Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Katrina Majkut Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48765-under-the-radar-genevieve-goffman-katrina-majkut-sheelah-mahalath-bewley" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/181750-katrina-majkut" target="_blank">Katrina Majkut</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>At first, I wanted to push the medium of embroidery itself by incorporating observational painting and freeform techniques. This enabled me to challenge notions of fine art as they relate to stereotypical &ldquo;domestic crafts.&rdquo; Simultaneously, in researching for my book, <em>The Adventures and Discoveries of a Feminist Bride</em>, I started to understand how social traditions embedded with obsolete gender roles influenced both social, domestic and textile traditions. For example, how the white wedding dress relates to virginity and the wedding cake relates to fertility and procreation. This awakened me to how the stereotypical subjects in embroidery promote outdated and biased gendering that affects women&rsquo;s private and public parity. Ultimately, I want to modernize the medium in process, content, and impact.</p> <p>By stitching every modern product related to women&rsquo;s health, bodies, and family planning, I&rsquo;m also raising awareness as to how complicated these issues are. Most people have a preexisting personal opinion on the matter, but when they are confronted by my unbiased, medical still lives, I&rsquo;ve observed that many viewers realize they know little to nothing about the medical scope of products, medications, and items women and their doctors must contend with on a daily basis (and sometimes this educational moment happens to the women themselves). I hope the artwork starts a conversation about the importance of sex education, control, and learning to be empathetic with the medical or physical needs of the people who use them. I&rsquo;m also thinking a lot about how objectivity can actually incite intersectionalism.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180115130858-20171031200336-Majkut.Katrina.Nursing_Pads.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Nursing Pads</em>, 2017,&nbsp;Thread and nursing pads on aida cloth</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>This may sound dark but the reality is that an artist&rsquo;s responsibility is probably to themselves, but not limited to it. What an artist makes is just a response to the world around them and their feelings and their beliefs about their subject or medium. Otherwise, art runs the risk of appropriation and being inauthentic. Or if artists make work to meet someone else&rsquo;s demands (say the market&rsquo;s or their gallerist&rsquo;s, etc.) for saleability or to be popular, they are accused of selling out.</p> <p>Commissioners are hopefully completely on board with the artist&rsquo;s vision and authority. BUT, sometimes the id is tied to important issues of the day and then that responsibility to the self suddenly becomes selfless, for the benefit of others beyond the artist. Then, one&rsquo;s art takes on a cause greater than oneself, even if the self instigated or motivated the origins of the artwork. One could argue this paradox, in the case of socially engaged art (like my own).</p> <p>I often think about what type of art I would make if I weren&rsquo;t compelled to modernize biased mediums or subjects and wasn&rsquo;t devoted to feminist causes. Then I wonder if artists who can make art irrespective of social causes, who make art for art sake, are they exclusively creating from a seat of privilege? What would I be making in that situation then? I&rsquo;ve been debating this concept of art-making and content for a while now and no matter what idea-path I follow, it seems to ultimately come back to the self because the questions begin with: What does the artist want to make? What does an artist need to create to feel fulfilled&mdash;emotionally, physically, and spiritually? Like an artist? To make a mark on the world?</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180115130036-Sexual_Assault_Rape_Kit_with_Detail.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">From the series&nbsp;<em>In Control, </em>Detail and installation view of <em>Sexual Assault Evidence Collection Kit Installation</em> (A forensic rape kit deconstructed step by step), 2016&ndash;2017,&nbsp;15 Artworks, Found objects &amp; thread on Aida cloth</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>What a loaded and pressure-filled question! I think artists are more likely to have particular milestone artworks that represent a significant shift in their ideas, skills, and work so it&rsquo;s hard to nail down just one, but here goes nothing. I will say my entire series <em>In Control</em>, which I mentioned above. It currently stands at over fifty artworks and continues to grow. I can&rsquo;t even adequately comprehend what the sheer volume of artwork and the time and effort it took to make each individual artwork means. Stitching is laborious and tedious! And I&rsquo;m excited that its momentum continues to grow. It&rsquo;s developed in ways that I hadn&rsquo;t anticipated like having a narrative component to it. I wanted people to consider the importance of the objects I&rsquo;ve embroidered and to not push my own experience with them. Instead, viewers started sharing their own stories with me and other viewers and that has created a powerful dimension to the still life artwork. I also aim to be bipartisan and research-based, which I think is crucial in this post-fact and divided country.</p> <p>I&rsquo;m also still pretty blown away by how I created a kid over a year ago&mdash;the science behind creating life is just mindboggling. And, I&rsquo;m proud of the book I wrote.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180115131428-20171031200101-Consent_Is_Asking_Every_Time_Condom.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Consent Is Asking Every Time Condom</em>, 2017, Thread on aida cloth</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will: </strong></p> <p>I think it&rsquo;s better to phrase this in terms of what&rsquo;s on my wish list to make. I&rsquo;d like to make a to-scale cross-stitch of a mammography machine. All women will have to have a breast cancer screening at some point and those with breast cancer will experience this very uncomfortable machine. It&rsquo;s a huge piece of machinery that is anything but a pleasant experience. I&rsquo;d love to stitch it but the sheer magnitude of it presents both physical and time challenges. It&rsquo;s an important tool, but presenting it as part of this series would help raise awareness about the need for more amenable testing options, the importance of prescreening, and hopefully more empathy towards what women (and some men) must endure through it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180115130433-UpSpring_Breastmilk_Alcohol_Test_Strips.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>UpSpring Breast Milk Alcohol Test Strips</em>, 2017, Thread on aida cloth</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Cobi Moules: He&rsquo;s a thoughtful and masterful painter, and I love the humor to his work. <a href="http://www.cobimoules.com/" target="_blank">www.cobimoules.com</a></p> <p>Cayce Zavaglia: I&rsquo;m blown away at how she proves thread is as powerful as paint. <a href="http://www.caycezavaglia.com/" target="_blank">www.caycezavaglia.com</a></p> <p>Ari Eshoo: She&rsquo;s doing innovative things with found material that really push comfort zones. <a href="http://ari-eshoo.squarespace.com/portfolio/" target="_blank">ari-eshoo.squarespace.com</a></p> <p>Lindsey Kocur: She really pushes the conceptual limits of architectural and designed spaces. <a href="http://lindseykocur.com/home.html" target="_blank">lindseykocur.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<em>In Control 5</em>, 2017, Thread on aida cloth)</span></p> Mon, 15 Jan 2018 05:17:58 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Our New Residency is Now Accepting Applications | Process Park <table> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">We are proud to announce a new experimental residency created by ArtSlant in collaboration with Chashama.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Process Park</span></strong>&nbsp;is a funded four-week residency for 3-4 artists at&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.chashama.org/chanorth" style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;" target="_blank">chaNorth Artist Residency</a>&nbsp;<span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">in Pine Plains, NY, the goal of which is to learn to live and work better through a process-oriented approach to art making and existing. The residency will conclude with an exhibition/symposium in New York that will be conceived and planned as a group during the residency.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">The Spring 2018 residency&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">runs April 1&ndash;April 29</span>. Application <span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">deadline: February 10, 2018.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204002549-Process-park-logo-sq.jpg" style="height: 249px; width: 250px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong style="font-family: serif; font-size: large; text-align: center;"><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Apply&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/foundation/index/10">here</a></span></strong><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large; text-align: center;">.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park is designed to foster an engaged community through developing engaged individuals.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Artists and cultural producers need space and time to interrogate and refine the ways they work and create while retaining a sense of amateurism. To this end, Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">encourages research and play</span>. Through knowledge-sharing, making, and experimentation, this residency aims to generate deeper connections between people and the visual and material culture they consume.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">focuses on reinserting ourselves into the act of production</span>, to interrupt the paradigm of contemporary alienation. Residents will be encouraged to develop a stronger&nbsp;relationship to</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">&nbsp;the food we eat, the images we ingest, and the omnipresent algorithms that fundamentally shape our lives</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">. Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">pushes back on throw-away consumption</span>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">We ask participants to bring knowledge to share and a willingness to learn from the residency&rsquo;s facilitators, visitors, and co-residents.&nbsp;The emphasis will be on learning through doing. The goal is not only to share knowledge useful in art making but to share knowledge which will be useful in the practice of everyday life. Intensives take the form of teaching or&nbsp;learning the basics of a given skill in a day. Residents will practice those skills throughout the duration of the residency to incorporate that new knowledge into their lives.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">If we create what supports and sustains us and our practices, our investment in the world is made richer, deeper.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">includes Room &amp; Board for four weeks, educational intensives, and an exhibition/symposium in NYC.</span>&nbsp;Residents are encouraged to continue their own practices during the residency but are expected to participate in courses and scheduled group meals and events.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Application Requirements:</span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong>Who:</strong>&nbsp;All artists, cultural producers, writers, musicians, programmers, and researchers,&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">21+</span></strong>, looking to enrich their relationship with a mode of production are welcome to apply.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Course Proposal</span>:</strong>&nbsp;Residents will lead an intensive, one-day course, sharing a skill of their choice with other residents. This skill can be part of your practice or not. You don&rsquo;t need to be an expert but should feel comfortable enough that you can assist people in exploring a given area of knowledge. Your course proposal should be a brief description of the skill you want to teach, and how (max 250 words) and be entered into the field &ldquo;Statement of Intent&rdquo; on the application page.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Current intensives available by residency facilitators for Spring 2018 include planting, pickling, fermentation, basic HTML, felting, podcasting, clay-refinement, digital publishing, kiln and oven construction, and baking.