfigured as cylinder pins for a clunky, yet charming music box. Viewers may play this unusual musical score by turning a rustic ratchet lever, which forces an explosion of pins through a comb of metal tines.<br /> <br /> In human-centered hierarchies of intelligence, insects generally figure somewhere near the bottom. And yet they have some of the most complex social formations on earth. Alison Reiko Loader and Christopher Plenzich explore the aesthetic side of this complexity in their project <em>Caterpillar Cartography</em>. Part of a larger, ongoing collaboration with forest tent caterpillars (<em>Malacosoma disstria</em>), it consists of a series of drawings made by fourth-stage caterpillar larvae as they crawl across sheets of paper dotted with piles of charcoal dust.<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn7" id="_ftnref7" name="_ftnref7" title="">(7)</a> A series of videos shows the choreographic nature of these sketches. Rather than dismissing their marks as the product of blind instinct, Loader and Plenzich treat them as an improvisational form of cartography, one that paradoxically &ldquo;creates the territory it maps.&rdquo;<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn8" id="_ftnref8" name="_ftnref8" title="">(8)</a><br /> <br /> Aganetha Dyck&rsquo;s twenty-year-long collaboration with honeybees takes a similar approach. Working closely with an apiarist, she places found objects into the bees&rsquo; hives, where the insects slowly and meticulously transform them into baroque, honeycombed sculptures. In <em>An Inconvenient Proposal </em>(2007), a kitsch pastiche of 18th century rococo fashion becomes uncanny beneath the hexagonal &ldquo;lacework&rdquo; of the bees. In a tragic twist of fate, Dyck recently developed a life-threatening allergy to bee stings. As part of her efforts to find new ways of working with the insects, she enlisted the help of photographer William Eakin. Together they collaborated on <em>Light</em> (2010-2011), a sculptural and photographic project focused on human and non-human appropriations of found objects. For this project, Eakin placed a selection of vintage table lamps from his personal collection in the hives. Dyck participated remotely, giving instructions via a cell phone. Eakin then re-appropriated the completed sculptures in a series of distorted photographs that quietly fold collaboration back into estrangement.<br /> <br /> Sometime in 2011, Michael Anthony Simon began bringing <em>Nephila clavata</em> spiders into his studio, where he devised a method of working with them to produce a variety of webs. Once completed, he fixed these delicate constructions with spray paint and other materials, and then returned the spiders to their natural habitat. While one might dismiss this as a form of appropriation art, such an assessment would reduce the insects to mere webmaking machines. But as Brian Massumi observes in his book <em>What Animals Teach Us About Politics</em>, &ldquo;Instinctive action plays its own natural creativity against the limitative conditions of the external milieu&hellip; It plays itself, as it plays upon. It is always the playing out of a true act, never just a stereotype of action.&rdquo;<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn9" id="_ftnref9" name="_ftnref9" title="">(9)</a><br /> <br /> Nina Katchadourian&rsquo;s work with spiders also supports the notion that they are motivated by more than pure instinct. Her video <em>GIFT/GIFT</em> (1998) shows the artist attempting to insert the word &ldquo;GIFT&rdquo; into a spider&rsquo;s web. The insect actively resists this intervention, and a battle ensues. This project was inspired by a 1950s Swedish nature book describing certain cultural practices particular to spiders, which sometimes wrap dead flies in silk and then offer them as gifts to potential mates.<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn10" id="_ftnref10" name="_ftnref10" title="">(10)</a> In Swedish, the word &ldquo;gift&rdquo; means poison, a doubleentendre underscoring the ambivalence inherent to any collaboration. Katchadourian&rsquo;s photographic series <em>Carla and a Friend</em> (2002), on the other hand, casts this ambivalence in a more positive light, focusing instead on an unusual friendship between a pet snake and a rat she was originally given as food.<br /> <br /> Although the curatorial impetus for <em>Animal Intent</em> is rooted in the growing field of interspecies collaboration, it is also part of a personal quest to &ldquo;unlearn the animal,&rdquo; to borrow a phrase from Giovanni Aloi&rsquo;s influential text<em> Art &amp; Animals</em> (2012). Such an approach inevitably raises more questions than it answers, but this space of uncertainty feels more comfortable to me than either post-humanist utopias or humanist anthropocene. If we are to reimagine human/non-human relationships in ways that will ensure the survival of the planet, it seems vital to me that we attend as much to the lines that separate us as to the inherent porousness of these lines. This exhibition represents one small attempt to do so.