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Caroline Picard

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Life Among Other Men: an Interview with Black Deutschland’s Darryl Pinckney

Originally published June 2016, on  “It doesn’t always start with a suitcase. Sometimes things begin with the wrong book. Berlin meant boys, Isherwood said. Fifty years after his adventures among proletarian toughs, Berlin meant white boys who wanted to atone for Germany’s crimes by loving a black boy like me.” So begins Darryl Pinckney’s latest novel, Black Deutschland, an account of a Chicago native and reformed addict, Jed, who returns to Berlin with new purpose. “After those few summers... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 6/15

Finding Black Mountain: A Working Model For Sensible Members of Society | Black Mountain College at the Hamburger Banhoff

Published in , Sept 2015. The idea of Black Mountain College has baited my imagination since it first emerged into my experience—an accidental and auxiliary reference—from the otherwise vast sea of culture. The college came up periodically thereafter, breaching conversations as a peripheral point of reference, its significance intuited rather than explained. A friend’s father reciting a Robert Creeley poem in a kitchen the morning before his daughter’s graduation. He made a point to recreate... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 3/14

Simultaneous: Seripop & Sonenzimmer

April 9, 2015 | Published Articles, Writing “We’ve been friends and fans of Seripop since the early 2000’s when we (Sonnenzimmer and Seripop) both began making screen printed posters… Though our aesthetic is notably different, our work tends to be much more pushed back and quiet, they have a similar use of formal exploration and material experimentation that guides our processes. In the end they merge intuition with structure in some way. Developing the show in tandem, we both kept in mind... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 3/14

Desirée Holman at Aspect Ratio Gallery (Critic’s Pick)

Published by Artforum in January 2015 Bay Area artist Desirée Holman mashes 1960s sci-fi, nineties New Age ideology, and posthuman technology in her solo show “Sophont.” The first room of the gallery features two air-brushed portraits of auras, titled  and Aura, Buckminster Fuller, both 2014, for the historic figures depicted. A large pencil-and-gouache drawing of a man wearing an ad hoc colander-cum-telepathic-hat, titled Time Traveler, 2013, hangs nearby. These strange portraits set the... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 3/14

Flickering Memoirs and Surveys: An Interview with Bill Burns

 Originally published by Art21 Magazine on Feb 21, 2017 The survey publication presents complex questions: what to highlight and what to discard? And, perhaps more importantly: how does one communicate one’s self to future audiences? (Black Dog Publishing and YYZ Books, 2016) is Bill Burns’s answer. Part memoir, part artistic survey, this lush hardbound volume teases out the inception, development, exaltation, and ambivalence of Burns’s artistic life, characteristically mixing documentation,... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 2/21

Flickering Memoirs and Surveys: An Interview with Bill Burns

 Originally published by Art21 Magazine on Feb 21, 2017 The survey publication presents complex questions: what to highlight and what to discard? And, perhaps more importantly: how does one communicate one’s self to future audiences? (Black Dog Publishing and YYZ Books, 2016) is Bill Burns’s answer. Part memoir, part artistic survey, this lush hardbound volume teases out the inception, development, exaltation, and ambivalence of Burns’s artistic life, characteristically mixing documentation,... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 2/21

In the Late Afternoon of Modernism: An Interview with Graham Harman

Originally published in Antennae. This issue of Antennae marks the celebration of the journal’s ten years of activity. From the very start, Antennae has provided a platform for new voices—it has outlined an academic space marked by a certain fluidity of content and freedom of format designed to foster the multidisciplinarity that is essential to the study of human/non-human relations. It is for this reason that the interview format has constantly been one of the most important publishing... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 2/5

Jefferson Pinder at The Hyde Park Art Center

Published in Artforum.com, Dec 2015. Jefferson Pinder’s first Chicago exhibition, “Onyx Odyssey,” is ambitious and nuanced, shying away from depicting a singular black experience in favor of a fluctuating and ambiguous study of American society. Above the gallery’s entrance is Gauntlet, 2015, a cluster of charred police batons strung by invisible wires. On the other side of the room hangs POTUS, 2015, a white neon drawing of President Obama’s eyes. The gaze is as cool as a billboard,... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 12/14/16

Open Access: A Conversation with Sria Chatterjee and Hanna Husberg

Although the seminars of “Anthropocene Campus: The Technosphere Issue” at Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW) in Berlin took place months ago (April 14–22, 2016), conversations and collaborations continue to develop and spill out from that place and time. This process of unfolding is a particularly important outcome of the original nine-day conference because it invites collaborators to explore Anthropocene topics with one another, on their own terms, and in locations around the world. Sria... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 10/24/16

Corresponding Between Found and Made: An Interview with Jessica Stockholder

Over the last month I have had the pleasure of peppering Jessica Stockholder with questions, each one sent with days or sometimes weeks between, so that the conversation itself extended through a peculiar duration. Unlike other interviews that happen either over three email exchanges or the course of a couple of recorded hours, this became more of a correspondence in which questions and answers hung, suspended and marinating for a while before getting shored up and integrated into a... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 10/5/16

