Bigindicator

Edo Dijksterhuis

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Exactly one hundred years after Hugo Ball and Emmy Hennings started Cabaret Voltaire, Zürich was once again the stage of an art revolution. This time it wasn’t Dada, however, but data. On February 13, 2016, The Museum of Digital Art opened its doors on the ground floor of the monumental Herdern Hochhaus. It’s the first physical and virtual museum dedicated to digital art in Europe. Worldwide, there are only a few institutions like it, most of them American. There is, of course, the pioneering... [more]
This text is written on a scrap of paper, torn from a sketchbook and almost carelessly tacked to the wall of Marijn van Kreij’s studio, just outside of Amsterdam. It’s a daily reminder resonating in the space where the artist spends most of his waking hours drawing and painting, but also reading, looking at pictures from his ever-growing art book library, immersing himself in this repository of text and image. Van Kreij’s work is the antithesis of what art is according to many: the work... [more]
Next year Eberhard Havekost turns fifty: time to balance the books. The press release for his current solo at KINDL positions Havekost “among the most important German artists of his generation.” The artist himself probably doesn’t agree with an accolade this generic, especially when it’s accompanying the kind of self-confident display of painterly power that is . The show takes up two full floors and doesn’t leave much wall space unused. The works on show are so diverse, they could have been... [more]
American politics has always had its fair share of weirdness, but with presidential debate season underway we’ve reached new levels of surrealism. In the days following the first debate, YouTube videos circulated showing guys bashing in TV screens with baseball bats, dropping them from balconies, or even head butting them into oblivion. Not very productive, but at least these disgusted viewers cared enough to react. But there are also those who, instead of punching TVs in frustration, have... [more]
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From Kitchen to Gallery, Ferran Adrià Unpacks the Tools of Creativity   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Ferran Adrià at Marres - Centre for Contemporary Culture March 10th, 2016 - July 3rd, 2016
Posted 6/15/16
In a culinary world populated by stars, Ferran Adrià is the uncontested sun, the center of the universe. The Catalan chef who started off as a dishwasher at Barcelona’s Hotel Playafels, joined the El Bulli kitchen staff at 22 and only eighteen months later became head chef. From 1994 onwards, the year the restaurant received a substantial investment, El Bulli’s reputation as a place for experimentation grew. It held three Michelin stars and ranked first in the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list... [more]
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Reflecting on History While Presenting a History of Perception   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Luc Tuymans at MAS | Museum aan de Stroom May 13th, 2016 - September 18th, 2016
Posted 6/6/16
The history of eyeglasses goes back almost a thousand years. In his , dated 1021, the Arab scientist Alhazen had already mentioned the use of a convex lens to enlarge images. The translation of this treatise into Latin led to the invention of magnifying glasses held together by a frame in thirteenth century Italy. The earliest depiction of someone wearing glasses, Tommaso da Modena’s portrait of a Dominican cardinal, dates from 1352. Since then corrective eyewear has been scarce in painting.... [more]
It took a crisis to spark off the next revolution in technology. In 2009, a year after Lehman Brothers’ disastrous crash and its subsequent domino effect on the rest of the financial sector, the Bitcoin was launched. The concept of cryptocurrency, cashless and operating in a peer-to-peer network, had been around for some ten years but until the dawn of the New Great Depression no one had felt the need to explore it in depth. Its stability—the conversion rate has been hovering around $382 per... [more]
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Aukje Dekker Makes Patrons Decide When Her Paintings Are Finished—And It Could Cost Them   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Aukje Dekker at Vriend van Bavink Project Space Pacific Place April 8th, 2016 - April 23rd, 2016
Posted 3/29/16
I’m not a gambling man by nature, never quite understood the allure of the blackjack table or roulette wheel. But when Aukje Dekker invited me to a game of I couldn’t resist. The game starts at 150 euro. Dekker’s ante is an empty canvas. When she adds something to the painting my deposit increases by 50 euro. At every stage she asks me whether I’ll “stick”—in other words, buy the work as is—or “twist,” and go for another round. It’s like playing chicken in an artist’s studio: the painting is... [more]