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Further intensives will be proposed and offered by residents.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Statement of Intent</span>:</strong>&nbsp;Following your course proposal, your statement of intent should introduce your practice and provide a connection between your practice and what you hope Process Park will allow you to achieve within its unique parameters. Discuss what you will gain from this experience and what you can bring to the group&rsquo;s dynamic. How would a process-based approach inform your practice going forward? How do you envision using your time at Process Park?&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">(max 500 words)</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Please also include c</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">ontact information for&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">two references</span></strong>&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">and your<strong>&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">CV</span></strong>.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">You must apply using your&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">ArtSlant Profile.</span></strong>&nbsp;Sign up&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/intros/plans" target="_blank">here</a>&nbsp;if you don&#39;t have one already. Use your profile to include supporting images or texts for your application.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Questions? See the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/articles/show/48841-faq-process-park" target="_blank">FAQ</a>. Still have questions? Email us at&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:process@artslant.com" style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">process@artslant.com</a>.&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p style="line-height: 24px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:22px;"><span style="font-family: serif;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Apply&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/foundation/index/10">here</a></span></strong>.</span></span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.chashama.org/"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204003616-chashama-logo-2017.png" style="width: 280px; height: 60px;" /></a></td> <td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204003642-ArtSlant-Logo-2014-01.jpg" style="width: 245px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Wed, 10 Jan 2018 10:04:14 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Informers: Ryan Steadman on Better Criticism Through Painting <p>In this series of interviews for ArtSlant, I wanted to talk to artists who are also involved in criticism or theory. There are any number of &ldquo;crossovers&rdquo; across creative and critical disciplines: Julian Schnabel is a painter and a filmmaker; Mel Bochner is a painter who has also been a good art reviewer.&nbsp; However&mdash;using Barnett Newman, and more recently Mira Schor, as examples, as well as the quirky Robert Smithson&rsquo;s dystopian fantasy world&mdash;I&rsquo;d like to focus on artists who broaden their field through criticism, writing, or curating. I&rsquo;m kicking off the series in conversation with the painter and writer Ryan Steadman about his paintings of books&mdash;possibly the best visual work currently addressing some ideas of art and its relationship to contemporary criticism&mdash;his writing, and Zombie Formalism.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180110154940-DSC08606.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ryan Steadman,&nbsp;<em>Headless West</em>, 2017, Oil on canvas, 21 x 10 x 10 inches. Photo: Safe Gallery</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Bradley Rubenstein:</strong> <strong>I want to talk a bit about some of the ways I see your work fitting into this series of talks. First, though, can you talk a little about your background and your own work?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ryan Steadman: </strong>Well, I went to Pratt Institute in 1998 for graduate school as a painter and have lived in Brooklyn ever since. There was a lot to learn about painting there, but what struck me most was the excellent art criticism program (Marjorie Welish, Robert Morgan), and that quickly became an interest as well, though I didn&rsquo;t really write until much later on, around 2008.</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> <strong>And what was the point at which you went from making things to thinking about how making things fits into a larger picture?</strong></p> <p><strong>RS: </strong>That&rsquo;s a good question. I&rsquo;ve worked for a few galleries over the years, so I&rsquo;ve seen how the sausage gets made (so to speak), but working at Feature Inc., owned by the late Hudson, perhaps taught me the most about a holistic approach to art. By that I mean I witnessed a gallery being run as an art project, staffed by artists, writers, and curators. This was long before the return of artist-run spaces, yet everyone who was a part of Feature Inc. didn&rsquo;t seem to locate their artistic output within one simple medium or practice. It was a good energy. Sorry, I sound like a hippie.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180110154500-aintings_install.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of <em>Ain&rsquo;tings</em>, Curated by Ryan Steadman, Robert Blumenthal Gallery, March 20&mdash;April 26, 2014, Works by George-Henry Longly, Ryan Wallace, Aaron Aujla</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> <strong>I thought that much of your work for <em>Observer</em> was really good art writing. I liked how you and Walter Robinson complemented each other there. He has sort of a Restoration-period feel to his writing, while I kind of pictured you as Christopher Isherwood. The 2014 talk that you and he did where the phrase &ldquo;Zombie Formalism&rdquo; was coined&mdash;how did that happen?</strong></p> <p><strong>RS:</strong> That was a very strange time, I suppose because of the market. I had been interested in, among other things, NYC artists who were looking back to Arte Povera for inspiration, creating abstract objects and wall works with found objects, but less with actual trash and more with product surplus. There was also an interest in how industry was coming closer and closer to mimicking the &ldquo;tricks&rdquo; of painting. It felt very American, I suppose. My interest culminated in a show I put together called <em><a href="http://www.robertblumenthal.com/exhibitions/aintings" target="_blank">Ain&rsquo;tings</a></em>. The irony is that, by this time, in 2014, I was already feeling pretty critical about the next generation of these artists, who produced cookie-cutter, high-turnover, and, of course, market-friendly works for a generation of copycat collectors who rated art like stocks. Though I wouldn&rsquo;t have termed it Zombie Formalism, I had the instinct to call out this work for over a year when Walter dropped <a href="https://www.artspace.com/magazine/contributors/see_here/the_rise_of_zombie_formalism-52184" target="_blank">his great piece</a>, which many in the art world appreciated. It was a great catchphrase, and Walter kept the ball rolling with opportunities like the SVA <a href="http://www.sva.edu/events/archive/zombie-formalism-and-other-recent-speculations-in-abstraction" target="_blank">talk</a>. (Stefan Simchowitz was originally supposed to be on that panel, which would&rsquo;ve been fantastic.)</p> <p>At any rate, I think people craved a retro &ldquo;fire and brimstone&rdquo; critic because everything started to feel like a press release, and Walter&rsquo;s intelligent yet down-to-earth writing countered that. He wasn&rsquo;t afraid to say &ldquo;I hate that.&rdquo; Another irony is that Walter&rsquo;s painting got a big critical boost after that, so he immediately started writing less! I was&mdash;and still am&mdash;maybe more even-handed as a critic. I honestly don&rsquo;t think many artists get into this with a &ldquo;scheme&rdquo; in mind. Artists lose the thread because of money or other reasons, but almost all of them have made <em>something</em> with some inspiration involved and a yearning to communicate. I try to always remember that, even when I&rsquo;m being very critical. Maybe I am a hippie?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180110154408-c0b491d4788c8caab0ec7139a655755b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of <em>Ain&rsquo;tings</em>, Curated by Ryan Steadman, Robert Blumenthal Gallery, March 20&mdash;April 26, 2014, Works by Ryan Estep, Graham Collins</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> <strong>The &ldquo;aha&rdquo; moment with regard to your writing happened when I read the &ldquo;<a href="http://observer.com/2016/06/gimme-shelter-why-artists-are-using-abstraction-to-hide-their-faces/" target="_blank">Gimme Shelter</a>&rdquo; piece. This really struck me as almost a throwback to Greenberg and Rosenberg&mdash;someone looking at paintings and thinking about them on many levels&mdash;psychological, historical, anthropological. And, of course, I found myself thinking, yeah, that&rsquo;s how I think about painting, too. It also seemed like the inverse of Zombie Formalism. First you have a &ldquo;movement&rdquo; of work that is bereft of aesthetic and moral value, then one comes along to correct it.</strong></p> <p><strong>RS:</strong> Thank you. That was really fun to write. I don&rsquo;t know how many people read it, though [laughs]. For the record, I think these kinds of &ldquo;corrections&rdquo; are mostly about fashion, particularly when it comes to painting where new variables are few and far between. The way I see it, certain artists, like a Sergej Jensen in 2005 for instance, help make a style&mdash;something that would eventually be described as Zombie Formalism&mdash;popular through their own originality. Because of his rise in visibility and the fact that he&rsquo;s an excellent artist, Jensen&rsquo;s work inspired many, many young artists. So five to ten years later, the style he helped energize was overwhelmingly prevalent, and since there are more bad and mediocre artists than there are good ones, you start seeing lots of bad examples of what you can loosely file under the term Zombie Formalism. It&rsquo;s not rocket science, and I don&rsquo;t think there&rsquo;s anything malicious about it&mdash;it&rsquo;s a natural series of events. Look at all the bad figurative painting we&rsquo;re seeing right now. But I think what&rsquo;s new is how compressed&mdash;meaning, fast&mdash;the fashion cycles have become, and you have to wonder if ultimately it&rsquo;s detrimental to all of the artists involved.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180110154324-You_Have_to_Laugh.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ryan Steadman, <em>You Have to Laugh</em>, 2016, Oil and paper on canvas, 10 x 8 x 1.25 inches. Photo: the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> <strong>So, one of the things I have noted in a lot of contemporary painting is the use of satire as a way of conveying a political position. I think that relates a lot to much of the criticism out there, too. You and Walter both captured something of that in your writing, and looking at your painting I feel that there&rsquo;s some aspect of that, too. At a very basic level you are making unreadable books, for example.</strong></p> <p><strong>RS: </strong>That&rsquo;s an interesting take. When I came out of school I started looking closely at a generation of ironic or satirical artists like Lisa Yuskavage and Sean Landers, and my own paintings were originally a paired down form of &ldquo;slapstick&rdquo; narratives. I would say that the current book paintings definitely court an ironic reading by simply focusing on the &ldquo;aesthetic&rdquo; of reading material rather than its content, but I&rsquo;d like to think the paintings are as much an earnest questioning of how and why these things came to be.&nbsp;They&rsquo;re also inspired by a love of the artistic precedents that fueled some of these aesthetics, such as Josef Albers.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180110154241-30.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ryan Steadman, <em>Garden Theory</em>, 2015, Oil on canvas, 10 x 8 x 1.5 inches. Photo: Joseph Parra</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> <strong>Yeah, that word &ldquo;earnest&rdquo; is key to this discussion. From a literary point of view one really has to love, or be immersed in the subject in order to address it satirically, or critically. I see that in your paintings, yet the irony of &ldquo;books that can&rsquo;t be read&rdquo; as a sort of momento mori is very powerful. I think what this brings up in a way is the relationship between the contemporary viewer and the producer of a text or image. I have seen some really good writing addressing both sides of this&mdash;Michel Houellebecq, for example, really investigates the limits of satire, while there are other voices suggesting that the current audience often fails to see it, thus becoming the butt of the joke. Ashley Bickerton&rsquo;s work in the 80s, for example, was a really biting satire of the art world and art market at the time. I do see artists trying to achieve that currently, like Angela Dufresne, but I think there is a sense of complacency in a lot of viewers that undermines that effort.