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Are you going with me?

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March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Edward Walton Wilcox with daughters Serenity and Temperance, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Lft-Rt : Stephane Ambrogi, Edward Walton Wilcox, Fabien Castanier, Michael Palank (William Morris), March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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FoundTrack.com Co-founders Viranda Tantula and Nassir Nassirzadeh, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Sara Srisoonthorn (LA Times) and Omar Kalincsak, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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"Are You Going With Me?" Opening Reception, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Edward Walton Wilcox and Mat Gleason , March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Gallery Manager Vanessa Villegas with Mike Weaver, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Opening Night!, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Viranda Tantula (Paramount) with Dane Jenson (Curator), March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Peter Frank (Art Critic, Associate Editor THE Magazine) and Edward Walton Wilcox, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Sara Srisoonthorn and Kristen Mlikae (LA Times), March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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The Crowd, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Gallery Manager Vanessa Villegas with Viranda Tantula, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Lft-Rt :Friend, Sophia Lee (Gallerist/Art Writer), Mat Gleason (Editor,Coagula Magazine), Artist Leigh Salgado (artist), Edward Walton Wilcox & Cristina Wilcox, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Peter Frank with Gallery owner Fabien Castanier and gallery manager Vanessa Villegas, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
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© Photographed by Christopher Simon
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© Photographed by Christopher Simon
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© Photographed by Christopher Simon
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Lft-Rt: Will Schrader (Filmaker), Vida Ghaffari (TV Host), Skye Delamey (Singer), Effie Shrabi, Jennifer Leigh, March 8th, 2008 © Photographed by Christopher Simon
Are you going with me?

300 N. Robertson Blvd.
West Hollywood, CA 90048
March 8th, 2008 - March 29th, 2008
Opening: March 8th, 2008 6:00 PM - 10:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.ambrogicastaniergallery.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
west hollywood/b.h.
EMAIL:  
info@ambrogicastaniergallery.com
PHONE:  
310-652-5511
OPEN HOURS:  
M-F 10am-6:30pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-5pm
TAGS:  
hollywood, art-walk, Galleries, culture painting
COST:  
FREE
CHILDREN:  
This event is appropriate for children

DESCRIPTION

AMBROGI   CASTANIER GALLERY

 

is proud to present

 

"Are you going with me?"

 

a new show by the artist

 

Edward Walton Wilcox

 

 

 

 

Opening Reception on

Saturday March 8, 2008 from 6-10pm

Edward Walton Wilcox invites us to take a second look at the decadence of the times with his gothic translation of iconographic images like the Hollywood Sign, known to the world as the gatekeeper to Hollywood's doors of extravagance. Wilcox's work is a commentary on a society clasping to garish distractions as a means of escaping the inevitable downfall. His work is a moral critique of a world attempting to shroud itself in beauty and diversion in the midst of its own collapse.

 

            Romanticism is where Edward's work finds its voice in both paintings and sculpture.  The genre’s inherent qualities and conventions are a suitable vehicle of expression for the cultural criticisms and social climate in which our generation finds itself. Edward merges classical technique with a modern perception. His paintings often utilize a "monochromy" that alludes to Hollywood's historic film noir sensibility. There is a visible erosion on the surface of some of his works, and it is in fact a subtractive process that metaphorically parallels the notion of social decay. His intention is for the work to have a preternatural effect on the viewer; evoking at times a sense of awe, terror, insignificance, romantic sensuality, allusions to our self destructive nature, the temporal nature of beauty and life, and the decay of the material world as a constant of which we are always aware.