BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:icalendar-ruby CALSCALE:GREGORIAN BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435474 DTSTART:20170112T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:

303 Gallery is proud to presen t our second solo exhibition of new work by Matt Johnson.
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\nFor this occasion\, Johnson will exhibit a selection of sculptures in carved\, bent\, and painted wood. The objects depicted in his new works are the casual detritus of art studios or building sites\, whose forms are the result of usage and discarding. Crumpled cardboard boxes\, shards of cut d rywall\, a discarded cup\, pizza box\, and rolls of blue painter&rsquo\;s t ape are preserved in stasis\, forms that would normally be realized only in the temporality between utility and refuse. These simple moments of dispos session become the generators of their own poiesis\, as their incidental el egance is preserved through replication as sculpture. In a conceit to the t ransient fragility of sculpture proffered by artists like Fischli &\; We iss\, a certain lack of the essential qualities that confer existence upon an object is imbued in Johnson'\;s forms. This impermanent nature is bor ne out by the sculptural constructions themselves\, as their wooden armatur es form the supports for objects that you would usually expect to see crumb le in front of you.
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\nJohnson'\;s approach to displa y lends the exhibition a scientific quality\, as objects are arranged in co nstellations that seem to hint at a gravitational attraction created by the ir masses and the spaces between them. Long concerned with creating rifts i n the negotiation between expectation and reality\, Johnson'\;s sculptur es are arranged to communicate with each other\, and seem to morph accordin g to their imposed relations. The rubble of production\, artistic\, commerc ial and otherwise\, is used to create a new type of codification\, one in w hich objects between states and materials in flux become their own profliga te and surreptitious communicators. An incorporeal form of predicate dualis m begins to take hold\, wherein an object can be both itself and signify a potential beyond both form and function.
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\nMatt Johnson has exhibited widely in such international venues as The Serpentine Galler y\, London (2005)\; The Hammer Museum\, Los Angeles (2005\, 2009)\; The Mor i Art \;Museum\, Tokyo (2007)\; The Hydra Workshop\, Hydra\, Greece (20 11)\; The Walker Art Center\, Minneapolis (2012). A series of the artist 9\;s Lautner Beams\, inspired by cast-offs from John Lautner&rsquo \;s demolished Shusett House was installed in the lobby of the Pacific Desi gn Center in West Hollywood in 2015. His site-specific work \;Untit led (Swan) was unveiled as part of Wanderlust\, a group exhibition ins talled along New York&rsquo\;s Highline in 2016\, where it is on view until March 2017. \; Born in \;New York\, Johnson currently lives and wo rks in Los Angeles.

\n LOCATION:303 Gallery\,555 W 21st Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Wood Sculpture\, Matt Johnson END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435475 DTSTART:20170112T180000 DTEND:20170112T200000 LOCATION:303 Gallery\,555 W 21st Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Wood Sculpture END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438664 DTSTART:20170204T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:

It&rsquo\;s that time of the y ear for the gallery&rsquo\;s annual Winter Salon. \; This show features new works by Gustavo Acosta\, Bernard Ammerer\, Paul Behnke\, Bergman & \; White\, Marcy Brafman\, Kathy Bruce\, Marie Dolma\, Reynier Ferrer\, Joh n A. Parks\, Ian Hughes\, Ilyan Ivanov\, Julie Langsam\, Nadja Marcin\, Dar rell Nettles\, Alastair Noble\, Eva O&rsquo\;Leary\, Tanja Selzer. \; A cross media\, including painting\, photographs\, mixed media\, video\, thes e artists pursue the addiction of art from varying and unique points of vie w. \; Their vibrant works brought together create a space for seductive engagement and thoughtful perceptions.