</strong></p> <p><strong>RS: </strong>If a tree falls in the woods and everyone in town says the sound it made was thunder, does that mean it was thunder? Of course not. But the uninformed audience can still create that narrative. In that case, the viewers are being complacent by not investigating the noise, but they&rsquo;re under no obligation to. That&rsquo;s why I think it&rsquo;s now more important than ever for an artist to find his/her specific audience as soon as possible, because those are the people interested enough to investigate your work and, eventually, become messengers for the work. Because after all, it&rsquo;s just art. The vast majority of people approach it looking either for decoration or banal commonalities (e.g., the picture has a golfer in it and I like golf).</p> <p>But yes, I think there&rsquo;s so much about books that oddly ignite emotions in me. I distinctly remember, having been a struggling reader early on, the intense tedium of books. But today I miss the leisure time that reading books afforded. No one I know has that kind of time available to them, except my young daughter. So maybe there is a mourning of lost youth or lost time in the work?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180110154203-Image.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ryan Steadman, Installation view from <em><a href="http://karmakarma.org/private/20238461938/tumblr_m1rj8uoxIm1qiyeuk" target="_blank">The Painted Word</a></em>, 2012, Karma</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> <strong>Do you separate the ideas and subject matter you write about from your studio work, or do you see one as elaborating on another? There are a lot of topics that are easier to tackle in writing, I think, that would be difficult to address in a painting.</strong></p> <p><strong>RS: </strong>I think as far as my writing goes, the ideas and subjects are fairly separate from what I&rsquo;m pursuing in the studio. For one, the media outlet often determines what is written about, and second, I feel as if I really need to do the research and expand my knowledge base in order to adequately write about a new artist or show. That being said, I cannot help but have a certain point of view that I bring to both my art and my writing, and the work I&rsquo;m writing about will often inspire my own studio process. I would say my writing vacillates between stumping for art that I <em>know</em> is good and needs more recognition, and art that feels foreign and can teach me something new.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180110154110-23.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ryan Steadman, <em>Blue Blazes at Dawn</em>, 2017, Oil on canvas, 19 x 12 x 7 inches. Photo: Joseph Parra</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> <strong>You just showed your own work at Safe Gallery in Williamsburg. Can you talk a little about the new paintings?</strong></p> <p><strong>RS: </strong>Yes, it was a <a href="http://safegallery.biz/AS_RS" target="_blank">two-person show</a> with the painter Anna Schachte, who makes lively and freewheeling abstractions that riff off of letters of the alphabet. Though I&rsquo;ve often shown my work on the wall, this show gave me the chance to really position the pieces as &ldquo;sculpture&rdquo; more than ever before. I&rsquo;ve always considered the work to be a synthesis of painting and sculpture, since the canvases are painted in the round so as to further emulate books (with spines and pages), but this is the first time I&rsquo;ve shown most of these paintings flat, and it really emphasizes all the different angles of them. On top of that, this is the first show where I&rsquo;ve created &ldquo;assemblages&rdquo; of the books. I started by simply stacking them on top of each other to highlight new color and line combinations, but that led to even more acrobatic experimentations.</p> <p>Those ideas came after some talks with the artist Ethan Greenbaum, who selfishly wanted me to expose the backs of my canvases in novel ways. (Ethan often turns accidentally exposed parts of buildings into luminous and mystical objects through his own multi-pronged art process.) It was a great idea, of course, and I also happened to be very into the animated geometries of Joel Shapiro at the time. I think it just furthers how I&rsquo;ve wanted to push the aesthetic focus of the book into the spotlight. I like relating books to paintings, an art form that &ldquo;died&rdquo; and then had to be loved for its pure form instead of its function. The book is going through something similar, what with information moving to the internet. It&rsquo;s absurd that we still have all these giant, heavy books lying around, but we still like them, I guess.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/216789-bradley-rubenstein?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Bradley Rubenstein</a></p> <p><em>Bradley Rubenstein is a New York-based artist and writer.</em>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 12px;">Ryan Steadman,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px;">The Village Green</em><span style="font-size: 12px;">, 2017, Oil on canvas, 14 x 11 x 1.5 inches. Photo: Joseph Parra</span><span style="font-size: 12px;">)</span></p> Thu, 11 Jan 2018 05:58:57 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Jan Christopher-Berkson Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/46094-b-stylecolor-333333under-the-radar-jan-christopher-berkson-stephanie-j-ryan-nash-bellowsb" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from </em><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/193078-jan-christopher-berkson?tab=PROFILE" target="_blank">Jan Christopher-Berkson</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>My practice is anchored in the image-making process and invested in generating relationships with and between images. Using basic materials like canvas, wood, and paint, my work often takes on a distinct spatiality as a point of departure to bring into focus sharp-edge geometric shapes, and occasional representational images, interplayed with color.</p> <p>My works of the past year or so contain the sense that they are creating another existence within their boundaries, the titles alluding to current political regret and fear. Whether a work has representational aspects or is purely abstracted, the viewer may attempt to order the imagery into a cogent scene that reflects perceptive reality, or the possibility of fantasy. In this way it is my goal to create synthetic structures to deal with my everyday sense of chaos and lack of control over real structures that exist in daily life&mdash;thus having a place to reorganize and compartmentalize feelings.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180108100006-20171211172924-Sundial.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Sundial</em>,&nbsp; 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 54 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>An artist&rsquo;s responsibility is to create their work from within their own experience. Whether an artwork is purely about beauty, politics, or cultural disrespect, its execution should come internally from the artist&rsquo;s expressive experience.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)? </strong></p> <p>I always think the last painting I made was the greatest thing I ever made until its been hanging around in my studio for a while, haha. So that would be this:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180108094718-20171213201320-YearInReview.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Year In Review</em>, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 52 x 50 inches</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:&nbsp; </strong></p> <p>I never say never&hellip; but I would like to continue with 2D work taking up a 3D space.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Angela Hoener: <a href="http://angelahoener.com" target="_blank">http://angelahoener.com</a><br /> Tully Satre: <a href="http://www.tullysatre.com" target="_blank">http://www.tullysatre.com</a><br /> Paul VerBurg: <a href="http://www.verburgstudio.com" target="_blank">http://www.verburgstudio.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<em>Slow Burn</em>, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 50 x 50 inches)</span></p> Mon, 08 Jan 2018 02:05:24 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list No, Donald Trump Is Not a Conceptual Artist. And Border Walls Are Not “Land Art” <p>I read the press release three times back to back, looking for any hint of irony. Or even confirmation of sincerity. I parsed the website, hoping an &ldquo;about&rdquo; page or mission statement could set my bearings. What exactly is MAGA, the &ldquo;non-profit arts organization&rdquo; <a href="https://www.borderwallprototypes.org/sign-now/" target="_blank">petitioning</a> the U.S. Government to designate the eight border wall prototypes erected outside of San Diego a national monument?</p> <p>The eight prototypes, constructed by six firms and built using $3.3 million in federal funds, were unveiled back in October. MAGA&rsquo;s petition to garner them protected status asserts their &ldquo;significant cultural value,&rdquo; and summons the Antiquities Act of 1906. The accompanying exhibition <em><a href="https://www.borderwallprototypes.org/" target="_blank">PROTOTYPES</a> </em>christens the walls &ldquo;land art&rdquo; and, from December 21, 2017, began offering tours from the Mexican side of the border.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180105150437-P1000585.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Courtesy of&nbsp;MAGA / Bjarni Grimsson</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p>With a press release and hashtags (#MAGA, #borderwall) so completely and absurdly deadpan, you&rsquo;re forgiven for not knowing whether you&rsquo;re in on or falling for some sort of joke. &ldquo;The walls are part of a multi-pronged security strategy to prevent the illegal migration of people, drugs, and human trafficking, and acts of terrorism,&rdquo; describes the project announcement, &ldquo;and are part of a border enforcement zone, which includes patrol roads, lights and surveillance technology.&rdquo; Enlightening, thanks. But are they art? Are they monuments? <em>Should </em>they be?</p> <p>The project, it turns out, is the brainchild of Swiss-Icelandic artist Christoph B&uuml;chel, who is something of an art world provocateur. Besides &ldquo;making art great again,&rdquo; MAGA claims to &ldquo;<a href="https://www.borderwallprototypes.org/mission/" target="_blank">question and adapt to the changing definitions of art.</a>&rdquo; <em>PROTOTYPES </em>is the first project, though a spokesperson tells me future projects are &ldquo;in planning.&rdquo;</p> <p>I&rsquo;m sympathetic to the mission of redefining what a monument is, thinking about how meaning and value are created and imbued, by and for whom. I even agree that, when viewed together, the prototypes are evocative of giant minimalist stelae. In fact, scrolling through images of the wall fragments is not unlike looking at Bernd and Hilla Becher&rsquo;s <a href="https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/typologies-industrial-buildings" target="_blank">industrial architectural typologies</a> (they too, sought to preserve their subject matter, helping at least one building get designation as a protected landmark).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052446?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180105150854-DSC_0535.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052459?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180105150910-DSC_0600.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052458?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180105150927-DSC_0546.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy of&nbsp;MAGA / Bjarni Grimsson</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>But B&uuml;chel swears he has no political stake or opinion here. &ldquo;My political position, that&rsquo;s not interesting in this context,&rdquo; he told the <em><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/03/arts/design/is-donald-trump-wall-builder-in-chief-a-conceptual-artist.html?_r=1">New York Times</a></em> this week, among other equivocal statements including, &ldquo;I am an artist, but not the artist of this,&rdquo; and &ldquo;This is a collective sculpture; people elected this artist.&rdquo; Without taking a critical position <em>PROTOTYPES</em>, as exhibition and petition, amounts to little more than a 30-foot-tall sight gag. <em>Haha, look! Those disembodied walls look like minimalist desert land art!