<br /> <br /> Emily Falvey &copy; 2016<br /> Unsolicited Exhibition Program<br /> <br /> 1. For an excellent critique of this aspect of Adams&rsquo; book, see Giovanni Aloi, Art &amp; Animals (London: I.B. Tauris, 2012) and &ldquo;Animal Studies and Art: Elephants in the Room,&rdquo; a special editorial published in March 2015 as part of the &ldquo;Beyond Animal Studies&rdquo; <em>Antennae</em> publishing project 2015-2016, http://www.antennae.org.uk/back-issues-2015/4589877799.<br /> 2. Laurie Schneider Adams, <em>The Methodologies of Art: An Introduction</em> (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2010), 14.<br /> 3. Alain Vaillant, &ldquo;Le rire de l&rsquo;artiste,&rdquo; paper given at No Joke/Sans blague, Max Stern Symposium, organized by the Mus&eacute;e d&rsquo;art contemporain de Montr&eacute;al, April 2, 2016.<br /> 4. Kay Peggs refers to such anthropocentrism as &ldquo;human primacy identity politics.&rdquo; See Kay Peggs, &ldquo;Human Primacy Identity Politics, Nonhuman Animal Experiments and the Oppression of Nonhuman Animals,&rdquo; in<em> Human and Other Animals: Critical Perspectives</em>, Bob Carter and Nickie Charles eds. (New York: Palgrave McMillian, 2011), 133.<br /> 5. Henri Bergson, <em>Creative Evolution</em>, trans. Arthur Mitchell (New York: Dover Publications Inc., 1998), 110.<br /> 6. Brian Massumi, <em>What Animals Teach Us About Politics</em> (Durham &amp; London: Duke University Press, 2014), 1-54.<br /> 7. Loader and Plenzich limited the amount of time each caterpillar spent drawing to one hour. They used insects from local colonies, and ensured they were fed and cared for throughout their lifecycle. They also selected charcoal dust as a medium because it is non-toxic. In North America, there are no protocols for working ethically with insects.<br /> 8. Op. cit., 23.<br /> 9. Ibid., 19.<br /> 10. Felicity Muth, &ldquo;Fake Jewels: Male Spiders Give Worthless Gifts to Entice Females,&rdquo; <em>Scientific American</em>, May 5, 2014, blogs.scientificamerican.com/not-bad-science/fake-jewels-male-spiders-give-worthless-gifts-toentice-females.<br /> <br /> above photo taken by William Eakin<br /> &nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align:justify"><strong>Emily Falvey</strong> is an independent art critic and curator based in Montreal, Canada. She is known primarily for her critical writing, which has been published by a wide range of Canadian museums, public galleries, and artist-run-centres. In 2009, the Canada Council for the Arts awarded her the Joan Yvonne Lowndes Award for excellence in critical and curatorial writing, and she received curatorial writing awards from the Ontario Association of Art Galleries in 2006 and 2012. As Curator of Contemporary Art at the Ottawa Art Gallery (2004-2008), she organized a variety of solo, group, and travelling exhibitions. She is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History at the Universit&eacute; du Qu&eacute;bec &agrave; Montr&eacute;al, where she is working on a dissertation examining the relationship between the grotesque work of art and commodity fetishism.<br /> <br /> <strong>apexart</strong>&rsquo;s programs are supported in part by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Buhl Foundation, the Degenstein Foundation, Lambent Foundation Fund of Tides Foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies, The Greenwich Collection Ltd., Affirmation Arts Fund, the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, the Fifth Floor Foundation, and with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.</p> <p style="text-align:justify"><br /> An Unsolicited Exhibition Program winning exhibition.<br /> Learn more about the <a href="https://apexart.org/unsolicited.php" target="_blank">Unsolicited Exhibition Program</a>.</p> Thu, 15 Dec 2016 16:11:39 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Eko Nugroho - Asia Society Museum - December 20th, 2016 - April 16th <p style="text-align: justify;">Eko Nugroho&rsquo;s multidisciplinary practice uses humor to address social issues, including changes within the rapidly urbanizing society of his native Indonesia, the risk of religious fanaticism, and the breaking of traditional taboos by the younger generation. This exhibition features three single-channel video works by Nugroho from the Asia Society Museum Collection: <em>Bercerobong (Like a Chimney)</em>, 2002; <em>The Breeder</em>, 2003; and <em>Let Me Love Me</em>, 2004. The exhibition complements a site-specific installation to be created by the artist in the Asia Society Visitor Center and the world premiere of his commissioned performance In the Name of Semelah, with his theater company Wayang Bocor, at Asia Society in January 2017.