Bigindicator

Andrea Guskin

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20160105025608-guskin_from_one_to_another
From One to Another, 2015 Thread, Photo Transfer on Canvas 6"x 6" © AG@2015
20160105025647-in_my_mind
In My Mind, 2015 Photo Transfer, Cord and Thread on Canvas 6"x 6" © AG@2015
20160105025716-degrees_of_separation
Degrees of Separation , 2015 Thread and Cord in Canvas 8" X 8" © AG@2015
20160105030757-guskin_mapping_thought
Mind Mapping, 2015 Thread on Canvas 6" X 6" © AG@2015
20160105042706-guskin_timeline
Timeline, 2015 Collage, Paint and Cord on Canvas 6" X 6" © AG@2015
20160105042729-guskin_it_lingers
It Lingers , 2015 Photography and Thread on Canvas 6" X 6" © AG@2015
20160105042938-guskin_connecting
Connecting, 2015 Wood, Cord and Photo Transfer on Canvas 8" X 8" © AG@2015
Quick Facts
Birthplace
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Lives in
San Leandro
Schools
Antioch College, 1993, B.A. Visual Arts
Statement

Using the everyday materials of mending found in domestic life, I explore the many layers of emotional experience related to home, ancestry and the fragility of existence. 

Thread and cord are sewn, tied, knotted and wrapped on both sides of the canvas: they are the tight ropes we all walk, each step composed of mundane and extraordinary moments, containing past influences both known and unknown. The cords must be taut, since one piece is only as strong as its connection to others. 

I work in series, each with an overarching question at its root. In my studio, I use a 1940 Royal typewriter to write guiding words or questions: What connects and binds us? What is unknown in our ancestry that we carry with us? What are the intangible ideas connected with home: refuge and reflection, guilt and longing, attachment and impermanence. 

In my latest series In Knots, thread and cord are used to draw the emotional realities of daily domestic life. They are layered over photographs taken in and around the home: domestic shadows blocking and revealing layers of feeling toward everyday actions. Included in the works are the remnants of a found family album from the early twentieth century. These images of New York City Jewish life in the 20's and 30's are transferred onto wood and bound to the canvas, much the same way as they are bound to my past and present--though I only know a few of their names.

I am inspired by the work of Christian Boltanski, Lee Bontecou, Franz Kline, and the unbelievable linear abstractions on rocks found at Grande Riviere Beach in Trinidad.