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Art Belongs To The People!

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Diese Fragen an die Kuenstler richten - auf Antwort bestehen! (Pose these questions to the artists - insist on answers!) , 1972. Hall Collection. Courtesy Hall Art Foundation. Copyright © Estate of the Artist
Art Belongs To The People!
Curated by: Sir Norman Rosenthal

Beaumont St
Oxford OX1 2PH
United Kingdom
April 10th, 2014 - December 7th, 2014
Opening: April 10th, 2014 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.ashmolean.org
COUNTRY:  
United Kingdom
EMAIL:  
director@ashmus.ox.ac.uk
PHONE:  
+44 (0)1865 278002
OPEN HOURS:  
Tues - Sun 10 - 6pm

DESCRIPTION

The Ashmolean is delighted to announce the next exhibition in its collaboration with the Hall Art Foundation with the opening of Art Belongs To The People!. Curated by Sir Norman Rosenthal, the exhibition shows a selection of important works by two outstanding German artists, Joseph Beuys (1921–1986) and Jörg Immendorff (1945–2007).

Art Belongs To The People! is the second in the Ashmolean’s series of exhibitions of post-war and contemporary art presented in collaboration with the Hall Art Foundation. Curated by Sir Norman Rosenthal, the exhibition shows a selection of important works by two outstanding German artists, Joseph Beuys (1921–1986) and Jörg Immendorff (1945–2007).

The exhibition focuses on the artists’ output from 1968 onwards, evoking the world of the student protests which were taking place across Europe and in the United States. In 1968, Beuys was a teacher and Immendorff his student at the Düsseldorf Academy of Art. Beuys had already established himself as a leading figure of the post-war avant-garde and had been involved with the international Fluxus movement since the early 1960s. His provocative statements and work in new and challenging media – performance pieces, sculpture in felt and animal fat – gave expression to his radical conception of art that won him both a devoted following and vehement opposition.

Jörg Immendorff joined the Düsseldorf Academy of Art in 1963 as a theatre design student before he changed course to study under Beuys. He was, throughout his career, involved in international protest movements, taking part in the anti-Vietnam war rallies, the Green movement, and, from the 1970s, engaged in the debate over the division of Germany.

This exciting exhibition series of contemporary art is presented on the lower ground floor in Gallery 2.