Bigindicator

Devi Art Foundation

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20110110204836-bibhu_maharna_naukachitra

Tradition Today

by Paroma Maiti
Is vernacular art necessarily “tribal” or “folk” art? Is it really possible to chalk out and adhere to such rigid categories in the art world today, considering the continuous blurring and overlapping of their “exclusive” identities.  These are crucial issues that spring forth when viewing ‘Vernacular in the Contemporary,' an exhibition jointly curated by Jackfruit Research & Design and the Devi Art Foundation. Although the exhibition draws primarily from the collection of Anupam and Lekha Poddar, the curators also commissioned artists from various corners of India to bring into a gallery space reg... [more]
Posted by Paroma Maiti on 1/10/11
Ayaz-jokhio

Pakistani Art in Perspective

by Alana Hunt
The current exhibition of contemporary Pakistani art, “Resemble Reassemble,” up at the Devi Art Foundation, was curated by Rashid Rana from the private collection of Lekha and Anupam Poddha, and fits comfortably within the context of contemporary discussions surrounding the peace talks between India and Pakistan and the Aman ki Asha (Hope for Peace) joint initiative between the Times of India and Jang Group of newspapers.In January of this year I attended a peace conference between India and Pakistan where the inaugurator opened with a light hearted remark about the lack of difference visible in a... [more]
Posted by Alana Hunt on 3/2/10
Souvenir_maker

Six Artists Deep in Gurgaon

by Sophia Powers
If the A. Balasubramaniam show has left you surfeit with sublimity, then visit the Devi Art Foundation for an antidote of socio-political specificity and grit.  “Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and the ‘Souvenir Maker’,” at the Foundations’ gorgeous year-old Gurgaon space, is an event not to be missed. The exhibition is essentially a three-part affair.  One portion of the museum displays a solo show by the mid-career Bangladeshi painter and performance artist Mahbabur Rahman, while another level showcases the “One Year Drawing Project,” an experimental exchange between four Sri Lankan artists.  Both shows are well worth a l... [more]
Posted by Sophia Powers on 9/6/09