</p> Fri, 30 Sep 2016 08:59:50 +0200 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Asia Society Museum - December 20th, 2016 - January 7th, 2018 <p style="text-align: justify;">This exhibition features a selection of the finest artworks from the renowned Asia Society Museum Collection. Included are Chinese, Korean, and Japanese ceramics, Indian and Cambodian sculpture, and sculptures from South and Southeast Asia and the Himalayas that show the varied imagery associated with the transmission of Buddhism across the region.</p> Fri, 30 Sep 2016 09:01:07 +0200 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Long Island City Artists, Inc. - Atlantic Gallery - February 7th - February 25th <p><img alt="Over the Bridge III Feb.7-25th, 2017" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/903864/12qup/20170131184452-Over_the_bridge_iii_eblast-01__3_.jpg" /></p> Mon, 06 Feb 2017 16:18:24 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Jude Broughan - Benrubi Gallery - January 12th - February 25th <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Benrubi Gallery</strong> is pleased to present <em>Athenree</em>, the gallery&rsquo;s first solo exhibition by Brooklyn-based artist, <strong>Jude Broughan</strong>. Athenree is a tiny beach town in the coastal Bay of Plenty, in the artist&rsquo;s native New Zealand. It was named after the Northern Irish &lsquo;townland&rsquo; that is home to the monolithic Athenree Portal Tomb. Revealing an interest in the process of traveling and the concomitant instability of &lsquo;place,&rsquo; Broughan&rsquo;s new works state their claim on the here and now while simultaneously questioning exactly where and when this might be.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In assemblages, loose-hanging works, mixed-media panels, and photo collages, Broughan draws on the languages of painting and printmaking alongside those of photography and collage to play with space and form, line and color. Using colored vinyl, leather, denim, and polyester grounds, she alludes to her own physicality while pondering the nature of artistic production itself. &nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Broughan manipulates her photographs visually and physically, subtly shifting the emphasis of personal and quotidian imagery in some works, referencing the language of commercial imagery in others. Her use of stitching&mdash;a strategy informed by Warhol&rsquo;s &ldquo;Sewn Photographs&rdquo;&mdash;inserts shots distinguished by their immediacy into carefully composed arrangements, the thread dividing our attention between the physicality of the art object and the patterning of its surface. By also cutting holes or apertures in her works&rsquo; supports, Broughan refers to the mechanics (and limitations) of photography, digital manipulation, and vision itself, and alludes to our seemingly innate tendency to edit. As New Zealand artist and critic Peter Dornauf writes, this &ldquo;exposes the constructed nature of the subject while also providing a simulation of depth, which seems like the contradiction it actually is. Such incongruity and paradox is the essence of this artist&rsquo;s practice.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Jude Broughan</strong> is a New Zealand-born artist living in Brooklyn, New York. Recent solo and group exhibitions include &ldquo;Best of 2012,&rdquo; Soloway, Brooklyn, and &ldquo;Written By Snakes,&rdquo; Churner and Churner, New York (both 2012); &ldquo;New. New York,&rdquo; Essl Museum, Vienna (2012&ndash;13); &ldquo;Plot,&rdquo; Dimensions Variable, Miami, and &ldquo;Certain Lights&rdquo; Churner and Churner, New York (both 2014); &ldquo;A Weekend in the Country&rdquo; Magnan Metz Gallery, New York, and &ldquo;Honey,&rdquo; Calder &amp; Lawson Gallery, Hamilton, New Zealand (both 2015); and &ldquo;Ornamentation of the Joint,&rdquo; Old Pfizer Building, Brooklyn (2016). Broughan is a 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation grantee and a graduate of the School of Visual Arts and Hunter College.</p> <aside class="grid-3 region region-sidebar-second sidebarsecondver2" id="region-sidebar-second"> <div class="region-inner region-sidebar-second-inner"> <div class="block block-views series seriesblock block-gallery-block-5 block-views-gallery-block-5 even block-without-title" id="block-views-gallery-block-5"> <div class="block-inner clearfix"> <div class="content clearfix"> <div class="view view-gallery view-id-gallery view-display-id-block_5 view-dom-id-acc5559d2edbc91f7e642665fa62451c jquery-once-1-processed"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first views-row-last">&nbsp;</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </aside> Thu, 15 Dec 2016 16:16:18 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list John Bradford - Bowery Gallery - January 31st - February 25th <div class="contentleft"> <p style="text-align: justify;">Cezanne said &quot; What art needs is to re-do Poussin over again after nature.&rdquo; There is something both nostalgic and unsentimental in that: he was yearning for permanence that could affirm his intuitive sensations, even as the values that had sustained permanence seemed to be evaporating around him.