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TENDER HOLLOW SURFACE

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Immediate, 2013 Oil On Panel 48 X 48 Inches © Courtesy of the artist & The GALERIE ANNA
TENDER HOLLOW SURFACE

4th Floor, Building B, SM Megamall
EDSA
Mandaluyong City
Philippines
December 21st, 2013 - January 5th, 2014
Opening: December 21st, 2013 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.galerieanna.com
COUNTRY:  
Philippines
EMAIL:  
galerie.anna@yahoo.com
PHONE:  
+632 470 2511
OPEN HOURS:  
Mon - Thurs: 10:00 am - 9:00 pm Fri - Sat: 10:00 am - 10:00 pm Sun: 10:00 am - 9:00 pm

DESCRIPTION

“My body is not the same as yours”- Roland Barthes

In a time of such pornographic fascination over beauty, JC Jacinto finds meaning with perverse enthusiasm in the gnarly unpleasant and malformed bodies to share a delicate sentiment of otherness.

While nature inevitably wears us out and violently changes us with intermittent afflictions in our lifetime, the artist proposes at least in his surfaces, a rather active and painful physical mediation. With distinct sonority and style, Jacinto’s current work is a site of bizarre anatomical free-play that plumbs on the mutilation and freakish tampering of human body. He frames them as alluring ‘unrealities’ in man’s search and desire for self perfection and existential thirst for meaning.

In this visual essay of sort, he relates how the body can be a malleable vessel that could be molded, repeatedly distorted and even partially destroyed to accommodate humanity’s instinctive desires for truth and goodness amid her mortal transience.

These biological metamorphoses of erased faces, punctured bodies, damaged and exaggerated limbs are only palpable remains and codes to a process--- they are the physical enactment of the encounter between the artist and the material. Jacinto insists that he doesn’t only paint but somewhat assumes the role of a god or a plastic surgeon who obstinately addresses material existence by his conscious and physical mediation. As he hurts the surface, he adds and subtracts on impulse to change the material into something more than a painting.

In his own articulation of bended realities, he describes this collection as, “exhausting alterations we apply on ourselves to be different, to have that transformation and to be something more special than shells.” Hence, these are subversion of realities and tense allegory of man’s willingness to submit to such brutal transformation and withering away.

These pieces are rife with human subjectivity and anxieties creating a psychological weigh of irrational awareness and were purposely made to stalk our minds distract and disturb us in order to blur and baffle further our predisposed thinking.

Finally, as Jacinto asserts ideas of change and mutability with pure aesthetic reasons, he resolutely posits possibilities of a liberating renewal at the end of these corrosive and tormenting physical inflictions.