ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Announcing the Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency Shortlist <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 600px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">We are pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2017 Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency in Paris. The candidates will be interviewed in the comings weeks and the selected resident will be announced in early May.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">A heartfelt <em>thank you</em> to everyone who applied in this exceptionally competitive year&mdash;we love reading your applications and are genuinely thrilled by the diversity of high-quality applications the residency receives. We&rsquo;ve got a difficult choice ahead of us, and we couldn&rsquo;t be happier.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">All applications were considered and discussed at length amongst our panel and even if you did not make it this time, we encourage you to apply next year.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: large; color: #000000; font-family: helvetica;"><strong>The Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency 2017 Shortlist:</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/258532-kayla-anderson" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Kayla Anderson</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/205424-holly-armishaw" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Holly Armishaw</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/430039-shannon-fannin" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Shannon Fannin</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/479163-brittany-julious" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Brittany Julious</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/478156-shoshana-kessler" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Shoshana Kessler</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477577-anna-kim" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Anna Kim</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/415736-dain-mergenthaler" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Dain Mergenthaler</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/155816-caroline-picard" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Caroline Picard</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/214092-krista-svalbonas" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Krista Svalbonas</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/369223-asli-uludag" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Asli Uludag</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/369829-gray-wielebinski" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Gray Wielebinski</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/479245-daniel-woody" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Daniel Woody</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;"><span style="color: #000000;">The</span>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/foundation/index" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;"><strong>Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency</strong></a>&nbsp;<span style="color: #000000;">was established in memory of&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/32913" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">ArtSlant&rsquo;s Founder who passed away December 8, 2012.</a>&nbsp;<span style="color: #000000;">Georgia was dedicated to supporting and investing in young artists and writers, and she had a deep connection with the city of Paris. This residency, which offers artists and writers the opportunity to create work for two months in Paris, has been created in Georgia&#39;s memory.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000; line-height: 24px;">The goal of the Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency in Paris is to support and invest in emerging artists and writers, to provide an opportunity for them to advance their work and explore and engage with the cultural landscape of Paris, to encourage experimentation, and to increase exposure of their work to an international audience.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000; line-height: 24px;">The Residency is open to visual artists of all mediums, art writers, and critics, 24 years or older. The selection will be made based on the merit of past work and the potential for future success, the ability to independently develop new work, and the proposed project&#39;s relevance to the city of Paris.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" style="font-size: 10px; text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">For more information on the Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency</span></a></span></p> <p><span style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration: none; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="mailto:%20residency@artslant.com" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">residency@artslant.com</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #00cfa6;">&nbsp;<span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/users/signin" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Subscribe</a>&nbsp;| <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/6424" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Contact Us</a></span></span><span style="font-size: small;"> <span style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">|</span> <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew" style="font-size: small; text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Website</span></a></span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 24 Apr 2017 14:08:15 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Rana Siegel Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/47728-under-the-radar-rana-siegel-antonio-torrez-solis-heui-tae-yoon">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/132944-rana-siegel" target="_blank">Rana Siegel</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work? </strong></p> <p>I don&rsquo;t set out to communicate something in particular&mdash;it&rsquo;s not so intentional or what directs my work; rather, communication/meaning grows out from an intuitive process of making that&rsquo;s tactile and responsive. It emerges from an exchange, like a conversation; it&rsquo;s somatic, being realized through the body, like dance or music. The work is a combination of the process, or the performance as I like to call it, and the &ldquo;thing&rdquo; that&rsquo;s being made. I don&rsquo;t delineate between the two as they have equal value. The process involved is inseparable from the content or the content arrives from the process. The interplay of movements between my hands and that which I am working with stimulate thought processes that lead to questions, urges, and curiosities that are then investigated and answered. Choices in arrangements and material combinations gain significance, even the slightest of acts become substantial.</p> <p>The work is in a constant state of being/becoming; it&rsquo;s not resolute. It is made in the moment and subject to change if made in the next. The sense of touch becomes very important, not only with how I engage with the work, but with how the materials and structures interact with each other. They aren&rsquo;t fixed or bound, instead, they come together by balancing on each other, wrapping, falling, allowing gravity to take hold; they&rsquo;re verbs. They are quite gestural, each having their behavioral qualities. Like characters, they can be precarious and at times vulnerable. They can be seen as visual narratives, where someone can supply their own meaning and connections. They are forever open to different possibilities. I think there is a beauty and realness in that.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>It may depend on the kind of artwork someone makes, but in general, I don&rsquo;t think an artist has a responsibility.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)? </strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170424133710-Siegel3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Breadth</em>, 2008, Smoke, paper</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t have the &ldquo;greatest,&rdquo; not yet, but this work taught me something of great value. This image is from an ongoing series called <em>Breadth</em>, which I started back in undergrad, in response to a simple request by my professor: make a drawing. I never sketched or did anything two-dimensional; I skipped over that first year of art school, bypassing all those tedious tasks, and jumped right into a Fiber department where I explored the dimensions of materiality and predominately made site-specific installations. Maybe she was curious to see what my type of drawing would look like, how I would approach that question, or maybe she wanted me to see something.</p> <p>I am not sure how the process came to be, but I crafted this elaborate system that included smoke, stools, long planks of wood. I was lying on the ground and by controlling the suction of air, created these linear-type drawings. The process was very physical, and I was intrigued by my recipe of production. Each drawing was unique, a surprise, as I never saw the work until it was made. They were delicate, and over time you could start to see dust particles accumulate on the surface of the soot&mdash;they aged that way. They were very tactile&mdash;the whole process was&mdash;and that seemed very fitting with how I was already making work.</p> <p>In that moment, I became aware of something important, something about how I operate; it was self-reflective. You can understand something about yourself when you leave the familiar and dive into different mediums, creative or not. It is similar to traveling somewhere new, when you leave your familiar backdrops and you&#39;re paired down to your essentials. As a student, this was a very good lesson; it was enlightening, still is.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170424133800-mini_monumental.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Mini Monumental</em>, 2016-2017,&nbsp;Stone, misc. ribbon&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I actually have an idea that I hope could be a reality some day, but it also might be a little far-fetched, so it seems appropriate for this question. I want to compose a symphonic experience made in several movements, written for voice for a huge choir. I think of voices like threads and want them to circulate around a large vast space, the kind that amplifies and lifts sound. The bodies would be stationary and the collective sound would be what travels by way of the orchestration&mdash;alternating notes, volume, reverberation... something like that.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>This is hard, only three? So I am going to limit myself to Chicago and list the first three who come to mind, though they don&rsquo;t need my praise, but I do admire them and think they add depth to our creative community: <a href="http://atom-r.com/">Atom-R</a> (Anatomical Theaters of Mixed Realities), <a href="http://www.karolinagnatowski.com/">Karolina Gnatowski</a>, and <a href="http://dfbrl8r.org/">DFBRL8R</a>, which is not a person, though it is run by the ever-talented Joseph Ravens, but a space for performance art.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Ravel</em>, 2016, Slate, misc. fiber material)</span></p> Mon, 24 Apr 2017 10:40:03 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Announcing: ArtSlant Prize IX Round 3 Juried Winners! <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><b><i>Check out the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=59%5Ejuried+winners" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Round 3 Juried Winners</a>! </i></b></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><font face="helvetica" size="4">Special thanks to this round&#39;s amazing jurors! &lt;3</font></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><b><i>Round 4 is now open! Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes! </i></b></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><i><strong>To apply</strong>, go to your ArtSlant profile and click <strong>enter contest</strong>.</i></font></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><font face="helvetica" size="4">Round 3 Jurors:</font></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170404122131-round-3-jurors.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><strong>Miguel Leal Rios</strong> is the director and curator of the <strong><a href="http://www.lealriosfoundation.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Leal Rios Foundation | Contemporary Art</a>.</strong></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><strong>Junho Lee</strong> is the Director of the <a href="http://www.narsfoundation.org/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>NARS Foundation</strong></a>.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><strong>Kerry Doran</strong> is a writer, editor, and curator based in New York. She is the director at <a href="http://www.postmastersart.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>Postmasters Gallery</strong></a>.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; background-color: #00cfa6; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none;">Round 3 Juried Winners:</span></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1037930"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1037930/u3azr9/20170317091316-1116_Posey_Bless_the_Mess-6434.jpg" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">PAINTING:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/288482-mark-posey" style="color: #000000;">Mark Posey, <i>Standing Table</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1027988"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027988/u3azr9/20170130041816-image.jpeg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">DRAWING:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/74231-david-rios-ferreira" style="color: #000000;">David Rios Ferreira, <i>Lets Use Them Up Till Every Piece Is Gone 1</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1040804"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040804/u3azr9/20170406045439-3_Hasta_la_Vista__Maybe.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">INSTALLATION:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/312083-denise-treizman" style="color: #000000;">Denise Treizman, <i>Hasta la Vista, Maybe</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1041131"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041131/u3azr9/20170407174057-Screen_Shot_2017-04-07_at_19.39.45.png" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">NEW-MEDIA:</span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/134050-carrick-bell" style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; text-align: left; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">Carrick Bell, <i>If you feel it let it happen</i>, 2016.</a></p> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1040624"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040624/u3azr9/20170405124855-07.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">SCULPTURE:</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/480451-tadasuke-jinno" style="color: #000000;">Tadasuke Jinno, <i>Black Box</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/995529"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995529/u3azr9/20160623024502-Migrator_8_right_sm.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">PHOTOGRAPHY:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/214092-krista-svalbonas" style="color: #000000;">Krista Svalbonas, <i>Migrator 8</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1021397"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1021397/u3azr9/20161212194431-Road._Yellow__canvas__acrylic__24_x_36_Tatiana_Savchenko.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="400" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">ABSTRACT:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/317779-tatiana-savchenko" style="color: #000000;">Tatiana Savchenko, <i>Road. Yellow</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1040815"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040815/u3azr9/20170420170413-20170406100112-cityoftheblind.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">MIXED-MEDIA:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477422-sohyun-han" style="color: #000000;">Sohyun Han, <i>City of the Blind</i>, 2017.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. Up for grabs are exhibition and sales opportunities including inclusion in our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Amazon Art Sales Platform</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, and great exposure&mdash;not to mention cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners. See below for all the details.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="line-height: 21px;">Art page</a><span style="line-height: 21px;">.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Past winners include:</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2015+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2015 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2014 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2013 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a>,&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2012 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce">Veronica Bruce</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer">Susan Meyer</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2011 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2010 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2009 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> Mon, 24 Apr 2017 10:05:32 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Eugene Macki | Krista Svalbonas | Steven Randall <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><em><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></span></em></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/277007-eugene-macki?utm_source=EugeneMacki&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Eugene Macki &ndash; London</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1042572?utm_source=EugeneMacki&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1042572/u3azr9/20170416145437-2.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1042574?utm_source=EugeneMacki&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1042574/u3azr9/20170416150113-Macke06.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1032891?utm_source=EugeneMacki&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1032891/u3azr9/20170227144026-1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1032898?utm_source=EugeneMacki&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1032898/u3azr9/20170227144317-1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/214092-krista-svalbonas?utm_source=KristaSvalbonas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Krista Svalbonas &ndash; Chicago</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/works/show/995532?utm_source= KristaSvalbonas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995532/u3azr9/20160623024536-Migrator_10_sm.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/works/show/995527?utm_source=KristaSvalbonas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995527/mf2ji7/20160623024441-Migrator_3_sm.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/works/show/995535?utm_source=KristaSvalbonas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995535/mf2ji7/20160623024604-Migrator_7_Left_sm.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/works/show/995528?utm_source=KristaSvalbonas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995528/mf2ji7/20160623024501-Migrator_8_sm.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/160517-steven-randall?utm_source=StevenRandall&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Steven Randall &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1008813?utm_source=StevenRandall&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008813/u3azr9/20160925160157-small_whitewalls1.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1008807?utm_source=StevenRandall&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008807/mf2ji7/20160925160128-small_mound2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1008808?utm_source=StevenRandall&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008808/mf2ji7/20160925160129-small_canda3.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1008811?utm_source=StevenRandall&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008811/mf2ji7/20160925160148-small_700lb_E6.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 24 Apr 2017 09:37:12 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Anicka Yi: Life is Cheap <p>Anicka Yi, the recipient of the 2016 Hugo Boss Prize, opened&nbsp;<em>Life is Cheap,&nbsp;</em>consisting of three works,&nbsp;<em>Lifestyle Wars</em>,<em> Immigrant Caucus,</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Force Majeure,</em>&nbsp;at the Guggenheim on April 21, 2017. The exhibition title is one part indictment, one part plea.</p> <p>&ldquo;Life is cheap&rdquo; is usually said with a quiet lilt; eyes down, a slight shake of the head. The disgust is projected both outward and inward. It&rsquo;s a gesture of shame. But Yi hints at perhaps another invocation of the saying&mdash;that life is in fact <em>cheap&nbsp;</em>and easy to come by. It is all around you, waiting for you to recognize its glorious complexity. And sure, this interpretation is navel-gazey, but in times like these, where minutiae are almost always irksome, it&rsquo;s nice to lose oneself in marvel for a few minutes and remember that we are a complex part of a complex part of a complex part... of something called a &ldquo;whole.&rdquo;</p> <p><em>H. sapiens, Homo, Hominidae, Haplorhini, Primates, Mammalia, Chordata, Animalia.</em> Our distinction is a denial of our dependence and a dismissal of our similarity. With her latest exhibition, Yi breaks down the notion of humanity&rsquo;s individualities and ethnic preoccupations by applying a scientific approach to sculptures consisting of carpenter ants, bacterial colonies taken from Chinatown and Koreatown in New York, manufactured scents, and a lot of agar-agar.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170421161128-Anicka_Yi_Portrait.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi. Photo: David Heald&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Joel Kuennen:&nbsp;<em>Life is Cheap</em>&nbsp;consists of two large dioramas,&nbsp;<em>Lifestyle Wars</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Immigrant Caucus...</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Anicka Yi:&nbsp;</strong><em>Immigrant Caucus</em>&nbsp;is a staging of violence, proliferation, unregulated life. It&rsquo;s a staging of the genesis of life and also throws back at us a physical manifestation of our anxieties around life, disease, bacteria, around that which we consider as harmful when it&rsquo;s actually not. Not in every case at least, but that there is harm and maybe that&rsquo;s something that we can coexist with and be tolerant of and maybe do a dance with.</p> <p>The ants in&nbsp;<em>Lifestyle Wars</em>&nbsp;are in this ceaseless motion and this transition of information, this data network. The power of ants is in their numbers; they don&rsquo;t really have individuality and they need, like our human society, social structures. They are the only other species, other than our own, that practices slavery. They are also highly guided by their sense of smell so they have a very refined, sophisticated olfaction.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170421161255-Hugo_Boss_Prize_2016-exh_ph-8.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag; font-style: italic;">Lifestyle Wars</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">, 2017 (detail), Ants, mirrored Plexiglas, Plexiglas, two-way mirrored glass, LED lights, epoxy resin, glitter, aluminum racks with rackmount server cases and Ethernet cables, metal wire, foam, acrylic, aquarium gravel, and imitation pearls. Courtesy the artist and 47 Canal, New York. Photo: David Heald &copy; Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: You are presenting a new scent in <em>Lifestyle Wars..</em>.</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>We have a scent, it&rsquo;s kind of a hybrid of species and forms. It&rsquo;s a scent that is based on an Asian-American female and a carpenter ant&mdash;it&rsquo;s a hybrid scent.</span></p> <p><strong>JK: What constitutes the gesture towards the Asian-American female?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>I wanted to talk about ethnicity through smell. I wanted to talk about smell as being a conditioned form of perception culturally, socially, politically. Ethnicity is a very gray area, scientifically speaking, in terms of how we can designate certain ethnic groups by smell. There&rsquo;s no definitive real answer scientifically. You can&rsquo;t say all Asian people smell like this and all Black people smell like that or all Caucasian people smell like this or all Latino people smell like that.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kQ4ky7CgdGI" width="560"></iframe></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: What is the marker in this case?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>It&rsquo;s contingent on a number of factors, primarily your diet followed by genetic make up. A lot of what you smell like is being produced through the bacteria in your gut. There is also the tertiary: the type of deodorant that you wear, the soap that you use, your shampoo... those are the main sort of components for how an individual human being smells. An Asian-American with a certain diet that is very similar to an African-American diet could end up smelling more similar than two Asian-Americans with vastly different diets. I was interested in that aspect of how it is very complex and inconclusive in terms of how you can designate a certain ethnicity smelling a certain way, and yet those types of prejudices still linger. </span></p> <p><span>Everybody has these types of misinformed ideas about how Indian people smell like curry; well, guess what, if anyone ate a lot of curry, the turmeric would sweat through your pores and you would smell like curry! There&rsquo;s certain foods that have that ability to become part of you but also announce itself to the rest of the world through our pores. For me it&rsquo;s a rich area to think about in terms of these kinds of stereotypes and prejudices and how even historically different classes were associated with how they smelled. A lot of &ldquo;improvements&rdquo; and radical social changes have been made based on how these different classes smelled, especially the working classes. </span></p> <p><span>How do you improve on something where it&rsquo;s a matter of just prejudice or intolerance about certain ethnicities? Because it&rsquo;s not a question of hygiene and it&rsquo;s not a question about health risks&mdash;it&rsquo;s a question of certain preferences for diet, a certain predilection for body ointments in the tertiary route, and genetics. It&rsquo;s very complicated and it&rsquo;s not something that has been resolved through science. That&rsquo;s what I&rsquo;m interested in: that science can&rsquo;t help us get past this. We also can&rsquo;t seem to come to terms with it intellectually or psychologically.</span></p> <p><strong>JK: &ldquo;Tertiary,&rdquo; for example, refers to a lotion you put on and external variance to the personal biome, correct?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>Yes, it is part of the constellation of my material choices.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="color: rgb(31, 31, 31); font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-large;">&ldquo;There&rsquo;s a consciousness there that&rsquo;s been assembled.