Bigindicator

two artists working on the edge of image and abstraction

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20121229012716-00120121229
Murmur: Cinquain, 2012 Steel, Glass, Photo Transparencies 24.75" X 22" X 1.25" © Courtesy of the artist & Lisa Sette Gallery
two artists working on the edge of image and abstraction

210 East Catalina Drive
Phoenix, Arizona 85012
January 3rd, 2013 - February 2nd, 2013
Opening: January 3rd, 2013 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.lisasettegallery.com
COUNTRY:  
United States
EMAIL:  
ashley@lisasettegallery.com
PHONE:  
480-990-7342
OPEN HOURS:  
Tuesday – Friday 10 – 5 Saturday 12 – 5
TAGS:  
photography, sculpture

DESCRIPTION

Alan Bur Johnson's work elegantly explores the idea that biological entities, though ephemeral and vulnerable individually, endure in a universal pattern, and may be reborn again - hanging in the bright atmosphere and shimmering in the clear desert air. Johnson incorporates photographic transparencies, medical X-rays, and other organic imagery arranged in groupings consisting of as little as one and as many as 600 parts. The "Swarm" works seem to come to luminous life as each framed, wing-like component flickers independently in the wake of an exhalation or current of air passing through the room. His newest "Murmur" work incorporates photographic negatives of bone into tiny mass-manufactured, fabricated steel frames that visually reference the repetitious syllabic structure of poetic forms while echoing natural rhythms.

Alison Rossiter, a photographer who does not use a camera, develops expired photographic paper to document the passing of time, relying primarily on circumstantial chemical reactions and light exposure processes in the darkroom. The resulting pieces are silvery, velvety photographic abstractions, as conceptually intriguing as they are beautiful. The sophisticated images speak eloquently of the artist's decades of experience and profound relationship with the physical materials and processes of photography. In a 2011 interview with the New York Times, the artist remarked, "For me, it's a personal imperative to know more about the history, materials and processes of my medium."