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JANET MACKAIG RETROSPECTIVE

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© Janet Mackaig
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© Janet Mackaig
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© Janet Mackaig
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© Janet Mackaig
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© Janet Mackaig
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© Janet Mackaig
JANET MACKAIG RETROSPECTIVE
Curated by: Lydia Takeshita

650 A South Avenue 21
Los Angeles, CA 90031
January 2nd, 2010 - January 31st, 2010
Opening: January 10th, 2010 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.laartcore.org/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
downtown/east la
EMAIL:  
info@laartcore.org
PHONE:  
323.276.9320
OPEN HOURS:  
Thu-Sun 12-4; by appointment on Wednesday
TAGS:  
figurative
COST:  
Free

DESCRIPTION

 

La Artcore presents a retrospective exhibition of Los Angeles artist Janet Mackaig.
Janet Mackaig has had a long and influential career in Los Angeles. She received her undergraduate and graduate degrees from CSU, Los Angeles, and has participated in over three hundred exhibitions, nationally and abroad. Mackaig has won numerous awards, her work is sited in over fifty publications, and her paintings are represented in many public and private collections throughout the world.
Mackaig employs several different techniques to create her raucous and satirical paintings/constructions. Photography, text, cut-outs and collage are often utilized in the creative process. Her imagery includes animals and humans, who co-mingle in a variety of environments, metamorphosing from one species to another; taking different forms to poignantly underscore the absurdities inherent in our cultural milieu.
While traveling, Mackaig photographs, without preconceived notions, images which pique her interest. Back in the studio, visual components are bought together intuitively, not intellectually. After the basic composition of a painting is decided upon, the image is digitally rendered, then completely and freely painted by the artist. Thus the image is altered several times before it becomes the final construction.
Ms. Mackaig says, “The content in these works of art have separated life into segments or situations. They resemble stream of consciousness writing. There is no consciousness logic. The paintings have a strong personal intent, looking beyond the obvious. The artist is a traveler seeking adventures. A record is kept through photographs and back in the studio they can be used as a reference. Colors and materials belong to the conscious mind and act as a reference and guide into the painting, and the adventure into the unconscious. I like to think of my work as a visual haiku.”
For more information regarding the work of Janet Mackaig, visit her website at: http://janetmackaig.com/
ALA Artcore hosted a retrospective exhibition of Los Angeles artist Janet Mackaig.
Watch video of exhibit.
Janet Mackaig has had a long and influential career in Los Angeles. She received her undergraduate and graduate degrees from CSU, Los Angeles, and has participated in over three hundred exhibitions, nationally and abroad. Mackaig has won numerous awards, her work is sited in over fifty publications, and her paintings are represented in many public and private collections throughout the world.
Mackaig employs several different techniques to create her raucous and satirical paintings/constructions. Photography, text, cut-outs and collage are often utilized in the creative process. Her imagery includes animals and humans, who co-mingle in a variety of environments, metamorphosing from one species to another; taking different forms to poignantly underscore the absurdities inherent in our cultural milieu.
While traveling, Mackaig photographs, without preconceived notions, images which pique her interest. Back in the studio, visual components are bought together intuitively, not intellectually. After the basic composition of a painting is decided upon, the image is digitally rendered, then completely and freely painted by the artist. Thus the image is altered several times before it becomes the final construction.
Ms. Mackaig says, “The content in these works of art have separated life into segments or situations. They resemble stream of consciousness writing. There is no consciousness logic. The paintings have a strong personal intent, looking beyond the obvious. The artist is a traveler seeking adventures. A record is kept through photographs and back in the studio they can be used as a reference. Colors and materials belong to the conscious mind and act as a reference and guide into the painting, and the adventure into the unconscious. I like to think of my work as a visual haiku.”