Bigindicator

olivia Hill

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Starry_lullaby_painting_small
"Starry Lullaby", 2009 Oil on Linen 24"x24"
Olivia_hill1_twin_pirates_at_sunset
'twin Pirates at Sunset, 2009 Oil on Linen 24"x24"
Lady_poulet_and_the_chickens_of_bywater
"Lady Poulet and the Chickens of Bywater", 2009 Oil on Canvas 30"x40"
In_the_woods
"In the Woods", 2009 Oil on Canvas 36"x48'
Liv
Quick Facts
Birthplace
HIndsdale, Il
Birth year
1985
Lives in
Los Angeles
Works in
New Orleans
Representing galleries
LeMieux Gallery, New Orleans
Tags
realism, surrealism, figurative
Statement

Growing up in Southern California, I was steeped in a culture that was constantly reinventing itself. It is a rarity in that sprawling windswept facade known as the greater Los Angeles area to find something that is truly a relic of past tradition because just when you think you've stumbled upon an ancient castle in the hills or a pirate's hideaway amongst the caves it turns out to only be a recreation of some millionaire or filmmaker's vision of a distant time and place. I too had a vision of a distant time and place that has played out in my artwork ever since I was a child. This was a place where two hundred year-old bricks still supported the walls of the churches and pirate caves had not been filled in with cement- a place where the speed of industry had not squelched tradition - where plants, animals, and spirits had not been forcibly evicted from their earthly dwellings by condos and supermarkets.

I had convinced myself that making art that feels genuine meant immersing myself in a place that held onto authenticity so I headed south to a town with an enchanting name that flooded my imagination with haunting images, a nostalgia for a past that I had never experienced and centuries old architecture designed not to satiate someone’s fantasy but built specifically to endure a heavy miasma created by rich culture and excessive plant- life. I knew the place I had been trying to paint was New Orleans and there I ended up.

Then something unanticipated happened that has recently come to define my paintings- I began working on local motion picture productions building sets and designing costumes. I had come across the country in search of something natural only to become fascinated with creating unnatural environments. Upon acceptance of this I realized that this dynamic between the fabricated and the natural has always played a role in my paintings and now I deliberately explore this subject by collaging the fluidity of human form with obscure situations, objects that contrast the environment and costumes that seem to play against the figures. In a sense I compose my art pieces as if I am the director of an absurd display of theatrics and the characters are not me, but I live through them in a world that could never be.