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Willy Richardson

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Three Muses, 2011 Oil on Linen 18 X 20 in © Willy Bo Richardson
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Music to Drive to, 2010 Oil on Canvas 53 X 57 in © Willy Bo Richardson
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Walkyries 3, 2010 Oil on Canvas 41 X 47.5 © Willy Bo Richardson
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Music to Drive To 9, 2012 Oil on Canvas 53 X114 in © willy richardson
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Confluence, 2006 Oil on Canvas 53 X 114 in (dyptic)
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Three Muses 4, 2012 Oil on Wood 16 X 20 in © willy richardson
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Three Muses 4, 2012 Oil on Wood 16 X 20 in © willy richardson
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PAPER BAND, 2012 © Photographed by Kevin Noble, NY
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Quick Facts
Birth year
1974
Schools
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, 2000, MFA
Representing galleries
Eirdrich White Fine Art, Jason McCoy Gallery, ClampArt, Fresh Paint, Holly Hunt
Tags
emerging artists modern abstract painting, santa fe emerging artist, emerging-artist painting abstract painting abstract
Statement

Willy Richardson received an MFA in painting from Pratt Institute in 2000.  He lived and worked in New York City for a decade, where he immersed himself in the international art scene.

Willy Bo Richardson’s painting combines architectural precision with abstracted flourishes rendered with a palette of many colors.  Listening to a wide array of music as he paints, his work captures the climactic essence of experiences that are fleeting – but which also last forever.

 In addition to exhibiting his work internationally, he maintains a standing position at Santa Fe University of Art & Design as a painting professor. He has shown along side a selection of modern and contemporary painters including Agnes Martin, Josef Albers, David Hockney, Hans Hofmann and Jackson Pollock at Jason McCoy Gallery, New York.

"Vertical strokes might resemble relics from a dream or histories without words—each color perhaps symbolic of a different emotion, radio station, or musical note.” Katy Crocker, arts editor of Adobe Airstream writes,  “In a synesthetic fashion, vibrating colors are like sounds, provoking movement. Transitions of color seem to indicate the passage of time.”