</em>&nbsp;They sure do. But to label them as such is a dangerous desire.</p> <p>They most certainly have &ldquo;value,&rdquo; even beyond their price tag. But what they represent also has consequences, sometimes life or death consequences, primarily for people on the south side of the wall. <em>PROTOTYPES </em>turns trauma into a punch line. It sanitizes the embodiment of the worst impulses in the American psyche: xenophobia, jingoism, racism. These compulsions are worth remembering, lest history repeat itself, but they are not worth honoring or protecting. America has always had these tendencies, has made carceral institutions from them, has erected monuments to racism and division. <em>PROTOTYPES </em>plays the inverse of the contemporary movement to deconstruct these monuments.</p> <p>MAGA takes the walls not as an instructive or cautionary tale, but at face value, offering little explanation of <em>why</em> they deserve protection. &ldquo;It takes a great deal of time and thought to install work carefully,&rdquo; intones the MAGA mission statement. &ldquo;This should not always be thrown away. Most art is fragile and some should be placed and never moved again.&nbsp;Instead of causing us to remember the past like the old monuments, the new monuments seem to cause us to forget the future.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180105151242-mission_brighter.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy of&nbsp;MAGA / Bjarni Grimsson</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Being neither Mexican nor North American, what investment does Christoph B&uuml;chel have in these monoliths? Is this what happens when conceptual artists start treating the United States the way the United States treats the &ldquo;Third World&rdquo;? &ldquo;Let me make this monument for you so you can reflect on how bad you have it,&rdquo; the project seems to say. Such a sentiment would, at least, be taking a position. B&uuml;chel hasn&rsquo;t even done that.</p> <p>As a cornerstone of one of the most contentious political campaigns in recent history, the proposed border wall has been fertile territory for artists. Postcommodity has made work about the border for years, such as the porous&nbsp;<em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43976" target="_blank">Repellent Fence</a> </em>(2015). t.Rutt went ahead and <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/09/arts/design/artists-begin-building-trumps-border-wall-sending-mexico-the-bill.html?_r=0" target="_blank">started building a wall</a> to reflect how President Trump&rsquo;s policies would affect agricultural and service sectors. Last year artists <a href="http://www.latina.com/lifestyle/our-issues/artists-mock-trumps-border-wall-prototypes" target="_blank">projected light onto the prototypes</a> and <a href="http://time.com/4977283/artist-stages-picnic-on-us-mexico-border/" target="_blank">threw a picnic</a> bisecting the current wall. MAGA&rsquo;s is not even the first petition-as-artistic-gesture. Before Trump took office last January, conceptual artist Luis Camnitzer <a href="https://www.change.org/p/donald-trump-commission-christo-with-an-orange-running-fence-that-separates-the-u-s-from-mexico" target="_blank">petitioned</a> the President Elect to commission land artist Christo to build the wall. When Trump issued the call for proposals last March, Pittsburgh-based collective J.M. Design&nbsp;Studio <a href="https://hyperallergic.com/371966/from-a-row-of-hammocks-to-one-million-gravestones-an-art-collectives-alternative-border-wall-proposals/" target="_blank">proffered</a>&nbsp;such designs as &ldquo;A Wall of Hammocks&rdquo; and &ldquo;A Wall of Pipe Organs,&rdquo; and &ldquo;A Wall of Gravestones for Migrants And Refugees.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180105151406-_D6G7120crop.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy of&nbsp;MAGA / Bjarni Grimsson</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In a <a href="http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-ca-cm-building-type-border-wall-20171231-htmlstory.html" target="_blank">recent meditation</a> on the prototypes, <em>LA Times</em> architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne undertook a kindred exercise, attempting to consider the prototypes as architecture worthy of critique. He even characterizes the installation as an &ldquo;odd open-air architecture gallery.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;All of a sudden my critical instincts seemed divided against themselves,&rdquo; he writes. &ldquo;The slabs in front of me seemed at once the most and least architectural objects I&rsquo;d ever seen. They were banal and startling, full and empty of meaning. Here were the techniques of Land Art, medieval construction, marketing and promotion, architectural exhibition and the new nativism rolled uncomfortably if somehow inevitably into one.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hawthorne at least grapples with the challenge and even futility of his undertaking, though he ultimately focuses more on political symbolism than the lived realities of the people most affected by the wall&rsquo;s erection. He muses on the physical and rhetorical meaning of building a wall&mdash;what he calls a &ldquo;political weapon&rdquo;&mdash;ultimately concluding that &ldquo;these sections of wall are better understood for their collective symbolism than as competing entries in a genuine design competition.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180105151454-P1000218_corr.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy of&nbsp;MAGA / Bjarni Grimsson</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>By not staking a claim, by not taking a position&mdash;even a questionable one&mdash;B&uuml;chel dooms his experiment to failure, while inoculating himself against critique, because, hey, &ldquo;I&rsquo;m not the artist.&rdquo; How many times must we repeat that&nbsp;simply appropriating something wholesale, does not <em>on its own&nbsp;</em>constitute meaningful critique?&nbsp;Art need not be beautiful; art can be readymade. No one would argue that in 2018. But just because you can call something art with little effort, doesn&rsquo;t mean you should. The prototypes are not aesthetic gestures: they are instrumental. They have a political purpose not so easily cast off. B&uuml;chel&rsquo;s lazy sleight of hand, thankfully, does little to transform these walls into something more than what they are. <em>PROTOTYPES </em>is turning out to be a successful (outrage-)PR stunt, but it&rsquo;s bad conceptual art.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrea Alessi</a></p> <p background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" times=""><em>Andrea Alessi is the Managing Editor of ArtSlant.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Courtesy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection / Yesica Uvina<strong>)</strong></span></p> Fri, 05 Jan 2018 14:46:44 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Karin Ferrari: Portrait of the Artist as a YouTube Conspiracy Theorist <p><em background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">We run an online magazine, so of course, we&rsquo;re interested in what&rsquo;s happening with art on the web. Every other Wednesday online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.karinferrari.com/index.php/de/" target="_blank">Karin Ferrari</a> was one of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48758-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-the-wrong-edition" target="_blank">my favorite discoveries</a> from the latest edition of <a href="http://thewrong.org/" target="_blank">The Wrong</a> digital art biennale. Her <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/squeakingdaisies/videos" target="_blank">work</a>&nbsp;emulates the conspiracy theory videos that have become a ubiquitous part of YouTube culture. Ferrari so perfectly captures the mood and aesthetic of these videos that the line between artistic creation and genuine belief becomes completely blurred.</p> <p>Many viewers, unaware that these videos&mdash;a decoding of Illuminati symbolism in an&nbsp;Azealia Banks&rsquo; music video, for example&mdash;were created by an artist, accept them at face value. The YouTube comments sections are a testament to how seriously and thoroughly Ferrari approaches her works&rsquo; creation. Fall down the rabbit hole Ferrari has excavated, and you&rsquo;ll find her videos are ripe for generating complex conspiracy theories of their own!</p> <p>Though Ferrari&rsquo;s videos focus on a relatively small corner of the web, they deftly provide unique and unexpected insights into the nature and meaning of the internet and contemporary culture as a whole&mdash;even if we are left with more questions than answers.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QMSQcdnr2xQ" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: When did you first become aware of the existence of the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>Karin Ferrari:</strong> I was held captive in a satanic cult as a spiritual medium and came into contact with the internet quite late.</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you describe your early experiences of the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> I was the administrator of the closed group Facebook page for the satanic cult.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first understand the creative possibilities of the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> 2009. I got caught up deep into the rabbit hole of the weird part of YouTube. I worked at a museum for applied arts at that time as a curatorial assistant for design. After watching, for the whole weekend, badly produced educational videos with trashy techno background music about various Alien species living among us I realized that this touches me way more deeply than most white cube art products.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/N-9xai73_n8" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What was your favorite product of popular culture when you were a kid?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> I liked He-man so much. I remember running around the apartment and shouting &ldquo;By the power of Greyskull!&rdquo; in Italian. For a very long time I considered him to be a grown up girl who did not turn into a woman.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103124746-1_gif_heman.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Did you question authority when you were young?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> I was a very happy sweet child. I don&rsquo;t know where this came from but there was a phase when I couldn&rsquo;t stop thinking &ldquo;God is bad, the devil is good.&rdquo; These thoughts just popped up sometimes. I must explain I come from a traditionally Catholic region. South Tyrol, it&rsquo;s in the Italian Alps. Cows and churches everywhere. It&rsquo;s beautiful. I was six years old and the religion teacher brought us to church for our first confession. And amongst the other children making up fake crimes in order to have something to talk about, there I was having a theological crisis. The priest was cool about it. I guess because the devil is at the innermost core of their secret teachings.</p> <p><strong>CP: You studied painting at college. What were your paintings like and how did you</strong><strong> transition to digital art?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> Yes, I am an academic painter and still draw. I experimented with materials, surrealist narratives, and gestural abstraction. My new drawings incorporate internet imagery, the aesthetics of digital image production, and neotrash materialism. They are inspired by vapor wave aesthetics and pulp fantasy illustrations and feature a fascination with the utopian desires of esoteric pop and consumer capitalism.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103124857-2_mimetic_vengeance_Kopie.jpg" width="100%" /></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103124919-3_starpictureslow_Kopie.jpg" width="100%" /></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103124935-4_IMG_2611_Kopie.jpg" width="100%" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first become interested in alternatives to mainstream thinking?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> As a child I loved to be upside down and stare at the ceiling until it started to look like a floor.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103125435-5_giphy-downsized-large.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you fist become aware of the idea of hidden symbolism in mainstream culture?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> On a Sunday afternoon during summer break there was a broadcast of &ldquo;They live&rdquo; by John Carpenter. &ldquo;They live&rdquo;&hellip; I wonder if that&rsquo;s a reference to images as well, that images are alive.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103125526-6_they_live.