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holes, voids, and other descriptive terms for blankness

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20120704215033-richard_haley
holes, voids, and other descriptive terms for blankness


Los Angeles, CA 90065
September 19th, 2012 - November 2nd, 2012
Opening: September 19th, 2012 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.anotheryearinla.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
eagle rock/highland park
EMAIL:  
info@anotheryearinla.com
PHONE:  
323-223-4000
OPEN HOURS:  
24 hours online
TAGS:  
photography, mixed-media, digital, installation, video-art, performance, conceptual, landscape, figurative, modern, sculpture

DESCRIPTION

Another Year in LA is hosting the third solo exhibition for Detroit-based artist, Richard Haley, “holes, voids, and other descriptive terms for blankness”

Haley’s work lingers between the romantic (in his photographs of celestial phenomenon) and the contextualization of the body/text and sculptural works.  While not always apparent, Haley’s work (manifest in a variety of media - photographs, sculpture, drawing and video) is clearly focused on the notion of one’s existence and is reflected through his conceptual investigations culminating in beautiful, humorous, romantic work that touches the viewer.  Haley’s playfulness is often a scrim for deeper, more heart felt emotions, presented; establishing his oeuvre in the making of sensual, smart works that are accessible and psychologically deep; simultaneously.

A key work in holes, voids, and other descriptive terms for blankness is “Moving a hole from here to there: Hole relocation” from 2012.  From an June, 2012 interview by Tom Friel and Sarah Margolis-Pineo for BadAtSports.com, Haley said, “I made a mold of a hole within Detroit. For this upcoming exhibition [at ANOTHER YEAR IN LA], the mold will be shipped to Los Angeles and cast using matter foraged locally. Essentially, I’m shipping nothing from one contested place to some other strange place—two strange cities. My work is usually an accumulation of small gestures, and this is a larger gesture. I don’t exactly know what a hole is, and I’m trying to figure that out. It’s a puncture in the land, but it’s not the land itself—it’s not the site. It’s surrounded by the site, but it can’t exist without the site. A hole is almost more like a photograph in that a photograph is not the thing, but it cannot exist without the thing the photograph is of. The hole is the space, it’s not the earth.”