\n LOCATION:532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel\,532 W. 25th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 01 SUMMARY:Winter Salon\, Gustavo Acosta\, Bernard Ammerer\, Paul Behnke\, Mar cy Brafman\, Kathy Bruce\, Marie Dolma\, Reynier Ferrer\, Ian Hughes\, Ilya n Ivanov\, Julie Langsam\, Nadja Marcin\, Darrell Nettles\, Alastair Noble\ , Eva O’Leary\, John A. Parks\, Tanja Selzer\, Bergman & White END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438665 DTSTART:20170204T160000 DTEND:20170204T180000 LOCATION:532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel\,532 W. 25th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 01 SUMMARY:Winter Salon END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439255 DTSTART:20170223T000000 DTEND:20170408T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Aicon Gallery \;is proud to present the first major New York solo exhibition by renowned South African artist \;Ernest Mancoba. Ernest Mancoba (1904-2002) was born and raised as a black man under the South African apartheid system. In 1938 he moved to Paris to be able to stu dy\, work\, and especially\, to think freely as an artist. At the end of Wo rld War Two\, Mancoba moved to Denmark with his wife\, artist Sonja Ferlov- Mancoba\, where they would both become founding members of the \;COBRA \;avant-garde art movement. The COBRA doctrine was comprised in pa rt by a stress on the absolute freedom of form and color with a focus on sp ontaneity and experiment\, a reaction against the prevailing tenets of Surr ealism\, and inspiration drawn from children'\;s drawings and "\;pri mitive art."\; Mancoba'\;s work represents a unique synthesis of mod ern European art and African spirit. His goal was to bring to European art his deep understanding of African culture\, represented by the frequently a ppearing totems in his drawings and paintings that reflect the humanist Ubu ntu philosophy\, which developed in Southern Africa and stresses "\;the belief in a universal bond of sharing that connects all humanity."\; O r\, as Mancoba put it: "\;A human is a human by and for other people.&q uot\;
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Mancoba'\;s interest in art began in in 1925 at the Grace Die u mission school outside of Johannesburg\, where he initially trained in wo od-carving and furniture making before deciding to pursue fine art full tim e and moving to Cape Town in 1935. Upon his arrival in Paris in 1938\, Manc oba continued his art studies at the É\;cole Nationale Superieure des Arts Dé\;coratifs de Paris. When the Germans occupied Paris during W orld War Two\, Mancoba was arrested and spent time in a Nazi internment cam p. At the war'\;s end\, Mancoba and Sonja decided to relocate to Denmark and immerse themselves in the European avant-garde art movements of the ti me. Although he was a founding member of COBRA and exhibited with them from 1948-51\, his relationship to and influence on the group was\, until very recently\, almost erased from the historical records and texts pertaining t o the movement. Many have argued that this marginalization was due to a com bination of a Eurocentric notion of Modernism\, which would have viewed bot h Mancoba and his work as representative of a "\;primitive"\; Other \, and the "\;ghettoization"\; or categorizing of his practice as i nherently "\;African"\; and thus apart from Europe'\;s modernist movements. Despite this\, Mancoba consistently challenged and defied what was expected from him as a "\;Black Artist"\; by his European artis tic counterparts and scholars\, and developed his own uniquely subjective p ractice that cannot be classified or pigeon-holed as African or "\;prim itive"\; Modernism. \;
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As suc h\, Mancoba'\;s historical importance to the founding of a notion of glo bal Modernism cannot be overstated. Indeed\, as the eminent artist and scho lar \;Rasheed Araeen\, who has written extensively on Mancoba\, has stated:
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"\;What is extraordinary about Mancoba'\;s achievement is that he is very likel y the first artist from the whole colonized world - Africa\, Asia\, the Ame ricas\, Australasia\, and the Pacific - to enter the central core of modern ism at a time when this world\, particularly his own country of South Afric a\, was still struggling under Colonialism\, and to challenge modernism' \;s historical paradigm on its own terms."\;
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Historical and sociopolitical issues aside\, Mancoba&# 39\;s work more than holds its own amongst the 20th century'\;s preemine nt practitioners and proponents of avant-garde Modern art\, whether globall y or in the West. As his practice reached maturity in the late fifties and early sixties\, a primary focus of his work emerged in delicate linear comp ositions on paper and canvas of version after version of a central totem-li ke abstracted figure composed with a minimal use of controlled but vibrant lines and subtle splashes of diffused color. As Mancoba himself stated abou t this focus in his art\, "\;In my painting it is difficult to say whet her the central form is abstract or not. What I am concerned with\, is whet her the form can bring to life and transmit\, with the strongest effect and by the lightest means possible\, the being which has been in me..."\; The canvases and drawings in this exhibition represent this central concern of Mancoba'\;s and are accompanied by an additional set of the artist&# 39\;s talismanic calligraphic drawings\, in which figuration succumbs entir ely to expressionistic groupings of line and color resembling a series of m ystical alphabets suffused with life and movement yet rendered with an asto unding economy of means.
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Only now\, after a lifetime of marginalization and miscategorization\, does Mancoba'\;s w ork seem to finally be garnering the critical attention and reevaluation it deserves\, when viewed as pioneering and defining a crucial moment in art history at the crossroads of a Eurocentric verses a global understanding of Modern art. At the end of apartheid\, Mancoba was honored with large retro spectives at the National Gallery in Cape Town and the Museum of Modern Art in Johannesburg. His work has been included in major institutional exhibit ions at the Tate Britain and MOMA PS1 in New York and will be shown in this year'\;s \;Documenta 14\, Universe in Universe&nbs p\;in Kassel and Athens. This is the artist'\;s first major solo exhibit ion in New York and the first showing of his work at Aicon Gallery.< /div>\n
\n LOCATION:Aicon Gallery - New York\,35 Great Jones Street \nNew York\, NY 10 012 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Ernest Mancoba END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439256 DTSTART:20170223T180000 DTEND:20170223T200000 LOCATION:Aicon Gallery - New York\,35 Great Jones Street \nNew York\, NY 10 012 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:440249 DTSTART:20170223T000000 DTEND:20170325T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Aicon Gallery \;is pleased to present \;Seed for History and Form - Tebhaga\, a group exhibition curated by \; Sumesh Sharma\, co-founder of \;Clark House In itiative\, Bombay\, featuring work by \;Richard Bartho lomew\, \;Jyoti Bhatt\, \;Biren D e\, \;Haren Das\, \;Auré\;l ien Froment\, \;Laxma Goud\, \;So mnath Hore\, \;M. F. Hussain\, \; Mohammad Omar Khalil\, \;Rachid Koraï\;chi\, \;Auré\;lien Mole\, \;Krishna Re ddy\, and \;Michael Kelly Williams.
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Survey shows deflect us from histories of art that engage in cross-pollination of ideas\, form\, and techniques ac ross geography\, language\, and culture. Such seeds\, often ignored and mis understood due to endogamous art research\, lead to untold histories and bi ases towards a linear understanding of the arts. Inclusion into art history and its long serving linear timeline to the Occident\, that is fattened as it descends through survey shows and geography-specific exhibitions\, only continues to serve an understanding of history that suffers from the lack of translation.  \;In art history\, the act of translation should not b e an act aided simply by a dictionary and etymology\, but one that makes us rethink relationships to color\, form and the idea of the visual.
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Conceptualism had its early history when Pablo Picasso and the Polish Avant-Garde were looking at face masks in the colonial collections that ar e now to be seen in the Musé\;e du quai Branly in Paris. There was an idea of translation in this looking that gave birth to many etymologies. T he etymology of modernism is a distinct idea in India\, one that may manife st itself today in the homes Indians build for themselves\, claiming them t o be modern homes. If Joseph Beuys was the Shaman who performed a radical a ct that changed the possible definitions of the term artist\, thereby allow ing those heretofore outside the linear art history of North America and Eu rope leeway to enter\, then these middle-class Indians may also define thei r own modernism. \; \;
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What were the g eo-political translations of a few men and women who gathered each year to teach printmaking through a series of workshops on the Atlantic coast of Mo rocco? This exhibition discusses those seeds of form\, tracking geography f rom Santiniketan in Eastern India\, to Dakar in Senegal\, and ending in New York. It spans the life and work of \;Krishna Reddy&n bsp\;and \;Mohammed Omar Khalil\, and listens to the s ongs of Amadou Badiane and Somnath Mukherjee through \;Aur&eacu te\;lien Froment'\;s cinema\, whileMichael Kelly Willia ms \;narrates the objectivity of form in sculpture that began in printmaking\, and we study what makes \;Somnath Hore'\;s< /strong> \;etchings both minimal and viscerally political. Does a droug ht effect conceptualism and modernism? \;Haren Das'\;s \;woodcuts narrate life in rural Bengal. How do blacksmiths in Daka r challenge form and materiality through history\, like the standing sculpt ure of an ancient Surya (Sun God) or a stone Buddha from ancient Gandhara?< /span>
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The right to land after the Bengal fa mine\, described as the Tebhaga movement\, where sharecroppers asked for a reduction in rent in return for giving grain to the landlords\, was support ed by the artists of Bengal.  \;In \;this exhibition\, a painting f rom the 1960s by \;M. F. Hussain \;defines the see ds of India'\;s modernism as one based on the independence a nascent nat ion\, depleted of its strength through colonialism\, but now somewhat lost in its circumstances. \;Jyoti Bhattcelebrates M. F. Hu ssain\, who was later vilified by the Indian right for his art\, by making a portrait of Hussain in the tricolors of the India flag. \;Aur é\;lien Mole \;makes a poignant critique on India'\;s Progressive Artists Group\, by inviting Akbar Padamsee'\;s muse\, Arai Kesava Naidu\, to the National Gallery of Art in Mumbai for her first time\ , despite her body being a source of that artist'\;s forms. \;Biren De'\;s \;drawings move from cubist renditions of pa storal Bengal to ones that circle out to tantric meditation and spiritualis m\, an element now celebrated in museum exhibitions of Indian modernism.
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Laxma Goud\, coming from the arid part of the Indian Andhras\ , puts a form to Indian erotica and an artist'\;s vision to vocabulary\, camouflaging erotica in deep lines of cubist rendition uncovering many sur prises.Rachid Koraï\;chi'\;s \;calligraphed cer amic hand in Arabic announces New Year wishes to the residents of the city of Saint Denis\, a Parisian suburb. As the city welcomes 2017\, it leaves b ehind the travesties of 2016 by celebrating an Algerian artist. Diasporas h ave created forms of conceptual intrigue in their role as a constant influe nce on creative thought. The Progressive Artist Group in Bombay was catalyz ed by two Jewish refugees\, Rudy Von Leyden and Walter Langhammer\, who had fled Europe to Bombay and brought the rejection of classical form to the s tudents of the Sir JJ School of Arts\, among whom was M. F. Hussain.  \ ;Like the sharecroppers of Bengal\, artists ask for their share in art hist ory not through representation but adequate translation that hears their na rrative.
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Please \;contact \;Aicon \;Gallery (Newyork@Aicongallery.com) for more infor mation.
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\n LOCATION:Aicon Gallery - New York\,35 Great Jones Street \nNew York\, NY 10 012 SUMMARY:Seed for History and Form - Tebhaga\, Richard Bartholomew\, Jyoti B hatt\, Haren Das\, Biren De\, Aurelien Froment\, laxma goud\, Somnath Hore\ , M. F. Hussain\, Mohammad Omar Khalil\, Rachid Koraichi\, Aurélien Mole\, Krishna Reddy\, Michael Kelly Williams END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:440250 DTSTART:20170223T180000 DTEND:20170223T200000 LOCATION:Aicon Gallery - New York\,35 Great Jones Street \nNew York\, NY 10 012 SUMMARY:Seed for History and Form - Tebhaga END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435969 DTSTART:20170112T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of Jo rge Macchi\, Rita McBride\, Pau l Thek\, and Jonathas de Andrade on Thursda y\, January 12\, 2017.

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Premium New Markers \, a series of sculptures by Rita McBride will be shown in the entrance gallery . The works are inspired by Joseph B euys'\; 7\,000 Oaks project\, inaugurat ed in 1982 at Documenta 7. Beuys &rsquo\; plan called for the planting of 7\,000 trees\, each paired with a basalt marker. Sixteen of these tree/ marker pairs can be found on West 22n d Street\, close to DIA Chelsea. Deriving their shape from those basalt tot ems\, McBride'\;s Premium New Markers are clad in Abet laminate \, a material emblematic of post -modern architecture and design of the 198 0s. With an eye trained on modern objects and architecture\, McBride&rsquo\ ;s sculptures toy with the formalism and functionalism of public structures and their oft-overlooked role as mainstays in public space.

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For press inquiries contact Laura Braverman at 21 2 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com

\n LOCATION:Alexander and Bonin\,132 10th Ave. between 18th and 19th streets i n Chelsea\nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Premium New Markers\, Rita McBride END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435970 DTSTART:20170112T180000 DTEND:20170112T200000 LOCATION:Alexander and Bonin\,132 10th Ave. between 18th and 19th streets i n Chelsea\nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435971 DTSTART:20170112T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of Jo rge Macchi\, Rita McBride\, Pau l Thek\, and Jonathas de Andrade on Thursda y\, January 12\, 2017.

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Eye of t he Beholder\, an exhibition of works on paper and small paintings by < strong>Paul Thek includes a pencil triptych executed in 1970 while he was living and working in Amsterdam. The three pages are filled with ro ws of vertical marks with a tender drawing of a lamb in the center \, which points to Thek&rsquo\;s continued engagement with Christian iconography an d Dutch Baroque painting . The exhibition title is taken from a turquoise w atercolor which was included in Thek&rsquo\;s final lifetime installation\n\n

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For press inquiries contact Laura Braverman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com

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\n LOCATION:Alexander and Bonin\,132 10th Ave. between 18th and 19th streets i n Chelsea\nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Eye of the Beholder\, Paul Thek END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435972 DTSTART:20170112T180000 DTEND:20170112T200000 LOCATION:Alexander and Bonin\,132 10th Ave. between 18th and 19th streets i n Chelsea\nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435973 DTSTART:20170112T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of Jo rge Macchi\, Rita McBride\, Pau l Thek\, and Jonathas de Andrade on Thursda y\, January 12\, 2017.

