Current Exhibitions & Events | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/show en-us 40 Matt Johnson - 303 Gallery - January 12th - February 25th <p style="text-align: justify;">303 Gallery is proud to present our second solo exhibition of new work by Matt Johnson.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> For this occasion, Johnson will exhibit a selection of sculptures in carved, bent, and painted wood. The objects depicted in his new works are the casual detritus of art studios or building sites, whose forms are the result of usage and discarding. Crumpled cardboard boxes, shards of cut drywall, a discarded cup, pizza box, and rolls of blue painter&rsquo;s tape are preserved in stasis, forms that would normally be realized only in the temporality between utility and refuse. These simple moments of dispossession become the generators of their own poiesis, as their incidental elegance is preserved through replication as sculpture. In a conceit to the transient fragility of sculpture proffered by artists like Fischli &amp; Weiss, a certain lack of the essential qualities that confer existence upon an object is imbued in Johnson&#39;s forms. This impermanent nature is borne out by the sculptural constructions themselves, as their wooden armatures form the supports for objects that you would usually expect to see crumble in front of you.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Johnson&#39;s approach to display lends the exhibition a scientific quality, as objects are arranged in constellations that seem to hint at a gravitational attraction created by their masses and the spaces between them. Long concerned with creating rifts in the negotiation between expectation and reality, Johnson&#39;s sculptures are arranged to communicate with each other, and seem to morph according to their imposed relations. The rubble of production, artistic, commercial and otherwise, is used to create a new type of codification, one in which objects between states and materials in flux become their own profligate and surreptitious communicators. An incorporeal form of predicate dualism begins to take hold, wherein an object can be both itself and signify a potential beyond both form and function.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Matt Johnson has exhibited widely in such international venues as The Serpentine Gallery, London (2005); The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2005, 2009); The Mori Art&nbsp;Museum, Tokyo (2007); The Hydra Workshop, Hydra, Greece (2011); The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2012). A series of the artist&#39;s <em>Lautner Beams</em>, inspired by cast-offs from John Lautner&rsquo;s demolished Shusett House was installed in the lobby of the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood in 2015. His site-specific work&nbsp;<em>Untitled (Swan)</em> was unveiled as part of Wanderlust, a group exhibition installed along New York&rsquo;s Highline in 2016, where it is on view until March 2017.&nbsp; Born in&nbsp;New York, Johnson currently lives and works in Los Angeles.</p> Sun, 29 Jan 2017 14:01:02 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel - February 4th - March 4th <p style="text-align: justify;">It&rsquo;s that time of the year for the gallery&rsquo;s annual Winter Salon.&nbsp; This show features new works by Gustavo Acosta, Bernard Ammerer, Paul Behnke, Bergman &amp; White, Marcy Brafman, Kathy Bruce, Marie Dolma, Reynier Ferrer, John A. Parks, Ian Hughes, Ilyan Ivanov, Julie Langsam, Nadja Marcin, Darrell Nettles, Alastair Noble, Eva O&rsquo;Leary, Tanja Selzer.&nbsp; Across media, including painting, photographs, mixed media, video, these artists pursue the addiction of art from varying and unique points of view.&nbsp; Their vibrant works brought together create a space for seductive engagement and thoughtful perceptions.</p> Sun, 29 Jan 2017 14:04:10 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Ernest Mancoba - Aicon Gallery - New York - February 23rd - April 8th <div align="justify" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;"> <div style="font-size: 9pt;"><strong>Aicon Gallery</strong>&nbsp;is proud to present the first major New York solo exhibition by renowned South African artist&nbsp;<strong style="font-size: 9pt;">Ernest Mancoba</strong><span style="font-size: 9pt;">. Ernest Mancoba (1904-2002) was born and raised as a black man under the South African apartheid system. In 1938 he moved to Paris to be able to study, work, and especially, to think freely as an artist. At the end of World War Two, Mancoba moved to Denmark with his wife, artist Sonja Ferlov-Mancoba, where they would both become founding members of the&nbsp;</span><strong style="font-size: 9pt;">COBRA</strong><span style="font-size: 9pt;">&nbsp;avant-garde art movement. The COBRA doctrine was comprised in part by a stress on the absolute freedom of form and color with a focus on spontaneity and experiment, a reaction against the prevailing tenets of Surrealism, and inspiration drawn from children&#39;s drawings and &quot;primitive art.&quot; Mancoba&#39;s work represents a unique synthesis of modern European art and African spirit. His goal was to bring to European art his deep understanding of African culture, represented by the frequently appearing totems in his drawings and paintings that reflect the humanist Ubuntu philosophy, which developed in Southern Africa and stresses &quot;the belief in a universal bond of sharing that connects all humanity.&quot; Or, as Mancoba put it: &quot;A human is a human by and for other people.&quot;</span></div> </div> <div style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;">Mancoba&#39;s interest in art began in in 1925 at the Grace Dieu mission school outside of Johannesburg, where he initially trained in wood-carving and furniture making before deciding to pursue fine art full time and moving to Cape Town in 1935. Upon his arrival in Paris in 1938, Mancoba continued his art studies at the &Eacute;cole Nationale Superieure des Arts D&eacute;coratifs de Paris. When the Germans occupied Paris during World War Two, Mancoba was arrested and spent time in a Nazi internment camp. At the war&#39;s end, Mancoba and Sonja decided to relocate to Denmark and immerse themselves in the European avant-garde art movements of the time. Although he was a founding member of COBRA and exhibited with them from 1948-51, his relationship to and influence on the group was, until very recently, almost erased from the historical records and texts pertaining to the movement. Many have argued that this marginalization was due to a combination of a Eurocentric notion of Modernism, which would have viewed both Mancoba and his work as representative of a &quot;primitive&quot; Other, and the &quot;ghettoization&quot; or categorizing of his practice as inherently &quot;African&quot; and thus apart from Europe&#39;s modernist movements. Despite this, Mancoba consistently challenged and defied what was expected from him as a &quot;Black Artist&quot; by his European artistic counterparts and scholars, and developed his own uniquely subjective practice that cannot be classified or pigeon-holed as African or &quot;primitive&quot; Modernism.&nbsp;</span></span></div> <div style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="font-size: 9pt;"> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 10pt; text-align: justify;"> <div><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">As such, Mancoba&#39;s historical importance to the founding of a notion of global Modernism cannot be overstated. Indeed, as the eminent artist and scholar&nbsp;<strong>Rasheed Araeen</strong>, who has written extensively on Mancoba, has stated:</span></span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;"><em>&quot;What is extraordinary about Mancoba&#39;s achievement is that he is very likely the first artist from the whole colonized world - Africa, Asia, the Americas, Australasia, and the Pacific - to enter the central core of modernism at a time when this world, particularly his own country of South Africa, was still struggling under Colonialism, and to challenge modernism&#39;s historical paradigm on its own terms.&quot;</em></span></span></div> </div> <div style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 9pt; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">Historical and sociopolitical issues aside, Mancoba&#39;s work more than holds its own amongst the 20th century&#39;s preeminent practitioners and proponents of avant-garde Modern art, whether globally or in the West. As his practice reached maturity in the late fifties and early sixties, a primary focus of his work emerged in delicate linear compositions on paper and canvas of version after version of a central totem-like abstracted figure composed with a minimal use of controlled but vibrant lines and subtle splashes of diffused color. As Mancoba himself stated about this focus in his art, &quot;In my painting it is difficult to say whether the central form is abstract or not. What I am concerned with, is whether the form can bring to life and transmit, with the strongest effect and by the lightest means possible, the being which has been in me...