Bigindicator

Andrea Alessi

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  LOCAL Table of Contents: Lost in the Local | James Pepper Kelly Bottling Local | Edo Dijksterhuis The Place of the Museum | Joel Kuennen New York State of Grind | Darren Jones We Are All Synecdoches | Himali Singh Soin Relocating Home | Nicole Rodriguez   The latest issue of Editions was inspired by the preponderance of “local” movements—particularly in food and craft culture. We so often hear this heart-warming, feel good idea that local is somehow better, more sustainable—and... [more]
It started with wordplay. This winter, artist, writer, and curator Darren Jones emailed me musings about the art world equivalent of “triple threat.” In musical theatre a “triple threat” is someone equally skilled in singing, acting, and dancing. Are artist-writer-curators, Jones asked, the art world analog to these stars of the stage? Or is this particular combination of professions more accurately described by a turn of phrase: “triple debt,” or perhaps “triple regret”? Working across three... [more]
Sam Rolfes, 2015 Animated gif.     Art in the Age of Celebrity | Joel Kuennen INSA's Gif-iti™ | Char Jansen I Was an e-Erotica Editor | Lesley Dixon The Talismanic Adventure of Nicholas Roerich | Philly Malicka Brand as Museum: Patronizing or Patronage? | James Loks Brand America | Philippa Snow   During the Cold War the CIA secretly promoted Abstract Expressionism at home and abroad as evidence of the United States’ intellectual freedom and cultural prowess. By exporting modern... [more]
Theodore Darst, Untitled, 2015. Animated gif     Table of Contents:  The Internet as a Platform for Art Criticism, and Dildos | Char Jansen Mario Rising: Imagery, Identity, and Myth in an 8-bit Classic | Guy Parker The Sphinx of Waikiki | Gan Uyeda Do It Anyway: Platforms of Perseverance in San Francisco | Leora Lutz Performing Tables | Caroline Picard   We don’t have websites, software, online marketplaces, or editing tools anymore—we have platforms. In recent years the digital... [more]
The most popular women’s sport in Afghanistan right now? It’s not soccer or cricket. It’s not track and field. Afghan girls aren’t picking up tennis rackets or hockey sticks. They’re hopping on skateboards.  They are. And the country’s young female skaters will be rolling into the spotlight next month when the Saatchi Gallery hosts an exhibition of UK photographer Jessica Fulford-Dobson’s portraits from her series Skate Girls of Kabul. Skate Girl, 2014 Last November Fulford-Dobson and a... [more]
As Caroline Picard pointed out earlier this year on ArtSlant, we’ve been living in the anthropocene our whole lives, but never before have we talked quite so much about it. Despite all the “age of man” chatter, “images of the anthropocene are missing,” argues one of two articles explicitly addressing the anthropocene in the latest . Irmgard Emmelhainz’s “Conditions of Visuality Under the Anthropocene and Images of the Anthropocene to Come” argues that the anthropocene “announces its own... [more]
The 2010s are so 90s. The decade’s enduring nostalgia moment—perhaps first identified, or at least concretized in ’s hilarious 2011 pilot—endures longer still. Look no further than this Jimmy Fallon Saved by the Bell reunion sketch, one of the most joyful things circulating the internet this week, to feel the prevailing 90s love.  We’re seeing 90s allusions in fashion’s grunge resurgence—piercings are mainstream, midriffs have resurfaced, flannels and Doc Martens abound, not to... [more]
When Lotte Geeven released two floating robots into opposite sides of the Atlantic last fall, she questioned the probability of them meeting within such a tremendous space and hoped to learn about the ocean by following their paths. “The moment the two robots touch the water,” she wrote, “the project's outcome is entirely ruled by the forces of nature.” Four months into the project, what she’s learned instead, and perhaps knew all along, is that oceans will do what they want—and so will... [more]
  A new building is not the only upgrade the Whitney is getting in 2015. The Museum of American Art relaunched its online collection Thursday, introducing the expanded collection.whitney.org. Making some 21,000 new artworks available for online viewing, up from a mere 700, the Whitney has contributed a sizeable resource on twentieth century and contemporary art to the artistic community. The digital database includes works from over 3,000 artists working in all mediums, as well as texts,... [more]