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: In another interview I read you describe yourself and life with three words: Aliens, sex, and paranoia. Can you explain these choices further?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> Being alive is about exploring the unknown. Meeting otherness. Sometimes it scares you, sometimes you want to fuck it.</p> <p><strong>CP: Is paranoia a reasonable/logical reaction to the modern world?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> Yes. Paranoid imagination is a natural backlash against paranoid politix&mdash;they are part of the same coin. For me as an artist, paranoia is interesting because it shows how powerful the creative mind is, bending the world towards our beliefs. We do that all the time without even realizing. It&rsquo;s always the same principle in magic, meme magic, advertising, and quantum physics: attention creates reality.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103125552-7_meme_classified.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: The internet vastly expanded a relatively small subculture of conspiracy theorists. What factors do you think caused this?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> The internet is a veritable conspiracy theory generator, and at the same time it operates the invisible stalking gaze of global surveillance programs, military espionage, data-mining, micro-targeting, etc. The internet is a creepy echo chamber for several recursive levels of communication and control. The Google Chrome browser compresses this wicked dynamic into one icon: three superimposed sixes spinning like a whirlpool around their circular center (does the circular center represent the empty gaze of a non-sentient artificial super-intelligence from another dimension, reigned by chaos and decay, that spreads into our human realm through infected technological devices?). I assume everyone knows that the numerical value of www is 666.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103125739-8_googlechrome.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103125812-9_giphy.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103125848-10_sophia.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> I examine images and symbols of pop culture and everyday culture in order to analyze the present. My video series<em> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3hA50KuyDlwkCb4UhA9b0g" target="_blank">DECODING (THE WHOLE TRUTH)</a> </em>reveals hidden messages in music videos and TV clips. It is inspired by counter-cultural YouTube videos that try to understand &ldquo;what&rsquo;s really going on.&rdquo; I deal with and create speculative narratives on the threshold of academic theory, spiritual utopian desires, and paranoid political imagination.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103125934-16_diagram.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When and why did you first decide to make work exploring that world?</strong><strong> What was the motivation behind your <em>The Whole Truth</em> series?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> After binge watching videos about reptilian shape-shifting news reporters in the weird part of YouTube I wondered why nobody is making art with this stuff and decided I was going to be the one. There is a huge creative and imaginative power. I like to call these speculative narrations that bloom in the New Internet Age &ldquo;trash mysticism&rdquo; because they are a sketchy version of Western esotericism and occultism. These narrations and explanations might not always be literally true and sometimes even delusional. Nonetheless they are symptomatic for our present, its opaque powers structures, the repressive structures of academic knowledge production, the challenges of new media, and the collective craving for something otherworldly, something new.</p> <p>With my <em>DECODING (THE WHOLE TRUTH)</em>&nbsp;series I want to blow people&rsquo;s minds. And on a meta level for the skeptics and art people I want to provide the experience to witness firsthand how information and attention influences perception. When I proclaim &ldquo;the whole truth&rdquo; in the title of my videos I refer to a bigger reality. A reality that includes the realms of possibilities and imagination as well. And it is there, in the imaginative realm, where the worlds of human agency, technology, natural laws, animals, objects, and facts converge.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103130008-11-giphy-trash.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103130101-13-fuckfin.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Knowing that you&rsquo;re an artist makes it harder to define your &ldquo;true&rdquo; level of belief in the theories in your videos. Can you talk a little about the balance between you actual beliefs and your creativity?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> I believe everything. To maintain emotional stability I go jogging everyday. And I am a bit psychic. During (intergalactic) telepathic communication messages appear as mental images, smells, and other substitutes. These have to be translated back into human language as precisely as possible. I get facts mixed up. It just happens. I guess that&rsquo;s why the secret military space program didn&rsquo;t want me. But I am still good enough to make art.</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about the differing reactions to your videos from &ldquo;regular&rdquo; YouTube users and &ldquo;art&rdquo; people?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> Some people are more impressed about research that consists in opening the book on the right page than having read the whole volume. Because it&rsquo;s proof that I&rsquo;m magic.</p> <p><strong>CP: Where do YouTube comments fit into your work? Do they become part of it?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> I put my videos on YouTube. This way they feed back into the realm were they came from. Yes, I consider the comments themselves part of the artwork. I published them as screenshot images in the philosophy book <em><a href="https://www.diaphanes.de/titel/epidemic-subjects-radical-ontology-3143" target="_blank">Epidemic Subjects &ndash; Radical Ontology</a></em> (ed. by Elisabeth von Samsonow). When Azealia Banks tweeted about my DECODING of her music video &ldquo;Atlantis,&rdquo; I produced her tweet as an object.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103130222-14_epidemic_Kopie.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><i>Epidemic Subjects</i></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><i><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103130300-15_Kferrari_banks-Foto_Philippe_Gerlach_Kopie.jpg" /></i></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo: Philippe Gerlach, 2015</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think the term &ldquo;conspiracy theory&rdquo; is used to reduce people&rsquo;s desire to consider&nbsp;certain ideas?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> The term conspiracy theory has definitely been and is still used as a verbal weapon. Historically you can trace that back to 1967 when the US government used the term to de-legitimize critique on the Warren Commission, naming Lee Harvey Oswald as the only murderer of Kennedy.</p> <p><strong>CP: Why do you think a lot of people are so hostile towards conspiracy theories and alternative ideas?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> That&rsquo;s a good question. I can only talk for myself, but I think generally nobody likes to be told that they&rsquo;re wrong. It&rsquo;s mind blowing to realize that every single person walking on earth believes and does the right thing from his or her perspective. It&rsquo;s incredible. Especially if one considers all the idiots that cross one&rsquo;s way. It was challenging to find a gentle way and artful strategies to broach the issue of conspiracy theories and explanatory schemas that differ radically from dominant views. In the end there is little left one can say is true with certainty once one starts questioning the world and one&rsquo;s own beliefs. I mean, I have never met anyone claiming to be part of the Illuminati, in contrast to Hybrid Reptiles. I have met Reptiles (ex-boyfriend, etc.). However it was impressive when I started to face my own biases and complicities in the reproduction of repressive power structures. And I consider myself a good person.</p> <p><strong>CP: What are your favorite and least favorite conspiracy theories?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> I like the gnostic revisions of Christian texts and ideas. Erik Davis called it the first metaphysical conspiracy theory: the snake in Eden was not the bad guy&mdash;finally the snake provided Adam and Eve with a knowledge upgrade. Monocausal fear-based scapegoat ideologies are dull and predictable. But truly alarming is the preemptive logic of paranoid politics.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103130343-17_detail_hyperconnected.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Detail <em>Hyperconnected (The Whole Picture)</em>, Karin Ferrari 2016</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Q-kkh_jaDcY" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about the process of creating your videos?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> Usually someone points out a suspicious pop music video packed with Illuminati symbolism. I mean, I don&rsquo;t believe in the Illuminati in the literal sense, at least most of the time. But there is definitely a cluster of symbols drawn from the tapestry of western Occultism and rooting back to ancient Egypt that keeps reappearing in contemporary design in high budget pop music video productions. For me the predominant message shines immediately through the video but it takes me months of unsystematic research and cosmic downloads until every detail of the video is completely decoded. It&rsquo;s like a puzzle where all the pieces fall together.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103130620-18_comment.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103130632-19_comment.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180103130645-20_coloring_book.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>CP: What projects do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>KF:</strong> <em>Mhtynix</em> is a hypnagogic road movie about the dark anthropocene in artistic collaboration with the artists Bernhard Garnicnig and Peter Moosgaard that will be produced 2018 for the Austrian national TV art program Pixel, Bytes &amp; Film. Over the Christmas holidays I worked on the DECODING of a Taylor Swift video that secretly tells the galactic origin myth of the global black magic elite.</p> <p>And then there is <em>DECODING Earth</em>, a pseudo sci-fi documentary that claims to reveal hidden messages within TV News opening titles. <em>DECODING Earth</em> is based on the thesis that the depictions of the planet and of time in the TV news intros are representative for the dominant worldview and Zeitgeist. So it is possible to psychologically analyze these images and deduce how a society conceives itself, the world, reality, and their contemporaneity. <em>DECODING Earth</em> is a work in progress. During my residency at the Cit&eacute; des Arts in Paris I produced a trailer with French News opening titles appropriating the format of Blockbuster movie trailers. The work was realized with the support of the Forum Culturel Autrichien, Paris.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pwc5cQT5i1U" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The idea to work with news intros was first applied in 2016 on Austria&rsquo;s leading TV news magazine Zeit im Bild. The film <em>DECODING Austria&rsquo;s News Intros (THE WHOLE TRUTH)</em> was produced for the Austrian national television channel ORFIII within the TV art program Pixel, Bytes &amp; Film with support of the Federal Chancellery of Austria.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CMl-3IeKWZg" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 05 Jan 2018 07:11:06 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list UNDER THE RADAR: JANE SZABO | TATIANA GULENKINA | MASHA TROTZKY <p><span style="font-size:medium"><em><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(9, 127, 245); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(9, 127, 245); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(9, 127, 245); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(9, 127, 245); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar.</span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:medium"><em><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(9, 127, 245); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/199511-jane-szabo?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large"><span style="color:rgb(9, 127, 245)">Jane Szabo &ndash; Los Angeles</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052456?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1052456/u3azr9/20170622021604-Jane_Szabo_Sugar_and_Spice_and_Everything_Nice.