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Defiant Chronicles

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© Courtesy of the Artist and Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA)
Defiant Chronicles

628 Alamitos Ave.
Long Beach, CA 90802
April 30th, 2011 - July 24th, 2011
Opening: April 30th, 2011 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.molaa.org
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
long beach
EMAIL:  
info@molaa.org
PHONE:  
562-437-1689
OPEN HOURS:  
Wed,Fri,Sat,Sun 11-5 ; Thur 11-9
TAGS:  
graffiti/street-art

DESCRIPTION

This exhibition, co-curated by MOLAA Curator Idurre Alonso and Slanguage Founders Mario Ybarra Jr. and Karla Diaz, focuses on representing current strategies for artistic production derived and influenced by urban and street art including graffiti, stencil and stickers. The exhibition is comprised of two multi-mixed media installations by artists a.k.a., Acamonchi from Tijuana, Mexico and Los Angeles-based artist a.k.a., Perl from the graffiti female collective FDS (From the Streets).

Both of the invited artists share a similar concern for utilizing artistic tactics of research-based projects, documentation and investigation. The exhibition redefines the traditional approach to street art/graffiti as a practice that is meant to be singled-out from its place and context, exclusive to an insider audience. It breaks the conception of urban art as a male dominated art form that rarely addresses gender issues on its content.

Perl researches and documents historical buildings, streets, neighborhoods, old signs, landmarks, alleys or abandoned buildings for her artistic practice. She uses the research to develop blog posts, photos, walking tours, among other forms of cultural production. On the other hand Acamonchi, who launched the first Mexican Mail Art website in 1995 and became known for his downloadable stencils, has been using street installation and graffiti as a critical forum. Acamonchi was heavily influenced by images in old magazines, fanzines and the skateboard-punk countercultures; his work usually addresses gender issues including a critical view of the notion of “the ideal woman” commonly promoted by the media.