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Cherry and Martin

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Nathan Mabry Makes Art in a Post-Modernist Modernist World

by Alex Anderson
Nathan Mabry’s exhibition gripgrabstacksqueeze, at Cherry and Martin, opens with a black, partially abstract, figurative sculpture suggestive of indigenous art placed on an oil drum. The upper half of this totemic form seems to have emerged from the drum, its dark and glutinous texture reminiscent of tar. With this opening work, Mabry succinctly kicks off the show with a meditation on the fetishism of early western cultures and their artifacts, as well as the loss of these cultures as a result of modern capitalism. Nathan Mabry, Installation view of the exhibition Nathan Mabry: gripgrab... [more]
Posted by Alex Anderson on 4/25
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Nathan Mabry: Postmodernist Sculpture for a Modernist's World

by Alex Anderson
Nathan Mabry’s exhibition gripgrabstacksqueeze, at Cherry and Martin, opens with a black, partially abstract, figurative sculpture suggestive of indigenous art placed on an oil drum. The upper half of this totemic form seems to have emerged from the drum, its dark and glutinous texture reminiscent of tar. With this opening work, Mabry succinctly kicks off the show with a meditation on the fetishism of early peoples and their artifacts, as well as the loss of these cultures as a result of modern capitalism. Nathan Mabry, Installation view of the exhibition Nathan Mabry: gripgrabstacksque... [more]
Posted by Alex Anderson on 4/25
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The Pataphysics of Dr (illegible)

by Andrew Berardini
One solution is as good as another; if it’s even a puzzle or needs explication, which remains debatable. Possible Uses of the Design in Question:a) A proto-DARPA experimental device developed by top engineers under the influence of LSD to channel orgones into potent ”love bombs” which when deployed on the populace of an enemy state caused all those exposed to strip and engage in mass orgies. Deployment was eminent, but the device physically disappeared under the Kennedy Administration and its researchers re-assigned, though it continued to be funded well into Bush II for reasons that have remai... [more]
Posted by Andrew Berardini on 12/12/11
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Nathan Mabry's Laughter: Part 1

by Ed Schad
After placing a solid, heavy Michael Heizer-ish hunk of rusty teel sculpture in the first gallery, Nathan Mabry has done an odd thing with the center gallery of Cherry and Martin. He has built a temple.  In the foreground, he has placed a copy of Jacques Lipchitz’s Figure, 1926-30, set on a bed of gravel, crying with a streaming water possibly to be used for ablutions. Deeper into the gallery stand three attendant goddesses around a central figure. The three sculptures are variations on Baga D’mba fertility shoulder masks atop bases painted entirely black but based on Donald Judd 1980s Swiss works... [more]
Posted by Ed Schad on 1/18/11
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Nathan Mabry's Laughter: Part 2

by Ed Schad
I’ve debated with myself about which side of this equation Mabry is on. For instance, when I see a Lipchitz piece crying, I think of sculpture as laughing at people who genuinely believe in the embedded spirit in things, who believe that a water spot under a bridge in Chicago is the Virgin Mary or that a crucifix can bleed real blood. Mabry maybe suggesting that Lipchitz’s strenuous beliefs in modernist form and its ability to tap into the primitive power of other cultures was bound to have a short shelf life. Mabry’s piece laughs thus like an Onion article or a seconds long bit on the Simpso... [more]
Posted by Ed Schad on 1/18/11
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Enter the Frenzy, Groin First

by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer
Despite his remarkable prescience and pioneering treatment of mass media imagery, Robert Heinecken (1931-2006) has been largely marginalized in the mainstream art historical record. Heinecken’s early experiments, beginning in the 1960s, with camera-less photographic cooption, alteration, and repurposing of magazine pages and commercial pornography anticipated by a decade the mass media appropriationist strategies that later launched the Pictures Generation and has since become utterly ubiquitous in contemporary practice. Everyone should see this exhibit, either to be introduced... [more]
Posted by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer on 6/28/10
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Matt Connors at Cherry and Martin

by Calvin Phelps
      At the Cherry and Martin opening for Matt Connors' new exhibit, "Dromedary Resting," I overheard someone in the gallery say, “Look! The artist didn’t finish this painting. And, he didn’t even stretch that one.” The visitor was not completely wrong, but he was looking at the work from a point of view that these works were merely paintings and not part of an ongoing dialogue. I was reminded of the interview/press release I had just read for the Joe Bradley and Chris Martin exhibition currently on view at Mitchell-Innes & Nash. In it Bradley stated about painting, “It's not like... [more]
Posted by Calvin Phelps on 3/8/10
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Dove at Cherry and Martin

by Ed Schad
      Daniel Dove has several images that he likes to employ – airplanes either being reassembled or being taken apart, theaters, and jungle gyms twisting with colorful slides and tubes. As images, his paintings are deft and have a sort of old fashioned feel to them, and I admit, that in my first two viewings, the feel of the paintings bothered me. If these images are “content,” as in a story to be interpreted or a symbolic language to be cracked, then the paintings are not very interesting at all. I thought of the future, the apocalypse, and ruins. To be honest in today’s contemporary art... [more]
Posted by Ed Schad on 2/1/10
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Make it Useless or Skip It

by Catherine Wagley
“Tell me things I won’t mind forgetting,” says a dying woman in Amy Hempel’s story In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried. “Make it useless stuff or skip it,” the woman continues, and her friend, the story’s narrator, tentatively launches into a succession of anecdotes. Tidbits about Bing Crosby and chimpanzees downplay the closeness of death and the women lose themselves in their own witty rapport, dismissing everything weighty in favor of anything paltry. Amanda Ross-Ho’s second solo show at Cherry and Martin Gallery, unequivocally titled Half of What I Say is Meaningless, attempts some... [more]
Posted by Catherine Wagley on 9/22/08
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Noah Sheldon in the Sun

by Nancy Lupo
There are some works of art that seem to uncannily capture what it is to live, work or simply spend time here in Southern California. I am thinking about the Beach Boys’s Pet Sounds, Joan Didion’s early essays especially from The White Album and Slouching Toward Bethlehem, and many of Stephen Shore's photographs of California’s diners and gas stations. Maybe it is just that the June sunshine is perfect in California, but walking into Noah Shelton’s exhibition at Cherry and Martin in Santa Monica made me feel that his works certainly embody something of this world - a wor... [more]
Posted by Nancy Lupo on 6/16/08
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A Look at Lassry

by Ed Schad
Elad Lassry’s delightful little show is as smart as it is seductive. He brings the geeky, insider knowledge of an arch conceptualist and presents it with a humanist touch and a poetic timbre. In this respect, he is much like his teacher Sharon Lockhart, who also believes the words “conceptual” and “beauty” mustn’t exist like quarreling neighbors. Two notable photographic works concern Lassry’s appropriation of a prize winning photograph from Life Magazine. He uses simple gestures to move the image out of the world of the magazines (with its paginations and captions) and into the world of art. By covering th... [more]
Posted by Ed Schad on 11/16/07
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Kitschy Business

Kitsch. It’s a funny thing. Clement Greenberg was terrified of it, warding off its evil with dripping, pouring, and splattering. The Independent Group analyzed it, even if only to conclude that it was integral to our lives as consumers. And Pop, as the tote bags and t-shirts emblazoned with Campbell’s Soup cans and pixilated comic book heroines tell us, took it and ran with it all the way to the bank. Why is the tacky, the lowbrow, the – dare I say it – popular still so fascinating to artists in the over-saturated 21st century? Antonio Adriano Puleo’s solo show Bird... [more]
Posted by sara k on 2/13/07