They’ve popped up at different occasions, ranging from Wiels Contemporary Art Centre in Brussels to the Abstract Myths show at Nest in The Hague, and they are now on display at Ellen de Bruijne Projects in Amsterdam: Kasper Akhøj’s photographs of the villa Irish architect Eileen Gray built in Roquebrune Cap Martin in 1929. They appear timeless: elegant black and white photographs shot in medium format showing the interior of a modernist icon. We see the dining room in a dismal state, the result... [more]
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In Ryan Mendoza’s Detroit House, Debris of a Financial Collapse Turns into Relief Aid   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Ryan Mendoza at Art Rotterdam February 11th, 2016 - February 14th, 2016
Posted 2/8/16
Is it a sculpture? A political indictment? A social activist gesture? Or maybe some form of contemporary historiography? It’s not really clear how to define or classify Ryan Mendoza’s . One thing’s for sure, though: it’s not a house.  You could easily be fooled into thinking it is. It’s got a roof, walls, a porch, windows, and a door you can enter through. It lacks, however, neighbors, a path or driveway leading up to it, a connection to the local power grid, a foundation—in short: physical... [more]
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Great Art Reduced to Origins in What about Africa?   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Dawit Abebe, Zarina Bhimji, Vitshois Mwilambwe Bondo, Phoebe Boswell, Gopal Dagnogo, Omar Victor Diop, Meschac Gaba, Nour-Eddine Jarram, Hamid el Kanbouhi, William Kentridge, Thierry Oussou, Kura Shomali, Ephrem Solomon, Barthélémy Toguo at Witteveen Visual Art Centre January 23rd, 2016 - February 27th, 2016
Posted 2/2/16
, at Witteveen Visual Art Centre in Amsterdam, is an exhibition with top-notch art on display. At the same time, its concept is highly problematic. The show brings together works by fourteen artists, who have little in common besides being African. They hail from countries like Morocco, South Africa, Benin, and Kenya—places removed from each other by the full length and breadth of a vast continent. In terms of social background, national history, or ethnicity the participants are as much alike... [more]
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What Do We See in Their Eyes? 22 Years Later, Documenting Watts   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Dana Lixenberg at Huis Marseille Museum voor Fotografie December 12th, 2015 - March 6th, 2016
Posted 12/30/15
“These photographs are actually racist.” I was shocked, to put it mildly, to hear my friend deliver this verdict of the Dana Lixenberg show at Huis Marseille. How could she say this of a body of work universally applauded for offering a respectful alternative to the stereotypical depictions of African-Americans? “They all look aggressive and arrogant, even the babies, and there’s hatred of white people in their eyes,” she retorted. “Lixenberg made them pose that way, so she’s responsible for... [more]
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Douglas Coupland's Bit Rot: Trying to Understand Yesterday While Confronting Tomorrow   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Douglas Coupland at Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art September 11th, 2015 - January 3rd, 2016
Posted 11/16/15
“I miss my pre-internet brain,” says the sticker handed to visitors of . The text brings an affirmative smile to faces—or is it more of a smirk? This kind of dry humor with a nostalgic tinge and an air of fatalism is difficult to process without some feeling of ambiguity. It’s typical for life in the early 21st century. Things are moving ahead so rapidly that we’re constantly trying to catch up but never really do. The technology driving us forward grows faster and more complex at an... [more]
Weapons manufacturers and tobacco industry are an obvious no-no. Most banks are iffy taking into account the financial sector’s ethical track record. The same is true for the fraudulent likes of Volkswagen. Times are tough for investors with a conscience. Where can you deposit your money and be sure it won’t have negative effects? Well, you could invest in a museum. The Cobra Museum in Amstelveen offers bonds to help finance its shows. Last year’s served as a pilot project. At the start of the... [more]
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America Without the Dream but with Compassion   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Robert Frank, Laura Israel at Stedelijk Museum November 19th, 2015 7:15 PM - 9:30 PM
Posted 11/3/15
Even 30 years later, you cannot feel but sorry for the poor French TV journalist who interviewed Robert Frank in 1984. He must have been quite happy before filming—he had succeeded where most important magazines and newspapers had failed: actually securing an interview with the most influential photographer alive. But everything goes awry right from the start. “I hate these fucking interviews,” is the first thing that comes out of Frank’s mouth. Lots of expletives follow, plus an explanation:... [more]
