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Let's Make the Water Turn Black

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20110125030701-farmer600
God's Dice, 2010 Installation View at the Walter Phillips Gallery, the Banff Centre © Courtesy the artist; Catriona Jeffries, Vancouver; and Casey Kaplan, New York
Let's Make the Water Turn Black
Curated by: Aram Moshayedi

631 West 2nd St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012
February 18th, 2011 - April 10th, 2011
Opening: March 5th, 2011 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://redcat.org/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
downtown/east la
EMAIL:  
redcatpr@calarts.edu
PHONE:  
213-237-2800
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Sun 12-6 or Intermission
SCHOOL ASSOCIATION:  
CalArts (California Institute of the Arts)
TAGS:  
Geoffrey Farmer, calarts, REDCAT, mixed-media, installation, performance, conceptual, figurative, modern, sculpture

DESCRIPTION

Regarded internationally for his cumulative, research-based projects, Farmer creates context-specific sculptural works that grapple with his longstanding interest in the relationship between art objects and theories of drama and dramatization. In doing so, Farmer mines a diverse array of literary and artistic histories to reveal the pervasiveness of theatricality within cultural experience. Rather than adhere to the convention of exhibitions as static displays, Farmer reconstitutes the gallery space as a site for improvisation, movement, alteration and accumulation.

For this exhibition, Farmer transforms the Gallery at REDCAT into both studio workshop and theatrical space where an assembly of performers and mechanized objects act out a scripted narrative in the form of a sculptural tableau. Starting mid-February, Farmer is in residence to work on-site and create a new site-specific "sculpture play" titled Let's Make the Water Turn Black in response to the region's social history and Los Angeles' influence on the counter-cultural movement. The exhibition begins on February 18 with a series of discrete installations on an architectural façade built to separate the central gallery from the REDCAT lobby. These revolving installations act as a prelude to the first public presentation of Farmer's sculpture play on March 5, 2011, when visitors are invited to enter the central gallery space for the first time.

Funded in part with generous support from the Audain Foundation.