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052446?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1052446/u3azr9/20170622021557-Jane_Szabo_Burden.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052459?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1052459/u3azr9/20170622021754-Jane_Szabo_Leap_of_Faith.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052458?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1052458/u3azr9/20170622021605-Jane_Szabo_You_Are_Here.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <hr /> <p><span style="color:rgb(9, 127, 245); font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/394558-tatiana-gulenkina?utm_source=TatianaGulenkina&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">Tatiana Gulenkina &ndash;&nbsp;</a>Washington D.C.</span></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/990131?utm_source=%20TatianaGulenkina&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/990131/u3azr9/20160524180222-5-A90A6255-Edit.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/990146?utm_source=TatianaGulenkina&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/990146/mf2ji7/20160524180442-21-A90A2058.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/990141?utm_source=TatianaGulenkina&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/990141/mf2ji7/20160524180345-15-A90A6106.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/990149?utm_source=TatianaGulenkina&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/990149/mf2ji7/20160524180447-22-A90A2120.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/458388-masha-trotzky?utm_source=MashaTrotzky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><span style="color:rgb(9, 127, 245); font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large">Masha Trotzky &ndash; Brussels</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/brx/works/show/1077518?utm_source=MashaTrotzky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1077518/u3azr9/20171122093757-Christmas_set.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/brx/works/show/1077521?utm_source=MashaTrotzky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1077521/u3azr9/20171122093759-Power_is....jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/brx/works/show/1077515?utm_source=MashaTrotzky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1077515/u3azr9/20171122093753-Art_and_Death.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/brx/works/show/1077522?utm_source=MashaTrotzky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1077522/u3azr9/20171122093800-Russian_morning_set.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p><em><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:medium">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> Thu, 04 Jan 2018 10:12:16 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In 2017, Artists Channeled Pessimism, But Weren’t Defeated <p>This summer Jill Lepore, writing for the <em>New Yorker</em>, declared that we&rsquo;re living in a &ldquo;<a href="https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/06/05/a-golden-age-for-dystopian-fiction" target="_blank">golden age for dystopian fiction</a>.&rdquo; She described a literature of &ldquo;radical pessimism&rdquo; and &ldquo;submission&rdquo; (in contrast, she wrote, to a literature of resistance). In an essay for Tin House&nbsp;author Allegra Hyde called for &ldquo;<a href="http://tinhouse.com/imagine-all-the-people-the-case-for-utopian-writing-in-the-age-of-trump/" target="_blank">literature that chases utopia</a>&rdquo; in the age of Trump. She urged her fellow writers: &ldquo;Our trade is in rendering the unreal real. We are world builders, after all.&rdquo;</p> <p>As ArtSlant&rsquo;s resident pessimist, I&rsquo;ll be the first to concur that dark undertones are leaving their marks on artistic and creative practice today. But I disagree with Lepore&rsquo;s assessment that pessimism necessarily means submission. Are Dystopia and Utopia not two sides of the same coin? Can we not invoke one to drive the other? Does pessimism preclude pragmatism? Let&rsquo;s not guilt people into optimism, I say: we&rsquo;re allowed to feel demoralized in times like these&mdash;what we do with our pessimism is another story.</p> <p>Many, though not all, of the artists we interviewed this year spoke of their frustrations and worries in our contemporary political, social, and technological landscapes. &ldquo;The exposed hatred of people of color by the white community is stressing me out,&rdquo; divulged Peter Williams in March, &ldquo;the only forum I have is through my art.&rdquo; &ldquo;I needed a place to channel the rage,&rdquo; Liz Markus told us. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s always been a challenge to locate and maintain a happy life,&rdquo; said Greg Ito.</p> <p>In our artist interviews from 2017, what we saw across the board were artists invested in world building, in rendering the unreal real, or in exposing the asymmetries and different lived realities in the world we already have. We spoke with artists who insist on shaping the art world they desire; artists clearing space in museums for underserved perspectives and communities; artists who champion equity and visibility for women, for Black people and bodies, for people with autism or disabilities; artists calling for satire, protest, even revolution.</p> <p>Stress, rage, and sadness haven&rsquo;t stopped these artists. And whether you&rsquo;re a pessimist like me, or not, I hope they won&rsquo;t stop you.</p> <p>These are ArtSlant&rsquo;s top artist interviews from 2017:&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/47640-invisibility-in-new-black-portraiture-aria-dean-and-hamishi-farah-in-dialogue">(In)visibility in New Black Portraiture: Aria Dean and Hamishi Farah in Dialogue</a></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220160739-20170317153341-WPTIR-25.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Aria Dean &amp; Aallyah Wright, <em>Wata Proxy (Yazoo, MS). </em>Courtesy the Artists &amp; Arcadia Missa. Photo: Tim Bowditch</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;I wanted to do violence to portraiture here, in a rather timid way.&rdquo; &mdash;Aria Dean</em></p> <p><em>&ldquo;What happens when pro-blackness is subsumed into an aesthetic turnstile?... I see contributing to &lsquo;art&rsquo;...as being a snitch.&rdquo; &mdash;Hamishi Farah</em></p> </blockquote> <p>In our most-read interview of the year, Audrey Phillips spoke with Aria Dean and Hamishi Farah on the occasion of their London exhibition, <em>White ppl think I&rsquo;m radical</em>. The duo deftly discussed the ways in which they navigate making and consuming Black portraiture today, considering the complexities of giving and withholding, visibility and invisibility.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/48293-designing-resistance-in-poland-how-a-simple-poster-became-a-viral-symbol-of-protest">Designing Resistance in Poland: How a Simple Poster Became a Viral Symbol of Protest</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220165812-20170807184853-20246250_1481322628580485_4074143743783029803_n.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo: <a href="http://bartekmuracki.com/en/" target="_blank">Bartek Muracki</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;Distinctions such as drawing vs. painting, art vs. design, bother me. I believe categories sometimes limit your freedom.&rdquo; &mdash;Luka Rayski</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Poland erupted in protest this summer when the far-right government made constitutional moves to consolidate power. Christian Petersen spoke with Luka Rayski, a young designer whose poster unwittingly became the symbol of resistance nationwide.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/48795-beloved-sculptor-thaddeus-mosley-on-91-years-of-carving-his-own-path">Beloved Sculptor Thaddeus Mosley on 91 Years of Carving His Own Path</a></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220162149-20171122091836-3466469054_42e0269e0a_b.jpg" /></p> <p background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 11px; text-align: center;" text-align:="" times=""><span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 12px;"><em style="box-sizing: border-box;">Thaddeus Mosley: Sculpture (Studio | Home)</em>, Installation view, 2009. Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;The main thing that sustained me was that I wanted to find out what I could do and I haven&rsquo;t found that out yet.&rdquo; &mdash;Thaddeus Mosley</em></p> </blockquote> <p>In this inspiring interview, 91-year-old Pittsburgh sculptor Thaddeus Mosley tells writer Jessica Lanay what he&rsquo;s learned over the span of his unique career&mdash;from the definition of a &ldquo;Black artist,&rdquo; to how to avoid the trappings of the commercial art world. This is a must read for all aspiring artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48736-good-art-always-gives-alvaro-barringtons-generous-first-solo-at-ps1" target="_blank">&ldquo;Good Art Always Gives&rdquo;: Alvaro Barrington&rsquo;s Generous First Solo at PS1</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220161421-20171107144229-0E9A2228.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of <em>Alvaro Barrington</em>. On view at MoMA PS1 in New York from October 22 to December 31, 2017. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;One of my cousins who never goes to museums or galleries said he felt comfortable in the room and that meant everything to me.&rdquo; &mdash;Alvaro Barrington</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Alvaro Barrington&rsquo;s artwork is intimately informed by the conversations and communities who have made him who he is. On the occasion of his MoMA PS1 solo he tells fellow artist Cristine Brache how he wanted to create a show where his brothers could enter a museum and &ldquo;feel like there is a space there for them.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/47718-bearing-witness-peter-williams-advances-an-art-history-of-accountability" target="_blank">Bearing Witness, Peter Williams Advances an Art History of Accountability</a></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220161534-20170331135149-Williams_0217.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Peter Williams, <em>The Return of Trayvon</em>, 2016. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;My vision is of the history of art being able to tell the appalling story of humankind and the evils it perpetuates.&rdquo; &mdash;Peter Williams</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Peter Williams makes art to bear witness, he told Bradley Rubenstein back in March. This challenging interview, conducted at a time when police brutality against Black men and women is more visible than ever, shows the seasoned painter thinking about the purpose of art history and grappling with how his art enters the broader conversation between politics and history.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/47812-anicka-yi-life-is-cheap" target="_blank">Anicka Yi: Life Is Cheap</a></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220161920-20170421162107-Hugo_Boss_Prize_2016-exh_ph-17.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Anicka Yi, <em>Force Majeure</em>, 2017 (detail), Plexiglas, aluminum, agar, bacteria, refrigeration system, LED lights, glass, epoxy resin, powder coated stainless steel, light bulbs, digital clocks, silicone, and silk flowers. Courtesy the artist and 47 Canal, New York. Photo: David Heald &copy; Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;I want my work to perish.&rdquo; &mdash;Anicka Yi</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Editor Joel Kuennen spoke with Hugo Boss Prize winner Anicka Yi as she opened her Guggenheim Museum solo exhibition, <em>Life Is Cheap</em>. With living artworks made from things like carpenter ants and bacterial colonies, Yi discussed individuality, social structures, and the scent markers of ethnicity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48124-imperial-bedrooms-liz-markus-high-satire" target="_blank">Imperial Bedrooms: Liz Markus&rsquo; High Satire</a></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220162338-20170628144919-LM16_November_hi_crop.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Liz Markus, <em>November 9, 2016</em>, 2016, Acrylic on canvas, 72 x 60 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;You must have some experience of the brutal nature of existence in order to create a painting that has depth.&rdquo; &mdash;Liz Markus</em></p> </blockquote> <p>&ldquo;Grab my pussy and I will fucking rip your dick off,&rdquo; reads a line scrawled into a November 2016 painting by Liz Markus. In a political moment primed for parody, she spoke with Bradley Rubenstein about empathy, the slippery language of satire, and the equal treatment her paintings give to subjects like punk rockers, celebrity girlfriends, and Nancy Reagan.