Recently, a “Stereotypes of the Netherlands” map made its rounds on the Internet, describing how the Dutch conceptualize their small country’s terrain. Down south, in the middle of Brabant’s “Catholic Carnival Country,” a short distance from “Dumb People, Great Beer” (apologies, Belgium), is the technological oasis of “Philipstown,” so named for the diversified technology mega-corporation. If the city is known for innovation in technology and industrial design then Philips is the omnipresent... [more]
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How to get an honest opinion about your artwork   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Jonas Lund at Boetzelaer|Nispen September 6th, 2014 - October 11th, 2014
Posted 10/9/14
"Empty, alienating, soul-less, superficial, formulaic, repetitive, awkward, thick, one-dimensional… Imitation of bad work does not flatter." "Yet another denim jeans riff on Yves Klein." "DESTROY." These are the types of criticisms Jonas Lund’s paintings have been receiving lately, but the Amsterdam-based Swedish artist is likely unconcerned. The offending artworks were not yet —and it appears they never will be. While the works were made at his behest following guidelines from a 300-page... [more]
, hosted in Kassel, Germany, every four or five years since 1955, announced yesterday that 2017’s documenta 14 will add a second host city: Athens. The mega-exhibition won’t abandon its Kassel home, but rather will run its signature 100 days in both locations. Artistic Director Adam Szymczyk hopes this gesture will address “the current social and political situation both in Europe and globally, which motivates artistic action.” Rather than dislocate the art world institution, the move will... [more]
As the fall art fair season in Europe gets properly underway with Frieze next week followed by FIAC and Artissima (not to mention that other fair across the pond come December) it's easy to get overwhelmed by overload: the glitz, cash, hype, ADD, FOMO, last big thing, current big thing, next big thing, and all the other BIG THINGS that are par for the course market-side of the art world.  But it doesn't have to be that way. Amsterdam kicked things off last month with a trio of specialized... [more]
via Wikimedia Commons When copper statues of a gold lion and silver unicorn were installed above Boston's Old State House in 1901, the majestic creatures weren’t the only objects left for posterity. Inside the lion’s head was a sealed copper box filled with “things that will prove interesting when the box is opened many years hence,” wrote at the time. The future is now. Earlier this month the lion and unicorn sculptures—emblems representing the building’s colonial era role as the seat of... [more]
On September 9th, a robot was released into the Gulf of Mexico, set adrift in the Gulf Stream. Off the southern tip of Portugal its transatlantic counterpart awaits sendoff into the strong Canary Current this week. Once offshore, these passive robots—floating spheres one-meter in diameter with sensors submerged below sea level—will be left on their own, without human intervention. Their mission: to unite in the middle of the Atlantic, carried only by currents and the forces of nature. It... [more]
Word of Katie Paterson’s made the rounds this summer when the Scottish artist launched her 100-year-long project to build a library literally from the forest floor up. Future Library is back in the news again after it was announced this week that the first author to contribute a new work to the library will be none other than Man Booker Prize winner Margaret Atwood. Paterson is known to think big—on a geological or even astronomical scale. She embedded a cell phone in a glacier so people... [more]
One of my colleagues crafted his city’s fall preview around the challenge of choosing exhibitions to visit when there’s so much to see. It’s a difficult task we all face, and quite frankly, I might have taken this approach myself. Instead, when charged with writing about September offerings I ended up looking for patterns; like a gallery staging a summer group show, I wondered what ad hoc themes I might attach to Amsterdam art this month. Of course, it’s a task more hopeless than trying to see... [more]
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Too Much Van Gogh: A journey from 3D to 2D and back again   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Vincent Van Gogh at Beurs van Berlage May 24th, 2014 - December 24th, 2014