&rdquo;</em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: In that sense, are you then constructing objects out of tertiary and secondary realities where the primary becomes the participant?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>If we follow that to the logical conclusion, then does that mean that my work needs a viewer?</p> <p><strong>JK: Then it&rsquo;s just biology?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>No, there&rsquo;s a consciousness there that&rsquo;s been assembled. With ants, there&rsquo;s a consciousness that&rsquo;s been assembled, so is that art as well?&nbsp;Ants are matriarchal; they only have males as drones and they die immediately after. They inseminate the eggs, which as far as I&rsquo;m concerned, is pretty good for me. Especially recently, I&rsquo;ve been telling my straight male friends,&nbsp;<em>just sit out a few</em>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170421161410-Hugo_Boss_Prize_2016-exh_ph-13.jpg" /></span></p> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag; font-style: italic;">Force Majeure</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">, 2017, Plexiglas, aluminum, agar, bacteria, refrigeration system, LED lights, glass, epoxy resin, powder coated stainless steel, light bulbs, digital clocks, silicone, and silk flowers. Courtesy the artist and 47 Canal, New York. Photo: David Heald &copy; Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><strong>JK: Your material vocabulary can be kind of cacophonous, a grab bag of consumer items and organisms. Can you speak to the importance of combining these different technical materials?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>It&rsquo;s through the filter, the lens of the lived life. In that sense, it&rsquo;s probably somewhat autobiographical. That&rsquo;s something I&rsquo;ve never really articulated to anyone. What is the binding agent of all of these materials? What is the reach of a length of a human arm or what is in this cosmology of the person who is trying to assemble the combinations? In that regard, there&rsquo;s something, probably a shattered narrative by a person who is living through these materials through a desiring body or a slightly repulsed body, a body that&rsquo;s not entirely pleased but not displeased. I don&rsquo;t know how to unravel that narrative logic until the very end and that&rsquo;s probably when I&rsquo;m dead. I can&rsquo;t really say and I don&rsquo;t even know if I&rsquo;m capable of doing that for you. I think that every person, especially creative people, they have a kind of wiring, a sensibility that overlaps with a certain zeitgeist and personal history much in the way we&rsquo;re describing how an individual smells in their own unique sense. There are these contributing factors: diet, genetic, and tertiary influences. Tertiary is separate from the zeitgeist. It&rsquo;s not necessarily something someone else picks up on that is in the air.</span></p> <p><strong>JK: One other thing about materiality in your work: when you use organisms you leave the names general, like &ldquo;bacteria,&rdquo; &ldquo;dough,&rdquo; &ldquo;fungi.&rdquo; Is there a particular reason for this?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>It does tend to be a catch-all because it would be very difficult for me to clarify what kind of bacteria will be grown in the Guggenheim diorama. There are specific certain kinds that we are introducing but we cannot be exclusive to that. For me to be able to categorize, I would have to go back throughout the course of the exhibition and start to analyze what type of bacteria is actually growing there. Once I put up an installation, it&rsquo;s difficult to do the reading after the fact because things are changing so rapidly. &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: Colonies can emerge and collapse in a number of hours&hellip;</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>There&rsquo;s a fair amount of what can we call a &ldquo;microbial eugenics&rdquo; that does take place in my installations. I do have aesthetic considerations: certain bacterial growth yields better colors; certain bacterial growth yields better shapes.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170421170540-AY_2666.jpg" /></span></p> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag; font-style: italic;">2666, 2015,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Bacteria, nutrient agar, Plexiglas, 24 x 20 x 4 inches (60.96 x 50.80 x 10.16 cm). Courtesy of 47 Canal, New York and Kunsthalle Basel.&nbsp;Photo: Philipp Hänger&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><strong>JK: Your work often begins with an essence and then the work is allowed to live from there and go where it may. How do you consider this relationship between refinement and growth?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>Refinement is an area that I think, as far as my participation and intervention, requires a tremendous amount of research and backstory. I have to learn a lot about a certain subject matter in order to set the conditions for the type of refinement that I would qualify as my version of refinement. Then there is an entire cosmology of chaos around that. It&rsquo;s always in flux, paradoxically different speeds, gears, logic. I think that&rsquo;s something that is maybe a leitmotif that doesn&rsquo;t get spoken about very often in relation to my work. </span></p> <p><span>There&rsquo;s a lot of counter-intuitive logic going on with the material choices, arrangement, juxtaposition, and the timing. We&rsquo;re talking about metabolic timing, physical time, geological time and there&rsquo;s a lot of counter-intuitive time and rationale that&rsquo;s embedded into the work and that&rsquo;s what I&rsquo;m working against. That&rsquo;s what happens when these collisions take place where they&rsquo;re not supposed to. Where a flower rejects the resin that is supposed to encase it and then you have this leaking&hellip;a lot of that&hellip;and so there are a lot of alchemical kinds of contradictions. We&rsquo;re in a universe that&rsquo;s populated with very sinister elements that don&rsquo;t really intend for anything to survive.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="color: rgb(31, 31, 31); font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-large;">&ldquo;I want my work to perish.&rdquo;</em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: When I was a kid I would make ant castles, blocks of wood that I would fashion into a castle structure and then I would entice ants with sugar water. The whole structure became this moving breathing thing but after a while, I realized they would all just go to the sugar water and drown. Then I realized, this isn&rsquo;t that cool and I&rsquo;m basically just killing a bunch of ants.</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>It&rsquo;s a very fine line and death is all around us. Life is death. With ants I have to stress that they are not really that great at individualistic thinking&hellip;and if they are, they are bullied and sequestered and extinguished. When we do these experiments with ants we&rsquo;ve found that an ant that smells a little different will be sequestered in a corner. They are put under a kind of trial. Other ants are there for hours questioning this ant that&rsquo;s different, this&nbsp;<em>rogue</em>&nbsp;ant. They don&#39;t go immediately into action. They just put it under this Kafka-esque trial. There are levels of security and authority at play.</p> <p><strong>JK: You&rsquo;ve said before that perishability is essential to your sculptural vocabulary. How do you think about your works as they move through time?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>Time is probably the dominant material. It&rsquo;s the unspoken, un-cited. A lot of my work is time-based and I&rsquo;m intentionally foregrounding that time. The motivation for that was trying to get at a present-ness, to be here. Don&rsquo;t worry about a hundred years from now&mdash;that also seemed like a very masculine type of aspiration: that the art should outlive us all and that signifies my proximity to the gods, immortality, legacy, all that nonsense. I personally don&rsquo;t care if you don&rsquo;t talk about me after I&rsquo;m dead. That&rsquo;s not a motivation for me. My motivation is the living, the suffering. That&rsquo;s what I care about.</span></p> <p><strong>JK: Is it more about creating a situation where that suffering comes into focus?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>Absolutely. I want to diminish and eliminate the suffering. In order to do that, you have to reveal the suffering and foreground the suffering to give that a voice. It&rsquo;s not about ignoring it or eliminating it but asking <em>what can we influence?</em> If we are even here to influence at all. Time is greater than I am and yet time is also non-linear when you think about it in a quantum way. I want my work to perish.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170421171511-HBP16AnickaYi_Sister.jpg" style="width: 400px;" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag; font-style: italic;">Sister</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">, 2011, Tempura fried flowers, cotton turtleneck, approximately 41 x 19 x 7 in Courtesy of 47 Canal, New York. Photo: Joerg Lohse&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: At the<a href="http://arts.mit.edu/artists/anicka-yi/#about-the-residency" target="_blank"> MIT Residency </a>you did, you worked on stabilizing things. How has stabilization entered your practice, specifically in regards to the reactive and active nature of your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>It&rsquo;s a framework. Without agar it&rsquo;s really hard for us to grow bacteria. Agar is a relatively known substrate, so in terms of that kind of &ldquo;stabilization&rdquo; that&rsquo;s how I point to it. In order to render tangible or visible.</span></p> <p><strong>JK: Is it more about producing a predictability?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>Let&rsquo;s just say it something that&rsquo;s more of a neutral value in order to support some principles, ideas, characters, voices. All equally important and necessary in the balance. I respect that kind of stability because I wouldn&rsquo;t be able to do what we&rsquo;re doing here without a giant cooling refrigerator system to get the bacteria to grow at the right temperature. Without the right temperature you have lots of problems: no growth or conversely over growth, where the bacteria just takes over. The bacteria I work with loves 72-75 degrees. That&rsquo;s the sweet spot when you&rsquo;ll have really nice, steady, consistent growth but you won&rsquo;t have an insane proliferation or, conversely, a completely empty, visual space.&nbsp;</span></p> <table align="right" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;If you&rsquo;re going to work with bacteria you have to work with the laws of bacteria.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>JK: So it&rsquo;s not necessarily about preservation but rather facilitation.</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>Yes, it&rsquo;s about these kinds of dichotomies, these shifts in the balance and learning temperatures. Understanding basics around physics. When you have humidity that the bacteria really thrives on, you&rsquo;re going to get condensation. I don&rsquo;t want a drippy piece of glass, for example, so how do we deal with that? The more I&rsquo;ve been using a conventional science laboratory as a tool for my work, the more I&rsquo;m having to understand all matters of stability because in order to create these experiments you have to offset it, to run it through something that is under your control. If you&rsquo;re going to work with bacteria you have to work with the laws of bacteria. It teaches me a great deal of physics and chemistry. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong>JK: Art is, almost by definition, historically stable. Performance art may have done the most to change this assumption, as far as art history goes. Do you consider your sculptural work as performative objects? How do you think about that relationship to performance?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>It&rsquo;s a good connection. Performance implies there&rsquo;s a certain kind of transience, ephemerality, and so it makes sense that some of my less permanent works would be in that performative state. I don&rsquo;t have the kind of art education or conditioning for that kind of language to act as the fencing around my actions and my thoughts, but I often think in terms of farming and agriculture with certain forms of organisms. You can consider that performative. I think that my use of &ldquo;science&rdquo; is performative: I am performing a science. Is it science? Yeah, but it&rsquo;s more of performing <em>as science</em>. Performing an act of control and chaos. So yes, I think performativity is running rampant throughout my work. One could even say I&rsquo;m performing as an artist. I didn&rsquo;t study art at all, I studied film theory.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div>&mdash; <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/153044-joel-kuennen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Joel Kuennen</a></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-size:10px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag; font-style: italic;">Force Majeure</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">, 2017 (detail),&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Plexiglas, aluminum, agar, bacteria, refrigeration system, LED lights, glass, epoxy resin, powder coated stainless steel, light bulbs, digital clocks, silicone, and silk flowers.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Courtesy the artist and 47 Canal, New York.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Photo: David Heald &copy; Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation)</span></span></div> Mon, 24 Apr 2017 11:50:07 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: SPAMM <p><a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank">Spamm</a> is an ambitious annual exhibition that gathers together a dizzying array of video work by net artists. Spamm was formed in France in 2011 by Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME, who invited Ellectra Radikal to start co-curating in 2013.&nbsp;</p> <p>The show freely unites undiscovered new talent with some of the most highly regarded artists now working in new media. This year&rsquo;s edition, <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real;, features 142 artists and functions as a fascinating overview of the wild world contemporary net art.</p> <p><strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real; was also recently a physical exhibition at the <a href="http://www.newschool.edu/parsons-paris/gallery/" target="_blank">Parsons Paris Gallery</a>. I spoke to the curators about the significance of moving digital art into the physical space as well as the history and thinking behind the Spamm project as a whole. Though they won&rsquo;t pick favorites&mdash;they prefer to view the Spamm curatorial project in its entirety&mdash;we also share some of the video work from this year&rsquo;s exhibition (click on the link below each video to watch it in the Spamm platform). You can find the full exhibition <a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170419140227-Screen_Shot_2017-04-19_at_16.01.56.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Screen capture of&nbsp;<a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank"><strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real;</a>, the online exhibition.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What is the philosophy of Spamm?</strong></p> <p>OPEN YOUR minds, be free, love art!!!!</p> <p><strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ lives on the web well before thinking.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is an open space that does not contain its boundary.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is NO BORDER.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is the quantity not the scarcity.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is the horizontal space of digital creation.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is an irreducible complexity that escapes the domain of words.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is the multi-faceted core of being in the world.<br /> We_Are_The_Power, We_Are_Internet!<br /> We_Are_Now, We_Are_Here!<br /> We_Are_<strong>ϟ</strong><strong>ℙ</strong>&forall;ℳℳ!<br /> We_Are_Happy!<br /> We_Are_TAAZ*!<br /> We_Are_Art!</p> <p><strong>SPAMM</strong> is constantly evolving. In this sense <strong>SPAMM</strong> is not based on a philosophy and does not define any.</p> <p><strong>SPAMM </strong>exists, it&rsquo;s a multiple entity as an image of the network.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/156049025" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Paula Pinho Martins Nacif,&nbsp;</span><em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=3" style="font-size: 12px;" target="_blank">&lt;3 take care of you &lt;3</a></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How do you choose the artists that you want to be part of Spamm?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>SPAMM</strong> gathers a community of artists and curators from the internet around several art projects shared via the social media Facebook.&nbsp;For <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real;, we shared an open call via our Facebook accounts and drove the whole curation directly through contact with the artists in a Facebook group for <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real;. The artists posted their artworks, links, and websites, YouTube and Vimeo channels and we made a final selection from there.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/59651562" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Emilio Gomariz,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=8" target="_blank">Finder Fantasy</a></em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think there is a difference between curating net art and more traditional art forms?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal:</strong> Our challenge as curators for <strong>SPAMM</strong> is to create a no-restrictions area for the artists and the public coming from all horizons, for an online or physical exhibition.&nbsp;To contextualize net art means being online &ldquo;a lot,&rdquo; to link web artists around the world via social networks, to open participatory spaces, groups online, to create websites, to develop a comprehensive and global digital strategy partnering with fb friends, artists, galleries, curators, museums, and art fairs around the world.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME:</strong> There are no recipes. We are self-taught as curators. We are not here to theorize on <em>what is curation</em>&mdash;there are good schools for that. We complete this work.&nbsp;I make something before knowing how to make it; if I know before I do it, it will not leave room for accidents, glitches, and discovery out of all traditional circuits. No, I do not think about all these terms: post internet, net art.</p> <p><strong>SPAMM</strong> shows contemporary artists who work with the tools of our time and who restore this time through their prism. It happens that we live in the digital time, maybe post-digital.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/120861217" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ei Jane Janet Lin,&nbsp;<a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=133" target="_blank"><em>Selfie #1</em></a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you define net art?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal:</strong> Digital creations that use digital technologies and media in relation to the internet; designed by, for, and with the internet; which interact with the Internet&mdash;these are net art. I also use Wikipedia. Net art is found less in what we can see and more in the device that makes it exist in cyberspace.</p> <p><a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank"><strong>Spamm.fr</strong></a> is one creation of net art.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>Stop. I won&rsquo;t say anything about net art or post internet art. It is contemporary art. There is no difference.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/116033798" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Eileen Isagon Skyers,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=73" target="_blank">Chitta</a></em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What was the art you saw that you understood was net art?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://wwwwwwwww.jodi.org/" target="_blank">Jodi</a>, <a href="http://larrycarlson.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Larry Carlson</a>, <a href="http://www.jimpunk.com/" target="_blank">Jimpunk</a>, <a href="http://www.fredforest.org/" target="_blank">Fred Forest</a>, <a href="http://www.newrafael.com/" target="_blank">Rozendaal</a>, <a href="http://paddleson.tumblr.com/about" target="_blank">PADDLES ON!</a> at Phillips&hellip;</p> <p><strong>CP: You are both artists. What would you define as your first experiments in net art?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>Ellectra Radikal is my avatar, who was born in 2005 in Second Life&mdash;a product of a form of life on the internet.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>I don&rsquo;t remember. Ask Google.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/146460515" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">J&aacute;nos Br&uuml;ckner, <a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=88" target="_blank"><em>Adult Material</em></a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What were you first experiences of curating net art?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: <a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank">SPAMM.fr</a>,</strong> 2013.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: <a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank">SPAMM.fr</a>, </strong>2011<strong>, </strong>but I did curate online before that.</p> <p><strong>CP: How did you two meet?</strong></p> <p>On Facebook.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R5wx3m_g8t0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Oblinof Kohara, <a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=63" target="_blank"><em>WTFile Payaso Cagar Trompada</em></a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why did you decide to work together?</strong></p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>A lot of my fb contacts asked me: &ldquo;are you Ellectra Radikal?&rdquo;</p> <p>Because I have many avatars on Facebook&hellip; I answered no and took a look at this avatar&hellip;</p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>We are coming from the painting practice, we came across alternative art scenes, punk, techno&hellip; We talked about our artistic backgrounds, experiences being an artist, being filmmakers, etc. We found each other.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME:</strong>&nbsp;The internet makes it possible to put the artwork before the person.&nbsp;Another art is possible.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/176262051" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Rapha&euml;l Moreira Gon&ccedil;alves,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=11" target="_blank">Versus Fant&ocirc;mes</a></em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What inspired your interest in net art?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>Living my life as an avatar online, performing, riding with the wind, digging the deep seas of Facebook accounts, searching for artists actively present on the social stream&mdash;YouTube, Vimeo, their websites&mdash;reading blogs, web medias, climbing the rainbows of glamorous profiles, looking for cats and unicorns, dogs and parrots, octopi and dolphins, piranhas and other creatures, reading, liking, sharing, posting, creating on line.</p> <p>When Micha&euml;l Borras offered me the chance to co-curate my first exhibition, <a href="http://cupcake.spamm.fr/" target="_blank">Cupcake</a>, for <a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank">SPAMM.fr</a> in 2013, I was more than interested! It was a great chance for me to discover and meet more of the artists from this gorgeous art scene. Net art is a paradigm, and I love to be part of improving collaborative work online and to show this new art.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/146020817" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Benjamin Berg,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=40" target="_blank">Black Ice</a></em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why did you decide to create Spamm?</strong></p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>To see all these artists existing, but ignored by institutions brought me to this observation of one artist: &ldquo;People do not seem to realize what is going on. We are going to show them.&rdquo; In short, it is the aim of all curation: to relay, to unite, to enlighten, to develop.</p> <p><strong>CP: You also had a physical show in a gallery for the launch of this year&rsquo;s </strong><strong>ϟ</strong><strong>ℙ</strong><strong>&forall;ℳℳ▁</strong><strong>ℙϴШ&euro;</strong><strong>&real;</strong><strong>.</strong><strong> Why do you think it&rsquo;s important to show this work away from the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>&ldquo;Actualization consists in bringing a thing in time to realize it. Potentiating involves subtracting something from time to keep it in a virtual state.&rdquo;&nbsp;We go from one to the other in the movement of breaths.</p> <p>I am not a digital native. I like to arrange the manifestations of art in the physical reality,&nbsp;to meet and to see my friends having good time together, dancing, making music, singing, jumping, drinking, playing, sharing, talking about art, non art, fake art, fruit juice recipes&hellip; Seriously?: The internet is COOL online, the internet is cool away from internet :)</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME:&nbsp; </strong>To show that this is art and its destination is not only online. Whatever we are doing online, our aim is to meet in the real. We are talking about <em>the incarnation of the avatar</em>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170419141314-Spamm2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">IRL ϟℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙϴШ&euro;&real; EXHIBITION X R3FRAG</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What are your thought on the monetization of net art? It is traditionally very hard to make money being a net&nbsp;artist.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>It is traditionally very hard to make money being an artist.&nbsp;Traditionally because of the traditional art market rules. But we are &ldquo;light&rdquo; and free of many certainties and presuppositions, and we are likely to rapidly evaluate and change the patterns of the market art world.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Spamm is free and the art is not for sale. Is that practical or philosophical?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>Practical&mdash;under construction. My philosophy of the internet is: Open Source. That does not mean not for sale.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>One of the problems of network art is to be not exhibited much because very few collectors have chosen to collect non-physical objects. Very few galleries encourage them in this direction. For example, my gallery owner asked me for my solo exhibition to show digital prints of screenshots from my videos. The post-internet movement could have been born to monetize this practice by dragging it towards the production of physical objects.