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Nicole Eisenman

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Coming to Power (Again): A 1993 Exhibition of Sexually Explicit Feminist Art Still Resonates   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Pnina Jalon Armour, Lynda Benglis, Judith Bernstein, Louise Bourgeois, Ellen Cantor, Patricia Cronin, Mary Beth Edelson, Nicole Eisenman, Nancy Fried, Nan Goldin, Nancy Grossman, G.B. Jones, Doris Kloster, Joyce Kozloff, Zoe Leonard, Monica Majoli, Marilyn Minter, Alice Neel, Lorraine O'Grady, Yoko Ono, Carolee Schneemann, Joan Semmel, Cindy Sherman, Nancy Spero, Hannah Wilke at Maccarone (Morton Street) September 9th, 2016 - October 16th, 2016
Posted 9/23/16
Entering Maccarone Gallery on the evening of the opening for , almost felt like walking into a reunion. This is possibly because the exhibition is a restaging of a 1993 show curated by Ellen Cantor at the then brand new David Zwirner Gallery, but also because there is a level of communal excitement that goes beyond the usual group show fervor. It’s an excitement indicative of the unprecedented effort on the part of Maccarone and six other New York institutions in celebrating the life and work... [more]
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Tick, Tick, Bang: On Painting in The Forever Now   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Richard Aldrich, Joe Bradley, Kerstin Brätsch, Matt Connors, Michaela Eichwald, Nicole Eisenman, Mark Grotjahn, Rashid Johnson, Julie Mehretu, Dianna Molzan, Oscar Murillo, Laura Owens, Amy Sillman, Josh Smith, Charline von Heyl, Mary Weatherford, Michael Williams at MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) December 14th, 2014 - April 5th, 2015
Posted 2/16/15
Between 1942 and 1963 Dorothy Canning Miller was the curator of the highly perceptive and ultimately influential shows at the Museum of Modern Art. Beginning with Americans 1942: 18 Artists From 9 States and ending with Americans 1963, Miller presented the work of artists such as Hyman Bloom, Robert Motherwell, Jay DeFeo, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Lee Bontecou, and Frank Stella—artists who would ultimately be the defining contributors to the mid-century American art historical canon.... [more]
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Herzog’s Whitney Biennial Piece Is Not Overrated but Under-Thought  
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Kai Althoff, Thom Andersen, Charles Atlas, Lutz Bacher, Forrest Bess, Dennis Cooper, Cameron Crawford, Moyra Davey, Liz Deschenes, Nathaniel Dorsky, Nicole Eisenman, Kevin Jerome Everson, Vincent Fecteau, Andrea Fraser, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Vincent Gallo, K8 Hardy, Richard Hawkins, Werner Herzog, Jerome Hiler, Matt Hoyt, Dawn Kasper, Mike Kelley, John Kelsey, John Knight, Jutta Koether, The Red Krayola, George Kuchar, Laida Lertxundi, Kate Levant, Sam Lewitt, Joanna Malinowska, Andrew Masullo, Nick Mauss, Richard Maxwell, Sarah Michelson, Alicia Hall Moran and Jason Moran, Stephen O’Malley, Laura Poitras, Matt Porterfield, Luther Price, Lucy Raven, Peter Rehberg, Kelly Reichardt, Elaine Reichek, Michael Robinson, Georgia Sagri, Michael E. Smith, Tom Thayer, Wu Tsang, Oscar Tuazon, Gisèle Vienne, Frederick Wiseman at Whitney Museum of American Art March 1st, 2012 - May 27th, 2012
Posted 4/1/13
My response to Art Fag Cities' Paddy Johnshons review of the Werner Herzog work at the 2012 Whitney Biennial, also mentioned in CAPITAL magazine.  PARIS — In a recent article on AFC, Paddy Johnson argues that Werner Herzog’s piece in this year’s Whitney Biennial is essentially a throwaway. She sees Herzog’s contribution as a quick fix for inclusion that relies mainly on “bells and whistles” rather than substance. But her account is conspicuously reactionary and seems to be more of a response... [more]
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Figures En Masse   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Nicole Eisenman at Koenig & Clinton May 24th, 2012 - June 30th, 2012
Posted 6/1/12
There are over seventy woodcuts, etchings, lithographs, and monotypes on view in Nicole Eisenman’s current solo exhibition at Leo Koenig, Inc. In addition to making clear the prolific nature of Eisenman’s practice, with this throng of works (and approximately fifty more recently installed in the now closed 012 Whitney Biennial), Eisenman hits the viewer over the head with a simple, yet challenging fact: She is a figure painter. Perhaps given the entire history of art, and given that... [more]
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GEOslant: Natalie Hegert at the Whitney Biennial   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Kai Althoff, Thom Andersen, Charles Atlas, Lutz Bacher, Forrest Bess, Dennis Cooper, Cameron Crawford, Moyra Davey, Liz Deschenes, Nathaniel Dorsky, Nicole Eisenman, Kevin Jerome Everson, Vincent Fecteau, Andrea Fraser, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Vincent Gallo, K8 Hardy, Richard Hawkins, Werner Herzog, Jerome Hiler, Matt Hoyt, Dawn Kasper, Mike Kelley, John Kelsey, John Knight, Jutta Koether, The Red Krayola, George Kuchar, Laida Lertxundi, Kate Levant, Sam Lewitt, Joanna Malinowska, Andrew Masullo, Nick Mauss, Richard Maxwell, Sarah Michelson, Alicia Hall Moran and Jason Moran, Stephen O’Malley, Laura Poitras, Matt Porterfield, Luther Price, Lucy Raven, Peter Rehberg, Kelly Reichardt, Elaine Reichek, Michael Robinson, Georgia Sagri, Michael E. Smith, Tom Thayer, Wu Tsang, Oscar Tuazon, Gisèle Vienne, Frederick Wiseman at Whitney Museum of American Art March 1st, 2012 - May 27th, 2012
Posted 3/26/12
“Be advised that the fourth floor galleries will be closing in about fifteen minutes for Sarah Michelson’s performance,” I was told when I arrived at the Whitney ticket counter, “So you should probably begin your visit there.” Yeesh. Fifteen minutes for an entire floor? I’d better hurry, I thought, as I dashed to the elevator. On the fourth floor, one of Michelson’s dancers was warming up, stretching her limbs out with a couple quick pas-de-bourrées over the dance floor—a site-specific work... [more]
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Nicole Eisenman's Human Touch   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Nicole Eisenman at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects April 30th, 2011 - July 16th, 2011
Posted 5/16/11
In her current solo show at Susanne Vielmetter, Nicole Eisenman continues to prove herself as a prolific and humorous artist, one whose blend of social commentary and human grotesquerie makes for a world edged in a slightly hallucinatory light. The hands on Eisenman’s subjects are bloated and awkward or sometimes ghoulishly slim, in one case, claws: they grope, they draw, they text, or they span out across a table in a circle as in her work Séance, 2011, attempting to make connections despite... [more]