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Edward Cella Art & Architecture

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WHAT'S NEXT?

Schmidt's title for his current work (Gyres) is revealing about the artist on various levels.  As a surfer who is an artist and an artist who is a surfer, the Gyres series examines Schmidt's daily experience of riding the curl on his surfboard. The monochromatic forms of this series can be viewed as abstractions of the atmospheric foam forms caused by the accelerating waves as they begin to fold over and curl.  On a physical and metaphysical level, he is nestled between four of the five major ocean gyres which are continuously rotating clockwise and counterclockwise. Schmidt spoke of his influences of Robert Ir... [more]
Posted by Sandra Vista on 3/27/13
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The Poetry of Observation

The artists talks that director Edward Cella and curator Carl Berg provided on Saturday March 23, 2013 for Claire Anna Baker and Steven Schmidt is a tribute to the emergence of supporters like Cella and Berg to promote the relevance of artists extending their works in dialogues with viewers, art students, artists, patrons and devotees.  During artist talks many artists have been known to create pieces of performance art during their presentations.  Such was the case of Claire Anna Baker.  SunBody portrays Baker's jubliance and rejoicing in the process of making art. Baker beamingly delivered her proc... [more]
Posted by Sandra Vista on 3/27/13
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Mark Harrington: From ArtScene Magazine by Roberta Carasso

The following was written by Roberta Carasso for ArtScene Magazine.  June, 2010 Mark Harrington By Roberta Carasso         The structural base of Mark Harrington’s exhibition begins with the visceral quality of Abstract Expressionism and the reductive simplicity of Minimalism.  Into the mix, he adds depth of field photography.  The rigor of working with three distinct visual disciplines yields a formidable body of work, a dynamic interplay of coalescence and contradictions that catch viewers off guard by having to negotiate territories that are both familiar and unfamiliar.  Rows of torn and ri... [more]
Posted by Edward Cella on 5/28/10
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The Human Form Illuminated

      In Mary Heebner’s new body of work Intimacies/Intimismos there is the suggestion of the male and female form, illuminated by a selective arsenal of materials including powdered copper pigment, watercolor and graphite on rag and Sekishu paper, but never once does Heebner objectify the body.  The site where the streams seep into the ocean causing a ripple in the tide inspires “Wetlands Muse." Heebner’s rich palette of Copper, Ochre, and Rose transforms the body into ripples in the sand and assumes a near tangible quality.  The body becomes part of the Earth and develops into a state as... [more]
Posted by A. Moret on 3/8/10
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Art in America: Gerald Incandela: In Touch with the Negative

by Alex Gartenfeldhttp://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-opinion/news/2010-01-11/gerald-incandela-edward-cella/Careful to differentiate his photographic output from photography as such, Gerald Incandela's  series of  "photographic drawings" take on the figure study as a tool to propose the erotics of the sketch and the formal potentials of the nude. Incandela alters his photographs of men in relaxed poses and various stages of undress by hand-brushing developer on the print. The results are the sitters are coaxed out of their isolation with vivid, highlighted lines and broad, expressive bru... [more]
Posted by Edward Cella on 1/11/10
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Drawings and Objects, LA Times

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/culturemonster/2009/08/art-review-visualizing-a-new-los-angeles-architectural-renderings-of-carlos-diniz.html [more]
Posted by Edward Cella on 8/28/09
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GARY LANG by Ray Zone in Art Scene

For the veteran abstract painter Gary Lang, a new series of monoprint paintings are a means of becoming "gravity free" while making work. When he is engaged in the art-making process, Lang says that "I'm floating, not encumbered by existence." In his studio, Lang will typically stand about 30 feet away from a work in progress to "find the right viewing distance."  Then, he discovers a kind of "magic between the surface of the painting and my body." The gallery patron will have this option as well, looking at the paintings on exhibit. Lang compares this kind of seeing with "looking at cond... [more]
Posted by Edward Cella on 2/16/08
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Look Around: Curiosities