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Jorg e Macchi is considered one of Argentina&rsquo\;s leading artists. Although Macchi has worked in a wide range of mediums from installation\, s culpture\, and works on paper to video and performance art\, he has recentl y directed his efforts to painting\, the discipline in which he was initial ly trained. The exhibition at Alexander and Bonin includes ten oil painting s made over the past three years. Departing from the ordinary and coinciden tal\, his paintings alter scale and context\, employing a system of layered visual complications and interruptions that offers a sensorial\, disconcer ting\, and contemplative experience. Macchi&rsquo\;s paintings have been te rmed &ldquo\;anti-iconic&rdquo\;1 by curator and art historian C uauhté\;moc Medina\, in that they seek to escape an overcoded\, predi ctable interpretation of the medium and move toward an understanding of pai nting tied to individual experience and ambiguity.

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Premium New Markers \, a series of sculptures by Rita McBride will be shown in the entrance gallery . The wo rks are inspired by Joseph Beuys'\; 7\,000 Oaks project\, inaugurat ed i n 1982 at Documenta 7. Beuys&rsquo\; plan called for the planting of 7\,000 trees\, each paired with a basalt marker. Sixteen of these tree/ marker pa irs can be found on West 22nd Street\, close to DIA Chelsea. Deriving their shape from those basalt totems\, McBride'\;s Premium New Markers are clad in Abet laminate\, a material emblematic of post -modern archit ecture and design of the 1980s. With an eye trained on modern objects and a rchitecture\, McBride&rsquo\;s sculptures toy with the formalism and functi onalism of public structures and their oft-overlooked role as mainstays in public space.

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Eye of the Behold er\, an exhibition of works on paper and small paintings by Pa ul Thek includes a pencil triptych executed in 1970 while he was l iving and working in Amsterdam. The three pages are filled with rows of ver tical marks with a tender drawing of a lamb in the center \, which points t o Thek&rsquo\;s continued engagement with Christian iconography and Dutch B aroque painting . The exhibition title is taken from a turquoise watercolor which was included in Thek&rsquo\;s final lifetime installation

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Selected Works 1987-1988 at Brooke A lexander\, New York. In the video gallery is Jonathas de Andrade&rsquo\;s O Caseiro/ The Housekeeper (2016)\, a work constru cted symmetrically in two narratives with synchronized shots. On the left\, Joaquim Pedro de Andrade&rsquo\;s 1959 film\, O Mestre de Apipucos shows t he daily life of Gilberto Freyre in his home in Recife. Freyre is the histo ricist who wrote the remarkable 1933 book Casa Grande e Senzala (The Ma sters and the Slaves). On the right\, Jonathas de Andrade constructs a mirroring of Pedro de Andrade&rsquo\;s film\, substituting Freyre with a f ictional caretaker of the aristocratic residence. The parallel between the two characters establishes a tension that underlines aspects of class and r ace\, two of the main subjects that Freyre dealt with \; in his work.\n\n

For press inquiries contact Laura Br averman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com

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1 Cuauhté\;moc Medina\, &ldquo\;A Renewab le Opacity\,&rdquo\; in Jorge Macchi &ndash\; Prestidigitador (Mexico City: MUAC\, Museo Universitario Arte Contemporá\;neo\, 2014): 18.

\n LOCATION:Alexander and Bonin\,132 10th Ave. between 18th and 19th streets i n Chelsea\nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Threshold\, Jorge Macchi END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435974 DTSTART:20170112T180000 DTEND:20170112T200000 LOCATION:Alexander and Bonin\,132 10th Ave. between 18th and 19th streets i n Chelsea\nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:436962 DTSTART:20170112T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Alexander and Bonin is pleased to announce the opening of four solo exhibitions of the work of Jo rge Macchi\, Rita McBride\, Pau l Thek\, and Jonathas de Andrade on Thursday\, January 12\, 2017.

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Selected Works 1987-1988 at Bro oke Alexander\, New York. In the video gallery is Jonathas de Andra de&rsquo\;s O Caseiro/ The Housekeeper (2016)\, a work co nstructed symmetrically in two narratives with synchronized shots. On the l eft\, Joaquim Pedro de Andrade&rsquo\;s 1959 film\, O Mestre de Apipucos sh ows the daily life of Gilberto Freyre in his home in Recife. Freyre is the historicist who wrote the remarkable 1933 book Casa Grande e Senzala (T he Masters and the Slaves). On the right\, Jonathas de Andrade constru cts a mirroring of Pedro de Andrade&rsquo\;s film\, substituting Freyre wit h a fictional caretaker of the aristocratic residence. The parallel between the two characters establishes a tension that underlines aspects of class and race\, two of the main subjects that Freyre dealt with \; in his wo rk.

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For press inquiries contact Lau ra Braverman at 212 367 7474 or lb@alexanderandbonin.com

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\n LOCATION:Alexander and Bonin\,132 10th Ave. between 18th and 19th streets i n Chelsea\nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:O Caseiro/ The Housekeeper\, Jonathas de Andrade END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:436963 DTSTART:20170112T180000 DTEND:20170112T200000 LOCATION:Alexander and Bonin\,132 10th Ave. between 18th and 19th streets i n Chelsea\nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:O Caseiro/ The Housekeeper END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439199 DTSTART:20170223T000000 DTEND:20170401T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Alexander Gray Associates presents recent work by Luis Camni tzer.

\n LOCATION:Alexander Gray Associates\,510 West 26 Street \nNew York\, NY 1000 1 SUMMARY:Short Stories\, Luis Camnitzer END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439200 DTSTART:20170223T180000 DTEND:20170223T200000 LOCATION:Alexander Gray Associates\,510 West 26 Street \nNew York\, NY 1000 1 SUMMARY:Short Stories END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:429068 DTSTART:20161006T000000 DTEND:20170226T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Securing the Shadow i s a contemplation of American self-taught portraiture through the lens of m emory and loss. Humanity demands that no life should pass without some reco gnition\, whether it is in the form of a marked grave\, a portrait painted after death\, or a postmortem photograph. Such tokens were once proof of li fe&mdash\;one last opportunity to secure a shadow that would survive beyond the limit of individual memories.

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Am erican gravestones offer standing testimony to the changing social structur e of dying from the colonial period through the nineteenth century as portr aits of the deceased slowly replaced stark memento mori of winged death hea ds\, hourglasses\, and the like. In painted portraiture\, the transition fr om frank mortuary depictions to living images coincided with a cultural shi ft as the individual came to be privileged over the community and a redempt ive view of death replaced a more intractable belief in original sin. Posth umous portraits and the postmortem daguerreotypes that ultimately replaced them are memories fixed in colored pigments on canvas and vapors on silver. We cannot help but hear them whisper through the years\, &ldquo\;remember me\,&rdquo\; because\, as photographer Mathew Brady warned in 1856\, &ldquo \;you cannot tell how soon it may be too late.&rdquo\;

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Stacy C. Hollander\, Exhibition Curator

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Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and Chief Curat or\, American Folk Art Museum

LOCATION:American Folk Art Museum\,2 Lincoln Square \nNew York\, NY 10023 SUMMARY:Securing the Shadow: Posthumous Portraiture in America END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:429069 DTSTART:20161006T103000 DTEND:20161006T173000 LOCATION:American Folk Art Museum\,2 Lincoln Square \nNew York\, NY 10023 SUMMARY:Securing the Shadow: Posthumous Portraiture in America END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438666 DTSTART:20170210T000000 DTEND:20170311T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Elliott Hundley&rsquo\;s intri cate and immersive works evolve from his historical research on theater\, l iterature\, and film\, emerging in this exhibition from an exploration of A ntonin Artaud&rsquo\;s enduringly imperative play &ldquo\;There Is No More Firmament.&rdquo\; Written in the 1930s and set in an imagined year 2000\, the script recounts a society&rsquo\;s frenetic response to an imminent cat aclysmic event. Replete with cacophonous sound\, jarring light and fitful m ovement&mdash\;a mesmerizing intimation of synesthetic experience&mdash\;th e text conveys a sense of anxiety and uncertainty.

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With dense accumulations of imagery and painted gestures ad joining three-dimensional elements puncturing and protruding from the surfa ce\, Hundley&rsquo\;s vibrant works appear alive and volatile. These teemin g\, insidious canvases impose a state of disquiet and hint at underlying vi olence with depictions of internal organs\, crowds\, ants\, taxidermied ani mals\, and a sculpture of the Fall of the Rebel Angels and The Last Judgmen t. Mediated by the processes of reproduction and re-presentation\, it is di fficult to locate these things in time and substance\; the works resist att empts at deciphering. Echoing the improvisational approach of Artaud&rsquo\ ;s text\, explicit meaning becomes elusive. Here\, Hundley reinforces an aw areness of the mutability of material and the subsequent need for alert and active viewing.

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Previously engagin g with translations of plays from antiquity\, Hundley has sustained his int erest in translation over time with &ldquo\;There Is No More Firmament.&quo t\; Moving from translation of language to translation of form\, Hundley&rs quo\;s works perform the unfinished script throughout the exhibition. In th is encounter with Artaud&rsquo\;s play&mdash\;written in the past\, project ing into a future that has now passed&mdash\;time folds in on itself. Part science fiction\, part political satire\, the text&rsquo\;s inherent ambigu ity allows it to remain eternally relevant\; the unknown impending disaster could represent a number of contemporary threats. This ability to extend i nto perpetual reinterpretations expresses an innate accessibility at the co re of Hundley&rsquo\;s sources\, reinforced by his use of collage to open t he experience and undermine an overwhelming \;seriousness.