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">No moment, of course, can ever be held on to. Something always has to give. But the genius of the whole thing was that painters&rsquo; relentlessness in holding on, regardless, had always been framed by a shared Westphalian narrative, which had allowed both the modern world and immutable beauty to be suspended, without irony, in a delicate, artificial harmony for 250 years. For Cezanne and the modernists who followed, that holding on continued to be worthy of affirming.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In these paintings, my &ldquo;nature&rdquo; is to see almost everything as an artificial reference: a certain sky is more Corot or Freilicher, sunsets are often Claudes, winter trees in front of buildings have the texture of Pissarro or a brown that is scumbled over a white like in a Kossoff.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To contact artist e-mail: i<a href="mailto:info@bowerygallery.org">nfo@bowerygallery.org</a></p> </div> Mon, 30 Jan 2017 14:54:21 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Jennifer Wynne Reeves - BravinLee Programs - February 10th - March 18th <p style="text-align: justify;"><i>I start to paint. I squeeze out lumps on the palette. One little blob speaks to me. He seems to say, &ldquo;I am the sun. You revolve around me.&rdquo; I swipe at him with my brush and lay a piece of him on the canvas. I say, &ldquo;I am the sun. You revolve around ME!&rdquo; And so the conversation goes until the end of the piece when the paint is silenced and the silence is golden. Jennifer Wynne Reeves, Facebook post, November 17, 2012&nbsp;</i></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;Jennifer Wynne Reeves (1963-2014) lived her art and life brazenly. Playing with pigment was a primal&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 1em;">manifestation and solace of her personhood. Her representations embrace and aim towards abstraction, just as her abstraction is always driven by narrative. Morphing reality and abstraction, anxious ambiguity is Reeves&rsquo; chosen meaning. Enacted on open, neutral stages, her self-proclaimed. proscenium-staged slugs then blobs of paint assert the dilemma of singular existence. Nature and built structures are vital props of her reality while often vehemently confounding their purpose and function. Her art resounds with sensibility: a distinctly specific and quirky personal style and set of motifs that assert and memorialize her fierce individuality and independence.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Like other artists who died too young, Reeves&rsquo; art and personal intensity suggests she knew that her life might be unduly shortened. Her works morphed and shifted from drawing to painting to photography and proliferated within an increasing impulse to write. She made use of Facebook and other online formats to declare private thoughts as publicly as possible.<br /> The works chosen for this exhibition incisively feature her far-ranging pictorial skill and her propensity to package big thoughts and feelings in small scale. Seductive yet prickly and hermetic yet driven to full disclosure, Reeves&#39; snapshots of her life and brain&rsquo;s visions picture a distinct and idiosyncratic consciousness.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;Patterson Sims, 2017</p> Sat, 04 Feb 2017 19:52:25 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Victoria Roth - Brennan & Griffin / Lower East Side - January 29th - February 26th <p class="intro_event" style="text-align: justify;">Brennan &amp; Griffin presents &ldquo;Off the Banks,&rdquo; an exhibition of new paintings and drawings by Brooklyn based artist Victoria Roth. The works in the exhibition use Marsden Hartley&rsquo;s stormy and majestic &ldquo;Seascape&rdquo; paintings of the mid 30&rsquo;s to 40&rsquo;s as a point of reference, culling from their unabashed drama and scopic connection of viewer to picture.</p> <p style="display: block; text-align: justify;">Roth&rsquo;s paintings are environments in which marks and gestures, addition and subtraction all collide to create an intimate painterly expanse inhabited by and crowded with elements that evoke the body. These paintings embody an intense sense of physicality: the muscular energy of the forms, the all-over movement of the imagery and its mark-making press against the edges of the frame. Roth&rsquo;s painterly process involves the constant accrual and removal of thin layers of oil paint to embed the surface with a rich luminescence. The finished works retain a fuzzy grain and diluted soft edges as Roth scrapes, erases, and sands the surface of the canvas. This softness is counterbalanced by defined outlines and stark markings, allowing for a graphic sensibility to emerge.</p> <p style="display: block; text-align: justify;">In empty space<br /> where entrails entwine<br /> with the cerebral<br /> blossom,<br /> I cast myself to stones,<br /> they caught me<br /> and ringed a sphere<br /> with what I became.