Posted 8/28/14
There’s some buzz in New York this summer because all seventeen of the Met’s van Gogh paintings are on view together for the first time in over ten years. That’s nice, though an abundance of van Gogh paintings isn’t something that preoccupies us too much here in Amsterdam. In fact, right now we’ve got too many—including quite a few of the ones currently installed at the Met. Packed wall-to-wall in the basement of the Beurs van Berlage these days are some two hundred digitally “re-created”... [more]
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How to Depict the Invisible Man?   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Michiel Voet at Nieuw Dakota June 15th, 2014 - September 7th, 2014
Posted 7/2/14
One of the most remarkable images in the Jeff Wall exhibition currently at the Stedelijk Museum is the constructed photograph (1999-2000). Ellison’s nameless protagonist sits in his underground hideaway, surrounded by 1,369 light bulbs illuminated by currents rerouted from Monopolated Light & Power. To counter his invisibility he surrounds himself in light. And if the world doesn’t want to see him, he’ll exploit that, thumbing his nose at the authorities, stealing their “power” without... [more]
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How not to be eaten by an out-of-focus monster: A fucking didactic educational exhibition review.   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Hito Steyerl at Van Abbemuseum April 12th, 2014 - June 22nd, 2014
Posted 4/25/14
“I think Bigfoot is blurry, that's the problem. It's not the photographer's fault. Bigfoot is blurry, and that's extra scary to me. There's a large, out-of-focus monster roaming the countryside. Run, he's fuzzy, get out of here.” – Mitch Hedberg   Mitch Hedberg’s enduring Bigfoot joke is predicated on a misunderstanding that conflates image-making technology and distribution with real world appearances. It’s the same one that Berlin-based writer and filmmaker Hito Steyerl explores in her... [more]
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Can war photography be beautiful?   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Richard Mosse at Foam - Fotografie Museum March 21st, 2014 - June 1st, 2014
Posted 4/9/14
“Are you an artist or a journalist?” Marcel Feil, the Deputy Director of artistic affairs at Foam, wasted no time getting to the big questions. The recipient was Richard Mosse, who had arrived in Amsterdam that morning for the installation and opening of his exhibition . Once the jokes about typical Dutch candor died down the Irish photographer swiftly dismissed the idea that he might be a journalist: “I’m an artist, though I’ve got documentarian blood.” Journalists, he said, work on tight... [more]
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F.A.T. Lab, F.A.T. GOLD Europe: Five Years of Free Art & Technology   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Mike Baca, Aram Bartholl, Magnus Eriksson, Michael Frumin, Geraldine Juarez, Katsu, Tobias Leingruber, Greg Leuch, Golan Levin, Zach Lieberman, LM4K, Kyle McDonald, Jonah Peretti, Christopher “moot” Poole, James Powderly, Evan Roth, Borna Sammak, Randy Sarafan, Becky Stern, Chris Sugrue, Addie Wagenknecht, Theo Watson, Jamie Wilkinson, Bennett Williamson, Hennessy Youngman at MU | Witte Dame November 13th, 2013 - January 26th, 2014
Posted 3/2/14
I crouched down, picked up a marker, and tried to remember the illegible scribble that used to be my “tag”: a gesture of sharp points and steady curves punctuated by a strategic line slashed through the whole inscription. In high school I would trace it onto book covers and notepads and think I was cool. It came to me eventually, the first delivery unsteady as I carefully considered which shapes fit where; in a second, more successful attempt, I let my arm do the work, confidently forging my... [more]
By a contingency of scheduling, our Amsterdam 2013 superlatives always seem to get published at the start of 2014. That’s okay. This hangover week, as we recover from festivities, resolving to eat lentils and drink lots of water, is as good of a time as any to reflect on the year past. The galleries prepare to open; the work we’ve put aside tiptoes from periphery to center. Sure, we fall right back into pensive reviews and editorial, but instead, let’s have one last recap to gently return us... [more]