August in the Anthropocene

Last April I had the opportunity to go to Anthropocene Curriculum: The Technosphere Issue, a ten-day conference at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW) in Berlin; I attended as a journalist working jointly for Bad at Sports and the HKW. My intentions were twofold: 1. To conduct a series of interviews with participants. 2. To make a comic about my experience and some of the seminar conversations. The comic will take some time, but the interviews will appear on Bad at Sports this August,... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 8/30/16

“Between the Ticks of the Watch”

Originally published by  (Critics Pick), May 2016. Curated by Solveig Øvstebø, “Between the Ticks of the Watch” explores fault lines within conventional thought through the work of Kevin Beasley, Peter Downsbrough, Goutam Ghosh,Falke Pisano, and Martha Wilson. In Posturing, 1973/2008, one among a suite of self-portrait photographs on display here, Wilson traces her transformation from a woman to a man to man in drag. Text beneath the image reads: “Theoretically, the uninitiated audience sees... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 5/18/16

“Between the Ticks of the Watch”

Originally published by  (Critics Pick), May 2016. Curated by Solveig Øvstebø, “Between the Ticks of the Watch” explores fault lines within conventional thought through the work of Kevin Beasley, Peter Downsbrough, Goutam Ghosh,Falke Pisano, and Martha Wilson. In Posturing, 1973/2008, one among a suite of self-portrait photographs on display here, Wilson traces her transformation from a woman to a man to man in drag. Text beneath the image reads: “Theoretically, the uninitiated audience sees... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 5/18/16

Kerry James Marshall: Artist Profile

May 12, 2016 | Published Articles, Writing Inspired by Mastry, Kerry James Marshall’s travelling museum retrospective, this article was originally published in ‘s 2nd print edition in April, 2016. “We are not, as we sometimes like to imagine, independent thinkers with our own unique & groovy style of cognition: we have in fact inherited a narrow repertoire of prefab concepts, and we find ourselves thinking as thinking things on highly ramified architectonics of ideas, and along deeply... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 5/12/16

The Sensation of Un-thought Thoughts: An Interview with Simone Forti

 Originally published by Art21 in March 2016 During a talk organized in conjunction with the exhibition, at Northwestern University’s Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, Simone Forti touched on the breadth of her work as a writer, dancer, choreographer, and teacher. As she spoke, students performed one of Forti’s seminal works, Huddle and read excerpted compositions made during a two-day, movement-and-creative-writing workshop. The combined effect of her conversation and this tableau... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 3/15/16

ANDREW HOLMQUIST at Carrie Secrist Gallery

 Originally published on The Seen in Feb 2013 Chicago-based painter Andrew Holmquist thinks and works through multiple mediums to reflect—not only on the act of painting and its central position in his practice, but also the (primarily male) body moving through space. His latest exhibition, , includes 26 new works ranging from paintings on canvas, ceramic collaborations, a collaborative fashion sculpture, a collaborative film, and two red-tinted freezer partitions that divide the gallery... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 2/10/16

“United States of Latin America” at MOCAD

The following review of “United States of Latin America,” appeared in Flash Art International issue #305. The exhibition was on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Detroit from September 18 – January 3, 2015. , a group show curated by Jens Hoffman and Pablo León de la Barra at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Detroit, features over thirty artists from fifteen different Latin American countries. Rather than adhere to a singular aesthetic, the ranging works reflect an eclectic... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 11/11/15

Edie Fake at Western Exhibitions (Critic’s Pick)

 June 23, 2015 | Published Articles, Writing Having recently relocated to Southern California, Edie Fake returns to Chicago with “Grey Area,” a solo exhibition of ten ink and gouache drawings on paper. Each work describes a different geometrical space: The Blood Bank, 2015, features an ornate green-and-gold-tiled, roofless bathhouse. Behind three arched columns, one glimpses the inside of this building, where there is a rich red pool. As the warmest mass of color, the pool vibrates in... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 6/23/15

Performing Tables

March 25, 2015 | Published Articles, Writing Laura Letinsky photographs material debris left behind on tabletops. Orange peels, breadcrumbs, partially consumed cakes, wine stains, or sometimes a more theatrical octopus spread out in evocative, transitory constellations. At any moment one imagines a figure will enter the picture frame, destroying the aesthetic confluence in an effort to wipe the table down and deposit all captured remnants in a trashcan. This is partly what’s so compelling... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 3/24/15

Shifting Directions: An Interview with Tania Mouraud

  March 17, 2015 | Published Articles, Writing Tania Mouraud’s retrospective at the Centre Pompidou-Metz, curated by Hélène Guenin and Elodie Stroecken, spans features over 70 works of art dating from the late 1960s to today. In June, the show spreads beyond the walls of the museum when nine surrounding locations will host additional works of Mouraud, engaging the entire city as an interlocking exhibition site. Mouraud began working in the 60s as a painter, shifting tacks in the 70s to... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 3/17/15