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/197782188" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Manuel Ro&szlig;ner,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=70" target="_blank">1822 vid05 .RGB color 5</a></em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your relationship with the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>There are no strangers on the internet, there are Internauts. I love that. It is the Internauts who create the dimension of the navigation online. And it is infinite.</p> <p>*** In matters of style, I swim with the current ***</p> <p>When I was connected to curate in the digital art scene, I subscribed to it in an almost abstract way, measuring the artistic practices that Internauts are investigating. I seek, in the first place, the traces, the voices, the sounds, the images of this machine-baby-talk with an imaginary look. I&rsquo;m looking for everything that allows us to overcome our isolation, the barriers of language and where <em>de-centration</em> confronts us with the foundations of our identity constructions.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>Internet is my brother.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DNYBbO7-uQU" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Elena Romenkova,&nbsp;<a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=99" target="_blank"><em>Walk Through</em></a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Are there any submissions to Spamm that you have been particularly impressed by?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>One-hundred-and-forty-two exactly : )</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>A curation is a choice. I will not make a choice in my choices. A curation tells a story. This story is about diversity. Once the curation is closed, the question of one work rather than another is no longer justified. It is a whole dynamic. Each work reinforces the previous one and the following. The idea is also to give the public the space to make its own choice, its own narrative.</p> <p><strong>CP: What does post-internet mean to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>The expression of the reincarnation of the desire;&nbsp;the expression of the need to leave the web, devices, connections, machines, screens; the temptation of the geek&hellip; One more utopia of the &ldquo;technological counter-culture.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What does the future hold for Spamm?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>More exhibitions, more Spammerz, more Art!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/v8yAiWs5EfI" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Paulin Paulin,&nbsp;<a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=60" target="_blank"><em>When you pretend to be a glitch artist but no one cares</em></a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Courtesy of the artists and <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real;)</span></p> Wed, 19 Apr 2017 13:01:47 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Let Them Eat Art! Dissent on Documenta 14’s Periphery <p>For Athenians, the presence of Documenta in Athens has raised a number of questions, including most importantly: how will this German-funded meta-exhibition transform the city, and what will happen after it has run its course? Yet for most Athenians, Documenta 14, whose tagline is &ldquo;Learning from Athens,&rdquo; will likely go unnoticed or even appear superfluous against the burdens of everyday life in the Greek capital. To be clear, while the exhibition does include Athenian and Greek artists, and while the public programs open their important discussions to a wider public audience, <a href="http://www.holobiont.net/blog/preconceptions-and-illusions-documenta-art-and-athens" target="_blank">recognizing and incorporating its criticism</a>, its visibility and attendance is likely to remain restricted to international visitors and the city&rsquo;s growing art scene. In a city reeling from <a href="https://littlegrapeguy.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">six years of politico-economic distress</a> and <a href="http://www.unhcr.org/news/press/2017/3/58d8f15a4/stronger-cooperation-crucial-ensure-sustainable-refugee-response-greece.html" target="_blank">an unresolved lack</a> of dignified housing and basic services for refugees, Documenta 14 could amount to a spectacle where &ldquo;the Germans,&rdquo; who have been vilified in the Greek media, proclaim, &ldquo;Let them eat art!&rdquo;</p> <p>This critique is not intended to devalue individual artists or artworks in Documenta 14&mdash;several of them ably contribute to ongoing and important discourses surrounding the current political situation in Athens and abroad&mdash;but rather to consider the exhibition&rsquo;s symbolic gesture of relocating from Kassel to Athens <em>and </em>Kassel at a traumatic nexus in Greece&rsquo;s history. At the inauguration of Ross Birrell&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.tornosnews.gr/en/greek-news/culture/22897-documenta-14-horseback-event-to-recreating-parthenon-frieze-scenes.html" target="_blank">controversial artwork</a> <a href="http://www.documenta14.de/en/notes-and-works/12798/the-transit-of-hermes" target="_blank"><em>The Transit of Hermes</em></a>, a 100-day transnational horse ride from Athens to Kassel, Artistic Director Adam Szymczyk stated that &ldquo;it&rsquo;s a physical act before it becomes a metaphor or allegory.&rdquo; Yet the artwork, which invokes not only Greek mythology but also the modern Greek nationalist avatar Alexander the Great with his horse Bucephalus, is an obvious provocation in an exhausted political climate. Birrell&rsquo;s work caricatures the ultimate inability to extricate an artwork from its exhibited context, even despite expressed intentionality.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170418135446-IMG_6095.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Athens departure of Ross Birrell&rsquo;s <em>The Transit of Hermes</em>. Photo: the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>But provoking Athenians is nothing new for the team of Documenta 14. In the two years leading up to the Athens opening, following its announcement in 2015, specific information about the exhibition, such as participating artists and venues, was actively withheld from the public until the last possible moment. This intentional obscurity conjured an environment of heightened anticipation with an added dose of skepticism, evoking reactions from Athenian artists and researchers. Before Documenta 14 opened on April 8, triggering an avalanche of performances, events, and exhibitions, a handful of formally unaffiliated initiatives emerged with one thing in common: some kind of orientation toward Documenta 14. These initiatives range in approach from objective study to artistic reflection/reaction, embodying a fashionable, if understandable negativity.</p> <p>One such initiative, <a href="http://learningfromdocumenta.org/" target="_blank">Learning from Documenta</a>, identifies itself as a research project situated between anthropology,&nbsp;art, and the media, and was established to critically observe and discuss multiple aspects of Documenta 14&rsquo;s presence in Athens. Coordinated by Greek anthropologists Eleana Yalouri and Elpida Rikou, Learning from Documenta <a href="https://hyperallergic.com/371252/the-messy-politics-of-documentas-arrival-in-athens/" target="_blank">examines the gaze of Documenta 14</a>, how this impacts what the institution &ldquo;learns&rdquo; from Athens, and the dynamic its presence creates in the city. The research project held its first public event in June 2016, sharing its mission alongside a presentation by Szymczyk himself.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170418135346-20161026110559-01_Marta_Minujin_El_Partenon_de_libros_A___Marta_Minujin_Archive.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Marta Minuj&iacute;n,&nbsp;<em>El Parten&oacute;n de libros</em>&nbsp;(<em>The Parthenon of Books</em>, 1983), installation, Avenida 9 de Julio, Buenos Aires. Photo: Marta Minuj&iacute;n Archive</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Since then, it has held four roundtable events, including one in January on the politics of curating with Documenta 14&rsquo;s Curator of Public Programs, writer and philosopher Paul B. Preciado. Having invoked the concept of &ldquo;<a href="http://www.thirdtext.org/exercises-freedom-documenta14" target="_blank">the indigenous</a>&rdquo; in Documenta 14&rsquo;s already ongoing public program &ldquo;<a href="http://www.documenta14.de/en/public-programs/927/the-parliament-of-bodies" target="_blank">The Parliament of Bodies</a>&rdquo; (which was used to discuss the situation of those born in Greece but permanently excluded from citizens&rsquo; rights), Documenta was accused at the roundtable of embodying an orientalist approach toward Greece. In response, Preciado contested the accusation. &ldquo;What is the position of being Documenta?&rdquo;, he countered, pointing to the ambiguity of the institution, its multiple layers and reference points, as an institution &ldquo;in the making.&rdquo; However the accusation of orientalism points to a latent, problematic tendency among some international participants of the exhibition&mdash;visible in <em>The Transit of Hermes</em> as well as Marta Minujin&rsquo;s <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/46744-this-artist-is-making-a-life-sized-replica-of-the-parthenon-out-of-banned-books" target="_blank">Parthenon of Books</a></em>, planned for Kassel&mdash;to ambiguously refer to Greek natives, Ancient Greece, and the modern Greek nation state almost indiscriminately as &ldquo;Greek&rdquo;&mdash;a tactic that is also used by the far right Golden Dawn to bolster an &ldquo;antique&rdquo; notion of democratic sovereignty based on blood right. The existence of conflicting viewpoints&mdash;from inside Documenta 14 (which was until recently shrouded in secrecy) and from outside it (a position dealing with different power structures and spheres of influence)&mdash;highlights the importance of observing Documenta&rsquo;s activities from the outside. Looking forward, Learning from Documenta will present its research findings at a workshop in Athens in October.</p> <p>Several other initiatives deploy a common strategy of <a href="https://www.academia.edu/31675842/A_Politics_of_Lies_Nationalization_Subversion_and_Semblance_in_Recent_Artistic_Activism_from_Greece" target="_blank">overidentification</a>, whereby they convincingly mimic existing power structures in society to expose the success of full-scale ideological self-identification, i.e. &ldquo;woke trolling.&rdquo; Examples include the <a href="https://idammathens.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">Institute for the Management of the Athenian Post-documenta Melancholy (IDAMM)</a> and <a href="http://documena.weebly.com/" target="_blank">Documena</a>, whose name borrows the Ancient Greek word for &ldquo;the perceptions that function as a given; those things believed in or hoped for.&rdquo; Perhaps most visible among them is the <a href="http://athensbiennale.org/" target="_blank">Athens Biennale</a>, whose early &ldquo;press conference&rdquo; at the derelict Hotel Bageion on the evening of April 5 was laced with overidentification. Titled &ldquo;Waiting for the Barbarians,&rdquo; the Biennale&rsquo;s 6th iteration for 2018 was announced one year early together with an anticipatory public program running throughout April. The curators ask, &ldquo;Will there ever be any &lsquo;Learning from Athens&rsquo;? &hellip; Are we witnessing the coming of the Barbarians, or the taming of the Barbarian?&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170418135210-09._The_Domestic_Godless__Mick_O_Shea.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The Domestic Godless, <em>Invasive Pests</em>,&nbsp;Photo of Mick O&#39; Shea. Courtesy 6th&nbsp;Athens Biennale 2017-2018 Waiting For The Barbarians. Photo: &copy; Nyssos Vasilopoulos</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Biennale&rsquo;s press conference, which took place one day before Documenta 14&rsquo;s, played out like participatory surrealist theater. A speech from the curators, who appeared to be in character, was preceded by the sound intervention <em>Europa Clock</em> by Dimitris Desyllas, which was performed from the fa&ccedil;ade out onto Omonoia Square, and was followed by <em>Invasive Pests</em>, a culinary action by The Domestic Godless in which strange, unexpectedly palatable food&mdash;like moss brownies and crispy fried fish bones&mdash;and equally unusual drink were offered to visitors on striking visual displays. The doors of the apparently abandoned hotel were opened up, inviting visitors to wander through two stories of empty rooms. On the third floor of the hotel, at the end of its main corridor, a solitary pianist, Nikos Laaris, played a single phrase of &ldquo;Ode to Joy&rdquo; (upon which the Anthem of Europe is based) durationally on repeat. One of the curators revealed in conversation that Documenta had originally approached the Biennale to collaborate, but in the end fruitful communication could not be established. Rather than curating a traditional exhibition in response to Documenta 14, the curators chose to focus attention on performative actions (including an ironic bus tour through the suburbs, <em>Klassenfahrt, </em>offered under the guise of an artificial tourist agency), leaving the Hotel Bageion mostly empty (though accessible) throughout the opening week of Documenta: &ldquo;Sometimes the best statement is no statement.&rdquo;</p> <p>Yet do such independent initiatives as Learning from Documenta and the Athens Biennale unavoidably get rolled up into the grand narrative of Documenta 14 itself, inevitably reinforcing the institution by proxy? In their various forms of critique have the institution&rsquo;s critics and &ldquo;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy5XKRWmXf8" target="_blank">trolls</a>&rdquo; arguably made Documenta 14 more visible than it would have been without them? They indeed contributed to the &ldquo;Documenta meme,&rdquo; especially by creating information about it before none had been released by the institution. But to criticize them on this basis ignores the fact that they could not have been unaware of their role in the grand scheme of things: the essence of trolling, perhaps also of overidentification, is to provoke overreaction&mdash;and in some cases disidentification.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170418134642-IMG_6100.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo: the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Now that the Documenta 14 exhibition has opened, it looks as though the works and locations selected do indeed oscillate between symbolic and literal readings of &ldquo;Learning from Athens.&rdquo; In the cacophony of highly differentiated artworks spread throughout the city, contradictions abound, which seems to be welcomed by Szymczyk, himself eluding critique by transferring it onto commissioned artists. Returning once more to the inauguration of the <em>Transit of Hermes</em>, it is finally worth noting that while Szymczyk, Birrell, and others introduced the artwork to the public, leaflets were distributed among the crowd of onlookers. One side read, &ldquo;Who is learning from Athens and what?&rdquo; and the other, &ldquo;European states are learning from the refugee crisis how to control and manage populations.&rdquo; Several walls bordering the public space of the inauguration displayed graffiti, one reading: &ldquo;The crisis of a commodity or the commodity of crisis?&rdquo; These are probably not the last interventions that will occur in the 100 days of Documenta in Athens.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170418134541-IMG_6093.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo: the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Should Documenta, as a contemporary art institution, be held responsible for nourishing citizens with food for thought instead of real food, which for some Athenians is indeed scarce? What kinds of subjectivities will Documenta 14 produce, as asked by Learning from Documenta? On the day of the opening, <a href="http://conversations.e-flux.com/t/open-letter-to-the-viewers-participants-and-cultural-workers-of-documenta-14/6393" target="_blank">an anonymous online statement</a> emerged directed toward viewers, participants, and cultural workers of Documenta 14. While it makes some generalizations and employs an alienating tone, the statement does importantly address the increasing precarity of autonomous housing in Athens, squats populated in no small part by refugees with nowhere else to turn. The statement challenges visitors to Documenta 14 hoping to learn from Athens to &ldquo;first open your eyes to the city and listen to the streets.&rdquo; As these squats are increasingly evicted, the statement makes clear that what Athenians need now, more than art consumerism, is solidarity. Time will tell if the surplus attention brought by Documenta 14 will in fact establish greater solidarity, reflected eventually in legislation, or, on the contrary, polarize and alienate further Athenian artists, activists, and refugees, pushing them farther into the periphery.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477171-benjamin-busch?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Benjamin Busch</a></p> <p><em><a href="http://www.benbusch.info/" target="_blank">Benjamin Busch</a></em>&nbsp;<em>is currently researching critical modes of architectural production within the field of spatial practice. Treating architecture as a symptom of abstract processes, his artwork and writing investigate complex fields of relations within the built environment.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: The Heart &amp; Sword Division during the Press Conference. Courtesy 6th&nbsp;Athens Biennale 2017-2018 Waiting For The Barbarians. Photo: &copy; Nyssos Vasilopoulos)</span></p> Tue, 25 Apr 2017 04:53:02 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Bodies Off the Street: In Turkey, Artists Face Politics by Looking Inward <p>On Sunday, Turkey will vote on a constitutional referendum, which threatens to expand the reach of the presidency. A &ldquo;yes&rdquo; (<em>evet</em>) vote will bring more control into the hands of the current president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and his Justice and Development Party (AKP), strengthening the executive government and reducing remaining parliamentary powers. A &ldquo;no&rdquo; (<em>hayir</em>) vote rejects this expansion, but carries with it fears of governmental push-back, including the likely continuation of the current &ldquo;state of emergency&rdquo; restrictions imposed after the <a href="http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/12/turkey-failed-coup-attempt-161217032345594.html" target="_blank">failed coup attempt</a> in the summer of 2016.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170416131857-IMG_1009.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Taksim Square in March. Photo: Danyel Ferrari</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Despite the significance of this momentous vote, the streets of Istanbul are strangely quiet. For a city known for the political outspokenness of its citizens, and particularly its artists, there is little public commentary. The difference between the seeming silence of those who would resist today and the historic resistance of the 2013 <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gezi_Park_protests" target="_blank">Gezi Park protests</a> and actions is stark, and undoubtedly owes to the very real threats of arrest, detainment, and violence from the police as seen in Gezi and in demonstrations since.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170415120519-IMG_1421.PNG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Taksim Hold&rsquo;em</em>.&nbsp;Courtesy of Bluff Films. Photo: Ersin Gok</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The soon-to-be-released film, <em>Taksim Hold&rsquo;em</em>, which takes place during the first explosive night in 2013 when Gezi Park occupiers were attacked by Istanbul police, takes its name from the park&rsquo;s surrounding square, Taksim. The feature film follows the events of one evening in one room&mdash;a living room over looking the square&mdash;where the three main protagonists, young middleclass men, who are old high school friends, meet for a weekly poker game.</p> <p>Typically, Gezi, the occupation protests, and the ensuing police attacks are largely represented in the popular imagination with images of the public square, through bodies in the street, under threat: we envision artist and performative interventions, and often police attacking, and even killing, protestors with tear gas, water canons, and rubber bullets. <em>Taksim Hold&rsquo;em</em>, however, forgoes these images so that the &ldquo;public&rdquo; space of the square is never pictured and only imagined through temporary intrusions. Despite the host&rsquo;s intentions to ignore the protest outside, the night&rsquo;s events intermittently penetrate the four walls&mdash;through the news on television, social media posts read aloud, through shouts outside, and two young female protestors admitted to take shelter from the gas and the police who are chasing them.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170415120627-memory_of_a_square.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">G&uuml;ls&uuml;n Karamustafa, <em>Memory of a Square</em>, 2005, Video, 2 projections, black and white and sound, 17 min.<br /> Installation view at Tate Modern. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The new film is a kind of echo in reverse of G&uuml;ls&uuml;n Karamustafa&rsquo;s film <em>Memory of a Square </em>(2005). On view in the Istanbul Modern&rsquo;s long-running permanent collection exhibition, <a href="http://www.istanbulmodern.org/en/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/artists-in-their-time_1663.html" target="_blank"><em>Artists in Their Time</em></a>, the prescient work offers a series of domestic vignettes. A two-channel installation reveals intimate moments juxtaposed beside existing historical footage from periods of political upheaval in the square. The street images begin with a balloon launch in the late Ottoman period, followed by the erection of the square&rsquo;s statue in the 30s, in the early days of Gezi Park. Several scenes of demonstrations and political turbulence in the 70s follow, ending finally with the demolition of houses around Taksim for the construction of the Tarlabaşı road. Reading these vignettes today, it&rsquo;s hard not to conjure the pedestrianization project and promised destructions that threatened Gezi Park and spurred the 2013 protests&mdash;eight years after the piece was produced. Alongside these historical images we watch meals interrupted, wounds bandaged by careful hands, suitcases packed: the everyday lives of individuals affected by the bodies on the streets.</p> <p>The claustrophobia of <em>Taksim Hold&rsquo;em</em> and the spotlight on the interior lives of its protagonists seem to carry particular weight now in Istanbul. Recent years of arrests, detainments, and dismissals of large numbers of judges, writers, professors, lawyers, and artists have left the streets quiet. As much of the world seems to be reawakening to the possibility of bodies in the streets&mdash;with protests in the tens and hundreds of thousands criticizing their own governments becoming daily events&mdash;it seems like representation in the street is more and more the measure of political engagement. Yet it must be remembered that this is not an option for every<em>body</em>, or everywhere.</p> <p>In her <a href="http://www.maskmagazine.com/not-again/struggle/sick-woman-theory" target="_blank">Sick Woman Theory</a>, writer and performer Johanna Hedva suggests that the dominant discourse on political action, drawing largely as it does from Hannah Arendt&rsquo;s faith in the political effect of bodies in the street, is too narrow a definition of how we engage the political. Arendt&rsquo;s conception suggests that only bodies that are <em>able</em> to enter the street are acting politically. It privileges those for whom this is a possibility and reduces other actions to the nonpolitical. Hedva asks us to consider the politics of intimacy, of interdependence, of bodies that <em>need, </em>that engage in relationships and in so doing reshape the social (political) fabrics around them.</p> <p>Two recent Istanbul performances, staged as part of <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/PeraMuzesi.Museum/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154991013937597" target="_blank"><em>Look Again</em> </a>at the Pera Museum, addressed the body, bound and in relationship to a fixed surrounding. A museum collaboration curated by dance critic and founding director of <a href="http://performistanbul.org/index.php/home/" target="_blank">PerformIstanbul</a>, Simge Burhanoğlu, <em>Look Again</em> offers &ldquo;an opportunity for artists to engage the permanent collection.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170415120410-IMG_1314.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ekin Bernay, <a href="http://performistanbul.org/index.php/9stone/"><em>9 Stone</em></a>, 2017. Photo: Danyel Ferrari</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Set in the <a href="http://www.peramuseum.org/Exhibition/Anatolian-Weights-and-Measures/133" target="_blank">Anatolian Weights and Measures collection</a>, surrounded by scales&mdash;from delicate and ornate ones designed to weigh jewels and flower seeds, to large and perfunctory ones for measuring flour&mdash;Ekin Bernay&#39;s <a href="http://performistanbul.org/index.php/9stone/" target="_blank"><em>9 Stone</em></a> plays at a kind of new-age healing of what she calls &ldquo;the relation between body and soul, the freedom of the body.&rdquo; Viewers are admitted in groups of fewer than five and given headphones connected to a microphone transmitter worn by the artist. A series of rocks sit in a line, with two larger ones on either side as seats. Bernay invites one audience member to join her. As they sit across from one another, we hear her whisper in our ears a message for this viewer&mdash;&ldquo;where are you heavy?&rdquo;&mdash;as she hands them a rock to hold against a knee, or shoulder, or heart. The piece moves in this strangely shared yet private way, from one participant to the next, like a game of telephone. An unnamed &ldquo;heaviness&rdquo; calls to mind not only hearts broken by lovers, and family traumas, but also the heavy anxious anticipation that hangs in the air of the city today.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170415115027-IMG_1318.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">İ. Ata Doğruel, <em>Ambassador</em>, 2017. Photo: Danyel Ferrari</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Also part of <em>Look Again</em>, İ. Ata Doğruel&rsquo;s performance <a href="http://performistanbul.org/index.php/ambassador/" target="_blank"><em>Ambassador</em></a>, is set in the exhibition <a href="http://www.peramuseum.org/Exhibition/Intersecting-Worlds/132" target="_blank"><em>Intersecting Worlds: Ambassadors and Painters</em></a> and is based on the museum&rsquo;s Orientalist Painting Collection. As we enter the gallery we see Doğruel in profile. He is bisected by a scrim, which extends from his clothing and tightly traces the edges of his face, head, and the chair on which he sits. Because the scrim curves in an S, one can never see both sides of Doğruel&rsquo;s face or body at once, but rather has to walk from side to side, jarred by the discrepancy of his appearance: on the one side of the screen the artist is fully shaved of all hair, including his eyebrows; on the other, he sports a beard, his hair grown long and dense. The performance, like much of Doğruel&rsquo;s work is durational, internally focused&mdash;he sits for six hours in the same position with no break, his head glued into the installation, which tugs visibly on his skin whenever he shifts even slightly. While the artist and official press release suggests the piece addresses the divided lives of historical figures, painters, and diplomats, the audience engages Doğruel as an immobilized body, as a body bound. The curator, Burhanoğlu, who was present in the gallery during my visit, instructed viewers to engage the artist. Viewers talked to him, although he could not answer; they lifted his feet for a moment&rsquo;s relief and rubbed his shoulders.