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R.I.P.olaroid

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Ripolaroid18x22_fin-webres
R.I.P.olaroid, Oct 22, 2009 - Nov 14, 2009 © Designed by Lisa Kay
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Seymour, 2009 Combination Of Polaroids And Digital Prints Mounted On Foam Board, Framed In Acrylic Box 14"X14" © Elliot V. Kotek
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Joshua Tree, 2009 Polaroids And Digital Prints Mounted On Foam Board, Framed In Acrylic Box 14"X14" © Elliot V. Kotek
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Ceci N'est Pas Une Polaroid, 2009 Polaroids And Digital Image Slideshow, Presented On I Pod Nano, Framed In Acrylic Box 13" X 16" © Elliot V. Kotek
R.I.P.olaroid

25 St. Edmonds Road
3181 Prahran
Victoria
Australia
October 22nd, 2009 - November 14th, 2009
Opening: October 22nd, 2009 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.helengory.com
COUNTRY:  
Australia
EMAIL:  
gallery@helengory.com
PHONE:  
+61 3 9525 2808
OPEN HOURS:  
11am - 5pm
TAGS:  
mixed-media, photography, digital, installation, video-art, conceptual
COST:  
Attendance of this exhibition is free

DESCRIPTION

R.I.P.olaroid is a film and photographic undertaking that celebrates and commiserates the concept of the instamatic camera.

Timed with the expiration of the last Polaroid 600 film ever made, Kotek's photographic presentation places old-school Polaroids alongside iPhone-captured pixels transformed into Polaroid-esque pictures.

By presenting the original instamatic alongside new media technology the audience must consider the tempestuous trajectory of digital photography and the concept of photographic replication inherent in normal photography that is uniquely missing in Polaroid technology.

The short film shown on iPods as part of the presentation, and for which many of the images on display were created, is Ceci n'est pas une Polaroid. The title is a direct play on Rene Magritte's 1928-29 series aptly known as "The Treachery of Images." Coincidentally, that series was created at a time when most were beginning to suffer the effects of the Great Depression.

Originally filmed as part of a project called "140," Kotek attempts to capture his environment in 140 seconds (a construct held in reference to Twitter's 140 characters) using both old media and new media, and to film theresults side by side using the appropriate slideshow "technology." The sound of Kotek's current environment (Venice Beach, Calif.) was captured using the iPhone's own speaker.