Bigindicator

Pomona College Museum of Art

Venue  |  Exhibitions  |  Reviews
20130801185552-zuma_9

Walks Through a Strange Country

by Ed Schad
During the later 18th century and into the 19th, most of Europe took to the countryside. It is not clear how the trend emerged, but when people started to walk, they really started to walk. Thomas De Quincey, author of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821), speculated that poet William Wordsworth walked 180,000 miles during his lifetime. Art historian Kenneth Clark, amongst others, located this new fervor in the decline of religion, a spiritual vacuum that found expression in a new belief in the divinity of nature. Accompanied by ambivalence over the outcome of the French Revolution whe... [more]
Posted by Ed Schad on 12/24/13
20110921101228-irwin

Past Midnight

by Andrew Berardini
Coming into the museum after midnight made me a little nervous. I gently pushed open the door, half expecting it to be locked even if the glass entryway was boldly marked “24/7” in vinyl. A gracious woman, perhaps sensing my trepidation welcomed me in, pointed toward the entrance and mentioned a few highlights, things tucked away that we might miss and we went in, feeling mischievous and exhilarated to be in one of these temples of art past bedtime. Driving to Pomona College Museum of Art in Claremont can be harrowing most days from downtown LA, listening to the newsman on the radio repeat... [more]
Posted by Andrew Berardini on 9/21/11
2001

Hammersley Is Out

A genuine misunderstanding is brought to the attention in plain colors or bright. There is in question a whole plane of experience, the salutary observer has this to say, that there is Western Abstraction and a compte rendu of Noland and Rothko, the blood-brother pact with McLaughlin, the signets of an early trial. The commedia is granted in plastic shapes, discernible or not to the critical eye. The general layout is given all around, the particular configuration, the unique instance. That has been missed, in looking at this work. Evidence of a mind where none was sought before. [more]
Posted by mulrooney on 4/6/07