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Art, Spirituality, and Love in the Time of Digital Dominance   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Markus Selg at De Hallen Haarlem September 12th, 2015 - January 3rd, 2016
Posted 10/6/15
Thank God for a new generation of artists! Today’s emerging artists stay away from the pushy know-it-all attitude of macho modernists who for half a century were quick to dismiss as inferior anyone supporting a dogma not their own. Neither are they infected by the postmodern virus of egalitarianism, which in the end robs everything of value and reduces art to an ironic game of smart references and endless footnotes. Artists of today are not afraid to shop around for culturally diverse... [more]
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The Icon Machine and the Deadly Domestication of Graffiti   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Delta, Dondi, Keith Haring, Lady Pink, Lee Quiñones, SHOE at Amsterdam Museum September 18th, 2015 - January 24th, 2016
Posted 9/29/15
The Mona Lisa, Vermeer’s Milkmaid, Fabritius’ Goldfinch. At the time of their creation they were considered exceptional works, no doubt. But only by a limited audience. These works hung in private homes or palaces, exclusively on display for their owners and the occasional visitor. This changed dramatically with the advent of the museum in the eighteenth century and even more so with the museum’s transformation into a fully-fledged public institution two centuries later. At the Louvre,... [more]
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A Monumental Gesture of Intimacy   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Taturo Atzu at De Oude Kerk June 27th, 2015 - September 6th, 2015
Posted 7/27/15
The number of tourists pouring into Amsterdam increases steadily every year. Obviously Madame Tussauds, the Anne Frank House and—of course—the red light district are popular destinations, but in the last decade or so museums have become a serious pull-factor. Number one on the list is the Rijksmuseum, welcoming more than 2.4 million visitors in 2014 and on track to break that record this year. For the exhibition alone half a million tickets were sold. Besides happy faces on the municipal... [more]
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Turning the Tables on Global Self-Evidence   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Georges Adéagbo, Brook Andrew, Raqs Media Collective, Marjolijn Dijkman, Mark Dion, Meschac Gaba, Simryn Gill, Mona Hatoum, Romuald Hazoumè, Femke Herregraven, Tsang Kin-Wah, Rivane Neuenschwander, Lucy + Jorge Orta, Batoul S'himi, Taryn Simon, Andrea Stultiens, Pascale Marthine Tayou, Ghana ThinkTank, Tintin Wulia, Chen Zhen at Museum De Lakenhal June 27th, 2015 - October 4th, 2015
Posted 7/20/15
Empty prisons, abandoned shipyards, derelict factories—in the past couple of decades these raw and unpolished places have become very popular as locations for art fairs, biennials, and temporary exhibitions. Often it’s simply because of their atmospheric quality. Or to stress the fact that the art on show really is connected to the outside world and not only functions within the artificial ecosystem of the museum. But it works best if the location’s identity and the exhibition’s content are in... [more]
On June 20, the Berlin-based online auction house Auctionata sold an 18th century Chinese clock. Created by a Guangzhou workshop, the musical and automaton clock is ivory-mounted and adorned with figurines and pagodas set in a mountain scene. The bidding started with 300,000 euro. A mere ten minutes later the final bid of 3.37 million euro was made, setting a new online auction record. The buyer is an art world fixture: businessman Liu Yiqian, owner of the Long Museum in Shanghai. More... [more]
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Out of the Black Box, into the White Cube   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Marina Alexeeva, Marco Brambilla, Mat Collishaw, Ger Van Elk, William Kentridge, Marzia Migliora, Jacco Olivier, Elisa Sighicelli, Bill Viola at Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya May 28th, 2015 - August 30th, 2015
Posted 6/30/15
Three rooms into the modern art section of the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya the film is projected on the wall. It’s a typical William Kentridge piece: animated black and white drawings, frolicking bathers are observed by Ghadhafi-like generals, a cow is slaughtered in a cabana, lots of political innuendo. Even though the film is combined with a couple of drawings by the South African artist, it’s pretty much a stand-alone presentation. It lacks the kind of contextualization... [more]
When you walk onto Basel’s Messeplatz this week you can’t miss it: the temporary Gesamtkunstwerk with the rhetorical title . It consists of a bamboo structure designed by architects Nicholaus Hirsch and Michel Müller. Inside, chef Antto Melasniemi manages his personally designed solar kitchen, working with locally grown spices and herbs. Besides unusual fusion snacks such as fish ice cream and "bastard pad Thai," invented by Melasniemi and artist Rirkrit Tiravanija, the menu contains... [more]