&quot; The canvases and drawings in this exhibition represent this central concern of Mancoba&#39;s and are accompanied by an additional set of the artist&#39;s talismanic calligraphic drawings, in which figuration succumbs entirely to expressionistic groupings of line and color resembling a series of mystical alphabets suffused with life and movement yet rendered with an astounding economy of means.</span></div> <div style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">Only now, after a lifetime of marginalization and miscategorization, does Mancoba&#39;s work seem to finally be garnering the critical attention and reevaluation it deserves, when viewed as pioneering and defining a crucial moment in art history at the crossroads of a Eurocentric verses a global understanding of Modern art. At the end of apartheid, Mancoba was honored with large retrospectives at the National Gallery in Cape Town and the Museum of Modern Art in Johannesburg. His work has been included in major institutional exhibitions at the Tate Britain and MOMA PS1 in New York and will be shown in this year&#39;s&nbsp;<strong>Documenta 14, Universe in Universe</strong>&nbsp;in Kassel and Athens. This is the artist&#39;s first major solo exhibition in New York and the first showing of his work at Aicon Gallery.</span></div> </div> Mon, 20 Feb 2017 14:28:18 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Aicon Gallery - New York - February 23rd 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <div align="justify" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;"> <div style="font-size: 9pt;"><strong>Aicon Gallery</strong>&nbsp;is proud to present the first major New York solo exhibition by renowned South African artist&nbsp;<strong style="font-size: 9pt;">Ernest Mancoba</strong><span style="font-size: 9pt;">. Ernest Mancoba (1904-2002) was born and raised as a black man under the South African apartheid system. In 1938 he moved to Paris to be able to study, work, and especially, to think freely as an artist. At the end of World War Two, Mancoba moved to Denmark with his wife, artist Sonja Ferlov-Mancoba, where they would both become founding members of the&nbsp;</span><strong style="font-size: 9pt;">COBRA</strong><span style="font-size: 9pt;">&nbsp;avant-garde art movement. The COBRA doctrine was comprised in part by a stress on the absolute freedom of form and color with a focus on spontaneity and experiment, a reaction against the prevailing tenets of Surrealism, and inspiration drawn from children&#39;s drawings and &quot;primitive art.&quot; Mancoba&#39;s work represents a unique synthesis of modern European art and African spirit. His goal was to bring to European art his deep understanding of African culture, represented by the frequently appearing totems in his drawings and paintings that reflect the humanist Ubuntu philosophy, which developed in Southern Africa and stresses &quot;the belief in a universal bond of sharing that connects all humanity.&quot; Or, as Mancoba put it: &quot;A human is a human by and for other people.&quot;</span></div> </div> <div style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;">Mancoba&#39;s interest in art began in in 1925 at the Grace Dieu mission school outside of Johannesburg, where he initially trained in wood-carving and furniture making before deciding to pursue fine art full time and moving to Cape Town in 1935. Upon his arrival in Paris in 1938, Mancoba continued his art studies at the &Eacute;cole Nationale Superieure des Arts D&eacute;coratifs de Paris. When the Germans occupied Paris during World War Two, Mancoba was arrested and spent time in a Nazi internment camp. At the war&#39;s end, Mancoba and Sonja decided to relocate to Denmark and immerse themselves in the European avant-garde art movements of the time. Although he was a founding member of COBRA and exhibited with them from 1948-51, his relationship to and influence on the group was, until very recently, almost erased from the historical records and texts pertaining to the movement. Many have argued that this marginalization was due to a combination of a Eurocentric notion of Modernism, which would have viewed both Mancoba and his work as representative of a &quot;primitive&quot; Other, and the &quot;ghettoization&quot; or categorizing of his practice as inherently &quot;African&quot; and thus apart from Europe&#39;s modernist movements. Despite this, Mancoba consistently challenged and defied what was expected from him as a &quot;Black Artist&quot; by his European artistic counterparts and scholars, and developed his own uniquely subjective practice that cannot be classified or pigeon-holed as African or &quot;primitive&quot; Modernism.&nbsp;</span></span></div> <div style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="font-size: 9pt;"> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 10pt; text-align: justify;"> <div><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">As such, Mancoba&#39;s historical importance to the founding of a notion of global Modernism cannot be overstated. Indeed, as the eminent artist and scholar&nbsp;<strong>Rasheed Araeen</strong>, who has written extensively on Mancoba, has stated:</span></span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;"><em>&quot;What is extraordinary about Mancoba&#39;s achievement is that he is very likely the first artist from the whole colonized world - Africa, Asia, the Americas, Australasia, and the Pacific - to enter the central core of modernism at a time when this world, particularly his own country of South Africa, was still struggling under Colonialism, and to challenge modernism&#39;s historical paradigm on its own terms.&quot;</em></span></span></div> </div> <div style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 9pt; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">Historical and sociopolitical issues aside, Mancoba&#39;s work more than holds its own amongst the 20th century&#39;s preeminent practitioners and proponents of avant-garde Modern art, whether globally or in the West. As his practice reached maturity in the late fifties and early sixties, a primary focus of his work emerged in delicate linear compositions on paper and canvas of version after version of a central totem-like abstracted figure composed with a minimal use of controlled but vibrant lines and subtle splashes of diffused color. As Mancoba himself stated about this focus in his art, &quot;In my painting it is difficult to say whether the central form is abstract or not. What I am concerned with, is whether the form can bring to life and transmit, with the strongest effect and by the lightest means possible, the being which has been in me...&quot; The canvases and drawings in this exhibition represent this central concern of Mancoba&#39;s and are accompanied by an additional set of the artist&#39;s talismanic calligraphic drawings, in which figuration succumbs entirely to expressionistic groupings of line and color resembling a series of mystical alphabets suffused with life and movement yet rendered with an astounding economy of means.</span></div> <div style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">Only now, after a lifetime of marginalization and miscategorization, does Mancoba&#39;s work seem to finally be garnering the critical attention and reevaluation it deserves, when viewed as pioneering and defining a crucial moment in art history at the crossroads of a Eurocentric verses a global understanding of Modern art. At the end of apartheid, Mancoba was honored with large retrospectives at the National Gallery in Cape Town and the Museum of Modern Art in Johannesburg. His work has been included in major institutional exhibitions at the Tate Britain and MOMA PS1 in New York and will be shown in this year&#39;s&nbsp;<strong>Documenta 14, Universe in Universe</strong>&nbsp;in Kassel and Athens. This is the artist&#39;s first major solo exhibition in New York and the first showing of his work at Aicon Gallery.