</p> <p style="display: block; text-align: justify;">(Paul C&eacute;lan, from &ldquo;Force of Light&rdquo;, 1970)</p> <p style="display: block; text-align: justify;">Victoria Roth (b. 1986 Paris, France) currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She received her BA from Brown University in 2008 and her MFA from Columbia University in 2014. Recent group exhibitions include The Clear and the Obscure, Lulu, Mexico City, MX (2016), In the Mix, Hometown Gallery, Brooklyn, NY (2016), Vivid Bra, New York, NY (2016), SPRING/BREAK Art Show, New York, NY (2016). Roth was an artist in residence at the Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program Residency in Brooklyn, NY in 2015-2016.</p> Sun, 29 Jan 2017 07:53:11 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Miguel Luciano - BRIC Arts | Media House - February 2nd - March 5th <p style="text-align: justify;">An Exhibition of Newly Commissioned Work by Miguel Luciano</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">A prominent mid-career artist based in Brooklyn, <strong><a href="http://www.miguelluciano.com/" target="_blank">Miguel Luciano</a> </strong>works in multiple media to examine issues of cultural identity, politics, and popular culture. BRIC has commissioned Luciano to create new work &ndash; sculptures featuring customized vintage Schwinn bicycles &ndash; that commemorate the traditions of Puerto Rican bike clubs in New York. He will exhibit this work along with paintings and historic ephemera that question the colonial relationship between the United States and Puerto Rico, at the centennial mark of U.S. Citizenship for Puerto Ricans (1917-2017). This body of work acts as a powerful commentary on the current economic and political crisis in Puerto Rico and examines its impact on the diaspora.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Public programs will accompany the exhibition.&nbsp;</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Group and individual tours available on Wednesday mornings.</em></p> Thu, 09 Feb 2017 07:24:14 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Lynn Hershman Leeson - Bridget Donahue - January 27th - March 19th <p style="text-align: justify;">Bridget Donahue is pleased to present <em>Remote Controls</em>, the gallery&rsquo;s second solo show by American artist and filmmaker Lynn Hershman Leeson. For the last five decades, Hershman Leeson has been a trailblazer in the use of new media and technologies, investigating issues of identity, gender-role, the double bind of voyeurism and surveillance, and what it means to be human in an increasingly cyber world and an era of bio- and genetic engineering. The exhibition features a broad selection of the artist&rsquo;s pioneering interactive media works and videos from the 70s to the present, most of them never before shown in New York City.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Included in <em>Remote Controls </em>are the first interactive video disc, <em>Lorna </em>(1979-82), in which viewers use a remote control to navigate through the apartment of an agoraphobic woman, accessing her fears and dreams, personal history and future; and the sexual fantasy video disc, <em>Deep Contact </em>(1984), which first used touch-activated screens. The exhibition also features&nbsp;<em>Home Front </em>(1993-2011), a two-channel synchronized installation inside a dollhouse, exploring spaces of domestic confrontation and voyeuristic stances; and <em>Synthia Stock Ticker </em>(2000-2002), a networked sculpture charting the market in a real time via a video of behavioral mood swings. Hershman Leeson&rsquo;s innovative work with genetic manipulation will be on display with her latest installation, <em>Venus of the Anthropocene </em>(2016), which captures viewers&rsquo; DNA patterns to create a mutating hybrid of mirrored identities.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Remote Controls </em>also features the video <em>Seduction of a Cyborg </em>(1994), a poetic allegory about technology&rsquo;s invasion of the body;&nbsp;<em>The Complete Electronic Diaries </em>(1986-1994), a 76-minute single-channel &quot;video typed&quot; confessional that records Hershman Leeson&#39;s struggle, transformation, and transcendence as her personal story unfolds before the camera; and several short video works. Also included in the exhibition are early drawings and a new wax sculpture. These mixed media works capture ideas of disappearance, alchemical and atmospheric connection to air, water and electric currents, and ultimately the fragile nature of life itself.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Lynn Hershman Leeson (b. 1941), who was just awarded a 2016 United States Artists (USA) Fellowship, is also featured in the current Whitney Museum exhibition, <em>Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, 1905-2016 </em>(until February 6, 2017), and her first comprehensive U.S. retrospective, <em>Civic Radar </em>&ndash; originally curated by ZKM, Karlsruhe, Germany &ndash; will open at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on February 10, 2017.