Roughly one sixth of the Netherlands was once covered by water and has over the centuries been reclaimed with dikes and windmills. The latest addition to this growing mass of new land is the so-called Centrumeiland (Center Island), a slender strip attached to Haveneiland (Harbor Island) of Amsterdam's new IJburg housing estate. Some 800,000 cubic meters of sand were deposited, layer upon layer, to create space for much needed homes to accommodate the city's rapidly increasing population.... [more]
The camera floats through a slap-dash architectural model, following a trickle of water originating from a fountain stuck through a passport picture, gargoyle-style, flowing past miniature cities consisting of slabs of transparent plastic, slipping into a next scene. Garishly colored deserts are bombarded with Jell-O and chocolate sprinkles. Fruit is hooked up to seriously scientific machines with electric cables. And TV-commercials from the eighties spin out of control. In the meantime the... [more]
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The Very Last of Youth Subcultures   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Ryan McGinley at Kunsthal KAdE May 30th, 2015 - August 30th, 2015
Posted 6/1/15
In early 2012 Icelandic post-rock band Sigur Rós challenged filmmakers to create videos for their album . Photographer Ryan McGinley chose the song “Varúð,” an eight-minute dream narrated by a raspy head voice over an unsteady piano and transparent strings. In his video a barefoot girl in a glittery gold wig and a washed-out blue nightie skips through the streets of New York City in slow motion. She passes trucks, taxicabs, construction workers, and business men, moves along highways and park... [more]
“Video killed the radio star,” The Buggles sang in 1979. The song brims with nostalgic longing for a simpler, low-tech era that was more authentic and wholesome. Two years later MTV was launched, the first television network to non-stop broadcast music videos. With a self-congratulating sense of irony the programmers selected “Video Killed the Radio Star” as the first clip to be shown. The event may not have marked the actual death of the radio star but it did introduce a new reality in pop... [more]
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Robin Hood in Times of Digitally Induced Relativism   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Constant Dullaart at Art Space of the De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB) May 6th, 2015 - May 29th, 2015
Posted 5/18/15
In the fall of 1987 John Knoll and his girlfriend Jennifer flew to Tahiti. For months they’d been working on the computer graphics of the film and they needed a well-earned rest. It was at the pristine Bora-Bora beach that Knoll took a photograph which in the decades ahead became an icon of international geekdom: Jennifer, seen from the back, sitting topless on the white sand with the almost fluorescent blue ocean as backdrop. The picture would have remained just another entry in the family... [more]
First comes a wave of chlorophyll: a fresh and forward odor, the smell of tender green. Then, when the first vapors thin in the air and the nose digs deeper, the wood follows. It’s darker, heavier, earthier—soothing and more serious after the initial playfulness. The French have Yves Saint-Laurent’s eau de toilette, Paris, in its compact pink bottle. New York is well taken care of with Bond 9 having designed a different smell for every borough—and I’m not even mentioning Donna Karan’s entire... [more]
“If you want to know what art looks like in 2014, go and see Hito Steyerl’s satirical video installations,” Ben Luke of the Evening Standard wrote last year when reviewing Steyerl’s show at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London. And right he is. Few artists have the Zeitgeist by the balls the way the German artist does. Her video works deal with technological evolution, the production and reproduction of images, and the power relations involved—subjects right at the heart of today’s... [more]
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Trying to Disarm a Racist Machine with Aesthetics   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin at Foam - Fotografie Museum March 20th, 2015 - June 3rd, 2015
Posted 3/24/15
The capitalist economy is sexist: women earn less than men for doing the same job and the glass ceiling prevents them from ever reaching the top. Mainstream media are biased against LGBTs and propagate heterosexuality as the norm. It’s usually systems that are accused of being skewed against minorities, and usually on just grounds. But Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin take it one step further. The artist duo echoes French filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard who, when shooting a film in Mozambique in... [more]