</span></div> </div> Mon, 20 Feb 2017 14:08:30 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - Aicon Gallery - New York - February 23rd - March 25th <div align="justify" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;"> <div style="font-size: 9pt;"><strong>Aicon Gallery</strong>&nbsp;is pleased to present&nbsp;<em>Seed for History and Form - Tebhaga</em>, a group exhibition curated by&nbsp;<strong>Sumesh Sharma</strong>, co-founder of&nbsp;<strong>Clark House Initiative, Bombay</strong>, featuring work by&nbsp;<strong>Richard Bartholomew</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Jyoti Bhatt</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Biren De</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Haren Das</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Aur&eacute;lien Froment</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Laxma Goud</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Somnath Hore</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>M. F. Hussain</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Mohammad Omar Khalil</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Rachid Kora&iuml;chi</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Aur&eacute;lien Mole</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Krishna Reddy</strong>, and&nbsp;<strong>Michael Kelly Williams</strong>.</div> </div> <div style="font-size: 9pt;">&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">Survey shows deflect us from histories of art that engage in cross-pollination of ideas, form, and techniques across geography, language, and culture. Such seeds, often ignored and misunderstood due to endogamous art research, lead to untold histories and biases towards a linear understanding of the arts. Inclusion into art history and its long serving linear timeline to the Occident, that is fattened as it descends through survey shows and geography-specific exhibitions, only continues to serve an understanding of history that suffers from the lack of translation. &nbsp;In art history, the act of translation should not be an act aided simply by a dictionary and etymology, but one that makes us rethink relationships to color, form and the idea of the visual.</span></span></div> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">Conceptualism had its early history when Pablo Picasso and the Polish Avant-Garde were looking at face masks in the colonial collections that are now to be seen in the Mus&eacute;e du quai Branly in Paris. There was an idea of translation in this looking that gave birth to many etymologies. The etymology of modernism is a distinct idea in India, one that may manifest itself today in the homes Indians build for themselves, claiming them to be modern homes. If Joseph Beuys was the Shaman who performed a radical act that changed the possible definitions of the term artist, thereby allowing those heretofore outside the linear art history of North America and Europe leeway to enter, then these middle-class Indians may also define their own modernism.&nbsp;</span></span>&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;"> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 10pt; text-align: justify;"> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">What were the geo-political translations of a few men and women who gathered each year to teach printmaking through a series of workshops on the Atlantic coast of Morocco? This exhibition discusses those seeds of form, tracking geography from Santiniketan in Eastern India, to Dakar in Senegal, and ending in New York. It spans the life and work of&nbsp;<strong>Krishna Reddy</strong>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<strong>Mohammed Omar Khalil</strong>, and listens to the songs of Amadou Badiane and Somnath Mukherjee through&nbsp;<strong>Aur&eacute;lien Froment&#39;</strong>s cinema, while<strong>Michael Kelly Williams</strong>&nbsp;narrates the objectivity of form in sculpture that began in printmaking, and we study what makes&nbsp;<strong>Somnath Hore&#39;s</strong>&nbsp;etchings both minimal and viscerally political. Does a drought effect conceptualism and modernism?&nbsp;<strong>Haren Das&#39;s</strong>&nbsp;woodcuts narrate life in rural Bengal. How do blacksmiths in Dakar challenge form and materiality through history, like the standing sculpture of an ancient Surya (Sun God) or a stone Buddha from ancient Gandhara?</span></span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">The right to land after the Bengal famine, described as the Tebhaga movement, where sharecroppers asked for a reduction in rent in return for giving grain to the landlords, was supported by the artists of Bengal. &nbsp;In&nbsp;this exhibition, a painting from the 1960s by&nbsp;<strong>M. F. Hussain</strong>&nbsp;defines the seeds of India&#39;s modernism as one based on the independence a nascent nation, depleted of its strength through colonialism, but now somewhat lost in its circumstances.&nbsp;<strong>Jyoti Bhatt</strong>celebrates M. F. Hussain, who was later vilified by the Indian right for his art, by making a portrait of Hussain in the tricolors of the India flag.&nbsp;<strong>Aur&eacute;lien Mole</strong>&nbsp;makes a poignant critique on India&#39;s Progressive Artists Group, by inviting Akbar Padamsee&#39;s muse, Arai Kesava Naidu, to the National Gallery of Art in Mumbai for her first time, despite her body being a source of that artist&#39;s forms.&nbsp;<strong>Biren De&#39;s</strong>&nbsp;drawings move from cubist renditions of pastoral Bengal to ones that circle out to tantric meditation and spiritualism, an element now celebrated in museum exhibitions of Indian modernism.</span></span></div> </div> <div align="justify" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 9pt; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9pt;"><strong>Laxma Goud</strong>, coming from the arid part of the Indian Andhras, puts a form to Indian erotica and an artist&#39;s vision to vocabulary, camouflaging erotica in deep lines of cubist rendition uncovering many surprises.<strong>Rachid Kora&iuml;chi&#39;s</strong>&nbsp;calligraphed ceramic hand in Arabic announces New Year wishes to the residents of the city of Saint Denis, a Parisian suburb. As the city welcomes 2017, it leaves behind the travesties of 2016 by celebrating an Algerian artist. Diasporas have created forms of conceptual intrigue in their role as a constant influence on creative thought. The Progressive Artist Group in Bombay was catalyzed by two Jewish refugees, Rudy Von Leyden and Walter Langhammer, who had fled Europe to Bombay and brought the rejection of classical form to the students of the Sir JJ School of Arts, among whom was M. F. Hussain. &nbsp;Like the sharecroppers of Bengal, artists ask for their share in art history not through representation but adequate translation that hears their narrative.</span></div> <div align="justify" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div align="center" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 9pt; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</div> <div align="center" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 9pt; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: center;">Please&nbsp;contact&nbsp;Aicon&nbsp;Gallery (Newyork<a shape="rect" style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34);">@Aicongallery.com</a>) for more information.</div> </div> Mon, 20 Feb 2017 14:29:57 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Aicon Gallery - New York - February 23rd 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <div align="justify" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;"> <div style="font-size: 9pt;"><strong>Aicon Gallery</strong>&nbsp;is pleased to present&nbsp;<em>Seed for History and Form - Tebhaga</em>, a group exhibition curated by&nbsp;<strong>Sumesh Sharma</strong>, co-founder of&nbsp;<strong>Clark House Initiative, Bombay</strong>, featuring work by&nbsp;<strong>Richard Bartholomew</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Jyoti Bhatt</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Biren De</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Haren Das</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Aur&eacute;lien Froment</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Laxma Goud</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Somnath Hore</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>M. F. Hussain</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Mohammad Omar Khalil</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Rachid Kora&iuml;chi</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Aur&eacute;lien Mole</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Krishna Reddy</strong>, and&nbsp;<strong>Michael Kelly Williams</strong>.