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Her work has been shown in over 200 large-scale exhibitions throughout the world and is featured in the public collections of the Museum of Modern Art (New York and San Francisco), Tate Modern and Modern Art Oxford (London), Lehmbruck Museum (Duisburg), Los Angeles County Museum of Art, National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), Whitworth Art Gallery (Manchester), and Berkeley Art Museum, in addition to celebrated private collections.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Hershman Leeson released the groundbreaking documentary <em>!Women Art Revolution (!W.A.R., 2010)</em>, charting the history of the feminist art movement in America. It was screened at major museums internationally and received first prize at the 2012 Montreal Films on Art Festival. Among Hershman Leeson&rsquo;s feature-length films are <em>Strange Culture </em>(2007), <em>Conceiving Ada&nbsp;</em>(1997), and <em>Teknolust </em>(2002) &ndash; all featuring actress Tilda Swinton. Leeson was awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Prize for writing and directing <em>Teknolust</em>, and her films have screened at the Sundance, Berlin, and Toronto International Film Festivals. In her most recent works, Lynn Hershman Leeson includes robots, mass communication media such as smartphones, as well as the latest scientific developments in the field of genetics and regenerative medicine including 3D bioprinters that create human body parts.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In 2016, Hatje Catz Verlag published <em>Civic Radar</em>, the first comprehensive monograph devoted to Hershman Leeson. Edited by Peter Weibel, this substantial publication includes articles and interviews with, among others, Peter Weibel, B. Ruby Rich, &nbsp;Tilda Swinton, Hou Hanru, and Laura Poitras.</p> Fri, 03 Feb 2017 15:50:34 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Marilyn Minter - Brooklyn Museum of Art - November 4th, 2016 - April 2nd <div class="exhibition-description"> <p style="text-align: justify;">Marilyn Minter&rsquo;s sensual paintings, photographs, and videos vividly explore complex and contradictory emotions around beauty and the feminine body in American culture. She trains a critical eye on the power of desire, questioning the fashion industry&rsquo;s commercialization of sex and the body.&nbsp;<em>Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty</em>&nbsp;is the first retrospective of her work.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Spanning more than four decades, the exhibition begins with the artist&rsquo;s earliest artworks, from 1969 through 1986, including rarely exhibited photographs as well as paintings incorporating photorealist and Pop art techniques. It continues with works from the late 1980s and 1990s that examine visual pleasure in visceral depictions of food and sex. The exhibition culminates in Minter&rsquo;s ongoing investigation of how the beauty industry expertly creates and manipulates desire through images.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty</em>&nbsp;is co-organized by the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston and the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver. The Brooklyn presentation is organized by Catherine Morris, Sackler Family Curator, and Carmen Hermo, Assistant Curator, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Brooklyn Museum.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The accompanying book is published by Gregory R. Miller &amp; Company, the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="exhibition-sponsors"> <p style="text-align: justify;">This exhibition is supported by generous grants from Gregory R. Miller &amp; Co.; Amy and John Phelan; Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn/Salon 94, New York; and Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch. Generous support for the Brooklyn Museum presentation is provided by the May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc.; the Taylor Foundation; Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch; Richard Edwards and Baldwin Gallery, Aspen; Christina and Emmanuel Di Donna; Stefan Edlis and Gael Neeson;&nbsp;the Bertha and Isaac Liberman Foundation; and Emily Glasser and William Susman.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br /><em>Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty</em>&nbsp;is part of&nbsp;<em>A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum</em>, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Leadership support is provided by Elizabeth A. Sackler, an anonymous donor, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the Calvin Klein Family Foundation, and Mary Jo and Ted Shen. Generous support is also provided by the Taylor Foundation, the Antonia and Vladimer Kulaev Cultural Heritage Fund, and The Cowles Charitable Trust.</p> </div> Mon, 05 Sep 2016 17:20:11 +0200 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list