The Undead Tree of Charles Ray

This piece was first published on the Art21 blog on November 2nd, 2012: Charles Ray, “Hinoki,” 2007. © 2007 Charles Ray. Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles. Charles Ray’s massive reproduction of a fallen redwood tree, , fills one room in the Modern Wing of the Art Institute of Chicago. The room it occupies was built around the work. At 2,100 pounds and 38 feet long, it’s that big. The piece originated in California where the original tree died, sunk into the ground, and began to... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 11/2/13

Centerfield | Embracing the Cliché: An Interview with Michelle Grabner

First published on the Art21 blog on March 26th, 2013  Michelle Grabner, “DRAFT,” Installation view, Autumn Space, 2013. Courtesy Autumn Space. Michelle Grabner exhibited at Autumn Space last month. Her show, , ran the gamut of Grabner’s practical, visual, and material practice. A black and white print of two San Francisco 49ers hung in a frame by the front desk near a round, black field painting of white dots. One side of the grand warehouse windows were dressed with... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 3/26/13

THE FLOOR GIVES AWAY: AN INTERVIEW WITH ANN TOEBBE

This article was first published on the Art21 blog on March 16, 2013. Ann Toebbe, “Death Beds,” 2012, mixed media on panel, 60 x 46 inches Ann Toebbe is well known for her stylized, architectural paintings — paintings of empty rooms occupied only by objects. These are rooms at rest, between uses, and the furnishings within them stand enigmatic and remote, at once pointing to a network of human relations while being simultaneously autonomous; it is as though... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 3/16/13

Sorry for Being A Genius

"There is no more chastity in the Young-Girl than there is debauchery. The Young-Girl simply lives as a stranger to her desires, whose coherence is governed by her market-driven superego."—Tiqqun, Preliminary Materials for a Theory of a Young-Girl, 2012 Aida Makoto's retrospective exhibit, “Monument for Nothing,” is a stunning body of work, taking full advantage of its towering exhibition site. The Mori Art Museum sits on the 53rd and 54th floors of Roppongi Hills Mori Tower—a massive... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 2/28/13

Center Field | The Stage of Scientific Reproduction: An Interview with Jeremy Bolen

, an exhibit of Jeremy Bolen’s documentary photographs, is on display at Andrew Rafacz Gallery until March 30. Here, Bolen presents a series of work that measures phenomena invisible to the human eye. Bolen has made a habit of such investigations. With a solid background in American landscape and survey photography, he has gone on to make the environment itself a lens for exposure, exposing film to bioluminescent plankton underwater by using the lake as a camera lens. He has buried film... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 2/26/13

TIME BOUND: AN INTERVIEW WITH MARK JEFFERY

Angela Ellsworth, (from Phoenix, Arizona) “Stand Back,” Sullivan Galleries until February 1st, 2013. We are in the midst of a winter festival. Its occasions take place at a variety of locations across the city, featuring a variety of performance artists from all over the world. In each case, the art work at hand is dynamic and ephemeral; the culmination of hours/months/years of work fit into a small, public window of time. Audiences come to experience that time-concentrate and in so... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 1/26/13

Artist Profile: Laura Letinsky

The following artist profile was published in  ltd, in January  2013: Laura Letinsky’s well-lit apartment draws you first into the dining room–a fitting entrance, given that so many of the artist’s photographs took place at this table. “I got a studio in 2006,” Letinsky says, at the table’s head. “Before that, I always worked out of my home. This table is where 90% of that work was made.” Surrounding cabinets contain countless ceramic dishes–satin, white painted bowls clearly made by hand.... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 1/3/13

Goal-less Living Things: An Interview with Heidi Norton

“The crude solution to the problem of vegetative life, interpreted as qualitatively weak and as verging on inanimate existence, forces this life into retreat, puts it on the run, and so increases the distance between philosophy and the plant.” –Michael Marder, Plant-Soul: The Elusive Meanings of Vegetative Life Generally we think of plant life as a kind of fuel — a material vitality that exists to be consumed and transformed to a higher purpose: as food, medicine, paper, or housing. As such,... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 9/5/12

Kerry James Marshall Unzips Barnett Newman

Art ltd’s summer issue, in 2012. See below to connect to the original link.  Kerry James Marshall’s studio stands two-stories high in the Bronzeville neighborhood, on Chicago’s South Side. From the street, it is non-descript, more like a very tall, brick garage than anything else; there are hardly any windows. It boasts a green lawn and stands near a new crop of condos; down the same street are some old Victorian brownstones interrupted by empty lots. It’s a significant neighborhood in... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 6/6/12

Field Static: Catalogue Essay

June 5th, 2012 You have entered the Co-Prosperity Sphere: a large corner-space on a neighborhood block in Bridgeport, five miles from the Loop’s chain shops. The inside of this space feels old. It is massive — 2,500 square feet. A tin ceiling stands fourteen feet above you, not for stylistic preference — though it suits current vintage tastes — but due to an oversight; the previous owner of 40 years did nothing to maintain the building, using it instead as a hoarder’s storeroom. Before... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 6/6/12