</div> </div> <div style="font-size: 9pt;">&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">Survey shows deflect us from histories of art that engage in cross-pollination of ideas, form, and techniques across geography, language, and culture. Such seeds, often ignored and misunderstood due to endogamous art research, lead to untold histories and biases towards a linear understanding of the arts. Inclusion into art history and its long serving linear timeline to the Occident, that is fattened as it descends through survey shows and geography-specific exhibitions, only continues to serve an understanding of history that suffers from the lack of translation. &nbsp;In art history, the act of translation should not be an act aided simply by a dictionary and etymology, but one that makes us rethink relationships to color, form and the idea of the visual.</span></span></div> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">Conceptualism had its early history when Pablo Picasso and the Polish Avant-Garde were looking at face masks in the colonial collections that are now to be seen in the Mus&eacute;e du quai Branly in Paris. There was an idea of translation in this looking that gave birth to many etymologies. The etymology of modernism is a distinct idea in India, one that may manifest itself today in the homes Indians build for themselves, claiming them to be modern homes. If Joseph Beuys was the Shaman who performed a radical act that changed the possible definitions of the term artist, thereby allowing those heretofore outside the linear art history of North America and Europe leeway to enter, then these middle-class Indians may also define their own modernism.&nbsp;</span></span>&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 9pt; text-align: justify;"> <div align="justify" style="font-size: 10pt; text-align: justify;"> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">What were the geo-political translations of a few men and women who gathered each year to teach printmaking through a series of workshops on the Atlantic coast of Morocco? This exhibition discusses those seeds of form, tracking geography from Santiniketan in Eastern India, to Dakar in Senegal, and ending in New York. It spans the life and work of&nbsp;<strong>Krishna Reddy</strong>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<strong>Mohammed Omar Khalil</strong>, and listens to the songs of Amadou Badiane and Somnath Mukherjee through&nbsp;<strong>Aur&eacute;lien Froment&#39;</strong>s cinema, while<strong>Michael Kelly Williams</strong>&nbsp;narrates the objectivity of form in sculpture that began in printmaking, and we study what makes&nbsp;<strong>Somnath Hore&#39;s</strong>&nbsp;etchings both minimal and viscerally political. Does a drought effect conceptualism and modernism?&nbsp;<strong>Haren Das&#39;s</strong>&nbsp;woodcuts narrate life in rural Bengal. How do blacksmiths in Dakar challenge form and materiality through history, like the standing sculpture of an ancient Surya (Sun God) or a stone Buddha from ancient Gandhara?</span></span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">The right to land after the Bengal famine, described as the Tebhaga movement, where sharecroppers asked for a reduction in rent in return for giving grain to the landlords, was supported by the artists of Bengal. &nbsp;In&nbsp;this exhibition, a painting from the 1960s by&nbsp;<strong>M. F. Hussain</strong>&nbsp;defines the seeds of India&#39;s modernism as one based on the independence a nascent nation, depleted of its strength through colonialism, but now somewhat lost in its circumstances.&nbsp;<strong>Jyoti Bhatt</strong>celebrates M. F. Hussain, who was later vilified by the Indian right for his art, by making a portrait of Hussain in the tricolors of the India flag.&nbsp;<strong>Aur&eacute;lien Mole</strong>&nbsp;makes a poignant critique on India&#39;s Progressive Artists Group, by inviting Akbar Padamsee&#39;s muse, Arai Kesava Naidu, to the National Gallery of Art in Mumbai for her first time, despite her body being a source of that artist&#39;s forms.&nbsp;<strong>Biren De&#39;s</strong>&nbsp;drawings move from cubist renditions of pastoral Bengal to ones that circle out to tantric meditation and spiritualism, an element now celebrated in museum exhibitions of Indian modernism.</span></span></div> </div> <div align="justify" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 9pt; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9pt;"><strong>Laxma Goud</strong>, coming from the arid part of the Indian Andhras, puts a form to Indian erotica and an artist&#39;s vision to vocabulary, camouflaging erotica in deep lines of cubist rendition uncovering many surprises.<strong>Rachid Kora&iuml;chi&#39;s</strong>&nbsp;calligraphed ceramic hand in Arabic announces New Year wishes to the residents of the city of Saint Denis, a Parisian suburb. As the city welcomes 2017, it leaves behind the travesties of 2016 by celebrating an Algerian artist. Diasporas have created forms of conceptual intrigue in their role as a constant influence on creative thought. The Progressive Artist Group in Bombay was catalyzed by two Jewish refugees, Rudy Von Leyden and Walter Langhammer, who had fled Europe to Bombay and brought the rejection of classical form to the students of the Sir JJ School of Arts, among whom was M. F. Hussain. &nbsp;Like the sharecroppers of Bengal, artists ask for their share in art history not through representation but adequate translation that hears their narrative.</span></div> <div align="justify" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div align="center" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 9pt; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</div> <div align="center" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 9pt; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; text-align: center;">Please&nbsp;contact&nbsp;Aicon&nbsp;Gallery (Newyork<a shape="rect" style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34);">@Aicongallery.com</a>) for more information.</div> </div> Mon, 20 Feb 2017 14:29:58 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Rita McBride - Alexander and Bonin - January 12th - March 4th <p style="text-align: justify;">Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435973-threshold" target="_blank">Jorge Macchi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435969-premium-new-markers" target="_blank">Rita McBride</a>,<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435971-eye-of-the-beholder" target="_blank"> Paul Thek</a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/436962-o-caseiro-the-housekeeper" target="_blank">Jonathas de Andrade </a>on Thursday, January 12, 2017.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Premium New Markers </em>, a series of sculptures by<strong> Rita McBride</strong> will be shown in the entrance gallery . The works are inspired by Joseph Beuys&#39; 7,000 Oaks project, inaugurat ed in 1982 at Documenta 7. Beuys&rsquo; plan called for the planting of 7,000 trees, each paired with a basalt marker. Sixteen of these tree/ marker pairs can be found on West 22nd Street, close to DIA Chelsea. Deriving their shape from those basalt totems, McBride&#39;s <em>Premium New Markers</em> are clad in Abet laminate, a material emblematic of post -modern architecture and design of the 1980s. With an eye trained on modern objects and architecture, McBride&rsquo;s sculptures toy with the formalism and functionalism of public structures and their oft-overlooked role as mainstays in public space.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For press inquiries contact Laura Braverman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com</p> Mon, 09 Jan 2017 11:07:22 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Paul Thek - Alexander and Bonin - January 12th - March 4th <p style="text-align: justify;">Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435973-threshold" target="_blank">Jorge Macchi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435969-premium-new-markers" target="_blank">Rita McBride</a>,<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435971-eye-of-the-beholder" target="_blank"> Paul Thek</a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/436962-o-caseiro-the-housekeeper" target="_blank">Jonathas de Andrade</a> on Thursday, January 12, 2017.