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Orchestrating a spectrum of perspectives\, vign ettes emerge from the swarm in these complex and exuberant works. Conflatin g color\, language\, sound\, and motion\, they approach a liminal sphere\, conjuring visceral reactions. Like dialing between radio frequencies\, Hund ley lingers in the static between lucid signals and sporadic staccato trans missions\, where dissolving is another type of becoming.

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Elliott Hundley (b. 1975) lives and works in Los Angeles. Dust Over Everything is Hundley&rsquo\;s fourth solo exhibition wi th the gallery. His series The Bacchae was the subject of his 2011-2012 tra veling museum solo exhibition at the Nasher Sculpture Center\, Dallas and t he Wexner Center for the Arts\, Columbus. His work is held in numerous prom inent public institutions including the Armand Hammer Museum\, Los Angeles\ ; Broad Foundation\, Los Angeles\; Louisiana Museum of Modern Art\, Humbleb aek\, Denmark\; Miami Art Museum\, Miami\; Museum of Contemporary Art\, Los Angeles\; Museum of Modern Art\, New York\; Nasher Sculpture Center\, Dall as\; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art\, San Francisco\; Solomon R. Guggen heim Museum\, New York and Whitney Museum of American Art\, New York.< /p>\n\n

For media and press inquiries\, ple ase contact Brittni Zotos at b.zotos@rosengallery.com.

\n LOCATION:Andrea Rosen Gallery\,525 W.24th St. \nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Dust Over Everything\, Elliott Hundley END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438667 DTSTART:20170210T180000 DTEND:20170210T200000 LOCATION:Andrea Rosen Gallery\,525 W.24th St. \nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Dust Over Everything END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438668 DTSTART:20170210T000000 DTEND:20170311T000000 DESCRIPTION:
\n

Performances of &ldquo\;Two Person Operating System&rdquo\;
\nby Susan Marshall &\; Company:
\nFe bruary 18\, 2017\, 2-6pm
\nMarch 4\, 2017\, 2-6pm

\n\n

Andrea Rosen Gallery 2 is pleased to announce Dancing A round Things\, an exhibition of work by Martha Friedman. Friedman&rsquo\;s work presents the processes and materials of sculpture vis-a-vis the materi ality of the body\, manipulating substance\, subject matter\, and scale to highlight the familiar as well as the surreal aspects of everyday things. F riedman&rsquo\;s work manifests a visceral intensity arising from her maste ry of material\, but simultaneously retains a footing in language \;and communication. Her works have an inherent wit and humor\, blurring the lin es between material and verbal engineering. In this exhibition\, Friedman h as created an installation of works that play out the slippage between the abstract and the erotic in commonplace objects and materials. In doing so\, they rouse viewers&rsquo\; consciousness of the tension between risk and p leasure that arises from encountering bodies and inhabiting one&rsquo\;s ow n.

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Rubber and metal feature frequen tly in the exhibition as sculptural material\, a continuation of Friedman&r squo\;s interest in industrial objects and their potential to reference and implicate the body. In the entryway of the gallery\, a video made collabor atively by Friedman and New York-based choreographer and dancer Silas Riene r is projected onto a large\, creamy white rubber flap cascading from the c eiling. The footage shows both artists moving amidst and through a small fo rest of giant hand-cast rubber bands knotted together and stretched from ce iling to floor in Friedman&rsquo\;s studio. Shot from a variety of angles\, Riener&rsquo\;s movements range from quotidian and leisurely to soaringly acrobatic. At one tense stage in the video\, the bands are freed from the f loor and Riener propels himself using the elasticity of the hanging loops\, his feet finding dangerous push-off points on the floorboards amidst a gri d of metal hooks. \;

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Made up of a latticed metal screen variously woven and penetrated with soft rubber tu bes in hues referencing the four humors &ndash\; black bile\, yellow bile\, phlegm and blood \;&ndash\; and metal spikes\, Friedman&rsquo\;s sculp ture Two Person Operating System\, situated in the center of the gallery\, channels both threat and attraction. Conceived for the artist&rsquo\;s rece nt exhibition at the Institute of Fine Arts\, New York University\, the pro ject&rsquo\;s form also alludes to work and labor\, from contemporary circu it boards to the archaic telephone switchboards operated by large workforce s of women. The piece will be activated by a dance performance conceived by Friedman and Susan Marshall and performed by Susan Marshall &\; Company . In Marshall&rsquo\;s choreography\, the dancers navigate the sculpture&rs quo\;s dangerously sharp elements with careful attention to precision\, spe ed\, and force\, further implicating the viewer to think about the sensory experience of inhabiting a body and touching or navigating bodies outside t heir own.

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These works confound our expectations of the form and substance of the most ubiquitous of objects an d materials\, drawing parallels with the material condition of the body\, b eckoning viewers to contemplate their own corporeal situatedness.

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Martha Friedman (b. Detroit\, MI) lives and works in Greenpoint\, Brooklyn. She earned her BFA from the School of t he Art Institute of Chicago in 1998 and her MFA from Yale University School of Art in 2003. Solo exhibitions of her work have been held at the Institu te of Fine Arts New York University\, New York (2016-17)\; Locust Projects\ , Miami (2015-16)\; Wallspace\, New York (2012\, 2009\, 2007)\; the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit\, MI (2010)\; DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Pa rk\, Lincoln\, MA (2010)\; and Shane Campbell Gallery\, Chicago\, IL (2010) . Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions\, nationally and internationally. Select examples include Frieze New York Sculpture Park\, curated by Tom Eccles\, New York (2013) and Museum on the Seam\, Jerusalem\ , Israel (2013). Friedman is Assistant Professor of Sculpture at Princeton University. A \;solo exhibition of Friedman&rsquo\;s work is forthcomin g at the Henry Museum\, Seattle in 2018. \;

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For media and press inquiries\, please contact Brittni Zo tos at b.zotos@rosengallery.com.

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\n LOCATION:Andrea Rosen Gallery 2\,544 West 24th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Dancing Around Things\, Martha Friedman END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438669 DTSTART:20170129T180000 DTEND:20170129T200000 LOCATION:Andrea Rosen Gallery 2\,544 West 24th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Dancing Around Things END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439201 DTSTART:20170223T000000 DTEND:20170408T000000 DESCRIPTION: LOCATION:Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 537 W. 22nd\,537 W. 22nd St. \nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:American Spirit\, Roe Ethridge END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439202 DTSTART:20170223T180000 DTEND:20170223T200000 LOCATION:Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 537 W. 22nd\,537 W. 22nd St. \nNew York \, NY 10011 SUMMARY:American Spirit END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435487 DTSTART:20170119T000000 DTEND:20170318T000000 DESCRIPTION:

A well-known humanist truism stat es that there is no art in the non-human world. Indeed\, when it comes to d efining art\, the notion that it constitutes a uniquely human activity ofte n serves as a reassuring rock in a storm of contestation. Laurie Schneider Adams&rsquo\; classic introductory text\, The Methodologies of Art: An Introduction (1996)\, uses this assumption to exclude animal creations such as bird&rsquo\;s nests\, ant hills\, and beaver dams from the categor y of art.(1) &ldquo\;Spiders\, unlike humans\, ar e not inspired by aesthetic or narrative ideas\,&rdquo\; she writes. &ldquo \;They neither observe the environment nor make a conscious choice to creat e the abstract geometry of their webs.&rdquo\;(2) More recently\, French literary theorist Alain Vaillant has advanced an ant hropocentric theory of art and laughter\, which ties them both to humanity& rsquo\;s ability to liberate itself from the exigencies of &ldquo\;reality& rdquo\; and play with representations.(3) At the heart of such theories lies a notion of human superiority strangely at odds with the prevailing tenor of much contemporary art theory and criticism\, which typically embraces otherness and encourages subversions of normative categories.
\n
\nWhile the spectrum of difference celebrated by c ontemporary art remains stubbornly anthropocentric\,( 4) few would argue that animals have no place in this world. Indeed\, t raditional art history narratives begin with depictions of animals &ndash\; usually the iconic horses of Lascaux Caves &ndash\; as well as objects mad e from their bodies\, such as etched shells\, or carved bones and teeth. Wh ile our relationship with non-humans may have changed more under capitalism than in all of human history\, they continue to play an important role in art\, usually as symbols of a social imaginary or as indexes of the real. I n the first case\, they tend to embody positive and negative attitudes towa rds shared cultural mores\, institutions\, and values. In the second\, thei r actual bodies &ndash\; documented\, confined\, taxidermied &ndash\; confr ont us with the limits of this imaginary and its failure to grasp their oth erness. While the goal of such art is usually to shock us\, or make us ques tion the status quo\, its treatment of animals as media or mere things to b e represented is far from innovative.
\n
\nIn his anti-Darwinian theory of biological origins\, French philosopher Henri Bergson observed: & ldquo\;It would be as absurd to refuse consciousness to an animal because i t has no brain as to declare it incapable of nourishing itself because it h as no stomach.&rdquo\;(5) Assuming that the pract ices of non-humans are not imaginative or artistic simply because they lack human organization seems equally absurd. We know that certain animals deco rate themselves and their dwellings\, collect and arrange objects\, make sy mbolic gestures\, and fashion tools. Humanism dismisses these activities as genetically programmed instinct\, devoid of conscious creativity. But we a lso know that animals play\, and play involves metacommunication\, improvis ation\, and stylistic flourishes belonging to the realms of the aesthetic a nd the comic.(6)
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\nAlthough contempo rary art continues to be defined by human agency\, the notion of animal cul ture now serves as a point of departure for a range of artistic practices f ocused on multispecies aesthetics and interspecies communication. The exhib ition Animal Intent explores this trend through the work of seven artists who partner with non-humans in the creation of unique artistic proj ects. Rather than merely representing animals\, using them as surrogates\, or politicizing their bodies as part of a broad social critique\, these art ists treat animal instinct as a form of stylistic invention in its own righ t.
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\nSapsucker Sounds\, Annie Dunning&rsquo\;s playfu l &ldquo\;conflation of woodpecker and human culture\,&rdquo\; is a good ex ample of interventions used by artists in this exhibition. At its heart lie s a pattern of holes dotting the surface of a log cut from a Manchurian wal nut. These are the drill holes of a yellowbellied sapsucker\, a North Ameri can woodpecker known both for boring into young deciduous trees and drummin g on them and other surfaces as a means of declaring its territory. Dunning borrows these marks\, which she treats as the residue of a specific cultur al practice\, and translates them into a series of quirky\, interactive sou nd sculptures. Music Box (2014)\, for instance\, features a negati ve cast of the pattern of holes that have been reconfigured as cylinder pin s for a clunky\, yet charming music box. Viewers may play this unusual musi cal score by turning a rustic ratchet lever\, which forces an explosion of pins through a comb of metal tines.
\n
\nIn human-centered hierar chies of intelligence\, insects generally figure somewhere near the bottom. And yet they have some of the most complex social formations on earth. Ali son Reiko Loader and Christopher Plenzich explore the aesthetic side of thi s complexity in their project Caterpillar Cartography. Part of a l arger\, ongoing collaboration with forest tent caterpillars (Malacosoma disstria)\, it consists of a series of drawings made by fourth-stage caterpillar larvae as they crawl across sheets of paper dotted with piles o f charcoal dust.(7) A series of videos shows the choreographic nature of these sketches. Rather than dismissing their marks as the product of blind instinct\, Loader and Plenzich treat them as an imp rovisational form of cartography\, one that paradoxically &ldquo\;creates t he territory it maps.&rdquo\;(8)
\n
\nA ganetha Dyck&rsquo\;s twenty-year-long collaboration with honeybees takes a similar approach. Working closely with an apiarist\, she places found obje cts into the bees&rsquo\; hives\, where the insects slowly and meticulously transform them into baroque\, honeycombed sculptures. In An Inconvenie nt Proposal (2007)\, a kitsch pastiche of 18th century rococo fashion becomes uncanny beneath the hexagonal &ldquo\;lacework&rdquo\; of the bees. In a tragic twist of fate\, Dyck recently developed a life-threatening all ergy to bee stings. As part of her efforts to find new ways of working with the insects\, she enlisted the help of photographer William Eakin. Togethe r they collaborated on Light (2010-2011)\, a sculptural and photog raphic project focused on human and non-human appropriations of found objec ts. For this project\, Eakin placed a selection of vintage table lamps from his personal collection in the hives. Dyck participated remotely\, giving instructions via a cell phone. Eakin then re-appropriated the completed scu lptures in a series of distorted photographs that quietly fold collaboratio n back into estrangement.
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\nSometime in 2011\, Michael Anthony Simon began bringing Nephila clavata spiders into his studio\, wh ere he devised a method of working with them to produce a variety of webs. Once completed\, he fixed these delicate constructions with spray paint and other materials\, and then returned the spiders to their natural habitat. While one might dismiss this as a form of appropriation art\, such an asses sment would reduce the insects to mere webmaking machines. But as Brian Mas sumi observes in his book What Animals Teach Us About Politics\, & ldquo\;Instinctive action plays its own natural creativity against the limi tative conditions of the external milieu&hellip\; It plays itself\, as it p lays upon. It is always the playing out of a true act\, never just a stereo type of action.&rdquo\;(9)
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\nNina Ka tchadourian&rsquo\;s work with spiders also supports the notion that they a re motivated by more than pure instinct. Her video GIFT/GIFT (1998 ) shows the artist attempting to insert the word &ldquo\;GIFT&rdquo\; into a spider&rsquo\;s web. The insect actively resists this intervention\, and a battle ensues. This project was inspired by a 1950s Swedish nature book d escribing certain cultural practices particular to spiders\, which sometime s wrap dead flies in silk and then offer them as gifts to potential mates.< a href="http://apexart.org/exhibitions/falvey.php#_ftn10" id="_ftnref10" na me="_ftnref10" title="">(10) In Swedish\, the word &ldquo\;gift&rdquo\; means poison\, a doubleentendre underscoring the ambivalence inherent to a ny collaboration. Katchadourian&rsquo\;s photographic series Carla and a Friend (2002)\, on the other hand\, casts this ambivalence in a more positive light\, focusing instead on an unusual friendship between a pet s nake and a rat she was originally given as food.
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\nAlthough th e curatorial impetus for Animal Intent is rooted in the growing fi eld of interspecies collaboration\, it is also part of a personal quest to &ldquo\;unlearn the animal\,&rdquo\; to borrow a phrase from Giovanni Aloi& rsquo\;s influential text Art &\; Animals (2012). Such an appro ach inevitably raises more questions than it answers\, but this space of un certainty feels more comfortable to me than either post-humanist utopias or humanist anthropocene. If we are to reimagine human/non-human relationship s in ways that will ensure the survival of the planet\, it seems vital to m e that we attend as much to the lines that separate us as to the inherent p orousness of these lines. This exhibition represents one small attempt to d o so.
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\nEmily Falvey ©\; 2016
\nUnsolicited Exhibitio n Program
\n
\n1. For an excellent critique of this aspect of Ada ms&rsquo\; book\, see Giovanni Aloi\, Art &\; Animals (London: I.B. Taur is\, 2012) and &ldquo\;Animal Studies and Art: Elephants in the Room\,&rdqu o\; a special editorial published in March 2015 as part of the &ldquo\;Beyo nd Animal Studies&rdquo\; Antennae publishing project 2015-2016\, http://www.antennae.org.uk/back-issues-2015/4589877799.
\n2. Laurie Sc hneider Adams\, The Methodologies of Art: An Introduction (Boulder \, CO: Westview Press\, 2010)\, 14.
\n3. Alain Vaillant\, &ldquo\;Le r ire de l&rsquo\;artiste\,&rdquo\; paper given at No Joke/Sans blague\, Max Stern Symposium\, organized by the Musé\;e d&rsquo\;art contemporain de Montré\;al\, April 2\, 2016.
\n4. Kay Peggs refers to such an thropocentrism as &ldquo\;human primacy identity politics.&rdquo\; See Kay Peggs\, &ldquo\;Human Primacy Identity Politics\, Nonhuman Animal Experimen ts and the Oppression of Nonhuman Animals\,&rdquo\; in Human and Other Animals: Critical Perspectives\, Bob Carter and Nickie Charles eds. (N ew York: Palgrave McMillian\, 2011)\, 133.
\n5. Henri Bergson\, Cr eative Evolution\, trans. Arthur Mitchell (New York: Dover Publication s Inc.\, 1998)\, 110.
\n6. Brian Massumi\, What Animals Teach Us A bout Politics (Durham &\; London: Duke University Press\, 2014)\, 1 -54.
\n7. Loader and Plenzich limited the amount of time each caterpil lar spent drawing to one hour. They used insects from local colonies\, and ensured they were fed and cared for throughout their lifecycle. They also s elected charcoal dust as a medium because it is non-toxic. In North America \, there are no protocols for working ethically with insects.
\n8. Op. cit.\, 23.
\n9. Ibid.\, 19.
\n10. Felicity Muth\, &ldquo\;Fake J ewels: Male Spiders Give Worthless Gifts to Entice Females\,&rdquo\; Sc ientific American\, May 5\, 2014\, blogs.scientificamerican.com/not-ba d-science/fake-jewels-male-spiders-give-worthless-gifts-toentice-females.\n
\nabove photo taken by William Eakin
\n \;

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Emily Falvey is an indep endent art critic and curator based in Montreal\, Canada. She is known prim arily for her critical writing\, which has been published by a wide range o f Canadian museums\, public galleries\, and artist-run-centres. In 2009\, t he Canada Council for the Arts awarded her the Joan Yvonne Lowndes Award fo r excellence in critical and curatorial writing\, and she received curatori al writing awards from the Ontario Association of Art Galleries in 2006 and 2012. As Curator of Contemporary Art at the Ottawa Art Gallery (2004-2008) \, she organized a variety of solo\, group\, and travelling exhibitions. Sh e is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History at the Univ ersité\; du Qué\;bec à\; Montré\;al\, where she is working on a dissertation examining the relationship between the grotesque work of art and commodity fetishism.
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\napexart&rsquo\;s programs are supported in part by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts\, The Buhl Foundation\, the Degenstein Foundation\, Lamben t Foundation Fund of Tides Foundation\, Bloomberg Philanthropies\, The Gree nwich Collection Ltd.\, Affirmation Arts Fund\, the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation\, the Fifth Floor Foundation\, and with public funds from t he New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the Cit y Council and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Go vernor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

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\nAn Unsolicited Exhibition Program winning exhi bition.
\nLearn more about the Unsolicited Exhibition Program.

