Bigindicator

Nathan Mabry

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Nathan Mabry: Postmodernist Sculpture for a Modernist's World   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Nathan Mabry at Cherry and Martin April 2nd - May 14th
Posted 4/25/16
Nathan Mabry’s exhibition gripgrabstacksqueeze, at Cherry and Martin, opens with a black, partially abstract, figurative sculpture suggestive of indigenous art placed on an oil drum. The upper half of this totemic form seems to have emerged from the drum, its dark and glutinous texture reminiscent of tar. With this opening work, Mabry succinctly kicks off the show with a meditation on the fetishism of early peoples and their artifacts, as well as the loss of these cultures as a result of... [more]
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Nathan Mabry's Laughter: Part 2   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Nathan Mabry at Cherry and Martin January 8th, 2011 - February 12th, 2011
Posted 1/18/11
I’ve debated with myself about which side of this equation Mabry is on. For instance, when I see a Lipchitz piece crying, I think of sculpture as laughing at people who genuinely believe in the embedded spirit in things, who believe that a water spot under a bridge in Chicago is the Virgin Mary or that a crucifix can bleed real blood. Mabry maybe suggesting that Lipchitz’s strenuous beliefs in modernist form and its ability to tap into the primitive power of other cultures was bound to have a s... [more]
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Nathan Mabry's Laughter: Part 1   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
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Nathan Mabry at Cherry and Martin January 8th, 2011 - February 12th, 2011
Posted 1/18/11
After placing a solid, heavy Michael Heizer-ish hunk of rusty teel sculpture in the first gallery, Nathan Mabry has done an odd thing with the center gallery of Cherry and Martin. He has built a temple.  In the foreground, he has placed a copy of Jacques Lipchitz’s Figure, 1926-30, set on a bed of gravel, crying with a streaming water possibly to be used for ablutions. Deeper into the gallery stand three attendant goddesses around a central figure. The three sculptures are variations on Baga D’mba fer... [more]
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