</p> <p><em>Look Again</em> was <a href="https://www.dailysabah.com/arts-culture/2017/04/01/with-performance-program-visitors-look-again-into-pera-museum" target="_blank">recently reviewed</a> by the largely pro-government <em>Daily Sabah</em>. The review praised these performances as revealing new aspects of the museum&rsquo;s collection, Turkey&rsquo;s Ottoman history, and, by extension, the nation&rsquo;s current cultural life. Recent moves by the government in the current post-coup-attempt &ldquo;state of emergency&rdquo; have suspended Turkish cultural institutions from participating in certain funding programs, including <a href="https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/creative-europe/" target="_blank">Creative Europe</a>. As a result Turkey will no longer be able to receive financial support from the program, and any of the country&rsquo;s partnerships with European institutions will be invalidated. Thus, experimental artists in the country are finding new homes within Turkish institutions and are producing works that read on multiple levels.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170415121125-17635541_10154991017382597_8803137853202222192_o.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ekin Bernay,&nbsp;<em>9 Stone</em>, 2017. Via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/PeraMuzesi.Museum/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154991013937597" target="_blank">Pera Museum</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I would be talking out of turn to suggest that these works are in any way a direct response to the upcoming referendum vote, or even that the artists have intended them as political pieces, explicitly or at all. However, they nonetheless speak to a growing consideration, in Turkey and beyond, of the politics of the most personal of interactions: those that surround bodies, and vulnerable bodies in particular. Whereas Karamustafa&rsquo;s <em>Memory of a Square</em>, and to some extent <em>Taksim Hold&rsquo;em</em>, oppose interiority with images of the street&mdash; public and political against private and personal, history against memory&mdash;many artists&rsquo; works now seem to muddy the distinctions.</p> <p>Artists are finding once again that, as always, the personal is political, but also that the intimate encounter, the whisper, may be the hidden script that keeps the possibility of resistance alive. As Gezi and the many development projects across the city indicate, the domestic, the intimate, is not the opposite of the public square. But, like the body itself, our interior lives are central to the stakes that call us out to the streets.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/200738-danyel-ferrari?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Danyel Ferrari</a></p> <p><em>Danyel M. Ferrari is an artist and independent researcher currently based in Istanbul, Turkey.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: İ. Ata Doğruel, <em>Ambassador</em>, 2017. Via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/PeraMuzesi.Museum/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154991013937597" target="_blank">Pera Museum</a>)</span></p> Sun, 16 Apr 2017 10:19:25 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Denise Treizman | Tadasuke Jinno | A.M. Hanson <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/312083-denise-treizmanutm_source=DeniseTreizman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Denise Treizman &ndash; New York</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1040804?utm_source=DeniseTreizman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040804/u3azr9/20170406045439-3_Hasta_la_Vista__Maybe.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1040799?utm_source=DeniseTreizman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040799/y8wnrh/20170406044958-Treizman_D_07.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1040803?utm_source=DeniseTreizman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040803/y8wnrh/20170406045437-8_Pent_up.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/810761?utm_source=DeniseTreizman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/810761/y8wnrh/20140505041643-Treizman_Denise_03.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/480451-tadasuke-jinno?utm_source=TadasukeJinno&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Tadasuke Jinno &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1040625?utm_source= TadasukeJinno&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040625/u3azr9/20170405124909-09.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1040626?utm_source=TadasukeJinno&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040626/y8wnrh/20170405124911-08.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1040622?utm_source=TadasukeJinno&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040622/y8wnrh/20170405124839-05.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1040624?utm_source=TadasukeJinno&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040624/y8wnrh/20170405124855-07.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/406499-am-hanson?utm_source=AMHanson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">A.M. Hanson &ndash; London</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/859988?utm_source=AMHanson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/859988/u3azr9/20141013161521-amhanson-a-distant-darkened-lobby-2014-installation-limboarts-margate-installview4.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="80%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/903427?utm_source=AMHanson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/903427/y8wnrh/20150405142549-a_m_hanson_hello_sunshine_indexical_traces_exhibition_brewery_tap_folkestone_6-march_2015.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/903420?utm_source=AMHanson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/903420/y8wnrh/20150405140015-A_M_Hanson_A_distant_darkened_lobby_show_sept_2014_Limbo_margate.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/859987?utm_source=AMHanson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/859987/y8wnrh/20141013161501-amhanson-a-distant-darkened-lobby-2014-installation-limboarts-margate-installview3.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 14 Apr 2017 14:01:33 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Girl on Girl: The New Book Exploring the Female Gaze in Photography <p>What does it mean for a woman to pick up a camera and point it at herself, or at another woman? Is there something unique to be found behind the lens, in the gaze of the female photographer?</p> <p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Girl-Age-Female-Gaze/dp/1780679556" target="_blank"><em>Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze</em></a> is an ambitious new book that sets out, if not to resolve this question, then to open it up, to unfold it through the exercise of prolonged looking. Over a year and a half, arts journalist Charlotte Jansen (who is, full disclosure, a former editor of this publication) interviewed 40 female artists from 17 countries who are making photographs of women today.</p> <p>With works largely spanning the last five years, <em>Girl on Girl</em> is not an exhaustive or historical anthology. Instead, it&rsquo;s a contemporary register of a unique moment and image economy, one in which we are seeing&mdash;or at least liking, commenting on, sharing, or swiping past&mdash;more images than ever before. And more than ever before, these images have been made by women.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170413140912-9781780679556._Main.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In her candid introduction, Jansen writes about &ldquo;learning to look at women&rdquo; at a time when the images we typically see of women are much more complicated than the circumstances in which we view them: ads, magazine covers, social media. She writes:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">Photographs taken by women do not only exist as a counterpoint to the male narrative. A photograph is an impulse&mdash;and challenge&mdash;to enquire, not a representation of truth. More often than not, I find that the photographs of women by women I see point me back to my own prejudice and misconceptions. Thanks to the generosity of the photographers on these pages, I had the chance to question my viewing habits and dig below the spectacle of surface.</p> <p>Over nearly 200 well-illustrated pages, Jansen asks us to consider a broad catalogue of photography: we find selfies and self-portraits; works that embrace overt feminism (and #feminism), and others that eschew it entirely; there&rsquo;s fashion, glam, and beauty; there are formal exercises, post-internet investigations, conceptual and documentary undertakings; there&rsquo;s humor, even horror! What Jansen&rsquo;s book smartly makes clear is that there is no singular female gaze. And it would be unfair to assume there were: why would the photographic output of 40 women be anything other than 40 unique practices?</p> <p>&ldquo;<em>Girl on Girl</em>,&rdquo; writes Jansen, &ldquo;is ultimately a meditation on the agency women are taking over the images that are made of them.&rdquo;</p> <p>In anticipation of the <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Girl-Age-Female-Gaze/dp/1780679556">U.S. book launch on April 18th</a>, we&rsquo;re sharing the first interview in <em>Girl on Girl</em>. For South African photographer Zanele Muholi, the stakes of visibility and representation of women&mdash;particularly black, lesbian, queer, and transgender women&mdash;are high. From Muholi&rsquo;s gaze to ours, the art of photography, and the art of looking itself, can be a life-affirming act.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>ZANELE MUHOLI: A LIVING ARCHIVE</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:22px;"><em>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s about claiming the spaces, taking back power, owning our voices and our selves and our bodies, without fear of being judged.&rdquo;</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170413141229-ZANELE_MUHOLI_Katlego_Mashiloane_and_Noshipo_Lavuta_Ext._2_Lakeside_Johannesburg_2007.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Zanele Muholi,<em> Katlego mashiloane and Noshipo Lavuta, Ext. 2, Lakeside, Johannesburg</em>, 2007</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In autumn 2016, I was walking around the exhibition <em>Zanele Muholi: Isibonelo/Evidence</em> at the Brooklyn Museum, New York, the most significant museum survey of the award-winning artist&rsquo;s work to date. A young boy was there visiting with his mother. I watched him put the headphones on and stare up at the screen that was showing Muholi&rsquo;s 2012 video <em>Being Scene</em>, depicting blurry footage of bodies&mdash;lesbian couples, including Muholi and her long-term girlfriend&mdash;making love. I looked at his mother, who shrugged and laughed. The was probably the boy&rsquo;s first encounter with sex, and it was an interracial, lesbian couple. It was a rare moment in which I realized how art can shift our perceptions of gender, sexuality and identity. &ldquo;I am hoping to break down those notions around what is to be seen and what is not,&rdquo; said Muholi in an interview about the exhibition at the time. &ldquo;I want to encourage young artists to think of photography as a possibility, as work&mdash;to think of art for consciousness, and in turn, museums as spaces where we can carve a new dialogue that favours us.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170413141518-ZANELE_MUHOLI_Beloved_I_2005.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Zanele Muholi,<em> Beloved 1</em>, 2005</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Photography in South Africa has long been intertwined with its political turbulence, and Muholi, the first black, gay, South African photographer to make a significant space in the country&rsquo;s cultural history with her work, is part of a legacy of photographers who have challenged their reality from the inside, from South Africa&rsquo;s first black photographer, Ernest Cole, to David Goldblatt, George Hallett and Peter Maguabane. In post-apartheid South Africa, however, inequalities persist.</p> <p>With a background in journalism and activism for women&rsquo;s empowerment, in 2006 Muholi embarked on her best-known work to date, the ongoing project <em>Faces and Phases</em>, photographing members of the LGBTI community she belongs to, in townships of South Africa and the African diaspora. As an active, involved member of this community, Muholi is not distanced from her subjects: over the years, Muholi has returned to shoot follow-ups of them&mdash;an affirmation in a place where black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people are persecuted.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170413141552-ZANELE_MUHOLI_Xana_Nyilenda_Los_Angeles_2013.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Zanele Muholi,<em> Xana Nyilenda, Los Angeles</em>, 2013</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>To the outsider, what is striking about <em>Faces and Phases</em>, made up of more than 250 portraits, is not only the content of the images but also their quantity: this living archive of women has a powerful presence that contradicts the pandemic belief that being gay is un-African. Muholi explains: &ldquo;It&rsquo;s about claiming the spaces, taking back power, owning our voices and our selves and our bodies, without fear of being judged. Saying that we are here, without fear of being displaced.&rdquo;</p> <p>South African constitutionally has the most liberal attitude towards homosexuality on the African continent&mdash;same-sex marriage is legal, and anti-discrimination laws exist&mdash;yet brutal violence, corrective rape and murder are a daily reality for LGBTI people, and Muholi raises these tragic failures against her people through her work. Each portrait represents a different story&mdash;a struggle and a triumph&mdash;but together they are part of a powerful collective force. Muholi&rsquo;s work is firmly rooted in the local, and her perspective of the situation she is living in, here and now. Yet a portrait in itself does not tell us the complexity of its subject&rsquo;s story. What we see first, and foremost, in Muholi&rsquo;s work, is the humanity common to all women, irrespective of their sexuality, gender or race. For Muholi, as a visual activist, photographs can change our world.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170413141339-ZANELE_MUHOLI_ZaVa_III._Paris_2013.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Zanele Muholi,<em> ZaVa III, Paris</em>, 2013</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Charlotte Jansen is an arts and culture journalist and editor-at-large at <em>Elephant</em> magazine. </strong></p> <p><em>From </em>Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze<em> (April 2017). Reprinted with permission of Laurence King Publishing. </em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Zanele Muholi,<em> Zinzi and Tozama II Mowbray</em>, 2010. All images:&nbsp;From <em>Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze</em> (2017) by Charlotte Jansen.&nbsp;&copy; Zanele Muholi, courtesy of Stevenson Cape Town and Johannesburg.)</span></p> Wed, 19 Apr 2017 15:03:24 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Sarp Kerem Yavuz Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46180" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/460462-sarp-kerem-yavuz" target="_blank">Sarp Kerem Yavuz</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>For the past three, maybe four years, I have been trying to find a way to criticize political Islam, particularly as it is employed by the Turkish government. I use traditional Islamic and Ottoman patterns to challenge the government&#39;s neo-Ottoman rhetoric and address some the oppression, injustice, and violence people are experiencing in the region.</p> <p>However, the broader issue I have been attempting to discuss for as long as I can remember, is masculinity, particularly Middle Eastern constructs of masculinity. Having grown up gay in Istanbul, the liberal and secular bubble I was located in certainly judged me but also protected me for the most part. Despite this, I was very cognizant of my otherness, and I wish to create a world in which no 12-year-old feels as conflicted or frightened as I did when I came to terms with my sexual orientation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170410115841-20160622001024-Haci.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Haci</em>, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>Make the world a better place. Challenge people to question themselves. Surprise people.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170410115431-Nick.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Nick</em>, 2011</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>I have a love-hate relationship with most of my work, so this is a terrible question to ask! Probably this attached image though. A large-format portrait of my friend Nick shot in 2011. It was the start of everything for me&mdash;it inspired the <em>In The Closet</em> series, which was my first major body of work.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I have always wanted to make an old-school Lucas Arts style computer game, like the great Monkey Island Series or Grim Fandango. I have no idea how to code and don&#39;t think there&#39;s a market for intelligent adventure gaming these days so it&#39;ll probably never happen.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>You should know my outrageously talented photographer &amp; illustrator friend <a href="http://edadurust.com/" target="_blank">Eda D&uuml;r&uuml;st</a>.<br /> Visual artist <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/koralsagular/" target="_blank">Koral Sagular</a>, who is also probably one of the bravest people I know for daring to be fabulous in Turkey.<br /> And brilliant architectural designer <a href="http://omerpekin.com" target="_blank">Omer Pekin</a>, with whom I have collaborated on some of the <em>Maşallah</em> series.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Sarp Kerem Yavuz,&nbsp;<em>Ah</em>, 2016)</span></p> Mon, 10 Apr 2017 09:46:51 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Joshua Hagler | Jacco Hinke | Andrea Castillo <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/55278-joshua-hagler?utm_source=JoshuaHagler&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Joshua Hagler &ndash; Los Angeles</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1032141?utm_source=JoshuaHagler&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1032141/u3azr9/20170224001028-Hagler_Joshua_10.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1032150?utm_source=JoshuaHagler&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1032150/mf2ji7/20170224001223-11_Nine_Explorers_in_the_Same_Place_at_the_Same_Time.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1032136?utm_source=JoshuaHagler&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1032136/mf2ji7/20170224000806-chums-final-studio.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1032134?utm_source=JoshuaHagler&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1032134/mf2ji7/20170224000733-bad-news-wall.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280399-jacco-hinke?utm_source=JaccoHinke&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Jacco Hinke &ndash; Nuenen, The Netherlands</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/933020?utm_source= JaccoHinke&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/933020/u3azr9/20150821141020-sketch_II.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/941482?utm_source=JaccoHinke&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/941482/u3azr9/20151001142052-all_the_parts_VII.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/941484?utm_source=JaccoHinke&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/941484/u3azr9/20151001142226-all_the_parts_sketch_V.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/933021?utm_source=JaccoHinke&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/933021/u3azr9/20150821141431-zonder_titel.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/460224-andrea-castillo?utm_source=AndreaCastillo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Andrea Castillo &ndash; Los Angeles</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/994759?utm_source=AndreaCastillo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/994759/u3azr9/20160620184522-Castillo.oilonpaper.48x60inches.2016.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1010352?utm_source=AndreaCastillo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1010352/mf2ji7/20161006043404-Andrea_Castillo_Sep_30_2016_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1010353?utm_source=AndreaCastillo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1010353/mf2ji7/20161006043615-skiliftforest.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/994800?utm_source=AndreaCastillo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/994800/mf2ji7/20160620193758-Feb_12_2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 07 Apr 2017 12:02:39 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list See Malick Sidibé’s Portraits the Way His Subjects Did in the 1960s <p>Malick Sidib&eacute;&rsquo;s striking images of the Malian rock-and-roll scene have been widely exhibited, though rarely in the form he originally sold to his subjects. After late-night parties, guests would come to Sidib&eacute;&rsquo;s photography studio to place orders for their portraits he&rsquo;d taken earlier that evening. They did this, he claimed, partly because his studio had electricity,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/02/nyregion/a-review-of-malick-sidibe-chemises-in-poughkeepsie.html" target="_blank">a luxury at the time</a>. He often worked after hours developing chemises (French for &ldquo;sleeves&rdquo;)&mdash;small proof prints arranged in colored folders and grouped by events for the guests. These chemises, some never before exhibited, are now on view at <a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/events/show/443097-chemises" target="_blank">M+B</a> in their original form.</p> <p>While Sidib&eacute;&rsquo;s signature black-and-white portraits are undeniably enhanced when enlarged, this smaller format invites a glimpse into his early process and the particular cultural moment of Bamako, Mali. At the time, both the subject matter he was depicting and photography at large were rare in the newly independent country. The young subjects he captured, self-fashioned with the influence of western rock-and-roll and clothing, were considered somewhat controversial in conservative Malian culture.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170405192218-M_B-Sidibe-MS.710.13.01-WEB.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Malick Sidibé, 1971, <em>Les &quot;Intimes&quot; de Bagadadji</em>, Collection of 22 vintage gelatin silver prints mounted on paper12-1/2 x 19 inches. &nbsp;Courtesy: the artist and M+B, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Sidib&eacute; was enmeshed in the scene and became a fixture at &ldquo;grins,&rdquo; dance parties and social clubs, and the chemises stand as an artifact of these events. Arranged in sequence, the 35-mm photographs reflect movement and the passage of time, like a contact sheet or film strip. They give credence to imperfect moments that weren&rsquo;t appropriate for enlarging, such as photos of people blinking or having bad posture, and have a grittiness in contrast to his better-known studio work. Though many of his photographs are in a traditional portraiture style, with subjects posed and aware of the camera, his candid models exude a greater sense of freedom, and even intimacy. The format reflects a vivid and provocative moment in Malian culture, one which Sidib&eacute;, the first African artist to be awarded the Golden Lion lifetime achievement award at the Venice Biennale in 2007, wasn&rsquo;t just documenting, but actively engaged in.</p> <p>Dating from 1960 through the early 1970s, Sidib&eacute;&rsquo;s photographs documented the political and cultural development of post-colonial Malian life. Fashions evolved, gender norms broke down, and old social formalities dissolved. <a href="http://www.mbphoto.com/artists/58-malick-sidib/series/other-works/12973/"><em>Formation Militaire</em></a> (1966) a rarely seen chemise depicting Malian soldiers (some of whom look quite young) performing drills, stands as an outlier to the carefree partygoers. This spread hints at continuing political conflicts after Malian independence outside of the particular scene Sidib&eacute; usually photographed.</p> <p>While other exhibitions highlight Sidib&eacute;&rsquo;s more stylized, posed portraits, <em>Chemises</em> offers a more candid lens, one that aesthetically borders on a family scrapbook. Photo albums seem a relic in our social-media driven mode of reminiscing, which privileges one or two images aimed to garner the most likes. But like hardcore punk zines from the 1970s and 1980s, the chemises&rsquo; original format preserves the raw sincerity of a sociocultural moment, and much of that is lost when images are blown-up and masterfully reproduced.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170405192154-M_B-Sidibe-MS.706.13.01-WEB.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Malick Sidibé, <em>Nuit du 22-9/72</em>, 1972, Collection of 23 vintage gelatin silver prints mounted on paper, 12-3/4 x 19-1/2 inches. Courtesy: the artist and M+B, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The aesthetic of massive, high-contrast prints for gallery display was a practice preferred by American and European art-world audiences; Sidib&eacute;&rsquo;s work wasn&rsquo;t exhibited in this form until the 1990s, when he became an internationally known artist. Though photography as a medium came to be embodied by its qualities of expansion, replication, and distribution, there is a sense of intimacy that these chemises, with their scalloped edges, exude. There is a sensibility one gets, not unlike sifting through old photos of strangers, relating to and imagining their life stories, that emerges in Sidib&eacute;&rsquo;s chemises that do not when looking at his larger, polished prints.</p> <p>Many of these parties were familial gatherings, birthday celebrations, or graduation parties, and their subjects likely never expected their photos to be exhibited on this scale. Often, when observing photography, viewers forget that subjects in the images are not always models&mdash;they are people interrupted by a camera. Their lives began before, and continue after the click of the shutter. The chemises remove the artistic guise of the photographer, even with a lens as refined as Sidib&eacute;&rsquo;s. There is a dignity gained in honoring the images, and their subjects, in this original format.</p> <p><em>Malick Sidib&eacute;&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/events/show/443097-chemises" target="_blank">Chemises</a> continues at M+B, Los Angeles, through April 22.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452094-sola-agustsson?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Sola Agustsson</a></p> <p><em>S&oacute;la Agustsson is a writer based in New York. She is working toward her MFA in Fiction at Columbia University and has contributed to The Huffington Post, FLAUNT, Bullett, Hyperallergic, Salon, and ArtSlant.