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AT THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE

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Installation View One, 08.03.08 © Michael Dodge
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Installation View Two, 08.03.08 © Michael Dodge
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Installation View Three, 08.03.08 © Michael Dodge
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Installation View Four, 08.03.08 © Michael Dodge
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Installation View Five, 08.03.08 © Michael Dodge
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Installation View Six, 08.03.08 © Michael Dodge
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Installation View Seven, 08.03.08 © Michael Dodge
AT THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE
Curated by: Michael Lewis Dodge

533 S. Los Angeles St.
Los Angeles, CA 90013
July 19th, 2008 - August 16th, 2008
Opening: July 19th, 2008 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.fivethirtythree.org
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
downtown/east la
EMAIL:  
info@fivethirtythree.org
PHONE:  
1.213.627.1541
OPEN HOURS:  
Flexible, please email for appointment.

DESCRIPTION

Five Thirty Three is pleased to present At the Middle of Nowhere. The exhibition runs from July 19th to August 16th, with a reception for the artists on Saturday, July 19th from 7-10PM

To exist at the middle of nowhere brings solace to some and distress to others. Each artist in this exhibition bends, stretches, and portrays relationships to familiar surroundings in unique ways, either transferring the viewer to a space of ease and contentment or leaving them with no footing at all.

Michael Dodge's sculptures examine how space itself is controlled and manipulated. Using simply constructed wooden modules with a repeating color palette, the sculptures are turned "inside out". This device pulls back the facade and allows one to walk around and through a stage or a Hollywood set. His work exists between frontal refinement and behind-the-scenes utilitarianism, allowing viewers to experience the divergent realities of construction and presentation.

In Karen Lofgren's installation, Dawn, two melting floor sculptures project magenta and blue light across paint-dripping pigeons on a wire. The work physically immerses viewers, placing them on an unfamiliar level with recognizable objects and reminding them of the unknown metaphysical realities of material and space.

In Justin Michell's collages, paper and magazines morph into architectural structures that form spatial conundrums. The repetitive nature of this technique and abundance of his source material transform spaces into abject, futuristic and maze-like shadows of their former utilitarian selves.

Molly Millar's paintings, reconstructions of personal mental snapshots—moments in everyday life, refer to the familiar while concealing specific naturalistic forms. Her work simultaneously memorializes and obscures distinctive experiences, pushing and pulling them into atmospheric landscapes.