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DANIA DE JONGHE, DAVID MOEN, NICHOLETTE KOMINOS & KRISTAN MARVELL

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Dania-de-jonghe
© Dania De Jonghe
Nicholette-kominos
© Nicholette Kominos
David-moen
© David Moen
Kristan-marvell-eventbrite
© Kristan Marvell
DANIA DE JONGHE, DAVID MOEN, NICHOLETTE KOMINOS & KRISTAN MARVELL
Curated by: Lydia Takeshita

120 Judge John Aiso St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012
August 26th, 2009 - September 18th, 2009
Opening: September 6th, 2009 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.laartcore.org/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
downtown/east la
EMAIL:  
info@laartcore.org
PHONE:  
213.617.3274
OPEN HOURS:  
Wed-Sun 12-5
TAGS:  
mixed-media, photography, digital, abstract, figurative, sculpture
COST:  
Free

DESCRIPTION

A four-artist exhibition featuring the recent works of artists Nicholette Kominos, Kristan Marvell, David Moen and Dania De Jonghe.

For over 25 years, David Moen has created abstract paintings grounded in his sustained observations of nature. Moen’s current body of work focuses on what he calls, “pre-conscious forms,” which he says, “gives rise to recognizable forms.” This oscillation between abstraction and representation is the source of resonance in Moen’s work.
Artist and photographer Dania de Jonghe will present for the first time a cumulative body of photographs that mark a decade of exploring photography’s boundaries. De Jonghe’s aesthetic is concerned with ascertaining qualities of radiance, clarity and immanence in the external world. De Jonghe states, “ I seek to create images which embody both that numinous quality and my emotional response to it.”
Los Angeles artist Nicholette Kominos has been producing mixed-media constructions and drawings for over 25 years. The subtle and humorous content of these intimately-scaled works are revealed from the processes they undergo: cutting, opening, weaving and putting together. In her works on paper, Kominos often evokes the grid while delineating within its borders, a psychological sense of space.
Kristan Marvell’s initial inspiration is gleaned from the raw power and beauty of geologic transformations. By beginning with monolithic chunks of Styrofoam, Marvell incises the material with large hot wires where the end result is a summation of both spontaneity and controlled guiding of the hot wire. The remaining block of Styrofoam is then cast in bronze. Marvell’s sculptures are not only suggestive of a multitude of forms found in nature but link themselves into the lineage of Expressionism’s many movements in modern art.
For over 25 years, David Moen has created abstract paintings grounded in his sustained observations of nature. Moen’s current body of work focuses on what he calls, “pre-conscious forms,” which he says, “gives rise to recognizable forms.” This oscillation between abstraction and representation is the source of resonance in Moen’s work.
Artist and photographer Dania de Jonghe presented for the first time a cumulative body of photographs that marked a decade of exploring photography’s boundaries. De Jonghe’s aesthetic is concerned with ascertaining qualities of radiance, clarity and immanence in the external world. De Jonghe states, “ I seek to create images which embody both that numinous quality and my emotional response to it.”
Los Angeles artist Nicholette Kominos has been producing mixed-media constructions and drawings for over 25 years. The subtle and humorous content of these intimately-scaled works are revealed from the processes they undergo: cutting, opening, weaving and putting together. In her works on paper, Kominos often evokes the grid while delineating within its borders, a psychological sense of space.
Kristan Marvell’s initial inspiration is gleaned from the raw power and beauty of geologic transformations. By beginning with monolithic chunks of Styrofoam, Marvell incises the material with large hot wires where the end result is a summation of both spontaneity and controlled guiding of the hot wire. The remaining block of Styrofoam is then cast in bronze. Marvell’s sculptures are not only suggestive of a multitude of forms found in nature but link themselves into the lineage of Expressionism’s many movements in modern art.