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/48844-at-miamis-all-women-art-fair-poorgrrrl-channels-the-weight-of-womanhood" target="_blank">At Miami&rsquo;s All-Women Art Fair Poorgrrrl Channels the Weight of Womanhood</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171222122503-20171206182649-poorgrrrl6.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" times="">Photo:&nbsp;Carlo Cavaluzzi</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;Poorgrrrl is bipolar as fuck. Like, there is the pity, this poor girl, and then there is the rage that goes hand-in-hand, repressed or not.&rdquo; &mdash;Poorgrrrl</em></p> </blockquote> <p>In one of our most candid and raw interviews of the year, Miami performance artist Poorgrrrl told Audrey Phillips about navigating the unstable territory between pity and rage. Can a &ldquo;damsel in distress&rdquo; be feminist? Poorgrrrl unpacks an enduring trope, leaving us with no easy answers.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/47301-digital-pioneer-lynn-hershman-leeson-walks-us-through-her-groundbreaking-firsts" target="_blank">Digital Pioneer Lynn Hershman Leeson Walks Us Through Her Groundbreaking &ldquo;Firsts&rdquo;</a></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220163616-20170203164518-Lorna.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Lynn Hershman Leeson, Still from <em>Lorna</em>, 1979&ndash;1984, Earliest interactive laser disc, created with original software. Copyright Lynn Hershman Leeson. Courtesy Bridget Donahue, NYC</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;Social media has a great ability to change reality&mdash;we have to learn as a global culture how to mobilize it in order to overcome oppression and freely communicate.&rdquo; &mdash;Lynn Hershman Leeson</em></p> </blockquote> <p>We knew how awesome Lynn Hershman Leeson is, but this interview with Olivia Murphy really brought home just how radical and innovative her use of technology has been throughout her career. This is the artist who first used, and even helped develop, the touchscreen&mdash;the <em>touchscreen</em>! Think about that.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48473-ayana-v-jacksons-photographs-are-monuments-to-historys-unmemorialized-black-women" target="_blank">Ayana V. Jackson&rsquo;s Photographs Are Monuments to History&rsquo;s Unmemorialized Black Women</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220163843-20170925172607-labouring_under.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ayana V. Jackson, <em>Labouring under the sign of the future</em>, 2017, Archival pigment print on German etching paper, 119 x 109 cm. All images courtesy of the artist and Gallery MOMO, Cape Town</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;Is it possible to see the Black woman&rsquo;s body as simply beautiful, as light, as free, as not in pain, as not suffering?&rdquo; &mdash;Ayana V. Jackson</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Ayana V. Jackson works from both sides of her camera to reframe the way the Black female body has traditionally been represented in photography. She spoke with Jessica Lanay this summer about race, gender, pleasure, escapism, and creating monuments that are missing for the Black femme in history.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/articles/show/47837-james-bridles-self-driving-car-steers-into-slippery-questions-about-automation" target="_blank">James Bridle&rsquo;s Self-Driving Car Steers into Slippery Questions About Automation</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220164008-20170426123533-trap.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">James Bridle, <em>UNTITLED (AUTONOMOUS TRAP 001)</em>, 2017, Ditone archival pigment print, 150 x 200 cm. Courtesy of the artist and NOME, Berlin</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;This is not really about building this technology; it&rsquo;s about building an understanding of the world through learning about how these systems work.&rdquo; &mdash;James Bridle</em></p> </blockquote> <p>James Bridle programmed and &ldquo;trapped&rdquo; a self-driving car inside a circle resembling road lines. At a time when the average person doesn&rsquo;t understand the mechanics and code behind the objects we use, Bridle questions the implications of technology and AI on governance, society, labor, and commerce. He spoke with Benjamin Busch in Berlin.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/48160-greg-ito-offers-a-pictorial-language-for-our-dreams" target="_blank">Greg Ito Offers a Pictorial Language for Our Dreams</a></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220164543-20170807220421-20170706141645-The_Seeker_Greg_Ito_Shulamit_Nazarian28.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Greg Ito, <em>The Seeker</em>, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 38 x 48.25 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;I think about going on a vacation and having a plane crash.&rdquo; &mdash;Greg Ito</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Greg Ito&rsquo;s paintings are diagrammatic road maps, charting fairytales and dark, personal stories. During his Shulamit Nazarian solo,&nbsp;<em>Broken Language</em>, the LA-based painter talked to Alex Anderson about the development of his truly unique visual vocabulary.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/articles/show/48454-andrea-crespos-latest-film-unpacks-dangerous-misrepresentations-of-autism" target="_blank">Andrea Crespo&rsquo;s Latest Film Unpacks Dangerous Misrepresentations of Autism</a></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220164659-20170918170142-Crespo_Intensifies_film_still_1_web_1000.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Andrea Crespo, <em>[intensifes]</em>, 2016, Digital video, 1:00:57. Courtesy the artist; Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin; Downs and Ross, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;We are not machines, we are human beings...&rdquo; &mdash;Andrea Crespo</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Andrea Crespo&rsquo;s recent film pries open common social and technological metaphors about autism. Vanessa Gravenor spoke with the artist in Berlin about the ways society manifests anxieties about violence and disabled or autistic bodies.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/48544-director-mariano-pensotti-talks-radical-theater-100-years-after-the-russian-revolution" target="_blank">Director Mariano Pensotti Talks Radical Theater 100 Years After the Russian Revolution</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220164815-20171010153435-csm_PENSOTTI_2_B100_429b333848.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/" target="_blank">Theater Spektakel</a>: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea, <em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think political theater needs to be propaganda, but I don&rsquo;t like theater that hides its political ideas too much either.&rdquo; &mdash;Mariano Pensotti</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Mariano Pensotti makes work that truly responds to the needs of our troubled generation, writes interviewer Olga Stefan. It&rsquo;s a big ask&mdash;but the Argentine director is up to the challenge. He talks here about his radical film-within-a-play-within-a-puppet-show, and what can be learned about contemporary society by interrogating the 100-year-old legacy of the October Revolution.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 11px; font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrea Alessi</a></p> <p background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 11px; font-family: Georgia, Times, " times=""><em style="box-sizing: border-box;">Andrea Alessi is the Managing Editor of ArtSlant.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<span style="text-align: center;">Photo:&nbsp;</span><a href="http://bartekmuracki.com/en/" style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;" target="_blank">Bartek Muracki</a>)</span></p> Fri, 22 Dec 2017 04:37:24 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list What’s Missing from the World’s Largest Street Art Museum? A Local Perspective <p>Since the <a href="https://urban-nation.com/museum/" target="_blank">Urban Nation Museum for Urban Contemporary Art</a> opened in Berlin this fall, it has already seen thousands of visitors. Placed inside of a pre-war apartment building in the sleepy neighborhood of Sch&ouml;neberg, the museum is easy to spot&mdash;it&rsquo;s painted from top to bottom in colorful murals with the words &ldquo;UNique, UNited, UNstoppable&rdquo; wrapping around the front of the building.</p> <p>The museum currently hosts new artworks on canvas by some 100 artists, as well as digital prints and sculptures, and a rainbow-hued staircase by British artist Ben Eine. We&rsquo;ve come a long way from the time when authorities would spend thousands to remove spray paint from buildings&mdash;these days street artists sell their works for those amounts. Over the last 40 years graffiti and street art have transformed from being considered vandalism into a celebrated, commercial art form, and the Urban Nation Museum is a prime example.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BZJ2SfPH9An/" data-instgrm-version="8" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:62.5% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BZJ2SfPH9An/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by Urban Nation Berlin (@urbannationberlin)</a> on <time datetime="2017-09-17T19:28:39+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Sep 17, 2017 at 12:28pm PDT</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p style="margin-left: 120px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;The opening of Urban Nation Museum for Urban Contemporary Art</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Inside, you will find the blockbuster superstars of street art,&nbsp;like Banksy, the stencil artist known for his award-winning feature film <em>Exit Through the Gift Shop</em>. There is also a two-story-high painting by Shepard Fairey, who created the iconic &ldquo;Hope&rdquo; portrait of Barack Obama in 2008, and works by 3D (the lead singer of Massive Attack) and Parisian stencil artist Blek le Rat.</p> <p>The museum is also home to works by graffiti pioneer Futura, who made his name painting New York City subway cars in the 1970s. But just as Futura&nbsp;went on to show in New York art galleries in the 1980s, Urban Nation&rsquo;s museum space drives home the point that&nbsp;street art and galleries have long been connected, and that it has notoriously been <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/44085-the-icon-machine-and-the-deadly-domestication-of-graffiti" target="_blank">a challenge for institutions</a> to &ldquo;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/40799" target="_blank">get it right</a>.&rdquo;</p> <p>This isn&rsquo;t the first street art museum and it won&rsquo;t be the last. There&rsquo;s the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.muca.eu/en/" target="_blank">Museum of Urban and Contemporary Art</a>&nbsp;in Munich and the outdoor&nbsp;<a href="https://www.streetartmuseumamsterdam.com/" target="_blank">Street Art Museum</a>&nbsp;in Amsterdam, which&nbsp;started as a grassroots project in 2010. There is the&nbsp;<a href="http://streetartmuseum.ru/" target="_blank">Street Art Museum in St. Petersburg</a>, which was founded in 2014, and London&rsquo;s own&nbsp;<a href="http://www.streetmuseumofart.org/" target="_blank">Street Museum of Art</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220135249-One_Wall_Handiedan_Museum_2014__1500x998_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Former facade of Urban Nation Musem building with wall by Handiedan for One Wall Project, 2014</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Apart from being the largest of its kind, what sets this Berlin museum apart from the rest? Well, it&rsquo;s a cool mix of up-and-coming European artists that also pays homage to the forefathers of American street art. For example, the museum presents a colorful canvas by New York artist Kenny Scharf, who rose to fame alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat in the 1980s. There is also a piece by&nbsp;Ron English, known for altering advertising billboards to have anti-corporate messages in the 1980s.&nbsp;</p> <p>The museum also shows what&rsquo;s hot at the moment, like Swedish artist Andreas Englund, who paints portraits of aging superheroes, and Iranian artists Icy and Sot, whose metal fence piece shows a refugee family running across a border.&nbsp;Despite this mixture of historical and contemporary strains, the layout isn&rsquo;t chronological, so it can be hard to follow a narrative, and the curation frequently comes across as cluttered.</p> <p>Despite the rebellious origins of urban art, it comes as a surprise no artist worked directly on the walls of the museum. All except one: the Portuguese artist VHILS, who carved out a portrait of a man&rsquo;s face into the drywall.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220135106-URBAN_NATION_innen_4_copyright_Sabine_Dobre.