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Malick Sidibé, <em>Nuit du 14/7/73</em>, Collection of 23 vintage gelatin silver prints mounted on paper12-3/4 x 19-1/2 inches. Courtesy: the artist and M+B, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane)</span></p> Thu, 06 Apr 2017 07:29:26 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Shawné Michaelain Holloway <p><a href="http://www.shawnemichaelainholloway.com/" target="_blank">Shawn&eacute; Michaelain Holloway</a> is a new media artist currently based in Chicago. Her deeply personal work, which often casts its unflinching lens onto the artist herself, boldly addresses the intersections of race, feminism, and sexuality in the internet age. She sees simply logging onto the internet as a political gesture that can be imbued with intentionality. Holloway asks important questions about our immersion and participation in a digital world that we all take for granted, but don&rsquo;t necessarily understand.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170405131426-meet-shawne_nicer-in-person-cuter-on-the-internet.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">meet-shawne_nicer-in-person-cuter-on-the-internet</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: When did you first become aware of computers?</strong></p> <p><strong>Shawn&eacute; Michaelain Holloway:</strong> Aware is a funny word: I had a computer growing up. My first operating system was Windows95, but I&rsquo;m not sure I was <em>aware</em> of it as a <em>device</em> that processed complex data in sequences of operations. Because I never used it for anything offline, I thought of it as a shell for the internet more than anything else. Not until college did I fully realize the capabilities of computers, the machines themselves.</p> <p><strong>CP: What was your first experience of the Internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> My first independent experience of the internet was registering for a hotmail.com email address. I used that account to sign up for things like TeenOpenDiary, AIM, Windows Messenger, and later Neopets. I was sodapop1616 everywhere for the longest. 20 years later, I&rsquo;m #outHere as cleogirl2525&mdash;it doesn&rsquo;t seem like my naming habits have changed any.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first think about using the internet as a platform to create art?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> I began seriously thinking about the internet as a way to make art when I realized that it allowed me to connect to people across great distances that I wouldn&rsquo;t ever have met otherwise. I was interested in how I could use it no matter how little space I had for a studio, how ill, or how broke I was.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170405134424-take-it-as-a-compliment_or_thanks-thomas___.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">take-it-as-a-compliment_or_thanks-thomas(!).png</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Does the potential of the internet still excite you?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> Absolutely. Every day there&rsquo;s something new to see and explore. It&rsquo;s the first and last thing I look at every day. If it didn&rsquo;t excite me, I wouldn&rsquo;t revisit it so often&mdash;that&rsquo;s why I keep working there. However, I don&rsquo;t think we, as a society, yet have a concrete or even collective understanding of what the internet has the potential to bring us&mdash;myself included.</p> <p>I truly believe that the general, very economic focused utilization of the network alienates us from creating a new language with which to embody the medium. I was invited to give a talk alongside <a href="http://cargocollective.com/ariadean" target="_blank">Aria Dean</a> at University of Arts Helsinki under the theme of &ldquo;<a href="https://www.uniarts.fi/en/events/thu-05012017-1532/rethinking-digitalization" target="_blank">Rethinking Digitalization</a>.&rdquo;<a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1aRJM-eduA9Ur007X9viEtfHbJqIt7_h7FBA8XMKVuUE/edit" target="_blank"> I talked about how understanding poetics might have an impact on the way we can understand cyberspace</a>. Aria and I really united over a questioning of institutionalized narratives about the foundation of cyberspace (and other digitalization), suggesting that taking a look at non-philosophy, subjective disciplines, and otherwise overseen narratives can expose a lot about a space we think we know everything about. The proximity of everyone&rsquo;s involvement is so close and crucial that we&rsquo;re forgetting that it&rsquo;s still a wild, glitchy figment of our creation that is able to be developed, reshaped, and re-historicized.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170405134405-after-marvin-van-peebles_rated-xxx-by-an-all-feminist-jury.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">after-marvin-van-peebles_rated-xxx-by-an-all-feminist-jury</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you start to use the internet as tool for creative expression of political and social beliefs?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH: </strong>Logging on to the internet at all is a political action. It was more of training myself to become more intentional about how I was already expressing my social and political beliefs from which sites I used to order books and look at pornography to which email provider I chose to use. Creatively my work reflects this because of all of the UX design I leave intact in screenshots, which platforms I choose to distribute my artwork on, etc.</p> <p><strong>CP: What were the positives and negatives of your college experience?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> The only negative I see about my education was that it was largely white and western. I&rsquo;m only just now catching up to the books and media I should&rsquo;ve been reading as an undergraduate&mdash;or, frankly, before that even. Part of my approach these days is to incorporate this investigation into the way I&rsquo;m producing work. This way I can educate myself but also align my practice with perspectives that feel more closely related to my experience. Instead of making my work fit a discourse I see as either a) superficially constructed for academic purposes or b) overlooking entire populations for the sake of a higher purpose, I create work to align and #cosign histories I feel passionate about. For example, my work <a href="http://www.shawnemichaelainholloway.com/alignment/" target="_blank">Picking Skin : Alignment</a> works to express this visually, and my recent show/ongoing series, <em><a href="http://www.shawnemichaelainholloway.com/daughter-of-the-cage/" target="_blank">Daughter of the Cage</a></em>, appropriates some of the imagery and language of work by filmmaker Oscar Micheaux in an effort to discover the early landscape of black cinema.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/205836460" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/205836460" target="_blank">DAUGHTER_OF_THE_CAGE : WITHIN-OUR-GATES_OR_(DUNGEON)THE-REMAKE(SOLO-WOMAN)NO-1.MOV</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/shawnemichaelainholloway" target="_blank">shawn&eacute; michaelain holloway</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Social media is an integral part of your art practice. What have you learned that is unique about expressing yourself in that way compared to more traditional art mediums?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> I don&rsquo;t see using social media to be any different than performance and I don&rsquo;t see performance as an untraditional art medium. I can understand that perhaps both of those things are pretty recently accepted into fine arts institutions as a truly valued form of practice but I can&rsquo;t be bothered to address that novelty. I believe it is crucial for the success of the discourse on the internet arts to relate to other mediums through the understanding that it was built by these other practices and that these practices continue to live on through new methodologies that web arts re-present. They are not separate. Take a look at my <a href="http://www.shawnemichaelainholloway.com/selfsubmit-portraits/" target="_blank">series of self portraits</a> for example: they&rsquo;re all a hybrid between performance documentation and a printable image that has been composed. My skills as a painter inform this practice as does my practice as poet. It&rsquo;s this triangulation that creates the new media out the internet itself.</p> <p><strong>CP: New media has become a vital home for the expression of feminist and gender ideas. What about the medium makes it a particularly interesting way to explore those issues? </strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:
&nbsp;</strong>Internet art is a vital resource for anyone thinking about what it means to inhabit a structure, whether that is a body or a future.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170405133642-castle_of_the_white_prince_or_an_offer_i_couldnt_accept_STILL1_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">castle_of_the_white_prince_or_an_offer_i_couldnt_accept(STILL1)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: I&rsquo;ve also noticed an increasing number of artists of color being drawn to new media. Do you agree?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> It&rsquo;s not increasing. They&rsquo;ve always been there but maybe just not always in the news. Now folks are out here trying to decolonize their institutions in order to make space for women and POC to varying levels of success. That&rsquo;s nice, but there needs to be less trying and more doing. I&rsquo;m done showing up to art and tech festivals and seeing no POC on an entire schedule when I know so many who are around and have been around for ages.</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you feel that each work you create represents a specific aspect of your overall identity? </strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> I&rsquo;m really struggling with the potential that my identity is ever truly represented in my work&mdash;it could be. In 2015, <a href="http://www.walkerart.org/magazine/2015/equity-representation-future-digital-art" target="_blank">I talked to Kimberly Drew about it</a>:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">Everything that I&rsquo;ve made is one singular artwork&mdash;each piece contributes to a stream of digital artifacts (films, status updates, music, publications, etc.) that, all together, carefully detail/describe one Black gURL&rsquo;s #identity + XXXperience of sex and pop culture online. It&rsquo;s intentionally nonlinear, but it is aesthetically cohesive and packed with small gestures that provide continuity across projects and mediums.</p> <p>Since then, I&rsquo;ve realized that whoever is in my videos is absolutely not me. While I&rsquo;m making one single artwork, I&rsquo;m still black, and still navigating the internet. There&rsquo;s something about the continuous dissonance of seeing my body online, or my name in a text, having done and performed these things, that doesn&rsquo;t necessarily resonate for me. Maybe it&rsquo;s imposter syndrome, maybe it&rsquo;s being young, or maybe it&rsquo;s that I&rsquo;m at a moment in my life where my identity is in flux. I&rsquo;m not sure.</p> <p>I do know, however, that it frustrates me when people feel they know me because they&rsquo;ve seen moving images of me online in vulnerable positions. While I&rsquo;m extremely polite and honest and present IRL, I&rsquo;m a say-everything-but-disclose-nothing type of person. I think my work reflects that. Perhaps that&rsquo;s exactly how I&rsquo;ve managed to communicate an aspect of my true self there.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170405133750-_a_active_-a_hover-_-or-position_-unavoidable_still1_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">_a_active,-a_hover-{-or-position_-unavoidable(still1)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work has also explored themes of intimacy and sexuality... </strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> Intimacy and embodiment are the two biggest concerns of internet art because of its native environment. Interacting with a screen, alone, is quite intimate and the ever-increasing desire to put ourselves inside the screen is very clear via the public&rsquo;s obsession with virtual and augmented reality technology. I think the language of sex and BDSM, in particular, fits very well with these rhetorics. I don&rsquo;t make work about sex, I make work about networks and culture.</p> <p><strong>CP: Has your relationship with the &ldquo;selfie&rdquo; changed over time? </strong></p> <p><strong>SMH: </strong>I started taking selfies for Myspace because everyone else did. I was too scared to really share photos of my face on the internet before that. It was still the time of net-based stranger danger horror stories&mdash;which are totally real&mdash;and I still remember how scared I was the day I left the house after uploading the first photo of myself. It took such a long time for me to quit hiding my face from the internet.</p> <p>Now, I&rsquo;m not afraid to put my likeness on the internet but I enjoy a fair amount of privacy and modesty. I control what people see and that&rsquo;s no mistake. I try to hide in plain sight, showing only what I decide others are allowed to see. Controlled vulnerability is important to me. Sometimes it&rsquo;s personal preference, sometimes it&rsquo;s logical. For example, in photos, I am always careful of what details I&rsquo;m giving away about my location because of my involvement in activities online that might require a bit of anonymity. Non-spaces without windows, like elevators or bathrooms, make regular occurrences in my selfies.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170405134724-looking_at_my_face_while_we_fuck_is_important.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">looking_at_my_face_while)we_fuck_is_important</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you feel you are part of an online community? If so how would you define it?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> I feel a part of a few online communities. I&rsquo;d say there is a larger, very decentralized one connected to the arts that translates into IRL spaces. I&rsquo;m also a part of a lively social media community on Fetlife and Xtube. With Xtube, it really feels great to be a part of something that is online and stays online. That is rare anymore. Most people I meet online, I eventually meet in person. I don&rsquo;t particularly ever want to meet my Xtube favorites in person. There&rsquo;s something erotic about that anonymity and I think that sentiment is often shared.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/158575465" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/158575465" target="_blank">EXTREME SUBMISSION: i-dont-want-to-go-to-bed-i-want-to-#play.mp4</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/shawnemichaelainholloway" target="_blank">shawn&eacute; michaelain holloway</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: New media art is traditionally very hard to monetize. What has your personal experience been of that?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> New media art can be difficult to monetize but internet art is even more difficult. I got around that for a while by making sure all the footage for my videos was paid for by people online through sex cam/chat environments. Now, I&rsquo;m rethinking that structure. From time to time, I do sell my work as prints or videos. Using <a href="https://www.ascribe.io/" target="_blank">https://www.ascribe.io/</a> has been really cool as a way to talk about relationships between collectors and digital artists. I first used it when <a href="https://noranahidkhan.com/" target="_blank">Nora Khan</a>, a writer and curator whom I respect deeply, curated an exhibition called <em><a href="https://left.gallery/collections/quiet-strategies-for-survival" target="_blank">Quiet Strategies for Survival</a> </em>at berlin-based <a href="https://left.gallery/" target="_blank">Left.Gallery</a>. We created editions of our work so I used the opportunity to set a&nbsp;limit to the amount of people who could have access to it. I felt like it was a necessary gesture to retain the conceptual integrity of the piece. Left.Gallery is a cool place, though&mdash;it sells downloadable files. I&rsquo;m so excited about it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170405134056-piecepeace_for_a_price.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">piecepeace_for_a_price.png</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Who/what in the contemporary world of new media art do you find particularly inspiring?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> I am most intrigued by the conversations that are beginning to surround Rhizome&rsquo;s <a href="http://rhizome.org/editorial/2017/mar/31/own-your-archives-webrecorder-player/" target="_blank">Web Recorder</a> about web as performance. This is a relatively new tool and I can&rsquo;t wait to see where it goes next.</p> <p><a href="http://auriea.org/" target="_blank">Auriea Harvey</a> is also endlessly inspiring. Her practice is vast, fiercely skillful, and honest. Her and her work are extraordinarily poetic and I appreciate the attention she pays to architecture, history, and other formalities.</p> <p>Additionally, in preparation for my last solo show, <em><a href="http://www.shawnemichaelainholloway.com/daughter-of-the-cage/" target="_blank">Daughter of the Cage</a></em>, I&rsquo;ve been looking very closely at how new media artists translate their work into a gallery space. Sondra Perry&rsquo;s exhibition <a href="http://thekitchen.org/event/sondra-perry-resident-evil" target="_blank"><em>Resident Evil</em></a> at The Kitchen was extremely gorgeous and used space so well. It felt purposeful and integrated the whole body without verging into extreme interactivity. So often new media work in a gallery falls short of proper communication. Hers didn&rsquo;t; I felt it and it&rsquo;s still with me.</p> <p>Luke R. Dubois instillation of the &ldquo;Learning Machines&rdquo; in his exhibition <a href="http://www.bitforms.com/exhibitions/dubois-2016" target="_blank"><em>The Choice is Yours</em></a> at Bitforms was really great, too&mdash;very technical. In new media we talk about transparency a lot. So many of us are occupied with transparent data usage but then turn around and go try to install something into a gallery, hiding the evidence of its construction, etc., effectively creating this weird double standard. In this exhibition, the construction of the Learning Machines was all so visible but never in your face. I liked the invitation to pay attention to it or not. The exhibition had an agenda&mdash;the form was an added bonus.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170405134233-slave_to_no_dick.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">slave 2 no dick . pdf</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What other projects do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>SMH:</strong> I&rsquo;m really excited to be apart of <em><a href="http://www.macp.sva.edu/sexual-fragments-absent" target="_blank">Sexual Fragments Absent</a> </em>curated by Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi on the 27th in New York City. I also have my second solo show of the year, <em>SUB NOT SLAVE</em>,&nbsp;opening at <a href="http://sorbusgalleria.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Sorbus Galleria</a> in Helsinki.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 05 Apr 2017 17:00:10 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Postcommodity’s Latest Installation Confronts Viewers with Fears at the U.S. Border <p>The darkness has long been a home for fear. Our avoidance of nighttime is instinctual, Darwinian. We cannot know what we cannot see. The formlessness of that unknown drives our imaginations to sculpt unnerving representations of evil. Demons, nightmares, and myths roam the night, serving as a mindful warning to children who would otherwise adventure into the darkness.</p> <p>Survival is a game best played in the light.</p> <p>But what happens when your only chance of survival is in the dark? When your journey to a better life necessitates the cloak of nighttime? An instructive companion to their current work in the Whitney Biennial, Postcommodity&rsquo;s <em>Coyotaje</em> at <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/441051-coyotaje" target="_blank">Art in General</a> shows how the aggressive decoy tactics of U.S. Border Patrol agents have already transgressed into the longstanding mythos of the surrounding Mexican border towns&mdash;making the journey across the border even more terrifying.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170403163504-AVeryLongLine_LoRes.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Postcommodity, <em><a href="http://postcommodity.com/AVeryLongLine.html" target="_blank">A Very Long Line</a></em>, 2016, Video still from four-channel video with sound, Duration: Infinite. Courtesy of the artists</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Postcommodity (Raven Chacon, Crist&oacute;bal Mart&iacute;nez, and Kade L. Twist) is an interdisciplinary art collective aiming to amplify 21st-century socio-economic and political criticism with an indigenous perspective. The primary target of their work has been the border wall between the United States and Mexico. This &ldquo;fence,&rdquo; a loaded symbol in contemporary politics, is also a physical metaphor for Postcommodity, who see it as calcifying the historic denigration of indigenous rights and immigrant humanity.</p> <p>Currently on view at the Whitney Biennial, <em>A Very Long Line</em> (2016) demonstrates Postcommodity&rsquo;s adept use of immersive video and sound manipulation to visually distill the contradistinctive tranquility and violence of the borderlands. More precisely, the peace we see in the natural landscapes of the borderland towns and deserts eerily underscores the silent war on immigrants occurring in that very same place. <em>Coyotaje</em> feels like the logical conclusion to that previous piece, showing how quotidian violence at the border can seep into the cultural consciousness, enforcing and reinforcing old myths with new relevance. Whereas <em>A Very Long Line</em> is contemplative, <em>Coyotaje</em> is thrilling and manic.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170403163431-Coyotaje_019-printres.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Postcommodity, Installation view of <em>Coyotaje</em>, 2017, Curated by Kristen Chappa. Courtesy of the artists and Art in General. Photo: Charles Benton</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The exhibition begins in disorienting darkness, out of which an enormous monster emerges. With sharp fangs, large eyes and a green night-vision glow, this apparition could be easily mistaken for one of the most infamous demons of Latin American lore: the chupacabra. A closer look at it, however, reveals its glib fabrication. This is not a real monster, but a decoy representing the many <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43976-working-it-out-with-gillian-dykeman-postcommodity" target="_blank">decoys U.S. Border Patrol agents use</a> to bend an individual&rsquo;s path a certain way, making them easier to capture. Like the chupacabra who hunts animals in folktales, this modern-day beast hunts people.</p> <p>And as you step toward the monster, two things happen. First, you see yourself refracted onto the monster&rsquo;s body via an unseen projector. Are you becoming the monster? Are you complicit in the monster&rsquo;s work? Second, you hear frantic whispers comings from your left. In Spanish, a voice pleads for you to follow him, to come to him and away from the patrolling monster&rsquo;s gaze. As you edge toward the voice, another voice emerges from farther down the hallway, telling you that that demon is, in fact, the chupacabra. With each subsequent dispatch, you become less certain about your position in this narrative and more certain about the presence of danger. Could these voices just be more sonic decoys leading you into a border agent&rsquo;s trap?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170403162744-postcommodity.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Postcommodity, <em>Es m&aacute;s alcanzable de lo que se imaginaban</em>, 2017, in&nbsp;<em>Coyotaje</em>, Curated by Kristen Chappa. Courtesy the artists and Art in General</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>After all this manipulation, you arrive at the end of the hallway with a single, large-scale photograph on the wall. <em>Es m&aacute;s alcanzable de lo que se imaginaban</em> depicts the skeletal remains of a horse, with two dogs looking anxiously at the viewer. Like a predator who plays with its prey before killing it, the chupacabra plays with us. The great manipulation here might not be the visual and sonic decoys that lead us into the chupacabra&rsquo;s trap, but rather how Postcommodity shifts our own expectations in the piece. In the darkness, we become both officer and immigrant, hunter and hunted. Yet, when we experience the fear and disorientation of the border patrol&rsquo;s nighttime decoys, our empathy goes squarely to the immigrants. From their viewpoint, we see Americans as the new chupacabras. The demons are not undocumented immigrants, but those of us who want to keep them out with nefarious tactics.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Postcommodity&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/441051-coyotaje" target="_blank">Coyotaje</a> continues at Art in General through June 3, 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477123-zachary-small">Zachary Small</a></p> <p><em>Zachary Small is a New York-based genderqueer writer. He&rsquo;s written for many publications including Hyperallergic, BOMB Magazine, Artinfo Magazine, and HowlRound. He was recently named the 2017 recipient of the CUE Foundation&rsquo;s Young Art Critic Mentorship Program. His latest play, /VANITAS/ debuted at Dixon Place. He tweets from @ZSmall93 and can be reached at zsmall93[at]gmail[dot]com.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Postcommodity, Installation view of <em>Coyotaje</em>, 2017, Curated by Kristen Chappa. Courtesy of the artists and Art in General. Photo: Charles Benton)</span></p> Tue, 04 Apr 2017 09:12:40 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Samantha Harvey Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46754-under-the-radar-yuliya-martynova-sarah-gilbert-samantha-harvey" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468787-samantha-harvey" target="_blank">Samantha Harvey</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I want my work to act as a bridge between political moments and the public discourse. Can this be addressed through a nonrepresentational rhetoric, one that punctures the art world bubble and into the mainstream? Seeking to present news and current issues through an emotive standpoint, whether or not the viewer agrees with my standpoint, it is important that a dialogue can be created and shared through an open discourse surrounding the work. Whether that is through hashtags, comments, or making a new work. Exploring the potential of open access by welcoming rather than restricting to see what environment this can create.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I think in this political climate it&rsquo;s important for the artist to be bold, and&mdash;particularly at the moment coming out of our artistic community where the majority of people share your ideals and principles&mdash;seeing if we can learn from, or have something to offer to people who might not have access to art or these ideas. We have to be challenged: it&rsquo;s not the artist&rsquo;s job to be comfortable, but to provoke and also to learn from others. There&rsquo;s no future in this increasing isolation, and as artists we surely have to be at the forefront of joining communities and inspiring positive action through our work.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170403130623-tumblr_mk4hwfUROo1qgv04ao1_500.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Heads</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>I had a phase obsessively making gifs. It probably saved me from going mad when I was looking for work, but walking around London and then having fun with images certainly helped me make the work I do today.