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UTOPIA 19001940. Visions of a New World

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20130927145049-kazimir_malevich__two_figures_in_a_landscape__twee_figuren_in_een_landschap___1931-32_
Two Figures in a Landscape, 1931-32 © MERZBACHER KUNSTSTIFTUNG
UTOPIA 19001940. Visions of a New World

Oude Singel 28-32
2312 RA Leiden
Netherlands
September 22nd, 2013 - January 5th, 2014

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.lakenhal.nl
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Netherlands
EMAIL:  
postbus@lakenhal.nl
PHONE:  
(071) 5165360
OPEN HOURS:  
Tuesday till Friday 10.00 - 17.00 Saturday, Sunday and bank holidays 12.00 to 17.00
SCHOOL ASSOCIATION:  
Constructivism, expressionism
TAGS:  
expressionism, Constructivism, figurative, modern, realism, abstract, sculpture, photography, mixed-media
COST:  
Under 18: free ; Regular: 12,50 ; Over 65: 9,50 ; Museum card: 5,00

DESCRIPTION

Until 5 January, Leiden’s Museum De Lakenhal will fully focus on revolutionary Utopia's. Works by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Kazimir Malevich, Franz Marc and over 130 others will exemplify  the all-encompassing ideals of expressionists and constructivists: two of the major avant-garde movements at the dawn of the 20th century. The exhibition ‘UTOPIA 1900-1940. Visions of a New World’ comprises international contributions, many of which have not been on display to the Dutch public before, and brings the two movements together in a radically original context. 

The avant-gardists felt they stood on the brink of a new era. They wished to achieve their aims by developing a utopian concept for a New Man in a New Society in a convincing and radical manner.  This comprehensive concept comprised the arts, architecture and design: artists would design life from teaspoons to skyscrapers with the aim to better society. Nevertheless, expressionists and constructivists had diametrically opposed views:  expressionism was focussed on personal freedom, individuals that literally exposed themselves, in particular emotionally. Constructivism envisaged individuals as part of a grand scheme, and standardisation and universality were its main cornerstones.