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Eye of the Beholder</em>, an exhibition of works on paper and small paintings by <strong>Paul Thek</strong> includes a pencil triptych executed in 1970 while he was living and working in Amsterdam. The three pages are filled with rows of vertical marks with a tender drawing of a lamb in the center , which points to Thek&rsquo;s continued engagement with Christian iconography and Dutch Baroque painting . The exhibition title is taken from a turquoise watercolor which was included in Thek&rsquo;s final lifetime installation</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For press inquiries contact Laura Braverman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> Mon, 09 Jan 2017 11:06:57 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Jorge Macchi - Alexander and Bonin - January 12th - March 4th <p style="text-align: justify;">Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435973-threshold" target="_blank">Jorge Macchi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435969-premium-new-markers" target="_blank">Rita McBride</a>,<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435971-eye-of-the-beholder" target="_blank"> Paul Thek</a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/436962-o-caseiro-the-housekeeper" target="_blank">Jonathas de Andrade</a> on Thursday, January 12, 2017.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Jorge Macchi</strong> is considered one of Argentina&rsquo;s leading artists. Although Macchi has worked in a wide range of mediums from installation, sculpture, and works on paper to video and performance art, he has recently directed his efforts to painting, the discipline in which he was initially trained. The exhibition at Alexander and Bonin includes ten oil paintings made over the past three years. Departing from the ordinary and coincidental, his paintings alter scale and context, employing a system of layered visual complications and interruptions that offers a sensorial, disconcerting, and contemplative experience. Macchi&rsquo;s paintings have been termed &ldquo;anti-iconic&rdquo;<sup>1</sup> by curator and art historian Cuauht&eacute;moc Medina, in that they seek to escape an overcoded, predictable interpretation of the medium and move toward an understanding of painting tied to individual experience and ambiguity.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Premium New Markers </em>, a series of sculptures by<strong> Rita McBride</strong> will be shown in the entrance gallery . The works are inspired by Joseph Beuys&#39; 7,000 Oaks project, inaugurat ed in 1982 at Documenta 7. Beuys&rsquo; plan called for the planting of 7,000 trees, each paired with a basalt marker. Sixteen of these tree/ marker pairs can be found on West 22nd Street, close to DIA Chelsea. Deriving their shape from those basalt totems, McBride&#39;s <em>Premium New Markers</em> are clad in Abet laminate, a material emblematic of post -modern architecture and design of the 1980s. With an eye trained on modern objects and architecture, McBride&rsquo;s sculptures toy with the formalism and functionalism of public structures and their oft-overlooked role as mainstays in public space.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Eye of the Beholder</em>, an exhibition of works on paper and small paintings by <strong>Paul Thek</strong> includes a pencil triptych executed in 1970 while he was living and working in Amsterdam. The three pages are filled with rows of vertical marks with a tender drawing of a lamb in the center , which points to Thek&rsquo;s continued engagement with Christian iconography and Dutch Baroque painting . The exhibition title is taken from a turquoise watercolor which was included in Thek&rsquo;s final lifetime installation</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Selected Works 1987-1988</em> at Brooke Alexander, New York. In the video gallery is<strong> Jonathas de Andrade</strong>&rsquo;s <em>O Caseiro/ The Housekeeper </em>(2016), a work constructed symmetrically in two narratives with synchronized shots. On the left, Joaquim Pedro de Andrade&rsquo;s 1959 film, O Mestre de Apipucos shows the daily life of Gilberto Freyre in his home in Recife. Freyre is the historicist who wrote the remarkable 1933 book<em> Casa Grande e Senzala (The Masters and the Slaves)</em>. On the right, Jonathas de Andrade constructs a mirroring of Pedro de Andrade&rsquo;s film, substituting Freyre with a fictional caretaker of the aristocratic residence. The parallel between the two characters establishes a tension that underlines aspects of class and race, two of the main subjects that Freyre dealt with&nbsp; in his work.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For press inquiries contact Laura Braverman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><sup>1</sup> Cuauht&eacute;moc Medina, &ldquo;A Renewable Opacity,&rdquo; in Jorge Macchi &ndash; Prestidigitador (Mexico City: MUAC, Museo Universitario Arte Contempor&aacute;neo, 2014): 18.</p> Mon, 09 Jan 2017 11:07:26 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Jonathas de Andrade - Alexander and Bonin - January 12th - March 4th <p style="text-align: justify;">Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435973-threshold" target="_blank">Jorge Macchi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435969-premium-new-markers" target="_blank">Rita McBride</a>,<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/435971-eye-of-the-beholder" target="_blank"> Paul Thek</a>, and Jonathas de Andrade on Thursday, January 12, 2017.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Selected Works 1987-1988</em> at Brooke Alexander, New York. In the video gallery is<strong> Jonathas de Andrade</strong>&rsquo;s <em>O Caseiro/ The Housekeeper </em>(2016), a work constructed symmetrically in two narratives with synchronized shots. On the left, Joaquim Pedro de Andrade&rsquo;s 1959 film, O Mestre de Apipucos shows the daily life of Gilberto Freyre in his home in Recife. Freyre is the historicist who wrote the remarkable 1933 book<em> Casa Grande e Senzala (The Masters and the Slaves)</em>. On the right, Jonathas de Andrade constructs a mirroring of Pedro de Andrade&rsquo;s film, substituting Freyre with a fictional caretaker of the aristocratic residence. The parallel between the two characters establishes a tension that underlines aspects of class and race, two of the main subjects that Freyre dealt with&nbsp; in his work.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For press inquiries contact Laura Braverman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> Mon, 09 Jan 2017 11:05:16 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Luis Camnitzer - Alexander Gray Associates - February 23rd - April 1st <p>Alexander Gray Associates presents recent work by Luis Camnitzer.</p> Sun, 05 Feb 2017 13:11:13 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Alexander Gray Associates - February 23rd 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p>Alexander Gray Associates presents recent work by Luis Camnitzer.</p> Sun, 05 Feb 2017 13:11:13 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - American Folk Art Museum - October 6th, 2016 - February 26th <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Securing the Shadow </em>is a contemplation of American self-taught portraiture through the lens of memory and loss. Humanity demands that no life should pass without some recognition, whether it is in the form of a marked grave, a portrait painted after death, or a postmortem photograph. Such tokens were once proof of life&mdash;one last opportunity to secure a shadow that would survive beyond the limit of individual memories.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">American gravestones offer standing testimony to the changing social structure of dying from the colonial period through the nineteenth century as portraits of the deceased slowly replaced stark memento mori of winged death heads, hourglasses, and the like. In painted portraiture, the transition from frank mortuary depictions to living images coincided with a cultural shift as the individual came to be privileged over the community and a redemptive view of death replaced a more intractable belief in original sin. Posthumous portraits and the postmortem daguerreotypes that ultimately replaced them are memories fixed in colored pigments on canvas and vapors on silver. We cannot help but hear them whisper through the years, &ldquo;remember me,&rdquo; because, as photographer Mathew Brady warned in 1856, &ldquo;you cannot tell how soon it may be too late.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Stacy C. Hollander, Exhibition Curator</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and Chief Curator, American Folk Art Museum</p> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 14:24:56 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Elliott Hundley - Andrea Rosen Gallery - February 10th - March 11th <p style="text-align: justify;">Elliott Hundley&rsquo;s intricate and immersive works evolve from his historical research on theater, literature, and film, emerging in this exhibition from an exploration of Antonin Artaud&rsquo;s enduringly imperative play &ldquo;There Is No More Firmament.