\n LOCATION:Apexart\,291 Church Street \nNew York\, NY 10013 SUMMARY:Animal Intent\, Annie Dunning\, Aganetha Dyck\, William Eakin\, Nin a Katchadourian\, Alison Reiko Loader\, Christopher Plenzich\, Michael Anth ony Simon END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435488 DTSTART:20170118T180000 DTEND:20170118T200000 LOCATION:Apexart\,291 Church Street \nNew York\, NY 10013 SUMMARY:Animal Intent END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:440473 DTSTART:20170224T000000 DTEND:20170315T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Art in General is pleased to anno unce an exhibition with Freya Powell as part of its New Commissions Program . The collective works on view engage issues around distance\, separation\, and empathy in relationship to various landscapes. The show will feature P owell&rsquo\;s new video\, \;The Silence of the Unsaid. This p roject traces the history of an Athena missile that was launched by the U.S . military in July of 1970 from a base in Green River\, Utah to test re-ent ry speeds and impact. The missile lost control\, went about 400 miles off c ourse\, and crashed in a Mexican desert known locally as the &ldquo\;Zone o f Silence.&rdquo\; It was carrying two containers of Cobalt-57\, a radioact ive element. Powell traveled to this desert with questions about the silenc e surrounding the clean up of the crashed missile\, as well as the myth tha t has since built on this history.

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Rel ated works presented in the exhibition include the three-channel video  \;Our Disappearance is Already There \;(2015). This silent pie ce shows the physical distance between New York City&rsquo\;s public and po tter&rsquo\;s field\, located on Hart Island in the Bronx. The seemingly ab andoned island that holds over a million deceased is seen from two vantage points\, as it is circumnavigated by the camera. In contemplating the separ ation currently enforced by the Department of Corrections around the public space of the cemetery\, the project calls into question the value of life\ , and how lives are allowed to be grievable or not through frames of refere nce such as shared experience\, nationality\, or humanness. Shown concurren tly is a text-based artwork&mdash\;evocative of epitaphs\, Powell&rsquo\;s word lists play with repetition of language to trigger sentiments that echo the separation that is unequivocally felt. The artist states &ldquo\;it is through the incorporation of forced distancing that disassociation is evok ed\, and one&rsquo\;s ability to empathize is often diminished.&rdquo\;

\n LOCATION:Art in General\,145 Plymouth Street \nBrooklyn\, NY 11201 SUMMARY:The Silence of the Unsaid\, Freya Powell END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:440474 DTSTART:20170223T180000 DTEND:20170223T200000 LOCATION:Art in General\,145 Plymouth Street \nBrooklyn\, NY 11201 SUMMARY:The Silence of the Unsaid END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:429550 DTSTART:20161220T000000 DTEND:20170416T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Eko Nugroho&rsquo\;s multidisc iplinary practice uses humor to address social issues\, including changes w ithin the rapidly urbanizing society of his native Indonesia\, the risk of religious fanaticism\, and the breaking of traditional taboos by the younge r generation. This exhibition features three single-channel video works by Nugroho from the Asia Society Museum Collection: Bercerobong (Like a Ch imney)\, 2002\; The Breeder\, 2003\; and Let Me Love Me\, 2004. The exhibition complements a site-specific installation to be c reated by the artist in the Asia Society Visitor Center and the world premi ere of his commissioned performance In the Name of Semelah\, with his theat er company Wayang Bocor\, at Asia Society in January 2017.

LOCATION:Asia Society Museum\,725 Park Avenue at 70th Street\nNew York\, NY 10021 SUMMARY:Video Spotlight: Eko Nugroho\, Eko Nugroho END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:429551 DTSTART:20161220T110000 DTEND:20161220T180000 LOCATION:Asia Society Museum\,725 Park Avenue at 70th Street\nNew York\, NY 10021 SUMMARY:Video Spotlight: Eko Nugroho\, Eko Nugroho END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:429552 DTSTART:20161220T000000 DTEND:20180107T000000 DESCRIPTION:

This exhibition features a sel ection of the finest artworks from the renowned Asia Society Museum Collect ion. Included are Chinese\, Korean\, and Japanese ceramics\, Indian and Cam bodian sculpture\, and sculptures from South and Southeast Asia and the Him alayas that show the varied imagery associated with the transmission of Bud dhism across the region.

LOCATION:Asia Society Museum\,725 Park Avenue at 70th Street\nNew York\, NY 10021 SUMMARY:Masterpieces from the Asia Society Museum Collection END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:429553 DTSTART:20161220T110000 DTEND:20161220T180000 LOCATION:Asia Society Museum\,725 Park Avenue at 70th Street\nNew York\, NY 10021 SUMMARY:Masterpieces from the Asia Society Museum Collection END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438850 DTSTART:20170207T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Over the Bridge III Feb.7-25th\, 2017

\n LOCATION:Atlantic Gallery\,548 West 28th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Third Annual "Over the Bridge (III)" group art show-38 artists \, L ong Island City Artists\, Inc. END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438851 DTSTART:20170209T180000 DTEND:20170209T203000 LOCATION:Atlantic Gallery\,548 West 28th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Third Annual "Over the Bridge (III)" group art show-38 artists END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435489 DTSTART:20170112T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Benrubi Gallery is pleased to present Athenree\, the gallery&rsquo\;s first sol o exhibition by Brooklyn-based artist\, Jude Broughan. Ath enree is a tiny beach town in the coastal Bay of Plenty\, in the artist&rsq uo\;s native New Zealand. It was named after the Northern Irish &lsquo\;tow nland&rsquo\; that is home to the monolithic Athenree Portal Tomb. Revealin g an interest in the process of traveling and the concomitant instability o f &lsquo\;place\,&rsquo\; Broughan&rsquo\;s new works state their claim on the here and now while simultaneously questioning exactly where and when th is might be.

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In assemblages\, loose -hanging works\, mixed-media panels\, and photo collages\, Broughan draws o n the languages of painting and printmaking alongside those of photography and collage to play with space and form\, line and color. Using colored vin yl\, leather\, denim\, and polyester grounds\, she alludes to her own physi cality while pondering the nature of artistic production itself.  \;

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Broughan manipulates her photographs visually and physically\, subtly shifting the emphasis of personal and quot idian imagery in some works\, referencing the language of commercial imager y in others. Her use of stitching&mdash\;a strategy informed by Warhol&rsqu o\;s &ldquo\;Sewn Photographs&rdquo\;&mdash\;inserts shots distinguished by their immediacy into carefully composed arrangements\, the thread dividing our attention between the physicality of the art object and the patterning of its surface. By also cutting holes or apertures in her works&rsquo\; su pports\, Broughan refers to the mechanics (and limitations) of photography\ , digital manipulation\, and vision itself\, and alludes to our seemingly i nnate tendency to edit. As New Zealand artist and critic Peter Dornauf writ es\, this &ldquo\;exposes the constructed nature of the subject while also providing a simulation of depth\, which seems like the contradiction it act ually is. Such incongruity and paradox is the essence of this artist&rsquo\ ;s practice.&rdquo\;

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Jude B roughan is a New Zealand-born artist living in Brooklyn\, New York . Recent solo and group exhibitions include &ldquo\;Best of 2012\,&rdquo\; Soloway\, Brooklyn\, and &ldquo\;Written By Snakes\,&rdquo\; Churner and Ch urner\, New York (both 2012)\; &ldquo\;New. New York\,&rdquo\; Essl Museum\ , Vienna (2012&ndash\;13)\; &ldquo\;Plot\,&rdquo\; Dimensions Variable\, Mi ami\, and &ldquo\;Certain Lights&rdquo\; Churner and Churner\, New York (bo th 2014)\; &ldquo\;A Weekend in the Country&rdquo\; Magnan Metz Gallery\, N ew York\, and &ldquo\;Honey\,&rdquo\; Calder &\; Lawson Gallery\, Hamilt on\, New Zealand (both 2015)\; and &ldquo\;Ornamentation of the Joint\,&rdq uo\; Old Pfizer Building\, Brooklyn (2016). Broughan is a 2015 Pollock-Kras ner Foundation grantee and a graduate of the School of Visual Arts and Hunt er College.

