Bigindicator

Joe Bucciero

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  “There are eight million stories in the Naked City”—and a decent chunk of them are think pieces about whether or not living (and for our purposes, making art) in New York is still a tenable enterprise. The older generation—the David Byrnes and Patti Smiths, the New York Times—keeps telling us that New York is dead, that we should move somewhere else: “the next Brooklyn,” perhaps, whether that means Detroit, northern New Jersey, or wherever. Despite these obituaries, however, artists keep... [more]
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America Is Hard to See, But Could Performance Offer the Clearest Lens?   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Matana Roberts at Whitney Museum of American Art August 5th, 2015 - August 9th, 2015
Posted 8/13/15
For five days New York-based saxophonist and multimedia artist Matana Roberts took over the Whitney’s third-floor theater for the latest installment of , her “extended research residency”-cum-performance, situated as a response to the Whitney’s inaugural exhibition, America Is Hard to See. “America is hard to see” compels us to look, to try to understand the complexities of America’s visual history; “I call America,” meanwhile, establishes an agent, compelling us to act. Understanding requires... [more]
“Ownership is the most intimate relationship that one can have to objects. Not that they come alive in him; it is he who lives in them.”   —Walter Benjamin [1]   Brooklyn-based publisher and curator Blonde Art Books recently organized its third annual Bushwick Art Book and Zine Fair (BABZ). A three-day event, BABZ featured a few dozen independent publishers hawking their goods, plus workshops and performances throughout the weekend. The presence of something like BABZ is not particularly... [more]
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We Contain Multitudes: the Hybrid Identities of Andrea Crespo   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Andrea Crespo at Hester July 12th, 2015 - August 9th, 2015
Posted 7/15/15
Within the first few minutes of David Cronenberg’s 1999 movie , video game designer Allegra Geller is referred to as both “goddess” and “demoness.” The polarizing reaction to Geller’s games sets the stakes for the ensuing narrative—one in which “realists” fight against gamers, who, according to the realists, “deform” reality. Indeed, in immersive games like eXistenZ, players are never sure if they are themselves or their characters. Buried under several layers of “reality,” everyone in the film... [more]
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