&rdquo; Written in the 1930s and set in an imagined year 2000, the script recounts a society&rsquo;s frenetic response to an imminent cataclysmic event. Replete with cacophonous sound, jarring light and fitful movement&mdash;a mesmerizing intimation of synesthetic experience&mdash;the text conveys a sense of anxiety and uncertainty.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">With dense accumulations of imagery and painted gestures adjoining three-dimensional elements puncturing and protruding from the surface, Hundley&rsquo;s vibrant works appear alive and volatile. These teeming, insidious canvases impose a state of disquiet and hint at underlying violence with depictions of internal organs, crowds, ants, taxidermied animals, and a sculpture of the Fall of the Rebel Angels and The Last Judgment. Mediated by the processes of reproduction and re-presentation, it is difficult to locate these things in time and substance; the works resist attempts at deciphering. Echoing the improvisational approach of Artaud&rsquo;s text, explicit meaning becomes elusive. Here, Hundley reinforces an awareness of the mutability of material and the subsequent need for alert and active viewing.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Previously engaging with translations of plays from antiquity, Hundley has sustained his interest in translation over time with &ldquo;There Is No More Firmament.&quot; Moving from translation of language to translation of form, Hundley&rsquo;s works perform the unfinished script throughout the exhibition. In this encounter with Artaud&rsquo;s play&mdash;written in the past, projecting into a future that has now passed&mdash;time folds in on itself. Part science fiction, part political satire, the text&rsquo;s inherent ambiguity allows it to remain eternally relevant; the unknown impending disaster could represent a number of contemporary threats. This ability to extend into perpetual reinterpretations expresses an innate accessibility at the core of Hundley&rsquo;s sources, reinforced by his use of collage to open the experience and undermine an overwhelming&nbsp;seriousness.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Orchestrating a spectrum of perspectives, vignettes emerge from the swarm in these complex and exuberant works. Conflating color, language, sound, and motion, they approach a liminal sphere, conjuring visceral reactions. Like dialing between radio frequencies, Hundley lingers in the static between lucid signals and sporadic staccato transmissions, where dissolving is another type of becoming.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Elliott Hundley (b. 1975) lives and works in Los Angeles. Dust Over Everything is Hundley&rsquo;s fourth solo exhibition with the gallery. His series The Bacchae was the subject of his 2011-2012 traveling museum solo exhibition at the Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas and the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus. His work is held in numerous prominent public institutions including the Armand Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Broad Foundation, Los Angeles; Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humblebaek, Denmark; Miami Art Museum, Miami; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For media and press inquiries, please contact Brittni Zotos at b.zotos@rosengallery.com.</p> Sun, 29 Jan 2017 14:06:52 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Martha Friedman - Andrea Rosen Gallery 2 - February 10th - March 11th <div class="content-block block-medium selected" id="press-release"> <p style="text-align: justify;">Performances of &ldquo;Two Person Operating System&rdquo;<br /> by Susan Marshall &amp; Company:<br /> February 18, 2017, 2-6pm<br /> March 4, 2017, 2-6pm</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Andrea Rosen Gallery 2 is pleased to announce Dancing Around Things, an exhibition of work by Martha Friedman. Friedman&rsquo;s work presents the processes and materials of sculpture vis-a-vis the materiality of the body, manipulating substance, subject matter, and scale to highlight the familiar as well as the surreal aspects of everyday things. Friedman&rsquo;s work manifests a visceral intensity arising from her mastery of material, but simultaneously retains a footing in language&nbsp;and communication. Her works have an inherent wit and humor, blurring the lines between material and verbal engineering. In this exhibition, Friedman has created an installation of works that play out the slippage between the abstract and the erotic in commonplace objects and materials. In doing so, they rouse viewers&rsquo; consciousness of the tension between risk and pleasure that arises from encountering bodies and inhabiting one&rsquo;s own.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Rubber and metal feature frequently in the exhibition as sculptural material, a continuation of Friedman&rsquo;s interest in industrial objects and their potential to reference and implicate the body. In the entryway of the gallery, a video made collaboratively by Friedman and New York-based choreographer and dancer Silas Riener is projected onto a large, creamy white rubber flap cascading from the ceiling. The footage shows both artists moving amidst and through a small forest of giant hand-cast rubber bands knotted together and stretched from ceiling to floor in Friedman&rsquo;s studio. Shot from a variety of angles, Riener&rsquo;s movements range from quotidian and leisurely to soaringly acrobatic. At one tense stage in the video, the bands are freed from the floor and Riener propels himself using the elasticity of the hanging loops, his feet finding dangerous push-off points on the floorboards amidst a grid of metal hooks.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Made up of a latticed metal screen variously woven and penetrated with soft rubber tubes in hues referencing the four humors &ndash; black bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood&nbsp;&ndash; and metal spikes, Friedman&rsquo;s sculpture Two Person Operating System, situated in the center of the gallery, channels both threat and attraction. Conceived for the artist&rsquo;s recent exhibition at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, the project&rsquo;s form also alludes to work and labor, from contemporary circuit boards to the archaic telephone switchboards operated by large workforces of women. The piece will be activated by a dance performance conceived by Friedman and Susan Marshall and performed by Susan Marshall &amp; Company. In Marshall&rsquo;s choreography, the dancers navigate the sculpture&rsquo;s dangerously sharp elements with careful attention to precision, speed, and force, further implicating the viewer to think about the sensory experience of inhabiting a body and touching or navigating bodies outside their own.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">These works confound our expectations of the form and substance of the most ubiquitous of objects and materials, drawing parallels with the material condition of the body, beckoning viewers to contemplate their own corporeal situatedness.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Martha Friedman (b. Detroit, MI) lives and works in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. She earned her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1998 and her MFA from Yale University School of Art in 2003. Solo exhibitions of her work have been held at the Institute of Fine Arts New York University, New York (2016-17); Locust Projects, Miami (2015-16); Wallspace, New York (2012, 2009, 2007); the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, MI (2010); DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, MA (2010); and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago, IL (2010). Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions, nationally and internationally. Select examples include Frieze New York Sculpture Park, curated by Tom Eccles, New York (2013) and Museum on the Seam, Jerusalem, Israel (2013). Friedman is Assistant Professor of Sculpture at Princeton University. A&nbsp;solo exhibition of Friedman&rsquo;s work is forthcoming at the Henry Museum, Seattle in 2018.&nbsp;</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For media and press inquiries, please contact Brittni Zotos at <a href="mailto:b.zotos@rosengallery.com">b.zotos@rosengallery.com</a>.