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FRAMING TIME

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FRAMING TIME
Curated by: Carl Berg

749 E. Temple St.
90012 Los Angeles
CA
US
December 1st - December 1st
Opening: December 1st 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

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free

DESCRIPTION

FRAMING TIME

UTA BARTH STEPHEN BERENS JOHN DIVOLA ROBBERT FLICK TIM HAWKINSON

DINH Q LÊ GEORGE LEGRADY SHARON LOCKHART ED RUSCHA AUGUSTA WOOD

EXHIBITION DATES: JANUARY 12 – FEBRUARY 9, 2019

RECEPTION: SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2019 6-8 PM

(Los Angeles, CA) - DENK gallery is pleased to present Framing Time, a group exhibition featuring photography- based works by ten contemporary artists with formative or working connections to Los Angeles. Each artist approaches the concept of temporality with unique and evocative applications of a medium that inherently lends itself to the capture of time. With projects ranging from the poetic and conceptual to the obsessively documentary, Framing Time presents investigations of its passing and ephemera from its arrest. In place of the static snapshot, or frozen 'Kodak moment' - an idea popularized by the company's iconic 60's ad campaign - these artists offer complex and layered sequences of photographic imagery, redistributing the visual narrative of the medium somewhere between the cinematic and the experiential.

Framing Time features critical works by Uta Barth, Stephen Berens, John Divola, Robbert Flick, Tim Hawkinson, Dinh Q Lê, George Legrady, Sharon Lockhart, Ed Ruscha, and Augusta Wood, all of whom have pushed the boundaries of photography in experimental ways. Shared among the examples from this group of artists is an interest in the medium's living dimensions, and its potential, to capture movement, subtle shifts in environment, incremental changes in observed or staged subjects, and even its sculptural or plastic possibilities through process-oriented interventions. Whether in pursuit of the primary moment, a lost history, a collective view, or an impression of time and place, these works are similarly in search of the physical traces of dead, transient time. This essential haunting, long the indisputable domain of photography, remains as poignant as ever, especially in an age of digital dissimulation and increasing disembodiment. A medium of longing and evasion, it's shadowy dimensions are fugitively caught, offering us the vague evidence of our own mortality.


Uta Barth, known for her subtle capture of shifting, localized conditions of space and light, investigates themes of subjective perception. With lyrical attention to the distortion of the commonplace, her work oscillates between the precise and the abstract.

Stephen Berens' juxtaposition of civil war and countercultural event sites, invokes the spatial idea of pilgrimage and journeying while questioning the progression of history and cultural time.

John Divola's pivotal series As Far As I Could Get, captures the artist with black and white film in a ten-second lapse, running as far away as possible, but still within frame, from the camera. Both spontaneous and choreographed, this exertion, equal parts performance and accident, provides a haunting reminder of our essential impermanence in its anxious desire to record.

Robbert Flick creates sequential works depicting rural and urban landscapes through successive incremental captures. In an attempt to still the visual experience of movement through space, Flick obsessively photographs every element, geometry, and nuance of light, resulting in works that feel both like cinema and itemized contact sheets. These detailed taxonomies of unremarkable places somehow invoke the experiential dimensions of time and place through their visual simultaneity.

Tim Hawkinson's approach to photography is similarly conceptual but uniquely activated by his sculptural intervention into the photographic image. In Framing Time, Hawkinson's self-portrait Twist, is a composited collage of a series of images the artist has taken in consecutive increments with the help of a rotating Lazy Susan. The fractured image reassembled presents a kinetic distortion of the artist's body, contorted impossibly as a twisting human corkscrew. Hawkinson's process-oriented experiments take the empirically rational towards the domain of strange abstraction.

Dinh Q Lê uses found images of Vietnamese subjects, exploring the country's complex sociocultural dynamics and political conflicts pre and post the Vietnam war. Weaving large reprinted strips of photographs together to create new images, Lê uses photography as a primary, historical material from which to generate new narratives in an effort towards cultural reclamation.

George Legrady takes a composited approach to the synthesis of multiple images by using a lenticular technique, not unlike that used to produce the optical illusions of holographs, to create kinetic impressions of movement and time. The dizzying synchronism of his images invokes the shadowy and partial recesses of memory.

Sharon Lockhart's social application of film and photography focuses on the engagement of specific cultural narratives and communities. Her works in Framing Time explore the month-long decay of decorative, agricultural arrangements made by a group of Japanese farmers radically reinterpreting the traditional art of Ikebana, or flower arranging, by substituting rare blooms for their crop vegetables.

The always categorically elusive Ed Ruscha is represented by his iconic book project, Every Building on the Sunset Strip, a fold out accordion pamphlet of sequentially taken photographs, documenting each building on a two and a half mile stretch of LA's Sunset Boulevard in 1966. Ruscha, known for the concision and resonance of his off-kilter emphases on the unremarkably mundane, captures a specific sense of time and place through the systematic and sequential documentation of its street front structures.

Augusta Wood explores a constellation of themes relating to the ideas of remembering, inheritance, and loss. Through the nuanced superimposition of interior images taken of her grandparents home, shot at different periods in time, she experiments with both the metaphysical and poetic dimensions of photography as a tool for visualizing the very impulse of recall.

image credit: Augusta Wood, HF, JM, RL, Posy (1983, 1985, 1996, 2002, 2008), 2010, Chromogenic Print, 29.75 x 38.5 inches.

ABOUT DENK GALLERY

Founded in LA's Downtown Arts District in January of 2017, DENK presents a diverse program of local and international contemporary artists working across a variety of mediums, including sculpture, installation, painting, photography, works on paper, and interdisciplinary media. The gallery curates engaging exhibitions by artists who are creating relevant, substantive, experimental, and timely work. By providing an adaptable venue that allows artists to develop their concepts and have them realized, DENK engages the community with a generative curatorial space.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT GALLERY DIRECTOR CARL BERG AT CARL@DENKGALLERY.COM

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749 E. Temple St Los Angeles, CA 90012 | www.denkgallery.com | info@denkgallery.com 

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