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I always have dance routine ideas in my head when I&rsquo;m walking around listening to music. They seem great when I&rsquo;m thinking about it but I&rsquo;m not sure how they would translate if I tried to explain my ideas to a professional dancer. For now they will remain great ideas, if only in my imagination.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Some really great upcoming artists I&rsquo;m hoping to collaborate with soon:</p> <p><a href="https://www.vishalkswamy.com" target="_blank">Vishal Kumaraswamy</a>, <a href="http://www.celiahay.fr" target="_blank">Celia Hay</a>, and <a href="http://www.nealewillis.com" target="_blank">Neale Willis</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 04 Apr 2017 12:01:29 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Rana Siegel | Antonio Torrez Solis | Heui Tae Yoon <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/132944-rana-siegel?utm_source=RanaSiegel&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Rana Siegel &ndash; Chicago</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1038688?utm_source=RanaSiegel&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1038688/u3azr9/20170321225717-3.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1038690?utm_source=RanaSiegel&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1038690/y8wnrh/20170321225718-4.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1038687?utm_source=RanaSiegel&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1038687/y8wnrh/20170321225717-1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1038686?utm_source=RanaSiegel&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1038686/y8wnrh/20170321225716-2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/84177-antonio-torrez-solis?utm_source=AntonioTorrezSolis&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Antonio Torrez Solis &ndash; San Francisco</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/920270?utm_source= AntonioTorrezSolis&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/920270/u3azr9/20150616152005-young_cannibals_.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1039090?utm_source=AntonioTorrezSolis&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1039090/y8wnrh/20170324172845-warren_mooncat.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1039068?utm_source=AntonioTorrezSolis&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1039068/y8wnrh/20170324164148-CREAM_copy.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1039072?utm_source=AntonioTorrezSolis&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1039072/y8wnrh/20170324164529-QUEEN.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/439711-heui-tae-yoon?utm_source=HeuiTaeYoon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Heui Tae Yoon &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1039930?utm_source=HeuiTaeYoon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1039930/u3azr9/20170330122749-Divided_Loyaltyties_1.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1039933?utm_source=HeuiTaeYoon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1039933/y8wnrh/20170330122800-Untitled.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1039932?utm_source=HeuiTaeYoon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1039932/y8wnrh/20170330122757-See_Far_Eyes.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1039931?utm_source=HeuiTaeYoon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1039931/y8wnrh/20170330122754-Divided_Loyaltyties.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Sat, 01 Apr 2017 05:15:31 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In Cambodia, Contemporary Artists Shed Light on Social and Environmental Issues <p>Riding through downtown Phnom Penh in a tuk tuk on my way to <a href="http://sasabassac.com/">Sa Sa Bassac</a>&mdash;the leading contemporary art gallery in Cambodia&mdash;I saw about 100 people marching in the street, holding signs and chanting slogans while flanked by cops on every side. I asked my guide what it was all about. She told me they were protesting land grabs by developers, who employ arsonists to burn down shanty towns to make way for apartment towers, which often then sit vacant, serving as investments to hide dirty money.</p> <p>Upon my arrival at Sa Sa Bassac I met with the artist <a href="http://sasabassac.com/artists/thansok/than.htm">Than Sok</a> to learn about his drawings and art installations, which are strikingly contemporary yet firmly rooted within a traditional Cambodian cultural milieu. His recent works dwell on the dynamics of Buddhist monk-hood and gift-giving, but I was particularly moved by his first major installation, titled <em>Negligence Leads to Loss; Attention Preserves. </em>Staged at the Singapore Art Museum in 2009, it consisted of a projector ensconced within a traditional cambodian spirit house. The video depicted a small spirit house built entirely out of incense, which the artist sets aflame.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170327171435-Than_Sok_Negligence_Leads_to_Loss_Attention_Preserves__2009__Digital_still__04.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Tham Sok, <em>Negligence Leads to Loss; Attention Preserves</em>, 2009, Video still. Courtesy of the artist and Singapore Art Museum</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Spirit houses are a phenomenon peculiar to Theravada Buddhism (the variety of Buddhism practiced in Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia). Almost every household in those countries keeps a doll-sized spirit house outside, at which they make offerings of food, drinks, and incense, lest the hungry ghosts that wander the streets at night come inside and haunt their actual house. Spirit houses are typically made out of wood, and ornately decorated to attract the spirits. By constructing a rickety little house of incense and burning it, Than Sok was referencing the plight of those urban shanty towns that continue to fall victim to arson. Police and government officials look the other way, leaving their former residents homeless like the wandering ghosts for whom the spirit houses are built.</p> <p>Stories of corruption like this abound in Cambodia. The tiny Southeast Asian nation is yet to fully recover from the devastating genocide enacted by the Khmer Rouge Maoist regime in the late 70s and the ensuing civil war which racked the country for over a decade. While the young populace processes the traumas of their parents&rsquo; generation, they also have their own challenges to face, ranging from basic poverty, to child sex trafficking, to the rampant expropriation of natural resources by Cambodia&rsquo;s more powerful neighbors.</p> <p>The matter of resource exploitation is addressed in the work of the artist Yim Maline, whom I met at her home in Siem Riep. One of the largest cities in the country after the capital, Siem Riep is home to Angkor Wat, the ancient seat of the Khmer empire, a UNESCO World Heritage Site which provides Cambodia with a precious source of tourism revenue (although, ironically, much of that money goes to the Vietnamese management company that runs the park, indicative of the lingering effects of the Vietnamese invasion that toppled the Khmer Rouge during the 80s).</p> <p>Yim Maline was born in 1982 in the city of Battambang, and her early artworks used a surrealist drawing style to deal obliquely with her childhood memories of growing up during the war. In recent years, however, she has shifted her approach to making sculptural installations and abstract drawings with environmental degradation as her primary subject. For instance, her most recent show at Sa Sa Bassac, which closed in January, was titled <a href="http://sasabassac.com/exhibitions/38_decomposition/decomposition.htm"><em>Decomposition</em></a><em>,</em> and consisted of abstract drawings on cardboard which were laid flat on the floor.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170327171358-Yim_Maline._Decomposition._2016._Graphite__charcoal__ink__acrylic_colored_pencil_on_cardboard._180_x_104_cm.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Yim Maline, <em>Decomposition (Measured) 10</em>, 2016, Graphite, charcoal, ink, acrylic colored pencil on cardboard, 180 x 104 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Sa Sa Bassac</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Richly textured with holes carved or burnt into their surface, the works possess a topographical quality with their exposed layers of cardboard substrate. By burning and digging into the cardboard to create negative space, Maline&rsquo;s <em>Decomposition</em> series references the various ways in which the Cambodian landscape is being eviscerated, not only by Chinese mining and logging conglomerates who use bribery to operate within protected areas, but also by locals who set fire to public forests in order to collect charcoal for a living. Maline explained that the dug out sections also relate to the illegal sand dredging taking place in Cambodia&rsquo;s waterways.</p> <p>Sand dredging is on everyone&rsquo;s mind in Cambodia these days, following a recent Court of Appeals decision to uphold an enormous fine for three prominent activists from the <a href="http://www.mothernaturecambodia.org/" target="_blank">Mother Nature</a> organization, who were temporarily imprisoned for climbing onboard a sand dredging barge in a 2015 protest. Despite the existence of laws forbidding the dredging (which is causing widespread coastal and riverside erosion and decimating the livelihoods of countless fishing communities), the courts have consistently sided with the predominantly Vietnamese companies that nevertheless continue to do it. Vietnam implemented a ban on the dredging of its own rivers and beaches a few years ago, but there too, companies with ties to high-ranking communist officials still get permission to dredge. The profits to be made by exporting sand to Singapore to build reclaimed land and artificial beaches are too massive to resist.</p> <p>Another artist making work related to dredging is <a href="http://sasabassac.com/artists/khvaysamnang/khvay.htm" target="_blank">Khvay Samnang</a>. Back in Phnom Penh, I met with Samnang at the gallery/restaurant Java Cafe, where he filled me in on his video and performance art practice. He addressed the sand issue in a very literal way in his video/performance <em>Enjoy My Sand </em>(2013&ndash;2015). He went to beaches in Singapore and, donning water buffalo horns upon his head, invited Singaporeans to go for buffalo rides on his back. While playful on the surface, the performance also served as a means of broaching this serious topic with Singaporeans who may not have known where their nice new beaches were coming from.</p> <p>While the conceptual impetus behind <em>Enjoy My Sand </em>is certainly strong, the delivery was quite blunt and the aesthetic dimensions of the performance a bit thin. Far more subtle and emotionally moving is Samnang&rsquo;s 2014 multi-channel video <em>Where Is My Land</em>, in which the artist collaborated with dancer and choreographer Nget Rady. Shot alongside riverbanks, in construction zones, and on the shores of a Phnom Penh lake which has since been filled with sand to make way for development, Rady can be seen engaging with his environment in a wistful, improvisational manner.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170327171239-KS_Where_is_my_land_2014__01_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Khvay Samnang, <em>Where Is My Land</em>, 2014, Video stills. Courtesy of the artists and Sa Sa Bassac</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Explaining the inspiration for this project, Samnang recounted a story he had heard about a family whose house collapsed into the river as a result of dredging-caused erosion. The collapse killed all three generations sleeping inside. Personifying one of these drowned souls, Rady is imagined to have drifted downriver for days, his body sucked into a drain pipe, eventually emerging at the site of the swiftly disappearing lake. He awakes lost and confused, a wandering ghost who no longer knows where his home is.</p> <p>The ability for either activism or artists&rsquo; projects to provoke meaningful change in Cambodia remains yet to be seen. Prime Minister Hun Sen has held a firm grip on power since 1985 (making him one of the longest running heads of state in the world), and with his family members holding monopolies over all the major industries in the country and his son poised to replace him after his demise, the prospects for internal political restructuring are looking pretty grim.</p> <p>Nevertheless, environmental and social issues have become a common theme in contemporary Cambodian art, and for good reason, as it must be incredibly frustrating to witness widespread injustice taking place in one&rsquo;s country while knowing that one has no legal recourse to stop it. Short of risking one&rsquo;s life and livelihood by engaging in direct activism, using art to shed light on such issues makes for a pretty good alternative (and given the inability of direct activism and <a href="http://hyperallergic.com/338755/artists-join-the-fight-to-protect-standing-rock/" target="_blank">artists projects</a> to prevent the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, we should acknowledge that the situation in America is not all that different).</p> <p>However, given the fact that all of these artists exhibit internationally as well as in Cambodia, they are uniquely positioned to draw attention to these problems on the world stage. Perhaps if pressure is leveraged on the Hun Sen government from abroad, some of the damage can be alleviated before Cambodia&rsquo;s next generation wakes up wondering where their land has gone.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;Dave Willis</p> <p><em>Dave Willis is a curator and art advisor from New York, currently based in Chiang Mai, Thailand.&nbsp;</em><em>He is the founder of </em><a href="https://mailtrack.io/trace/link/c315e671439d0df9d5c8e01a0588c2e0945c544e?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwillisartadvisory.com%2F&amp;signature=3505799e679e1db9"><em>Willis Art Advisory,</em></a><em> an international firm specializing in contemporary art.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Khvay Samnang, <em>Enjoy My Sand</em>, 2013-2015, Digital C-Print, 80 x 120 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Sa Sa Bassac)</span></p> Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:18:31 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Minaa Mohsin Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46437" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/459461-minaa-mohsin?tab=PROFILE" target="_blank"><em>Minaa Mohsin</em></a></em><em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>We live our lives in the middle of things. The homes we maintain and the items we collect are all documentation of our personal histories for which we seek acknowledgment. Material objects are given life by the meaning we attach to them. With this bestowed power, inanimate objects participate as important decision makers in one&rsquo;s life. Attachment with objects, specifically household items of utility, fascinates me. By creating portraits of these articles, I elevate their status from being mere possessions to being actual people, and thus, try to communicate the idea that for humans, making associations is second nature, may it be with other humans or animals or simply objects&mdash;with the latter becoming increasingly problematic in our society. Humor is important to me. Like a standup comedian who makes jokes about family, I use humor to talk about attachment with material culture, and bourgeois aesthetics and aspirations that I have experienced growing up in Pakistan.</p> <p>Several studio visitors have opened up about their homes and families upon looking at my work&mdash;about how their grandma in upstate New York had the same table, about how their parents would not let go of the bookshelf they bought three decades ago, about how oddly attached some of us are to our homes and domestic possessions, and about life before Ikea and Apple. Wherever in the world one is from, home is a subject that can start endless conversations.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170327135651-Minaa_Mohsin__2_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>The maid must&rsquo;ve taken it</em>, 2016, Mixed media on canvas, 66 x 42 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>The responsibility of artists is to thoughtfully use the language of art (in any genre), to the best of their ability, to communicate the message they attempt to convey even if they are unsure of what the message is; to have an inquisitive mind and vigor to constantly dig deeper and seek more from the world around them; and most importantly, to empathize&mdash;whether it is with others or with their own selves.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)? </strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170327135722-Minaa_Mohsin__1_.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>The Pleasure Principle</em>, 2013, Mixed media on canvas, 96 X 96 inches</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>To me, this painting marks a turning point. In the course of collecting references for this visual, I literally experienced the pain and pleasure of maintaining appearances that I attempted to portray. Being a regular salon goer, I had always found it extremely uncomfortable when the salon staff would start working on me all at once, killing the whole point of relaxation for which one goes to spas and salons in the first place. I felt like a product being repaired with other products sitting in line for their turn. I saw bridal make-up being applied in assembly line with each bride hoping to look different than the other. The whole production house feel was amusing to me and I somehow wanted to stay and remain an observer despite my annoyance.</p> <p>This painting allowed me to witness interesting salon dynamics. The employees came from entirely different backgrounds to work in beauty parlors which cater to a class whose life they may never get to experience. Clients would have at least one favorite employee who they would always ask for at each visit. These salons serve as meeting grounds that allow bonds to be formed between different social classes, and power structures to be switched in a way where the less fortunate is the star upon which relies the fate of the fortunate.</p> <p>For this painting I asked the salon girls to attend to me like they would normally to a client while a friend documented the whole process. The resulting images were used to create an ironic and almost otherworldly pleasure parlor that depicted with humor what goes into keeping up this beautiful fa&ccedil;ade. With a painfully bright color palette, massive scale, and subjects engaged in grotesque acts of grooming, I think I was pretty successful in achieving that. The painting now hangs in one of Pakistan&rsquo;s most well-known hair and wardrobe stylist, Tariq Amin&rsquo;s studio. It could not have found a better home and I wonder what people feel when they encounter it.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>As it is said, never say never! There are countless ideas and projects that I want to accomplish. It&rsquo;s only a matter of time and availability of resources that will allow their eventual execution. I am working on potential projects in my mind (and journal) but for now I&rsquo;m keeping it a surprise, even for myself!</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>I feel an immediate connection with the work of <a href="http://sabakhan.com/" target="_blank">Saba Khan</a>. The heightened use of non-traditional mediums and techniques as a tool of irony, accurately depicts her concern regarding the gaudy display of abundance in the Pakistani nouveau riche. <a href="http://heraakhan.wixsite.com/heraakhan" target="_blank">Hera Khan</a>, on the other hand, uses traditional miniature painting to comment on the absurd material attachment and self-consciousness that accompanies the lavish lifestyles led by a slim segment of the Pakistani society. I would like to mention <a href="http://www.rukheneelofer.com" target="_blank">Rukh-e-Neelofer Zaidi</a> (who happens to already be <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/86669-rukhe-neelofer-zaidi?tab=PROFILE">on ArtSlant</a>) because her paintings are one of the first pieces of art I experienced in a museum setting in Pakistan. Her large-scale, dazzlingly bright, flat paintings speak volumes about femininity, culture and the everyday. I came across her work at the Pakistan National Art Gallery in Islamabad in 2008 and ever since then I have admired and taken inspiration from it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Just put a flower pot on it</em>, 2016, Mixed Media on Printed Fabric, 54 X 40.5 inches)</span></p> Tue, 04 Apr 2017 12:03:25 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Can Collecting Digital Art Make Museums More Competitive? <p>Exactly one hundred years after Hugo Ball and Emmy Hennings started Cabaret Voltaire, Z&uuml;rich was once again the stage of an art revolution. This time it wasn&rsquo;t Dada, however, but data. On February 13, 2016, <a href="http://muda.co/zurich/" target="_blank">The Museum of Digital Art</a> opened its doors on the ground floor of the monumental Herdern Hochhaus. It&rsquo;s the first physical and virtual museum dedicated to digital art in Europe. Worldwide, there are only a few institutions like it, most of them American. There is, of course, the pioneering <a href="http://www.amoda.org/" target="_blank">Austin Museum of Digital Art</a> (AMODA), founded in 1997 and embellished with a full-fledged exhibition program five years later. And on the West Coast the <a href="http://www.lacda.com/">Los Angeles Center for Digital Art</a> (LACDA) has been going strong since 2006.</p> <p>The fact that these are brick and mortar entities is more significant than one might think. Their physical nature allows them to showcase a much wider range of artworks than any of the online museums dedicated to digital art. Those have been around since the start of the World Wide Web and include the <a href="http://moca.virtual.museum/" target="_blank">Museum of Computer Art</a> (MOCA, since 1993), the <a href="http://dam.org/home" target="_blank">Digital Art Museum</a> (DAM, since 1999), and the <a href="https://dimoda.art/" target="_blank">Digital Museum of Digital Art</a> (DiMoDA, since 2015). They are quite proficient at documenting the fifty-plus-year history of digital art and often put on virtual exhibitions. But the curating and staging is limited to the screen, so what you&rsquo;re looking at is basically net art or documentation. Lenticular prints, 3D-printing, animatronics, and all other varieties of art involving computers in the creation process are excluded. That makes for a very narrow interpretation of an art form that keeps redefining its boundaries as technological evolution speeds forward.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170321103654-Screen_Shot_2017-03-21_at_11.32.41.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Screengrab of <a href="https://dimoda.art/" target="_blank">DiMoDA</a>, Digital Museum of Digital Art</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Another great advantage of a building with the word &ldquo;museum&rdquo; on the fa&ccedil;ade: it&rsquo;s much more visible. Whereas digital traffic tends to become compartmentalized by algorithms feeding us information tailored to our personal preferences and previous behavior, a physical structure is less easily overlooked. Moreover, it&rsquo;s potentially a place where people meet and interact, thus investing the art on display with the humanity necessary for it to be accepted and adopted by the public at large. (This is not to say that online interactions concerning digital art are inauthentic or lack human presence, but they are typically confined to communities who are already aware of or sold on the medium.) Still, while attempting to help along the emancipation of digital art, the museums dedicated exclusively to it tend not to grow beyond the status of oddity. They are well outside the mainstream and attract mostly techies and art geeks, largely failing to cross over into the regular museum-going crowd.</p> <p>Traditional museums, on the other hand, are extremely slow on the uptake where digital art is concerned. While our everyday lives are increasingly saturated with digital technology and many feel it&rsquo;s nearly impossible to even imagine life before the internet, smart phones, and laptop computers, we see very little of that when entering a museum. Some institutions do organize exhibitions by digital natives, post-internet artists, or whatever label they choose to categorize digital artists under, but these tend to be one-offs. The Whitney Museum in New York dedicated a retrospective to <a href="http://whitney.org/Exhibitions/CoryArcangel" target="_blank">Cory Arcangel</a> in 2011, when the artist was still in his early thirties. Chris Bodman curated a number of important shows at the Barbican and Tate Modern in London. And right now, the <a href="http://www.kunsthal.nl/en/plan-your-visit/exhibitions/human-digital-symbiotic-love-affair/" target="_blank">Kunsthal in Rotterdam</a> is presenting the Hugo Brown family&rsquo;s digital art collection: a worthwhile presentation of works produced and collected over the last decade and a half. But after these shows close, the flat screens and heavy-duty hardware go back to the rental shop and the works are returned to their owners.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170321105938-tabor_robak.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Tabor Robak, <em>A*</em>, 2014 14-channel HD video; 8 minutes, Hugo Brown Family Collection. Currently on display in&nbsp;<em>Human/Digital: A Symbiotic Love Affair</em>&nbsp;at Kunsthal Rotterdam</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The number of general art museums collecting digital art on a regular basis is negligible. In recent years MoMA has been catching up, but most of its acquisitions are in the realm of pixel icons and antiquated videogames like Pac-Man, Tetris, and SimCity. Worldwide there is basically only one museum with a sizeable digital art collection spanning the entire history of the medium, and that is, perhaps surprisingly, the <a href="http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/t/v-and-a-computer-art-collections/" target="_blank">Victoria &amp; Albert Museum</a> in London. The museum owes its wealth of digital art to the donation of two private collections: the Computer Art Society Collection and the Patric Prince Archive. Although the V&amp;A regularly stages digital art exhibitions, it too fails to integrate this facet of its collection with the rest and make it part of the museum&rsquo;s DNA.</p> <table align="right" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>Focusing on digital art could be a strategy to strengthen a museum&rsquo;s position in an increasingly competitive market.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>One could argue there&rsquo;s no urgency for the V&amp;A to do so: the museum is primarily known for its vast and excellent collections of fashion and design, and presents itself as such. Why develop a new USP when you already have one? The V&amp;A is in the luxury position not having to rethink its position in the light of technological evolution. This is not the case, however, for quite a few modern and contemporary art museums. For them,<strong> </strong>focusing on digital art could be a strategy to strengthen their position in an increasingly competitive market.