\n\n\n LOCATION:Benrubi Gallery\,521 West 26th Street 2nd floor\nNew York\, NY 100 01 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Jude Broughan END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435490 DTSTART:20170112T180000 DTEND:20170112T200000 LOCATION:Benrubi Gallery\,521 West 26th Street 2nd floor\nNew York\, NY 100 01 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:440544 DTSTART:20170225T000000 DTEND:20170402T000000 DESCRIPTION:

This exhibition consists of five ta bleaus made of pressed wool\, dyed with natural materials and cut with pres surized water. The images inscribed and materials used were chosen to refle ct a few of the ways that women work. Some of these images may look familia r to you: a rendering of Courbet'\;s \;The Grain Sifters \;and the  \;The Sleeping Spinner\, while some these scenes may feel familiar to yo u: women trading in influence\, selection\, assistance and care by communic ating\, designing\, aiding\, sifting\, listening\, responding\, crafting an d up-scaling. Like these women\, some of you may also be leveraging your ab ility to engage in this work at a time that fetishizes such modes of produc tion\, particularly affective labor (which is often made invisible) and art isanal craft (which is often made hypervisible). These ways that women work are neither universal nor natural. These images are not atemporal or timel ess\, they are tethered to 1853\, 1855\, 2017\, 2017 and 2017.
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\nDena Yago (b. 198 8\, New York\, NY) is based in Los Angeles. Recent solo exhibitions include Sandy Brown\, Berlin\; High Art\, Paris\; Boatos Fine Art\, Sã\;o Pa ulo\; White Flag Library\, St. Louis\; and Cubitt\, London. Recent group ex hibitions include Museum of Modern Art Warsaw\, Warsaw\; Hammer Museum\, Lo s Angeles\; Cell Space\, London\; Studio for Propositional Cinema\, Dü\ ;sseldorf\; JTT\, New York\; and Kunsthalle Bern\, Bern.

\n LOCATION:Bodega\,167 Rivington St. Lower Level East\nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:The Lusting Breed\, Dena Yago END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:440545 DTSTART:20170225T180000 DTEND:20170225T200000 LOCATION:Bodega\,167 Rivington St. Lower Level East\nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:The Lusting Breed END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:440545 DTSTART:20170225T180000 DTEND:20170225T200000 LOCATION:Bodega\,167 Rivington St. Lower Level East\nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:The Lusting Breed END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:437609 DTSTART:20170131T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Cez anne said "\; What art needs is to re-do Poussin over again after natur e.&rdquo\; There is something both nostalgic and unsentimental in that: he was yearning for permanence that could affirm his intuitive sensations\, ev en as the values that had sustained permanence seemed to be evaporating aro und him.

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No moment\, of course\, ca n ever be held on to. Something always has to give. But the genius of the w hole thing was that painters&rsquo\; relentlessness in holding on\, regardl ess\, had always been framed by a shared Westphalian narrative\, which had allowed both the modern world and immutable beauty to be suspended\, withou t irony\, in a delicate\, artificial harmony for 250 years. For Cezanne and the modernists who followed\, that holding on continued to be worthy of af firming.

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In these paintings\, my &l dquo\;nature&rdquo\; is to see almost everything as an artificial reference : a certain sky is more Corot or Freilicher\, sunsets are often Claudes\, w inter trees in front of buildings have the texture of Pissarro or a brown t hat is scumbled over a white like in a Kossoff.

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To contact artist e-mail: info@bow erygallery.org

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\n LOCATION:Bowery Gallery\,530 W. 25 St. 4th Floor \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Over Again After All\, John Bradford END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438765 DTSTART:20170202T180000 DTEND:20170202T200000 LOCATION:Bowery Gallery\,530 W. 25 St. 4th Floor \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Over Again After All END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439148 DTSTART:20170210T000000 DTEND:20170318T000000 DESCRIPTION:

I start to paint. I squeeze out lumps on the palette. One little blob speaks to me. He seems to say\, &ldquo\;I am the sun. You revolve around me.&rdquo\; I swipe at him with my brush and lay a piece of him on the canvas. I say\, &ldquo\;I am the sun. You revolve around ME!&rdquo\; And so the conversation goes until the end o f the piece when the paint is silenced and the silence is golden. Jennifer Wynne Reeves\, Facebook post\, November 17\, 2012 \;

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 \;Jennifer Wynne Reeves (1963-2014) lived he r art and life brazenly. Playing with pigment was a primal \;manifestation and solace of her personhood. Her repres entations embrace and aim towards abstraction\, just as her abstraction is always driven by narrative. Morphing reality and abstraction\, anxious ambi guity is Reeves&rsquo\; chosen meaning. Enacted on open\, neutral stages\, her self-proclaimed. proscenium-staged slugs then blobs of paint assert the dilemma of singular existence. Nature and built structures are vital props of her reality while often vehemently confounding their purpose and functi on. Her art resounds with sensibility: a distinctly specific and quirky per sonal style and set of motifs that assert and memorialize her fierce indivi duality and independence. \;

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Like other artists who died too young\, Reeves&rsquo\; art and persona l intensity suggests she knew that her life might be unduly shortened. Her works morphed and shifted from drawing to painting to photography and proli ferated within an increasing impulse to write. She made use of Facebook and other online formats to declare private thoughts as publicly as possible.< br />\nThe works chosen for this exhibition incisively feature her far-rang ing pictorial skill and her propensity to package big thoughts and feelings in small scale. Seductive yet prickly and hermetic yet driven to full disc losure\, Reeves'\; snapshots of her life and brain&rsquo\;s visions pict ure a distinct and idiosyncratic consciousness. \;

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 \;Patterson Sims\, 2017

\n LOCATION:BravinLee Programs\,526 West 26th Street Suite 211\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Blobscape\, Jennifer Wynne Reeves END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439149 DTSTART:20170210T180000 DTEND:20170210T200000 LOCATION:BravinLee Programs\,526 West 26th Street Suite 211\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Blobscape END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:437611 DTSTART:20170129T000000 DTEND:20170226T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Brennan &a mp\; Griffin presents &ldquo\;Off the Banks\,&rdquo\; an exhibition of new paintings and drawings by Brooklyn based artist Victoria Roth. The works in the exhibition use Marsden Hartley&rsquo\;s stormy and majestic &ldquo\;Se ascape&rdquo\; paintings of the mid 30&rsquo\;s to 40&rsquo\;s as a point o f reference\, culling from their unabashed drama and scopic connection of v iewer to picture.

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Roth&rsquo\;s paintings are environments in which marks and gestures\, addi tion and subtraction all collide to create an intimate painterly expanse in habited by and crowded with elements that evoke the body. These paintings e mbody an intense sense of physicality: the muscular energy of the forms\, t he all-over movement of the imagery and its mark-making press against the e dges of the frame. Roth&rsquo\;s painterly process involves the constant ac crual and removal of thin layers of oil paint to embed the surface with a r ich luminescence. The finished works retain a fuzzy grain and diluted soft edges as Roth scrapes\, erases\, and sands the surface of the canvas. This softness is counterbalanced by defined outlines and stark markings\, allowi ng for a graphic sensibility to emerge.

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In empty space
\nwhere entrails entwine
\nw ith the cerebral
\nblossom\,
\nI cast myself to stones\,
\nt hey caught me
\nand ringed a sphere
\nwith what I became.

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(Paul Cé\;lan\, fro m &ldquo\;Force of Light&rdquo\;\, 1970)

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Victoria Roth (b. 1986 Paris\, France) currently liv es and works in Brooklyn\, NY. She received her BA from Brown University in 2008 and her MFA from Columbia University in 2014. Recent group exhibition s include The Clear and the Obscure\, Lulu\, Mexico City\, MX (2016)\, In t he Mix\, Hometown Gallery\, Brooklyn\, NY (2016)\, Vivid Bra\, New York\, N Y (2016)\, SPRING/BREAK Art Show\, New York\, NY (2016). Roth was an artist in residence at the Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program Residency in Brooklyn\, NY in 2015-2016.

\n LOCATION:Brennan & Griffin / Lower East Side\,122 Norfolk Street \nNew York \, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Off the Banks\, Victoria Roth END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438642 DTSTART:20170129T180000 DTEND:20170129T200000 LOCATION:Brennan & Griffin / Lower East Side\,122 Norfolk Street \nNew York \, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Off the Banks END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:437651 DTSTART:20170202T000000 DTEND:20170305T000000 DESCRIPTION:

An Exhibition of Newly Commiss ioned Work by Miguel Luciano

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A prom inent mid-career artist based in Brooklyn\, Miguel Luciano works in multi ple media to examine issues of cultural identity\, politics\, and popular c ulture. BRIC has commissioned Luciano to create new work &ndash\; sculpture s featuring customized vintage Schwinn bicycles &ndash\; that commemorate t he traditions of Puerto Rican bike clubs in New York. He will exhibit this work along with paintings and historic ephemera that question the colonial relationship between the United States and Puerto Rico\, at the centennial mark of U.S. Citizenship for Puerto Ricans (1917-2017). This body of work a cts as a powerful commentary on the current economic and political crisis i n Puerto Rico and examines its impact on the diaspora.

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Public programs will accompany the exhibition.  \;

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Group and individual to urs available on Wednesday mornings.

