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S. P. Harper

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Brilliant-cut Diamond on Tablecloth, 2014 Oil And Acrylic On Canvas Tablecloth 24 X 24 Inches
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Round-cut Diamond on French Poster, 2014 Oil And Acrylic On Canvas Poster 6 X 16 Inches
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Brilliant-cut Sapphire on Graphic Reproduction, 2014 Acrylic On Canvas Color Print 16 X 16 Inches
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Round-cut Diamond on Tablecloth, 2015 Acrylic On Cotton Tablecloth 36 X 36 Inches
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Oval Peach Morganite on Salvage Canvas, 2015 Oil And Acrylic On Canvas 54 X 42 Inches
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Brilliant-cut Diamond on Newspaper, 2015 Acrylic, Oil Pastel, Ink & Pencil On Paper 27 X 25 Inches
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Ametrine on Ready-made, 2014 Oil And Acrylic On Renaissance Reproduction With Gold Gilt Frame 14 X 16 Inches
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Quick Facts
Birthplace
Pasadena, California
Birth year
March 21
Lives in
Los Angeles
Works in
Oil and acrylic painting on recycled materials
Schools
University of Southern California, BFA
Art Center College of Design
Representing galleries
Los Angeles Artist Association/Gallery 825
Statement

S. P. Harper

Harper paints images of cut gem stones on recycled materials. What begins as a bit of refuse is repurposed, transforming base materials into noble objects.

Focusing on the intersection of rummage rubbish and object d’art, showing how materials change from valuable to worthless and back to valuable again, the work explores layers and levels of reality. The surface first layer is a discarded scrap, formerly a door, made from wood, which originates from a tree. A photograph from a jewelry catalogue taken of a precious stone instigates the gem painting. 

An existing printed background partially disappears behind an acrylic wash as well as disappearing all together behind opaque oil paint rendering. Background recycled patterns appear and disappear through the transparent and reflective facets in the jewels.

Diverse mediums such as wall lath and plaster rubble, tablecloths, discarded canvases and metal scraps are surface materials. By reforming and re-employing, the work fits into the green movement to reduce, reuse and recycle.

S. P. Harper studied art at the American University in Paris, France, the University of Southern California (Bachelor of Fine Art, summa cum laude) and advanced studies at Art Center College in Pasadena, California. After spending 12 years in New York, Harper returned to Los Angeles. Since returning, Harper spent time teaching art before concentrating on eco-art.

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