</p> <p>Case in point is the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. In the period following World War II this institution qualified as one of the world&rsquo;s top modern art museums. It was one of the first to embrace photography as a legitimate art form, acquired absolute masterpieces by German and American abstract painters and conceptualists in the sixties and seventies, and classifies as an early adopter where video art is concerned. But in the late twentieth century it was overtaken left and right by museums with bigger budgets and more decisive directors. A complicated overhaul and expansion of the building, which took five years, was supposed to help bring the Stedelijk &ldquo;back into the Champions League of museums,&rdquo; as then-director Gijs van Tuyl put it. This is not achieved by focusing on twentieth century art, however. In a world where the likes of the Al Thani family dominate the art market and don&rsquo;t think twice about spending millions of dollars to procure the latest C&eacute;zanne, Rothko, or Warhol at auction, a museum like the Stedelijk doesn&rsquo;t stand a chance.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170321102611-Screen_Shot_2017-03-20_at_16.26.05.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Rosa Menkman, <em><a href="http://rosa-menkman.blogspot.nl/2010/08/vernacular-of-file-formats-2-workshop.html" target="_blank">A Vernacular of File Formats</a></em>, 2010. Work recently acquired by Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and MOTI, Museum of the Image, Breda</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>It could make a killing in the digital art market, though. This type of art is still relatively cheap. Its makers are eager to acquire recognition by formal art institutes and are probably willing to set aside exclusive works for museums. Even early net art from the 1990s is quite easily obtained. With a modest but earmarked budget the Stedelijk could quickly assemble a consistent and coherent digital art collection, which it could deploy to revitalize its image and redirect its course, setting it apart from the rest of the museum field, ahead of the competition.</p> <p>Not only would such a digital art collection boost the Stedelijk&rsquo;s contemporariness, it could also refresh its permanent collection. The museum has been experimenting with new ways of presenting the collection, most notably in the 2014 Matisse show, which mixed up a monographic blockbuster with more or less forgotten treasures from the storage rooms. How great would it be to see Dominik Starch&rsquo;s flickering screens combined with color field paintings by Ellsworth Kelly, C&eacute;cile B. Evans next to surrealists, or Petra Cortright <a href="https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-petra-cortright-is-the-monet-of-the-21st-century" target="_blank">dialoguing with Claude Monet</a>? These combinations&mdash;and these are only some of the most obvious&mdash;could provide a &ldquo;point of entry&rdquo; for a new audience, viewers conditioned by a digital visual culture. By incorporating their aesthetic and everyday frame of reference, the museum could reinsert itself in contemporary life and regain a sense of urgency.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170321102713-008.SM-JON_RAFMAN_-06-2016-PH.GJ.vanROOIJ.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of <em>Jon Rafman: I Have Ten Thousand Compound Eyes and Each Is Named Suffering</em>, Installation view at the Stedelijk Museum, 2016. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Already the Stedelijk is on the right path. High profile exhibitions like <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/42287-interview-with-ed-atkins-cadavers-telling-you-to-shut-up" target="_blank">Ed Atkins&rsquo; 2015 <em>Recent Ouija</em></a> show and the current <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/434925-part-2-truth-love" target="_blank">Jordan Wolfson diptych </a>bring the 21st century into the museum. And in December 2016, in partnership with <a href="https://www.motimuseum.nl/" target="_blank">MOTI</a>, the Museum of the Image in Breda, the Stedelijk announced its acquisition of seventeen digital artworks by artists ranging from 1990s pioneers JODI and Dutch greats such as Constant Dullaart and Jan Robert Leegte to international mainstays like Jonas Lund and Jon Rafman. But more could be done, and should be done. Digital art should be fully integrated in the presentation of the permanent collection so as to persuade private collectors to donate their works or even help fill in the blanks. Moreover, digital artists should be actively invited to co-curate exhibitions the way Director Willem Sandberg once opened up the doors to CoBrA members, kinetic artists, and other avant-gardists which resulted in legendary exhibitions like <em>Bewogen Beweging</em> (1961) and <em>Dylaby </em>(1962). Digital art could function as a prism to look at both the museum&rsquo;s collection and society as a whole. It could catapult the Stedelijk not only back into Champions League position, but into the heart of contemporary life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Stedelijk permanent collection. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij. Illustration: Andrea Alessi and Joel Kuennen)</span></p> Fri, 24 Mar 2017 08:58:42 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Martina Menegon <p><a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/">Martina Menegon</a> is an Italian new media artist and educator currently based in Vienna, Austria. <a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/bio">Her art explores</a> &ldquo;the instability and ephemerality of the human body as well as the alienation from physicality in today&rsquo;s digital age, questioning the gap between real and virtual, flesh and data.&rdquo; Menegon&rsquo;s expression of these ideas range from uncanny scenes of endless, undulating fleshy figures to far more personal depictions of her own digitally distorted physical form. Her work reveals the ever-evolving relationship between all of us and the inescapable digital world, as well as a complex, autobiographical representation of one artist&rsquo;s journey through it.</p> <p>I asked Menegon about her history of using computers to make art, the origins of her fascination with the human body, and the difference between selfies and self-portraits.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111132734-2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>, 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What were your earliest memories of computers?</strong></p> <p><strong>Martina Menegon:</strong> Some years ago my mother was a graphic designer, often freelancing, so as far as I can remember, we always had a computer at home for her to work. Me and my brother were allowed to use it when she didn&rsquo;t need it for work. I remember once I wanted to clean up the desktop and somehow I trashed everything (including the Macintosh HD icon) and the computer never started up again. It was terrifying and I must admit, back then I blamed my little brother (shame on me!).</p> <p><strong>CP: When and why did you first go online?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I honestly cannot remember. It must have been early and probably just because it was finally possible to go online at home. My earliest memory of going online is during my first year of high school, when I opened my first blog where I was writing and posting pictures everyday (back then I was very much into writing little poems or short texts). But I already knew how to use the internet so I must have been online way before this memory.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><br /> <img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131135-3.I_ll_Keep_You_Warm_and_Safe_in_My_People_Zoo__3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131024-5.I_LL-KEEP-YOU-WARM-AND-SAFE-IN-MY-PEOPLE-ZOO-x-Paper-Thin-V2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon, <em>I&rsquo;ll Keep You Warm and Safe in My People Zoo</em>, 2016, VR installation Sounds by&nbsp;Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first think about computers as a creative tool?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I guess it always was for me. My mother&rsquo;s computer only had software she needed for work (Illustrator, Photoshop, etc.) and she also installed for me and my brother the amazing &ldquo;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kid_Pix">Kid-Pix</a>.&rdquo; I was always playing and drawing and creating with it since I can remember. I always treated computers as creative tools somehow.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you start to experiment with 3D?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> It was in 2008 during my study in Visual and Performing Arts at the IUAV University in Venice. I followed a 3D animation class where I learned how to model and animate and render in Cinema4D. It was such a fun experience, and I never stopped working with 3D since then. I think I even repeated the class just for the fun of it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111132915-7.SPLITS-ARE-PARTED.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Splits Are Parted</em>, 2016, Interactive installation,&nbsp;sounds by&nbsp;Stefano D&#39;Alessio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How and why did the human body, and your own body, become such a constant theme in your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I think it always was. I can&rsquo;t say why. I think many different aspects and events of my life brought me to focus a lot on the human body: growing up as a synchronized swimmer, going to art school, experimenting with some performance art, studying performance and interactive art in Venice, being in Second Life, etc.</p> <p>In general I am quite a shy person, always scared of exposing myself publically. This is way I rarely ended up performing in real life. But for some reason, exposing myself in a digital realm does not bother me much. Maybe the only challenge for me is at openings, where people watch or interact with my 3D-scanned body and I am next to it. I sometimes try to blend in with the gallery walls :-P</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131341-1.Virtual_Narcissism_-_making_of.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>&nbsp;(making of), 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How has the digital age changed our relationship with the human body? How do you think the digital age has changed your relationship with your own body?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I will not speak for others, but for me, the digital age gave me the possibility of exploring my body in many different ways: through audio, photo, videos, slow-mo, 3D, etc. It made it possible for me to augment and expand the relationship I had with my body. Sometimes I think it&rsquo;s my body that changed my relationship with the digital age: as I am more and more anxious in memorizing its changes and visualizing its data, I feel the urge to explore different techniques and tools.</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think Virtual Reality will distort this relationship even further? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I think VR is going to create another way for us to relate to our body and it is not going to be necessarily a distortion, just another form. And I am definitely interested in exploring this.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Pzd2UI9_pHg?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your project <em><a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/post/144465199907/virtual-narcissism-various-multimedia" target="_blank">Virtual Narcissism</a></em> feels very autobiographical.</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> <em>Virtual Narcissism</em> is definitely autobiographical. It started as an experiment and ended up being an ongoing project, based on my digital archive of 3D-scanned selfies. In real life, I am generally a very shy person: I feel very uncomfortable being photographed or filmed. When I am alone I am of course less self-conscious, and it&rsquo;s virtually sculpting those moments that interests me the most at the moment.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="360" src="//giphy.com/embed/3o6ZtnBPZyoiR2c9tS" width="480"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>&nbsp;(making of), 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p><strong>CP: What do you think is the difference between a self-portrait and a selfie? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> When I 3D scan myself, I never really think ahead about what kind of pose or where to sit. I usually plug in my Kinect, open the software, and it gives me 10 seconds to find a pose before the scan starts. I want to be as spontaneous as I can, given that a scan takes a bit longer than a photograph to be done. The results are untouched; all my <em>Virtual Narcissism</em> scans are uploaded as the software puts them out. There is no selection. All my scans are going to be uploaded in my Sketchfab account. So if we stick with the common distinction that sees self-portraiture as a representation of a person and a selfie as an insight into a person&rsquo;s life, then I should consider my work as selfies. But I am not sure this distinction is valid anymore.</p> <p><strong>CP: You regularly collaborate with certain artists. Why is collaboration important to you and your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I always loved collaborating with other artists, I think it is a great way to grow artistically as well as share knowledge. I am very fond of this. I never hide my process in art making&mdash;I believe in sharing. I guess this is also why I love teaching. Of the many collaborations I do with artists, two are regular and very important to me and my art. One is with <a href="http://cargocollective.com/stefanodalessio/" target="_blank">Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio</a>, with whom I create interactive installations and some performances. Even when we work separately, I regularly ask him for support in programming or audio design. My collaboration with <a href="http://www.exile.at/ko/" target="_blank">Klaus Obermaier</a> started back in 2010, after I took his <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_(software)" target="_blank">Max/MSP</a> workshop in Venice, where I learned how to create interactive tools for art practice. It was an important event in my artistic career, a major turning point. His works have been influencing me since then.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KzDifurF9wQ?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Klaus Obermaier, Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio, and Martina Menegon, <em>EGO</em>, Interactive installation, 2015</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Tell us about your experience playing Second Life? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> Second Life has been and still is a big and important experience and influence for my art. It was the first place where I experienced tridimensional glitches, the frustration of being stuck in a wall, having an arm passing through my body, etc. It was also the place where I started socializing, as I had a little shop where I was selling clothes and furniture. I was part of a design community that created amazing artistic events, and I was always trying to go to art performances and installations there as well.</p> <p>I was a Second Life resident for almost 10 years, and the only reason I am using the past tense is because I somehow destroyed my poor virtual me for an art project: I wanted to record the result of me attaching everything I owned in Second Life to my avatar (thousands of different hair styles and colors, clothes, shoes, animations, furniture, houses, etc.). I somehow overloaded the system and my avatar started changing, then transformed into a white cloud, and then the software crashed. Since then, whenever I try to open Second Life, the app crashes. I tried some solutions I found online but nothing worked. I will try to contact the Linden Lab soon, because I have to admit, I miss being in Second Life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-ibWVK9QBco?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon, <em>Ouch!</em>, 2014</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How is the new media art scene in Vienna ?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I have to admit most new media works I see here in Vienna are mainly in university exhibitions or small art spaces. In general I have the feeling there is not really a community here for new media, yet. But I guess it&rsquo;s just a matter of time. Just before Christmas, for example, at the Angewandte Innovation Lab (AIL) there was a very nice exhibition, <em><a href="http://www.ailab.at/archive/the-age-of-experience/" target="_blank">The Age of Experience</a></em>, featuring among others <em>The Legible City</em> by Jeffrey Shaw and a great work by Ip Yuk-Yiu, <em>S for Sisyphus</em>. I have to say I felt almost &ldquo;at home&rdquo; while visiting.</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you have coming up in 2017?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> Apart from exhibitions and teaching, I will definitely keep working on new developments in&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>. I am currently working on a VR version of it, struggling around with some intricate scripting in Unity3D. I plan to play around with some augmented reality projects as well, as soon as the VR one is done. In general, I will keep working.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>I&#39;ll Keep You Warm and Safe in My People Zoo #2</em>, 2016, Video loop. All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 11 Jan 2017 13:01:05 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Natalia Zuluaga Kicks Off ArtCenter/South Florida’s Latest Chapter with “An Image” <p>When <a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/" target="_blank"><strong>ArtCenter/South Florida</strong></a> opened on Lincoln Road in 1984, in the heart of South Beach, the street was &ldquo;nearly abandoned and severely dilapidated.&rdquo; Today the center, which hosts exhibitions, classes, and a studio residency program, is credited with kickstarting the revitalization of the mall and its surrounding area. Following the appointment of Natalia Zuluaga as Artistic Director this August, ArtCenter itself is getting something of a revitalization. Dynamic changes are underway as the promising Bard Center for Curatorial Studies graduate begins her tenure with an ambitious exhibition that rethinks the space&#39;s programming structure&mdash;and the very shape of what an exhibition can be.</p> <p>Part of an emerging generation of local creatives that have been actively distinguishing Miami&rsquo;s cultural identity through art&mdash;challenging stereotypes about the city and bringing it visibility outside of the annual art fair invasion&mdash;Zuluaga will oversee programming, education initiatives, and artist residencies. In addition, she works on a variety of collaborative curatorial and publishing projects such as <a href="http://namepublications.org/" target="_blank"><strong>[NAME] Publications</strong></a> and PDP/PLP, a transdisciplinary &ldquo;think tank&rdquo; co-run by <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/334661-alan-gutierrezhttps://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/334661-alan-gutierrez" target="_blank"><strong>Alan Gutierrez</strong>,</a> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/228798-patricia-margarita-hernandez" target="_blank"><strong>Patricia Margarita Hernandez</strong></a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/223455-domingo-castillo" target="_blank"><strong>Domingo Castillo</strong></a>. &nbsp;</p> <p>For her debut ArtCenter exhibition, she worked with Castillo, an artist and co-founding <a href="http://noguchibreton.net/" target="_blank"><strong>Noguchi Breton</strong></a> gallerist, to co-curate <a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/fall2016/animage/" target="_blank"><strong><em>An Image</em></strong></a>, which runs through December 18. Together, they organized an exhibition that deconstructs, subverts, and reasserts notions of <em>the image</em>: what it is, what it could be, and how it functions in culture. The exhibition title is borrowed from Harun Farocki&rsquo;s film, included in the show, and the installation presents a smart selection of video art, objects, performance, and talks.</p> <p>I spoke recently with Zuluaga and Castillo about their conceptual framework and the intricacies of their robust exhibition, which is a must-see during Miami Art Week next month.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180139-ArtCenter_An_Image_Exterior_View.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Exterior view of <em>An Image</em>,&nbsp;ArtCenter South/Florida. Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Audrey Phillips: Natalia, what led to your move to ArtCenter/South Florida and what shape do you see things taking with future exhibitions? &nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Natalia Zuluaga: </strong>My move to ArtCenter was really the result of a confluence of things, and luckily so. I think the institution is going through an interesting transition period and was a great place from which to explore my own interests in &ldquo;institutional forms&rdquo; and programming. So the invitation to come in and re-imagine the way ArtCenter&rsquo;s many pieces fit together (exhibitions, residencies, pedagogy) was particularly exciting for me.</p> <p><em>An Image</em> reflects a way of programming that allowed us to think through ideas over longer periods of time. So, instead of thinking about an exhibition schedule that included 10 exhibitions a year, I figured we could shorten that down to 3-4, and instead unpack the ideas over longer periods of time and through a variety of engagements. This is where the thinking behind an exhibition in the shape of objects, lectures, screenings, and using the exhibition space as the site where most of these things happen came into fruition. So future programs at ArtCenter may not be exhibitions at all, and instead focus on the necessary outputs for the content we want to engage with and breaking with the demands we place on ourselves to produce (or overproduce!) in one particular way.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121181003-ArtCenter_An_Image_Barbara_Kasten__2_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Barbara Kasten,&nbsp;Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: The exhibition seems so thoughtful, even the design of the </strong><a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/fall2016/animage/" target="_blank"><strong>web page</strong></a><strong>&mdash;which is beautiful. I imagine it was also approached as an image in and of itself. Could you talk about the process of selecting works and how they operate in relation to one another?</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>Domingo and I really did want to think about all of the components in the exhibition as images, or as contributing factors to the construction of an image. We wanted to move beyond the representational force of an image which had dominated so much of &ldquo;image&rdquo; discourse/politics and think about the way an image is both imbricated and a catalyst for a number of social/political processes. So yes, the website, and especially the installation was important for this because we knew that the exhibition space as an image would travel further than the amount of people who could possibly access it in person.</p> <p>As a project we like to think that it works on two registers: that the exhibition space itself works as the place where the construction of an image is set to play, and that the public programs were a way of thinking through effects and gamuts of temporalities. In the space you have works by Harun Farocki, Enrique Castro-Cid, Barbara Kasten, and Suzan Pitt as immediate examples bolstered by the exhibition design and by the lighting, which Alan Gutierrez so carefully designed. Each one of these pieces does something slightly different: Farocki gives you the careful construction of desire in an image; Pitt&mdash;the presence of the hand in her very rich imagery; Castro-Cid in the relation between reality, computer-aided design, and painting. &nbsp;</p> <p>I think together the pieces are more than individual images&mdash;and this is important because we weren&rsquo;t interested in <em>importing </em>images; we wanted to create one too.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180257-ArtCenter_An_Image_Alan_Gutierrez.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Alan Gutierrez, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Domingo Castillo:</strong> We looked at <a href="http://arquitectonica.com/blog/portfolio/residential/the-pink-house/" target="_blank">ARQUITECTONICA&rsquo;s Pink House</a> as a case study of a project that literally reprogramed the visual identity of Miami for the 80s and made ARQUITECTONICA an instant global architecture firm. The house, which perfectly exemplifies the &ldquo;post-modern&rdquo; in architecture, won multiple awards before it was even built. The proposal of which was first designed by Laurinda Spear and Rem Koolhaas, showed a return to the hand-painted and romanticized rendering which clearly highlighted their admiration of the Bauhaus thinking but begins to do something else.</p> <p>When the house is finally constructed it&rsquo;s redesigned by the newly established firm. It begins getting highlighted for its five Shades of Pink and it continues to get awards through all the photography-based architectural magazines. Luxury brands use the house as a stage for their advertisements, becoming the actual post-modern moment. The functionality of the house as a house comes second to it functioning as a stage where images are created. Due to the sheer amount of images that are generated through the house and its positioned branding of the image, the City of Miami starts to pivot towards the lifestyle, colors, and aesthetics laid out by the house and the images of its use. That to this day continues informing a &ldquo;luxurious&rdquo; understanding of the city, as per <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKbR7u8J5PU" target="_blank">Pitbull and Chris Brown&rsquo;s &ldquo;Fun&rdquo; music video.</a></p> <p>This is the grounding logic we wanted to work through with the exhibition as a whole. Instead of bringing in archival material, the logic is re-performed and our study of the house gets incorporated into the exhibition design and promotional apparatus of the exhibition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180722-ArtCenter_An_Image_Enrique_Castro_Cid.jpg" style="width: 467px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Enrique Castro-Cid,&nbsp;Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: You mention that the exhibition is &ldquo;an inherent political project&rdquo; that looks at &ldquo;image in relation to power structures and pseudo-agency&rdquo; referencing a &ldquo;history of anxiety,&rdquo; then tie these themes to the image of Miami as &ldquo;colonial fantasies of Latin America&rdquo; in your press release. Further to that, you assert that &ldquo;images are coded by different cosmologies in order to reconfigure the politics of visibility and presence.&rdquo; I&rsquo;m curious to know how or where these different cosmologies exist and am also interested in your thoughts related to these aspects of your statement.</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>Alan Poma&rsquo;s <em>La Victoria Sobre el Sol </em>[Victory Over the Sun], which is the multi-media opera we are presenting at the conclusion of the exhibition that re-appropriates the Russian futurist play by the same name, is a good example of what we mean by the way in which different cosmologies code images. The play translates the opera both visually and linguistically to incorporate both Andean visions of the last moments of the solar system -- a story that has its origins in pre-columbian cultures. This incorporation is not in effect to translate the story, but to reclaim and decolonize the notion of futurity as a narrative that is strictly european in origin and in doing so re-situates the way in which that narrative has a <em>presence</em>, and is made <em>visible</em>; and that is inherently a political act.