</p> </div> Sun, 29 Jan 2017 14:12:40 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Roe Ethridge - Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 537 W. 22nd - February 23rd - April 8th Sun, 05 Feb 2017 13:14:42 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 537 W. 22nd - February 23rd 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Sun, 05 Feb 2017 13:14:42 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Annie Dunning, Aganetha Dyck, William Eakin, Nina Katchadourian, Alison Reiko Loader, Christopher Plenzich, Michael Anthony Simon - Apexart - January 19th - March 18th <p style="text-align:justify">A well-known humanist truism states that there is no art in the non-human world. Indeed, when it comes to defining art, the notion that it constitutes a uniquely human activity often serves as a reassuring rock in a storm of contestation. Laurie Schneider Adams&rsquo; classic introductory text, <em>The Methodologies of Art: An Introduction</em> (1996), uses this assumption to exclude animal creations such as bird&rsquo;s nests, ant hills, and beaver dams from the category of art.<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn1" id="_ftnref1" name="_ftnref1" title="">(1)</a> &ldquo;Spiders, unlike humans, are not inspired by aesthetic or narrative ideas,&rdquo; she writes. &ldquo;They neither observe the environment nor make a conscious choice to create the abstract geometry of their webs.&rdquo;<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn2" id="_ftnref2" name="_ftnref2" title="">(2)</a>More recently, French literary theorist Alain Vaillant has advanced an anthropocentric theory of art and laughter, which ties them both to humanity&rsquo;s ability to liberate itself from the exigencies of &ldquo;reality&rdquo; and play with representations.<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn3" id="_ftnref3" name="_ftnref3" title="">(3)</a> At the heart of such theories lies a notion of human superiority strangely at odds with the prevailing tenor of much contemporary art theory and criticism, which typically embraces otherness and encourages subversions of normative categories.<br /> <br /> While the spectrum of difference celebrated by contemporary art remains stubbornly anthropocentric,<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn4" id="_ftnref4" name="_ftnref4" title="">(4)</a> few would argue that animals have no place in this world. Indeed, traditional art history narratives begin with depictions of animals &ndash; usually the iconic horses of Lascaux Caves &ndash; as well as objects made from their bodies, such as etched shells, or carved bones and teeth. While our relationship with non-humans may have changed more under capitalism than in all of human history, they continue to play an important role in art, usually as symbols of a social imaginary or as indexes of the real. In the first case, they tend to embody positive and negative attitudes towards shared cultural mores, institutions, and values. In the second, their actual bodies &ndash; documented, confined, taxidermied &ndash; confront us with the limits of this imaginary and its failure to grasp their otherness. While the goal of such art is usually to shock us, or make us question the status quo, its treatment of animals as media or mere things to be represented is far from innovative.<br /> <br /> In his anti-Darwinian theory of biological origins, French philosopher Henri Bergson observed: &ldquo;It would be as absurd to refuse consciousness to an animal because it has no brain as to declare it incapable of nourishing itself because it has no stomach.&rdquo;<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn5" id="_ftnref5" name="_ftnref5" title="">(5)</a> Assuming that the practices of non-humans are not imaginative or artistic simply because they lack human organization seems equally absurd. We know that certain animals decorate themselves and their dwellings, collect and arrange objects, make symbolic gestures, and fashion tools. Humanism dismisses these activities as genetically programmed instinct, devoid of conscious creativity. But we also know that animals play, and play involves metacommunication, improvisation, and stylistic flourishes belonging to the realms of the aesthetic and the comic.<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn6" id="_ftnref6" name="_ftnref6" title="">(6)</a><br /> <br /> Although contemporary art continues to be defined by human agency, the notion of animal culture now serves as a point of departure for a range of artistic practices focused on multispecies aesthetics and interspecies communication. The exhibition <em>Animal Intent</em> explores this trend through the work of seven artists who partner with non-humans in the creation of unique artistic projects. Rather than merely representing animals, using them as surrogates, or politicizing their bodies as part of a broad social critique, these artists treat animal instinct as a form of stylistic invention in its own right.<br /> <br /> <em>Sapsucker Sounds</em>, Annie Dunning&rsquo;s playful &ldquo;conflation of woodpecker and human culture,&rdquo; is a good example of interventions used by artists in this exhibition. At its heart lies a pattern of holes dotting the surface of a log cut from a Manchurian walnut. These are the drill holes of a yellowbellied sapsucker, a North American woodpecker known both for boring into young deciduous trees and drumming on them and other surfaces as a means of declaring its territory. Dunning borrows these marks, which she treats as the residue of a specific cultural practice, and translates them into a series of quirky, interactive sound sculptures. <em>Music Box </em>(2014), for instance, features a negative cast of the pattern of holes that have been reconfigured as cylinder pins for a clunky, yet charming music box. Viewers may play this unusual musical score by turning a rustic ratchet lever, which forces an explosion of pins through a comb of metal tines.<br /> <br /> In human-centered hierarchies of intelligence, insects generally figure somewhere near the bottom. And yet they have some of the most complex social formations on earth. Alison Reiko Loader and Christopher Plenzich explore the aesthetic side of this complexity in their project <em>Caterpillar Cartography</em>. Part of a larger, ongoing collaboration with forest tent caterpillars (<em>Malacosoma disstria</em>), it consists of a series of drawings made by fourth-stage caterpillar larvae as they crawl across sheets of paper dotted with piles of charcoal dust.<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn7" id="_ftnref7" name="_ftnref7" title="">(7)</a> A series of videos shows the choreographic nature of these sketches. Rather than dismissing their marks as the product of blind instinct, Loader and Plenzich treat them as an improvisational form of cartography, one that paradoxically &ldquo;creates the territory it maps.&rdquo;<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn8" id="_ftnref8" name="_ftnref8" title="">(8)</a><br /> <br /> Aganetha Dyck&rsquo;s twenty-year-long collaboration with honeybees takes a similar approach. Working closely with an apiarist, she places found objects into the bees&rsquo; hives, where the insects slowly and meticulously transform them into baroque, honeycombed sculptures. In <em>An Inconvenient Proposal </em>(2007), a kitsch pastiche of 18th century rococo fashion becomes uncanny beneath the hexagonal &ldquo;lacework&rdquo; of the bees. In a tragic twist of fate, Dyck recently developed a life-threatening allergy to bee stings. As part of her efforts to find new ways of working with the insects, she enlisted the help of photographer William Eakin. Together they collaborated on <em>Light</em> (2010-2011), a sculptural and photographic project focused on human and non-human appropriations of found objects. For this project, Eakin placed a selection of vintage table lamps from his personal collection in the hives. Dyck participated remotely, giving instructions via a cell phone. Eakin then re-appropriated the completed sculptures in a series of distorted photographs that quietly fold collaboration back into estrangement.<br /> <br /> Sometime in 2011, Michael Anthony Simon began bringing <em>Nephila clavata</em> spiders into his studio, where he devised a method of working with them to produce a variety of webs. Once completed, he fixed these delicate constructions with spray paint and other materials, and then returned the spiders to their natural habitat. While one might dismiss this as a form of appropriation art, such an assessment would reduce the insects to mere webmaking machines. But as Brian Massumi observes in his book <em>What Animals Teach Us About Politics</em>, &ldquo;Instinctive action plays its own natural creativity against the limitative conditions of the external milieu&hellip; It plays itself, as it plays upon. It is always the playing out of a true act, never just a stereotype of action.