Curiosities At Edward Cella Art + Architecture. Shows through February 17. By Charles Donelan Thursday, January 24, 2008 The Santa Barbara Independent This 10-person group show takes as its point of departure the 19th-century notion of art as just one facet of a world view developed through collecting odd objects. Each contributor has fashioned something that pricks the surface of identity to expose the fact that assimilation, while it makes a nice ideal, is messy in practice. Ethan Turpin is represented by his ingenious and historically aware stereopticon project, titled “Stereocoll... [more]
Posted by Edward Cella on 1/24/08
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Montauk's Ditch Plains: Wet Plate Photography

“We know that people are formed by the light and air, by their inherited traits, and their actions. We can tell from appearance the work someone does Or does not do, we can read in his face whether He is happy or troubled.” - August Sander from “Man of the Twentieth Century” My photographs of surfers evolved out of my earlier landscape projects: Ocean Details and Sea/Sky, which I had worked on for many years. Surfers are an integral part of the topography at Ditch Plains in Montauk, NY. Their avocation takes place right on the water; they are persistent elements in a shifting scene. My approa... [more]
Posted by Edward Cella on 10/6/07
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"Secret agency - Cold War-era images of 'Surveillance' hold relevancy today" By Josef Woodard, SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

ART REVIEW Secret agency - Cold War-era images of 'Surveillance' hold relevancy today 'FRONTIER DEFENSE: IMAGES OF SURVEILLANCE,' LAWRENCE GIPE By Josef Woodard, SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS October 5, 2007 Though his various exhibitions around town, local art followers have learned that Lawrence Gipe loves esoterica and detective work. At the short-lived but lovable Ro Snell Gallery last year, his show of dark and detailed imagery was based on a book of circus photographs from 1936 Germany, an inviting calm before the Nazi storm. Gipe -- who draws and paints in a clean realistic style that wou... [more]
Posted by Edward Cella on 10/5/07
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ART REVIEW: Horse whispers

ART REVIEW Horse whispers - Gerald Incandela's equine 'photodrawings' celebrate species through darkroom manipulation 'EQUINE EXPRESSIONS: NEW PHOTODRAWINGS,' GERALD INCANDELA By Josef Woodard, SANTA BARBARA October 12, 2007 Horse art tends to be its own niche, populated by horse lovers primarily smitten with the subject, rather than the creative energies fueling the art. Gerald Incandela's equine "photodrawings," showing at Edward Cella Art + Architecture, might seem to come from the opposite, conceptualist side of the fine-art spectrum. But horse lore is alive and well, along with th... [more]
Posted by Edward Cella on 10/12/07
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Im(press)ions: Contemporary/Modern Prints 1960-Today.

Im(press)ions: Contemporary/Modern Prints 1960-Today. At Edward Cella Art + Architecture. Shows through September 16. By Charles Donelan Thursday, August 16, 2007 While the ubiquity of reproductions of great modernist classics has made it easy to imagine that the late 20th century was dominated by large images and grand statements, connoisseurs know that some of the best work of even such familiar names as Jasper Johns and James Rosenquist was done in the more subtle but no less imaginative arena of the print studio. In Santa Barbara, the tradition of the painter/engraver is partic... [more]
Posted by Edward Cella on 8/16/07
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Lost Horizon: Bathers, by Thomas Zika

Bathers, by Thomas Zika. At Edward Cella Art+Architecture. Shows through July 29. Lost Horizon By Charles Donelan Thursday, June 21, 2007 Thomas Zika’s pictures of bathers currently on view at Edward Cella are an extension of the direction Cella took in the recent Davis Birks show, toward objects that read as though they belong to traditional genres — painting, photography — but on closer inspection, reveal that they have been crafted in ways that significantly complicate the categories. Zika’s photographic process involves appropriation and digital and analog manipulation of the image. Th... [more]
Posted by Edward Cella on 6/21/07