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s great that you picked up on the &ldquo;colonial fantasies.&rdquo; This was a slight jab at the idea that Miami is the &ldquo;gateway to the Americas&rdquo; or the &ldquo;capital of Latin America.&rdquo; This is language that has been disseminated by economic and tourist development boards in an effort to really sell Miami as that; but for us that idea pointed to a kind of colonial fantasy that doesn&rsquo;t play out through the dispossession of land or the acquisition of it for a nation state, but through a more pervasive form of economic colonialism. One key example that Domingo and I are always talking about is <a href="http://www.verizonenterprise.com/infrastructure/data-centers/north-america/nap/nap-americas.xml" target="_blank">NAP of The Americas</a>. This data site located just north of downtown Miami is where a large amount of internet traffic from the Americas is funneled through. So if you send an email, say, from Brazil to Chile, there&rsquo;s a chance it has to travel up here before reaching its destination. This subtle crossing of territories says more about Miami as a gateway and capital and the power structures that support and propel this vision forward than palm trees and sunsets do.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180826-ArtCenter_An_Image_Installation_shot.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: What makes Miami unique in relation to other &ldquo;art worlds&rdquo;?</strong></p> <p><strong>DC:</strong> Miami is just another node within the larger network of Contemporary Art. A place of constant contestation, natural disasters, racial inequality, financial inequality, constant land (re)development, and the ecological harmony of the Everglades are a few things of many that constantly rub up against each other and have to be constantly negotiated. The politics of the image become almost obvious if we start thinking about the way that art has always been instrumentalized within the creation and development of this city&rsquo;s imagery. When used with this kind of awareness and agency images and art can be used as a great vehicle where one can act and possibly change the course or at least the conversation towards more radicalized and empowered futures.</p> <p><strong>AP: What are your top Miami picks for Art Basel week?</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>To see:&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/events/show/427723-an-image" target="_blank"><em>AN IMAGE</em></a> :) and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433501-sometimes-random" target="_blank">Lynne Golob Gelfman</a> at Noguchi Breton.</p> <p>To eat: <a href="http://www.chefcreole.com/" target="_blank">Chef Creole</a> (200 NW 54th Street in Little Haiti), <a href="http://www.lapalapahondurena.com/" target="_blank">La Palapa</a> (2699 Biscayne Boulevard in Edgewater), and <a href="http://www.lacamaronera.com/" target="_blank">La Camaronera</a> (1952 W Flagler Street in Little Havana).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;Audrey L. Phillips</p> <p><em>Audrey Phillips is a Toronto-based writer. She is a regular contributor to AQNB.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image to top: Installation view of <em>An Image</em> at ArtCenter/South Florida. Harun Farocki and Alan Gutierrez. Photos: Zack Balber. All images courtesy of ArtCenter/South Florida)</span></p> Tue, 29 Nov 2016 15:23:06 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Artist Positioning Himself as Richter’s Crown Prince <p>Next year Eberhard Havekost turns fifty: time to balance the books. The press release for his current solo at KINDL positions Havekost &ldquo;among the most important German artists of his generation.&rdquo; The artist himself probably doesn&rsquo;t agree with an accolade this generic, especially when it&rsquo;s accompanying the kind of self-confident display of painterly power that is <em>Inhalt</em>. The show takes up two full floors and doesn&rsquo;t leave much wall space unused. The works on show are so diverse, they could have been created by three or four different artists.</p> <p>Most recognizable as Havekost&rsquo;s are the flat figurative paintings of everyday objects and scenes. They&rsquo;re based on photographs, either Havekost&rsquo;s own or found footage, which have been digitally enhanced and transferred to canvas with a minimum of depth or visible brushstroke. A lipsticked mouth blowing out smoke, a close-up of a sugar cube, a bent, tanned leg framing the ocean behind. It&rsquo;s imagery with a pop-art charm, somewhere between social and photo realism. And it is what it is. Only occasionally does Havekost allow himself an ironic wink, like in the <em>Transformers</em>-titled depiction of a car wreck.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222950-KINDL_Havekost_01_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 413px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, <em>Baum, B15</em>, 2015, Oil on canvas, 270 x 160 cm.<br /> Courtesy of Galerie Gebr. Lehmann and Anton Kern Gallery. Photo: Werner Lieberknecht</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Havekost&rsquo;s most vacant paintings are of dead screens, of TVs, computers, or mobile phones. The vast pools of grey nothingness hold promises of light and pigment but they turn out to be the dull opposite of everything painterly. In their off mode it&rsquo;s almost impossible to imagine we spend hours every day looking at them, our windows to the world. With sardonic delight Havekost exposes the soul of the virtual world in <em>Baum</em>: the colorful electronic bits inside a cracked iPhone are more real than the numb screen.</p> <p>With a series of iridescent works Havekost bounces to the other side of the spectrum. One triptych is even called <em>Light</em>. It&rsquo;s a depiction of basic physics but the result is both kitschy and hysterical. Havekost offsets these luminary explosions with measured color schemes, rhythmic compositions of six shades of secondary colors with titles such as <em>Copy + Property</em> or <em>Sch&ouml;ner Wohnen</em>. Here, the natural force of light and reflection has been categorized and domesticated.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222918-KINDL_Havekost_M1_02_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 518px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, Installation view of <em>Inhalt</em> at KINDL&rsquo;s Power House (first floor, M1). Photo: Jens Ziehe, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Up to this point the works in <em>Inhalt </em>can somehow be linked together, however diverse they may be. But Havekost rudely breaks this logic by adding half a dozen semi-abstract expressionist paintings, scattered across the walls, often right next to the flattest images in the presentation. The palette is geared towards contrast, the paint seems to have been forcefully smeared onto the canvas, attacked with sharp objects. To see <em>Zimmerpflanze</em> (House plants), a violent clash of sweeping greens, blacks, and yellows, right next to the perfectly realistic flowers in <em>Poison</em>, is nothing short of shocking.</p> <p><em>Inhalt</em> is Havekost flexing his painterly muscles. He obviously feels the need to showcase the full range of his skills. And he is explicitly competing with Gerhard Richter, the greatest German painter alive today, the best of not just his own but of all generations. The color schemes, the abstract work, the photorealistic images&mdash;they echo Richter&rsquo;s multi-faceted oeuvre. The standoff between the now 84-year-old Nestor and his would-be crown prince doesn&rsquo;t end favorably for Havekost, though. As Frieze critic Kristy Bell noticed in her review of his 2006 show at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg: &ldquo;Richter described the process of painting from photographs as being about making the banal &lsquo;more than just banal,&rsquo; but the problem with Havekost&rsquo;s paintings is that the banal just becomes more banal.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222822-KINDL_Havekost_02_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 391px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, <em>Gef&uuml;hl, B15</em>, 2015, Oil on canvas, 80 x 45 cm.<br /> Courtesy of Galerie Gebr. Lehmann and Anton Kern Gallery. Photo: Werner Lieberknecht</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>What holds true for Havekost&rsquo;s photographically inspired paintings, applies to his entire body of work. Richter&rsquo;s works are about history and painting, memory and painting, identity and painting, a lot of different subjects combined with painting. Havekost&rsquo;s are only about painting. His subject matter is of secondary concern; the images are first and foremost shapes and colors. His large-scale reproduction of an illustration from a history book he received as a child might inspire mild bewilderment but his decision to paint it seems random. In that light the show&rsquo;s title, <em>Inhalt</em> (Content), feels deeply ironic. To be counted amongst the truly greatest painters of his age, however, Havekost needs to go beyond his noncommittal game of half-hearted references.</p> <p><em>Eberhard Havekost&rsquo;s </em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433413-inhalt" target="_blank">Inhalt</a><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433413-inhalt" target="_blank"> </a>is on display at KINDL &ndash; Zentrum f&uuml;r zeitgen&ouml;ssische Kunst, Berlin, until February 19. 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Eberhard Havekost, Installation view of <em>Inhalt</em> at KINDL&rsquo;s Power House (second floor, M2). Photo: Jens Ziehe, 2016)</span></p> Sat, 26 Nov 2016 14:13:28 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Relentlessly Dissecting Beauty, Marilyn Minter Gets at the Guts of Glamour <p><em>October saw the launch of&nbsp;A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The series&rsquo; first two exhibitions honor two unique feminisms. Today, we&rsquo;re taking a look at them both: Beverly Buchanan&rsquo;s&nbsp;</em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46824-beverly-buchanan">Ruins and Rituals&nbsp;</a><em>and Marilyn Minter&rsquo;s&nbsp;</em>Pretty/Dirty<em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A woman just beginning to show the signs of a life well-worn, with deeply impressed laugh lines and a made-up face sagging ever so slightly, stares almost seductively, or maybe placidly at you from her bed. A cigarette burns in her liver-spotted hand, the strap of her nightgown barely hangs on to one shoulder. The photograph is titled <em>Coral Ridge Towers (Mom Smoking) </em>(1969/1995), and as titled, along with the eight other photos in the series, it depicts the artist&rsquo;s mother in her Florida home. But there is a reason it took Marilyn Minter over twenty years to print and show this series.</p> <p>On a walk-through of her recently opened retrospective at Brooklyn Museum, Minter stops at the Coral Ridge Tower series, which begins the show, to recall how she didn&rsquo;t feel there was anything special about these photos when she took them&mdash;she was simply snapping photos of her mother in her apartment, doing the things she usually did. But upon showing them to some classmates, she realized that what she&rsquo;d captured was something entirely different. She saw what they saw: a woman defeated by the patriarchal standards of femininity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130743-Coral_Ridge_Towers__Mom_Smoking_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 543px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Coral Ridge Towers (Mom Smoking)</em>, 1969/1995, Gelatin silver print. Collection of Beth Rudin DeWoody</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Pretty/Dirty</em>, Minter&rsquo;s first major retrospective, explores this idea of abject beauty that we see running throughout her entire oeuvre&mdash;from her first student photographs, to her current paintings and videos. As a show, it is concise and clear cut, taking a few choice samples from each era of the artist&rsquo;s history in order to create a trajectory to understanding more fully how she arrived at her current work: the glossy, high production value, artificial colored, painted lips and lacquered nails&mdash;all resulting in what looks almost like Maybelline advertisements on acid.</p> <p>But the early works play an important role in understanding this largely misunderstood artist, because we see that there is a desire throughout to give agency to the unspoken, the overlooked, the scoffed, the embarrassing. Through the photographs, paintings, and videos she dissects this idea of beauty, a beauty that has been forced down the throats of women like her mother, a beauty that she herself would not be consumed by, rather she would turn in on itself, revealing the guts of glamour.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130636-Big_Girls.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 508px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Big Girls</em>, 1986, Enamel on canvas, 2 panels. Collection of Bill Contente, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The first real hint of this after the early photographs is <em>Little Girls #1 </em>(1986) and <em>Big Girls </em>(1986), both of which depict a deconstruction of women&rsquo;s bodies via the media they are most widely represented in: magazines. Each painting is constructed from source images ripped apart and put back together, representing the scrutiny women&rsquo;s bodies are put through on a daily basis. This is the beginning of Minter&rsquo;s interest in reclaiming oppressive images from the media for her own feminist agenda.</p> <p>Included as well are her photorealist paintings of floors and sinks, mostly taken from her home and in her studio. Here, in a collision of the domestic realm with the workspace, we see that she trained her photorealist eye on the mundane, turning the ordinary into something beautiful, something to look at or even objectify. It&rsquo;s not until later in her career that she brings this technique back, focusing instead on the absurdity of realism&mdash;the freckles the fashion industry takes such pains to erase (<em>Blue Poles,</em> 2007), the stubble still visible in freshly shaved underarms (<em>Armpit</em>, 2006), the unsightly marks binding clothes leave on bodies (<em>Sock</em>, 2005). Even the close-up shots in <em>Plush </em>(2016) are beautiful, taking a kind of professional care to make each individual bush look like a star&mdash;a head shot for your vulva.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130547-Armpit.jpg" style="width: 467px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Armpit</em>, 2006, C-print. Courtesy of the artist, Salon 94, New York, and Regen Projects, Los Angeles</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This sort of sexual glorification is also visible in her first hardcore porn paintings, like <em>Porn Grid </em>(1989). To a contemporary audience the paintings might seem quaint, portrayed in bright colors, with an almost cartoonish halftone dot matrix, which was actually a laborious hand-painted effect. In fact, the depictions may not even register as &ldquo;hardcore porn&rdquo; anymore, as we see things almost as graphic on HBO these days. But it&rsquo;s important to note that these paintings were coming out of a time wrought with identity politics, and just by daring to go tackle the issue of porn had established Minter as something of a feminist-outcast, a traitor to the rhetoric of the time, shunned as a perceived accomplice of oppression.</p> <p>Looking back we can see that she was taking a feminist stance that was way ahead of her time with these paintings. Minter, as a heterosexual woman, was reclaiming the oppressive images from porn in hopes to turn them on their head with a female sex-positive message. Porn has been a reality of our culture for longer than most like to admit, so by co-opting these images of consensual sex, she was giving women agency over their sexuality, agency to enjoy and indulge in their sexuality. Plus, she noted, &ldquo;no one has PC fantasies, anyways,&rdquo; so we might as well get it all out there in the open. She was also searching for subject matter that would indeed shock and alarm for the very fact that a woman was dealing with it, noting that &ldquo;if Mike Kelley could mine 13-year-old girl culture of mall culture, unicorns, crushes&hellip;&rdquo; the equivalent would be her mining hardcore porn.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130449-Orange_Crush.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 420px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Orange Crush</em>, 2009, Enamel on metal, 108 x 180 in. Private collection</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Her practice and eye have certainly grown and evolved along with the available technology, now incorporating higher production photo shoots, from which she constructs Photoshopped images, called &ldquo;cobbles,&rdquo; to create the perfect source image, from which she then makes her signature photorealistic enamel on metal paintings. She has moved away from the explicitly sexual, and back into a world of opulent sensuality. In the video <em>Meltdown</em> (2011), a silver-heeled and bejeweled foot dripping in metallic silver, kicks through an invisible plane of glass in slow motion. And paintings like <em>Drizzle (Wangechi Mutu)</em> (2010) and <em>Orange Crush</em> (2009) display similar dripping, metallic, almost ravenous mouths pouring over with glimmering substances.</p> <p>There&rsquo;s something insatiable about these paintings and videos. They contain a force that draws you in and pushes you away at the very same time, imploring you to consume them, much like their subjects slurp and taste and lick. Minter is creating seductive, yet off-putting steamy, frosty, wet, crystalized, shiny gem-filled fantasy worlds. You look in and look in, until you pull back, for fear of being consumed. This is the power of subverting the patriarchal gaze, the confinement and rule of imposed femininity&mdash;that the beauty and lust can linger along with the abject and repellent.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452624-olivia-b-murphy?tab=REVIEWS">Olivia B. Murphy</a></p> <p><em>Olivia Murphy is a writer and editor based in New York, covering arts and culture. Her work has appeared in various publications both in print and online, including&nbsp;</em>L&#39;Officiel Magazine<em>,&nbsp;</em>Freunde Von Freunden<em>,&nbsp;</em>Whitehot<em>,&nbsp;</em>Riot of Perfume<em>,&nbsp;</em>doingbird<em>, and&nbsp;</em>Whitewall Magazine<em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Marilyn Minter, <em>Blue Poles</em>, 2007, Enamel on metal. Private collection, Switzerland)</span></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2016 09:21:50 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Beverly Buchanan and the Architecture of Blackness <p><em>October saw the launch of&nbsp;A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The series&rsquo; first two exhibitions honor two unique feminisms. Today, we&rsquo;re taking a look at them both:&nbsp;Beverly Buchanan&rsquo;s </em>Ruins and Rituals<em> and Marilyn Minter&rsquo;s </em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46826-relentlessly-dissecting-beauty-marilyn-minter-gets-at-the-guts-of-glamour">Pretty/Dirty</a><em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>How might we understand a spatial and architectural discourse that marks a black subjectivity? This is the question that lingers in my thoughts as I reflect on <em>Ruins and Rituals</em>, a retrospective exhibition presenting the work of the late Beverly Buchanan, now on view at the Brooklyn Museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Sackler Family Curator Catherine Morris considers Buchanan a game changer, which is not untrue; I would consider Buchanan a witness.</p> <p>Beverly Buchanan was a black Southern woman. As a black Southern woman myself, many of those in my personal circles ascribe to this positionality a type of unspoken power. However, as <a href="http://4columns.org/d-souza-aruna/beverly-buchanan">critics</a> have already rightfully articulated, within the parameters of the mainstream (read: New York City) art world during the 1970s, 80s, and early 90s&mdash;the periods during which Buchanan was most active&mdash;to be Southern and black and woman often resulted in an overlooking. Buchanan worked anyway, creating a repository of site-specific earthworks, sculptures, self-portraits, and other assemblage objects that move across the schools of conceptual and land art, while responding to the idiosyncrasies of the geographies in which she lived. So, as the artist traversed multiple landscapes, so too did her ever evolving canon traverse the political histories of the land, which often revolved explicitly around blackness(es).</p> <p>Organized by guest curators Jennifer Burris and Park McArthur, <em>Ruins and Rituals </em>points a critical, unprecedented eye towards Buchanan&rsquo;s multi-disciplined oeuvre. (Full disclosure: I am now employed at the organization where McArthur was once an artist-in-residence.) The exhibition is divided among three galleries, resisting a chronological viewing experience while still offering an obvious thread of conceptual connectivity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110165731-Untitled__Slab-Works_1_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 560px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Untitled (Slab Works 1)</em>, circa 1978&ndash;80, Black-and-white photograph of cast concrete sculptures with acrylic paint in artist studio. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Upon entering the Sackler Center, one is drawn towards Buchanan&rsquo;s <em>Frustuala</em> series: small, concrete blocks and columns the artist utilized as markers of presence, or, in some cases, the withering away of that which once was. When she began the series in the late 70s, Buchanan was employed in the public health field in New York and New Jersey. She used the stones to respond to the urban decay she was encountering, acutely aware that the materials she used to compose the works were also subject to weathering and aging. In a document on view in the archival section of the exhibition, Buchanan writes that she was &ldquo;...interested in urban walls when they [were] in various stages of decay; walls as part of a landscape.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Buchanan&rsquo;s topographical engagement embodies critic (and close friend of the artist) Lucy Lippard&rsquo;s meditations on place&mdash;that is, a location in which space meets memory. <em>Marsh Ruins</em> (1981), for example, marks the memory of a group of Igbo slaves who drowned themselves off the coast of St. Simons Island, Georgia, as a way of resisting enslavement. Buchanan built these ruins in the marshes of Glynn, in Brunswick, Georgia, and in the show we encounter them via a video created by Burris, McArthur, and Jason Hirata. <em>Marsh Ruins</em> is a material reckoning with the earth in which its stone are planted, certainly, but also a physical (perhaps even spiritual) negotiation through unseen remnants of time.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170452-Shack_Stories__Part_I_.jpg" style="width: 531px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, with poet Alice Lovelace, <em>Shack Stories (Part I)</em>, 1990, Unpublished handmade book of ink and crayon drawings with watercolor and collaged typewritten text. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The same might be said of Buchanan&rsquo;s small shack sculptures. It is in these works that we see the artist most vividly address a Southern, black, architectural vernacular. That is to say, the shack, in Buchanan&rsquo;s hands, is not merely a signifier of social status, but rather a framework&mdash;literally and figuratively&mdash;through which we might understand the nuances of black Southern life. The form represents an important site of social and familial interactions such as weddings, births, and religious gatherings. The centering of the shack as structure<em>&nbsp;but also&nbsp;</em>cultural idiom places blackness within the frame of reference for spatial inclusion, as architect Mario Gooden describes in his book&nbsp;<em><a href="https://www.arch.columbia.edu/books/catalog/3-dark-space-architecture-representation-black-identity">Dark Space: Architecture, Representation, Black Identity</a></em>. Through these loaded forms, Buchanan speaks to the particularities of a black Southern subjectivity, past and present.&nbsp;<em>Low Country House</em>&nbsp;(date unknown), a small, unpainted wood shack, is an eloquent illustration of Buchanan&rsquo;s deftness for the subtle processes of commemoration.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170038-Low_Country_House.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Low Country House</em>, date unknown, Wood. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan, courtesy of Jane Bridges. Photo: Adam Reich, courtesy of Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In the 90s, Buchanan also began to make assemblage pieces, often dedicated to or named after close friends, once again embodying experience and memory within material form. In the final gallery we see the bulk of this later work alongside a trove of photos, letters, and other textual ephemera produced by Buchanan throughout her life. In this room, though full of works ostensibly different in form, we still encounter Buchanan&rsquo;s entanglement with space, object, and memory. Here, the artist turns inward, tracing a personal relationship to the people she loved and the spaces she called home. In one black and white photograph, <em>Hunger and Hardship Creek</em> (1977/1994), Buchanan grips a sign pole with her right arm while staring intently at the camera. In an untitled, undated photocopied business card, she has drawn an image of herself as working artist/good cook/drama queen/safe driver. She is naming herself.</p> <p>McArthur and Burris have gifted us with a well-deserved exhibition that offers a full picture of the prolific artist. The curatorial narrative surrounding the exhibition is concise and direct, some may argue approaching the didactic. But, for me, the texts and exhibition materials feel extremely important as a narrative tool, especially when Buchanan is unfamiliar to many who will first encounter her story through this exhibition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170211-Untitled__The_Doctor_will__if_you_re_lucky__see_you__now_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Untitled (&ldquo;The doctor will, if you&rsquo;re lucky, see you, now.&rdquo;)</em>, July 1993, Unpublished writing in notebook. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In <em>Dark Space</em> Gooden goes on to remark that &ldquo;...the black female body occupies a space within the matrix of subjectivities and bodies, and as such, its spatial praxes, whether visible or invisible, yield its potential agency to reference its own self.&rdquo; Gooden makes this statement with specific regard to the ways blackness has (or has not) tended to operate within spatial and architectural theories and dialogues. Buchanan then, it can be argued, transgresses the boundaries of seen and unseen in order to map a non-linear grid, a dark <em>place</em>, to borrow again from Lippard, where blackness is represented through memory, structure, or through her own image, her body.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/417193-jessica-lynne?tab=REVIEWS">Jessica Lynne</a>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Jessica Lynne is co-editor of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.arts.black/">ARTS.BLACK</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Beverly Buchanan,&nbsp;<em>Untitled (Double Portrait of Artist with Frustula Sculpture) (detail)</em>, n.d. Black-and-white Photograph With Original Paint Marks, 8&frac12; x 11 in. Private Collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan)</span></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2016 09:22:37 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list