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Phantoms Inc.   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Agnieszka Kurant at Stroom Den Haag December 1st, 2013 - February 23rd, 2014
Posted 12/19/13
Did you know that in the 1920s a con artist sold the Eiffel Tower – twice? Or that Spain and Portugal once claimed discovery and settlement of the same nonexistent island? That MoMA might own an artwork by Marcel Broodthaers that isn’t an artwork at all? Collecting this sort of fun factoid is all in a day’s work for Agnieszka Kurant, the New York-based Polish artist who is equal parts scholar, editor, necromancer, and philosopher. In her interdisciplinary practice, stories, rumors, and the... [more]
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And the winner isn’t…   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Christian Friedrich, Falke Pisano, Remco Torenbosch, Ola Vasiljeva at de Appel arts centre October 25th, 2013 - January 26th, 2014
Posted 11/20/13
The 2013 Prix de Rome exhibition at de Appel in Amsterdam got me thinking about payoff, the rewards of looking at art. I’m not mad at “Museums as Playgrounds” or Banksy – as far as I’m concerned, if you’re getting people into museums or talking about art, that’s a good thing. Nor do I think anyone would accuse me of hating on difficult art. For me, one of the best parts of writing about art is pushing myself to be more open minded, to spend time with art, struggle with it. I savor the challenge... [more]
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The Photo and the Filing Cabinet   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Adam Helms at Almine Rech Gallery Brussels September 6th, 2013 - October 29th, 2013
Posted 10/4/13
In his seminal 1986 essay “The Body and the Archive”, Allan Sekula argued that photography, bolstered by notions of veracity both for and by its scientific and legal usage, could be an apparatus of power used for social categorization, repression, and criminalization. He demonstrated how in the nineteenth century the photographic archive, an epistemological, systematizing institution, came to designate a “criminal body” constituted as much from police photography as from its juxtaposition with... [more]
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Lost and found in translation   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Olga Balema at Galerie Fons Welters September 7th, 2013 - October 12th, 2013
Posted 9/26/13
Acoording to ayou are here but she isrelease Thursdayby theateam consisting of the plancute fordoexperts foundoutanoilslick   True story. And while we’re still perplexed, let us ask: What do rusty metal fountains, stretched leggings, and elongated latex hands have to do with translation? For that, I direct you to Olga Balema, whose cryptic solo show is currently installed in Galerie Fons Welters. If it sounds like I’m being snarky, I’m not. The work, which centers on notions of... [more]
More than birthdays, more than New Year’s Eve, there’s something about September that viscerally marks the passage of time. A feeling of nostalgia hides under the angle of the Earth’s axial tilt. It blows in on cooling winds, grows with the lengthening shadows. It begins gradually, the bittersweet end of Summer, then suddenly there’s no time left. Last September the Stedelijk Museum reopened. Has it really been a ? Indeed. We’ve attended stellar exhibitions dedicated to Mike Kelley, Aernout... [more]
There’s something appealing about Brussels’ approach to the reopening of its contemporary art galleries in September. Some cities take a couple weekends of openings to repopulate their galleries with new artworks. Others have one night when the entire local art scene switches on, decisively ending the August blackout. These evenings are fun – whether they come in staccato bursts or roaring symphony – but they’re also exhausting. And if you happen to be craving actual art over appetizers and... [more]
More than birthdays, more than New Year’s Eve, there’s something about September that viscerally marks the passage of time. A feeling of nostalgia hides under the angle of the Earth’s axial tilt. It blows in on cooling winds, grows with the lengthening shadows. It begins gradually, the bittersweet end of Summer, then suddenly there’s no time left. Last September the Stedelijk Museum reopened. Has it really been a ? Indeed. We’ve attended stellar exhibitions dedicated to Mike Kelley, Aernout... [more]