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Marking Territory

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20130917201844-image_for_catalogue_-_weinberg
Silene Colorata: Ein Tamar, 2013 Paper, Wood, Paint 20" X 17" © 2005 Mimi Weinberg
Marking Territory
Curated by: Erin Healy, Alycia Piazza

400 S. Orange Avenue
South Orange, NJ 07079
November 11th, 2013 - December 13th, 2013
Opening: November 14th, 2013 5:00 PM - 9:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.shu.edu/walshgallery
COUNTRY:  
United States
EMAIL:  
jeanne.brasile@shu.edu
PHONE:  
973-275-2033
OPEN HOURS:  
10:30am to 4:30pm Monday through Friday
SCHOOL ASSOCIATION:  
Seton Hall University
TAGS:  
cartography, mapping, LOCATIONS/MAPS, colonial contemporary, botany, sculpture, mixed-media, installation, conceptual
COST:  
free

DESCRIPTION

The Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall University presents “Marking Territory,” a group exhibition co-curated by Alycia Piazza and Erin Healy, graduate students in the university’s Museum Professions program. The exhibition features artworks created using maps deaccessioned from the Walsh Library collection and re-purposed by artists to explore their socio-political impact.  The exhibition includes metropolitan-area artists Aileen Bassis, Wenye Fang, Joshua Knoblick, Zannah Marsh, Disnarda Pinilla, Nyugen Smith and Mimi Weinberg.  Their diverse backgrounds and perspectives stimulate a dialogue on the implications of superimposing lines on land.

Maps drawn by cartographers and artists have influenced the human understanding of the world from their inception.  Maps are not static objects, they are ever-changing to reflect the knowledge, beliefs and circumstances of the people who use and create them. “Like many official documents, maps are something we often take at face value -- an essential truth. But as this group of artists demonstrates, maps are far more than simple diagrams or way-finding tools” say co-curators Piazza and Healy. The artists involved in “Marking Territory” have used a variety of media to manipulate maps and highlight themes potentially lost between the lines. Topics addressed in the show include colonialism, identity politics, economic growth and decline, biology, memory and social interaction.