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Interior installation view of Urban Nation Museum, 2017. Photo: Sabine Dobre</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While this museum is a wonderful gesture to a marginalized art form, there isn&rsquo;t enough real world politics, grit, or transgression crossing the institutional threshold, and this&nbsp;first exhibition hardly comments on the state of the western world. Artists like Hanksy, who did a <a href="http://www.hanksy.com/street/" target="_blank">dung portrait of Donald Trump</a> in New York City, or the collective Indecline, which painted political murals on the Mexican-US border wall, or local political street artist&nbsp;<a href="https://berlinstreetart.com/famous-street-artists-berlin/" target="_blank">Thierry Noir</a>, who was one of the first to paint the Berlin Wall while it was being torn down, would have been great additions. As a result, Urban Nation&rsquo;s inaugural exhibition takes no weighted risks in presenting an art form once synonymous with risk-taking.</p> <p>The museum is a living testament to show how far street art has come, and where it is today, grappling with the role of commercial brand crossovers and teetering on the cusp of institutionalization, but there is scant visibility of the local scene. Considering the long history of street art and its political past in Berlin, there are few voices represented, and they aren&rsquo;t the strongest ones.</p> <p>For a real slice of the Berlin street art scene, however, gallery-goers are better off going to <a href="http://www.urbanspree.com/" target="_blank">Urban Spree</a>, a street art gallery and studio in Friedrichshain, which has shown works by Berlin-based artists like Rylsee, Klub7, and Johannes&nbsp;Mundinger.</p> <p>To Mundinger, the museum does have some perks, but it still leaves room for improvement. &ldquo;What I like about the museum is its initial concept to invite different people to bring their favorite street artists for the first pre-exhibition they hosted, and bringing different artists from different backgrounds to Berlin,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Still, there could have been more diversity, content and style-wise.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220140742-_NKP4043__1500x998_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Walls from the &ldquo;Art Mile&rdquo; along&nbsp;B&uuml;lowstrasse, timed with the opening of Urban Nation Museum. Courtesy: Urban Nation</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Urban Nation is not just a museum&mdash;the organization also commissions walls around the city with their ongoing One Wall project, and timed with the museum opening, they organized an &ldquo;Art Mile&rdquo; of works on walls and trains along B&uuml;lowstrasse. Nevertheless, there isn&rsquo;t much devoted to Berlin&rsquo;s own important history here, considering countless artists made their mark on the Berlin Wall between the years 1961&ndash;1989. After the fall of the Wall, hundreds of artists painted the east side of the Berlin Wall, now called the East Side Gallery, with peace imagery and murals. There is little trace of that heritage, unfortunately.</p> <p>According to Jochen K&uuml;pper, director of&nbsp;<a href="http://urbanaffairs.berlin/" target="_blank">Urban Affairs</a>, an urban art festival in Berlin, the local scene was ignored by the museum in the months leading up to their grand opening. &ldquo;Many international artists were invited, but the local scene was mostly ignored,&rdquo; says K&uuml;pper. &ldquo;For locals, it didn&rsquo;t make sense why their requests were ignored, as everyone wanted to help create. Urban art is a public art form and communication is at the core of the movement.&rdquo;</p> <p>He adds: &ldquo;Why did they call this a museum of urban art? There isn&rsquo;t much about the history, especially the history of urban art in Berlin; there&rsquo;s no information about the artists or any technical framing, which should be normal for a museum. For most people, it looks like a private collection, more like a gallery. This is not good for the art and this so-called museum, right now, is more of a negative threat for urban art, than any opportunity or community building.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171220140027-URBAN_NATION_innen_5_copyright_Sabine_Dobre.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Interior installation view of Urban Nation Museum, 2017. <span style="text-align: center;">Courtesy: Urban Nation.&nbsp;</span>Photo: Sabine Dobre</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241816-nadja-sayej?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Nadja Sayej</a></p> <p><em>Nadja Sayej is an arts reporter and the founder of ArtStars*, check out her website at&nbsp;<a href="http://nadjasayej.com/" target="_blank">nadjasayej.com</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Interior installation view of Urban Nation Museum, 2017. <span style="text-align: center;">Courtesy: Urban Nation.&nbsp;</span>Photo: Sabine Dobre)</span></p> Thu, 21 Dec 2017 00:16:15 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Artists Chart Evidence of the Inhuman, and the Inhumanity of Evidence <p>The group exhibition <em><a href="http://nomegallery.com/exhibitions/evidentiary-realism-berlin/" target="_blank">Evidentiary Realism</a></em> identifies an ongoing trend in contemporary art, as well as in broader cultural circles, that takes up &ldquo;evidence&rdquo; as a material or animating subject matter. Characteristic works deal with social structures that exist to perpetuate crime or to hinder it, to represent or claim authority over certain groups through data or data representations. The exhibition is complimented by <a href="http://www.evidentiaryrealism.net/" target="_blank">a website</a> that includes more than a dozen texts and a handful of artworks not in the Berlin show <em>(Evidentiary Realism </em>was shown in New York earlier this year)<em>.</em></p> <p>In its <a href="http://www.evidentiaryrealism.net/evidentiary-realism-by-paolo-cirio/" target="_blank">programmatic essay</a>, curator Paolo Cirio coins &ldquo;Evidentiary Realism&rdquo; not as a style or a genre, but rather a certain impulse or tendency that rejects poststructural aesthetics in favor of &ldquo;the real,&rdquo; of forensic, documentary, and investigative aesthetics. &ldquo;Reality today,&rdquo; he writes, &ldquo;can only be fully apprehended by pointing at evidence from the language, programs, infrastructures, relations, data, and technology that power structures control, manipulate, and hide.&rdquo;</p> <p>Cirio says that this tendency &ldquo;pushes the boundaries of what can be seen beyond sight,&rdquo; building on the tradition of historical realisms, where artworks become &ldquo;advanced learning tools&rdquo; for the development of social knowledge and inquiry. More than descriptive graphs or visualizations, such works fundamentally question the overall use of sophisticated tools for data visualization (think of Facebook&rsquo;s Big Data-driven &ldquo;social graph&rdquo; as a totality of technologically-mediated social relations). It&rsquo;s less about how we look at data, and more about <a href="https://thenewinquiry.com/invisible-images-your-pictures-are-looking-at-you/" target="_blank">how our data look at us</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171218141241-NOME_EVIDENTIARY_REALISM-9916.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Evidentiary Realism</em>&nbsp;at NOME Gallery, Berlin, with Thomas Keenan and Eyal Weizman&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>Mengele&rsquo;s Skull&nbsp;</em>(left). Courtesy of the artists and NOME</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Works range from Hans Haacke&rsquo;s <em>Comparison of 3 Art Exhibition Visitors&rsquo; Profiles</em> (1972&ndash;76), by far the most senior work in the exhibition, to Thomas Keenan and Eyal Weizman&rsquo;s <em>Mengele&rsquo;s Skull </em>(2012), and the exhibition&rsquo;s youngest work, <em>My Father&rsquo;s FBI File, Project 4</em> (2017) by Sadie Barnette. Each work interrogates its own evidence-based aesthetic regime (e.g., statistics, forensics, or classified documents) with its own authorial approach (e.g., ironic, scientific, or autobiographical). While all the works stand on their own, the red thread Cirio sews becomes more apparent in the constellation.</p> <p>Ingrid Burrington&rsquo;s lenticular print <em>Monck&rsquo;s Corner</em>, part of her series <em>Reconnaissance</em> (2015), combines two satellite images of Google&rsquo;s data center site in Monck&rsquo;s Corner, South Carolina, one image taken before and one after construction. The technique, which allows two images to be overlaid onto one surface, each visible with the viewer&rsquo;s change of perspective, enhances the hallucinatory nature of images taken from the perspective of outer space, now commonplace but only half a century ago utterly alien to humans.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171218143329-Information-of-Note-BIG.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Josh Begley, <i>Information of Note</i>, 2014, Composite image, C-Print. 40 x 40 inches. Courtesy of Robert Koch Gallery</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Josh Begley&rsquo;s c-print <em>Information of Note </em>(2014) compiles images never meant for public observation into a <em>Gestalt</em> perhaps reminiscent of silicon wafers. The images were pulled from a database created by the NYPD Demographics Unit, which was tasked with profiling Muslim-owned or affiliated places of business, gathering, and worship. In the original database and in the artwork, the data-images themselves are banal. However, with a machine learning algorithm they could be employed as raw material to create biased profiles for predictive policing. These examples, together with works by James Bridle, Harun Farocki, Navine G. Khan-Dossos, Khaled Hafez, Jenny Holzer, Mark Lombardi, and Kirsten Stolle, comingle to form a human-readable portrait of social structures and technical systems beyond the scope of everyday life, beyond the purveyance of any one individual.</p> <p>Critique of <em>Evidentiary Realism </em>could arise from a thoughtful consideration the curator&rsquo;s hypothesis before regarding the exhibition as a proof of concept, successful or otherwise. Yet such a reasoned approach would affirm implicit assumptions about the humanist social structures upon which contemporary art rests. While dealt with on some level in Haacke&rsquo;s work from the 70s, the exhibition might benefit from a deeper and more generalized reflexivity toward contemporary art as a humanist social construct. Beyond considerations of aesthetics and affect indebted to humanism, the question is whether or not the material conditions that brought about the emergence of contemporary art still exist (or ever existed in a generalized way).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171218141508-NOME_EVIDENTIARY_REALISM-9933.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Evidentiary Realism</em>&nbsp;at NOME Gallery, Berlin. Courtesy of the artists and NOME</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To what extent are the material conditions of any society transformed by artistic research? To what extent are human utterances recognized as necessarily important, valid, or unique under the capitalist mode of production? Cirio&rsquo;s assertion that <em>Evidentiary Realism </em>makes visible the invisible, sensible the insensible, may be valid for a particular subset of humans. But rather than appealing to some prefigure of the human through narrative, would a more radical form of <em>Evidentiary Realism</em> appeal instead to the irresolvable complexity of <a href="http://www.glass-bead.org/article/inhumanism-reason-blackness-feminism/?lang=enview" target="_blank">the inhuman</a> it inquires?</p> <p><em><a href="http://nomegallery.com/exhibitions/evidentiary-realism-berlin/" target="_blank">Evidentiary Realism</a> will remain on view at NOME Gallery in Berlin, December 1, 2017&ndash;February 17, 2018. Evidentiary Realism was first shown at Fridman Gallery in New York, February 28&ndash;March 31, 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;Benjamin Busch</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.benbusch.info/" target="_blank">Benjamin Busch</a>&nbsp;is currently researching critical modes of architectural production within the field of spatial practice. Treating architecture as a symptom of abstract processes, his artwork and writing investigate complex fields of relations within the built environment.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: [left] Sadie Barnette,&nbsp;<em>My Father&rsquo;s FBI File, Project 4</em>, 2017 [right]&nbsp;Hans Haacke,&nbsp;<em>Comparison of 3 Art Exhibition Visitors&rsquo; Profiles</em>, 1972&ndash;76. Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Evidentiary Realism</em>&nbsp;at NOME Gallery, Berlin. Courtesy of the artists and NOME)</span></p> Mon, 18 Dec 2017 10:27:46 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list