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John Goodyear: Shifting Views

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20120424153344-goodyear_redyellowblue
Red, Yellow, Blue Construction, 1978 Acrylic on Wood 28 ¾ X 29 ¼ X 6 Inches © John Goodyear 2012
20120424153727-john_goodyear__john_cage_throws_a_fish_into_the_piano
John Cage Throws a Fish into the Piano (detail), 1960 Enamel on Wood 72 X 33 X 6 Inches © John Goodyear 2012
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Paesaggio (after Fra Angelico)- detail, 2011 Ink on Acrylic Bars 24 X 48 X 6 Inches © John Goodyear 2012
John Goodyear: Shifting Views
Curated by: Mary Birmingham

68 Elm Street
Summit, NJ 07901
May 4th, 2012 - July 8th, 2012
Opening: May 11th, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.artcenternj.org
COUNTRY:  
United States
EMAIL:  
info@artcenternj.org
PHONE:  
908-273-9121
OPEN HOURS:  
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday: 10:00 am- 5:00 pm; Thursday 10:00am–8pm; and Saturday & Sunday 11am–4pm. Please call to confirm holiday hours.
TAGS:  
kinetic painting, modern
COST:  
Suggested Admission: Adults $5; Seniors/Kids $3; Art Center Members free

DESCRIPTION

John Goodyear: Shifting Views showcases the work of an internationally recognized artist who has lived and worked in New Jersey for nearly half a century. The exhibition unites Goodyear’s ground-breaking artwork from the 1960s with some recent, related pieces and features three distinct, but interrelated bodies of work.

His “pole” paintings—an idea he originated in the 1960s—are painted wood constructions that spin to reveal fragmented views simultaneously.  Another series incorporates moving latticed screens in front of stationary paintings. When the screens are lightly pushed from side to side, the viewer experiences a strong optical effect that creates a new visual experience.  Both these groups of kinetic works require the viewer’s active participation.  Goodyear’s “Double Subject” paintings are based on iconic works from art history reduced to outline drawings and superimposed one over the other.  The viewer must continually shift focus to “read” the individual images.  The meaning for all of the works in this exhibition is continually in flux depending on elements of chance and the spectator’s shifting vision.