&rdquo;<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn9" id="_ftnref9" name="_ftnref9" title="">(9)</a><br /> <br /> Nina Katchadourian&rsquo;s work with spiders also supports the notion that they are motivated by more than pure instinct. Her video <em>GIFT/GIFT</em> (1998) shows the artist attempting to insert the word &ldquo;GIFT&rdquo; into a spider&rsquo;s web. The insect actively resists this intervention, and a battle ensues. This project was inspired by a 1950s Swedish nature book describing certain cultural practices particular to spiders, which sometimes wrap dead flies in silk and then offer them as gifts to potential mates.<a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn10" id="_ftnref10" name="_ftnref10" title="">(10)</a> In Swedish, the word &ldquo;gift&rdquo; means poison, a doubleentendre underscoring the ambivalence inherent to any collaboration. Katchadourian&rsquo;s photographic series <em>Carla and a Friend</em> (2002), on the other hand, casts this ambivalence in a more positive light, focusing instead on an unusual friendship between a pet snake and a rat she was originally given as food.<br /> <br /> Although the curatorial impetus for <em>Animal Intent</em> is rooted in the growing field of interspecies collaboration, it is also part of a personal quest to &ldquo;unlearn the animal,&rdquo; to borrow a phrase from Giovanni Aloi&rsquo;s influential text<em> Art &amp; Animals</em> (2012). Such an approach inevitably raises more questions than it answers, but this space of uncertainty feels more comfortable to me than either post-humanist utopias or humanist anthropocene. If we are to reimagine human/non-human relationships in ways that will ensure the survival of the planet, it seems vital to me that we attend as much to the lines that separate us as to the inherent porousness of these lines. This exhibition represents one small attempt to do so.<br /> <br /> Emily Falvey &copy; 2016<br /> Unsolicited Exhibition Program<br /> <br /> 1. For an excellent critique of this aspect of Adams&rsquo; book, see Giovanni Aloi, Art &amp; Animals (London: I.B. Tauris, 2012) and &ldquo;Animal Studies and Art: Elephants in the Room,&rdquo; a special editorial published in March 2015 as part of the &ldquo;Beyond Animal Studies&rdquo; <em>Antennae</em> publishing project 2015-2016, http://www.antennae.org.uk/back-issues-2015/4589877799.<br /> 2. Laurie Schneider Adams, <em>The Methodologies of Art: An Introduction</em> (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2010), 14.<br /> 3. Alain Vaillant, &ldquo;Le rire de l&rsquo;artiste,&rdquo; paper given at No Joke/Sans blague, Max Stern Symposium, organized by the Mus&eacute;e d&rsquo;art contemporain de Montr&eacute;al, April 2, 2016.<br /> 4. Kay Peggs refers to such anthropocentrism as &ldquo;human primacy identity politics.&rdquo; See Kay Peggs, &ldquo;Human Primacy Identity Politics, Nonhuman Animal Experiments and the Oppression of Nonhuman Animals,&rdquo; in<em> Human and Other Animals: Critical Perspectives</em>, Bob Carter and Nickie Charles eds. (New York: Palgrave McMillian, 2011), 133.<br /> 5. Henri Bergson, <em>Creative Evolution</em>, trans. Arthur Mitchell (New York: Dover Publications Inc., 1998), 110.<br /> 6. Brian Massumi, <em>What Animals Teach Us About Politics</em> (Durham &amp; London: Duke University Press, 2014), 1-54.<br /> 7. Loader and Plenzich limited the amount of time each caterpillar spent drawing to one hour. They used insects from local colonies, and ensured they were fed and cared for throughout their lifecycle. They also selected charcoal dust as a medium because it is non-toxic. In North America, there are no protocols for working ethically with insects.<br /> 8. Op. cit., 23.<br /> 9. Ibid., 19.<br /> 10. Felicity Muth, &ldquo;Fake Jewels: Male Spiders Give Worthless Gifts to Entice Females,&rdquo; <em>Scientific American</em>, May 5, 2014, blogs.scientificamerican.com/not-bad-science/fake-jewels-male-spiders-give-worthless-gifts-toentice-females.<br /> <br /> above photo taken by William Eakin<br /> &nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align:justify"><strong>Emily Falvey</strong> is an independent art critic and curator based in Montreal, Canada. She is known primarily for her critical writing, which has been published by a wide range of Canadian museums, public galleries, and artist-run-centres. In 2009, the Canada Council for the Arts awarded her the Joan Yvonne Lowndes Award for excellence in critical and curatorial writing, and she received curatorial writing awards from the Ontario Association of Art Galleries in 2006 and 2012. As Curator of Contemporary Art at the Ottawa Art Gallery (2004-2008), she organized a variety of solo, group, and travelling exhibitions. She is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History at the Universit&eacute; du Qu&eacute;bec &agrave; Montr&eacute;al, where she is working on a dissertation examining the relationship between the grotesque work of art and commodity fetishism.<br /> <br /> <strong>apexart</strong>&rsquo;s programs are supported in part by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Buhl Foundation, the Degenstein Foundation, Lambent Foundation Fund of Tides Foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies, The Greenwich Collection Ltd., Affirmation Arts Fund, the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, the Fifth Floor Foundation, and with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.</p> <p style="text-align:justify"><br /> An Unsolicited Exhibition Program winning exhibition.<br /> Learn more about the <a href="https://apexart.org/unsolicited.php" target="_blank">Unsolicited Exhibition Program</a>.</p> Thu, 15 Dec 2016 12:11:39 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Art in General - February 23rd 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align:justify">Art in General is pleased to announce an exhibition with Freya Powell as part of its New Commissions Program. The collective works on view engage issues around distance, separation, and empathy in relationship to various landscapes. The show will feature Powell&rsquo;s new video,&nbsp;<em>The Silence of the Unsaid</em>. This project traces the history of an Athena missile that was launched by the U.S. military in July of 1970 from a base in Green River, Utah to test re-entry speeds and impact. The missile lost control, went about 400 miles off course, and crashed in a Mexican desert known locally as the &ldquo;Zone of Silence.&rdquo; It was carrying two containers of Cobalt-57, a radioactive element. Powell traveled to this desert with questions about the silence surrounding the clean up of the crashed missile, as well as the myth that has since built on this history.</p> <p style="text-align:justify">Related works presented in the exhibition include the three-channel video&nbsp;<em>Our Disappearance is Already There&nbsp;</em>(2015). This silent piece shows the physical distance between New York City&rsquo;s public and potter&rsquo;s field, located on Hart Island in the Bronx. The seemingly abandoned island that holds over a million deceased is seen from two vantage points, as it is circumnavigated by the camera. In contemplating the separation currently enforced by the Department of Corrections around the public space of the cemetery, the project calls into question the value of life, and how lives are allowed to be grievable or not through frames of reference such as shared experience, nationality, or humanness. Shown concurrently is a text-based artwork&mdash;evocative of epitaphs, Powell&rsquo;s word lists play with repetition of language to trigger sentiments that echo the separation that is unequivocally felt. The artist states &ldquo;it is through the incorporation of forced distancing that disassociation is evoked, and one&rsquo;s ability to empathize is often diminished.&rdquo;</p> Wed, 22 Feb 2017 19:23:09 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Eko Nugroho - Asia Society Museum - December 20th, 2016 - April 16th <p style="text-align: justify;">Eko Nugroho&rsquo;s multidisciplinary practice uses humor to address social issues, including changes within the rapidly urbanizing society of his native Indonesia, the risk of religious fanaticism, and the breaking of traditional taboos by the younger generation. This exhibition features three single-channel video works by Nugroho from the Asia Society Museum Collection: <em>Bercerobong (Like a Chimney)</em>, 2002; <em>The Breeder</em>, 2003; and <em>Let Me Love Me</em>, 2004. The exhibition complements a site-specific installation to be created by the artist in the Asia Society Visitor Center and the world premiere of his commissioned performance In the Name of Semelah, with his theater company Wayang Bocor, at Asia Society in January 2017.</p> Fri, 30 Sep 2016 03:59:50 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list