\n LOCATION:BRIC Arts | Media House\,647 Fulton Street \nBrooklyn\, NY 11217 SUMMARY:Ride or Die\, Miguel Luciano END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:437652 DTSTART:20170201T190000 DTEND:20170201T210000 LOCATION:BRIC Arts | Media House\,647 Fulton Street \nBrooklyn\, NY 11217 SUMMARY:Ride or Die: END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439071 DTSTART:20170127T000000 DTEND:20170319T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Bridget Donahue is pleased to present Remote Controls\, the gallery&rsquo\;s second solo show by American artist and filmmaker Lynn Hershman Leeson. For the last five deca des\, Hershman Leeson has been a trailblazer in the use of new media and te chnologies\, investigating issues of identity\, gender-role\, the double bi nd of voyeurism and surveillance\, and what it means to be human in an incr easingly cyber world and an era of bio- and genetic engineering. The exhibi tion features a broad selection of the artist&rsquo\;s pioneering interacti ve media works and videos from the 70s to the present\, most of them never before shown in New York City.

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Incl uded in Remote Controls are the first interactive video disc\, Lorna (1979-82)\, in which viewers use a remote control to navigate t hrough the apartment of an agoraphobic woman\, accessing her fears and drea ms\, personal history and future\; and the sexual fantasy video disc\, Deep Contact (1984)\, which first used touch-activated screens. The ex hibition also features \;Home Front (1993-2011)\, a two-channe l synchronized installation inside a dollhouse\, exploring spaces of domest ic confrontation and voyeuristic stances\; and Synthia Stock Ticker (2000-2002)\, a networked sculpture charting the market in a real time vi a a video of behavioral mood swings. Hershman Leeson&rsquo\;s innovative wo rk with genetic manipulation will be on display with her latest installatio n\, Venus of the Anthropocene (2016)\, which captures viewers&rsqu o\; DNA patterns to create a mutating hybrid of mirrored identities.

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Remote Controls also features th e video Seduction of a Cyborg (1994)\, a poetic allegory about tec hnology&rsquo\;s invasion of the body\; \;The Complete Electronic D iaries (1986-1994)\, a 76-minute single-channel "\;video typed&quo t\; confessional that records Hershman Leeson'\;s struggle\, transformat ion\, and transcendence as her personal story unfolds before the camera\; a nd several short video works. Also included in the exhibition are early dra wings and a new wax sculpture. These mixed media works capture ideas of dis appearance\, alchemical and atmospheric connection to air\, water and elect ric currents\, and ultimately the fragile nature of life itself.

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Lynn Hershman Leeson (b. 1941)\, who was just awarded a 2016 United States Artists (USA) Fellowship\, is also featured i n the current Whitney Museum exhibition\, Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art\, 1905-2016 (until February 6\, 2017)\, and her first comprehe nsive U.S. retrospective\, Civic Radar &ndash\; originally curated by ZKM\, Karlsruhe\, Germany &ndash\; will open at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on February 10\, 2017.

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Her work has been shown in over 200 large-scale exhibitions throughout the wor ld and is featured in the public collections of the Museum of Modern Art (N ew York and San Francisco)\, Tate Modern and Modern Art Oxford (London)\, L ehmbruck Museum (Duisburg)\, Los Angeles County Museum of Art\, National Ga llery of Canada (Ottawa)\, Walker Art Center (Minneapolis)\, Whitworth Art Gallery (Manchester)\, and Berkeley Art Museum\, in addition to celebrated private collections.

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Hershman Leeso n released the groundbreaking documentary !Women Art Revolution (!W.A.R .\, 2010)\, charting the history of the feminist art movement in Ameri ca. It was screened at major museums internationally and received first pri ze at the 2012 Montreal Films on Art Festival. Among Hershman Leeson&rsquo\ ;s feature-length films are Strange Culture (2007)\, Conceivin g Ada \;(1997)\, and Teknolust (2002) &ndash\; all featur ing actress Tilda Swinton. Leeson was awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Prize for writing and directing Teknolust\, and her films have sc reened at the Sundance\, Berlin\, and Toronto International Film Festivals. In her most recent works\, Lynn Hershman Leeson includes robots\, mass com munication media such as smartphones\, as well as the latest scientific dev elopments in the field of genetics and regenerative medicine including 3D b ioprinters that create human body parts.

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In 2016\, Hatje Catz Verlag published Civic Radar\, the firs t comprehensive monograph devoted to Hershman Leeson. Edited by Peter Weibe l\, this substantial publication includes articles and interviews with\, am ong others\, Peter Weibel\, B. Ruby Rich\,  \;Tilda Swinton\, Hou Hanru \, and Laura Poitras.

\n LOCATION:Bridget Donahue\,99 Bowery 2nd Floor\nNew York\, NY 10002US SUMMARY:Remote Controls\, Lynn Hershman Leeson END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:427368 DTSTART:20161104T000000 DTEND:20170402T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Marilyn Minter&rsquo\;s sensual paintings\, photographs\, and video s vividly explore complex and contradictory emotions around beauty and the feminine body in American culture. She trains a critical eye on the power o f desire\, questioning the fashion industry&rsquo\;s commercialization of s ex and the body. \;Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty \;is the f irst retrospective of her work.

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Spann ing more than four decades\, the exhibition begins with the artist&rsquo\;s earliest artworks\, from 1969 through 1986\, including rarely exhibited ph otographs as well as paintings incorporating photorealist and Pop art techn iques. It continues with works from the late 1980s and 1990s that examine v isual pleasure in visceral depictions of food and sex. The exhibition culmi nates in Minter&rsquo\;s ongoing investigation of how the beauty industry e xpertly creates and manipulates desire through images.

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Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty \;is co-organiz ed by the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston and the Museum of Contemporary A rt Denver. The Brooklyn presentation is organized by Catherine Morris\, Sac kler Family Curator\, and Carmen Hermo\, Assistant Curator\, Elizabeth A. S ackler Center for Feminist Art\, Brooklyn Museum.

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The accompanying book is published by Gregory R. Miller &\; Company\, the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston\, and the Museum of Contemp orary Art\, Denver.

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 \;

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Thi s exhibition is supported by generous grants from Gregory R. Miller &\; Co.\; Amy and John Phelan\; Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn/Salon 94\, New York\; and Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch. Generous support for the Brooklyn Museum pre sentation is provided by the May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation\, Inc.\ ; the Taylor Foundation\; Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch\; Richard Edwards and B aldwin Gallery\, Aspen\; Christina and Emmanuel Di Donna\; Stefan Edlis and Gael Neeson\; \;the Bertha and Isaac Liberman Foundation\; and Emily G lasser and William Susman.

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Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty \;is part of \;A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum\, a yearlong series of te n exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Leadership support is provided by Elizabeth A. Sac kler\, an anonymous donor\, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation\, the Calvin Kl ein Family Foundation\, and Mary Jo and Ted Shen. Generous support is also provided by the Taylor Foundation\, the Antonia and Vladimer Kulaev Cultura l Heritage Fund\, and The Cowles Charitable Trust.

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LOCATION:Brooklyn Museum of Art\,200 Eastern Parkway \nBrooklyn\, NY 11238- 6052 SUMMARY:Pretty/Dirty\, Marilyn Minter END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:427369 DTSTART:20161104T110000 DTEND:20161104T180000 LOCATION:Brooklyn Museum of Art\,200 Eastern Parkway \nBrooklyn\, NY 11238- 6052 SUMMARY:Pretty/Dirty\, Marilyn Minter END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:427370 DTSTART:20161021T000000 DTEND:20170305T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Beverly Buchanan (1940&ndash\;2015) explored the relationship betwe en place and personal\, historical\, and geological memory. Engaging with t he most vanguard movements of her time\, including land art\, post-minimali sm\, and feminism\, she linked political and social consciousness to the fo rmal aesthetics of abstraction.

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The m ost comprehensive exhibition of Buchanan&rsquo\;s work to date\,Beverly Buchanan&mdash\;Ruins and Rituals \;presents approximately 200 ob jects\, including sculpture\, painting\, photography\, drawing\, and notebo oks of the artist&rsquo\;s writing as well as documentation of performances . A new video installation of her existing earthworks is presented for the first time.

Emphasizing how Buchanan&rsquo\;s work resisted easy categorization\, this exhibition investigates her dialogue not only with a range of styles\, materials\, and movements\, but also with gender\, race\ , and identity. Works on view examine histories of locations where she live d and worked\, including Florida\, New York\, and Georgia.

Accor ding to Buchanan\, "&hellip\; a lot of my pieces have the word 'ruins' in t heir titles because I think that tells you this object has been through a l ot and survived&mdash\;that&rsquo\;s the idea behind the sculptures&hellip\ ;it&rsquo\;s like\, 'Here I am\; I&rsquo\;m still here!' "

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Beverly Buchanan&mdash\;Ruins and Rituals&nb sp\;is organized by guest curators Jennifer Burris and Park McArthur\, and coordinated by Catherine Morris\, Sackler Family Curator for the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art\, and Cora Michael\, Associate Curator o f Exhibitions\, Brooklyn Museum.

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&nbs p\;

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Generous support for this exhibition is provided by the Brooklyn Museum's Contemporary Art Acquisitions Committee.

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Beverly Buchanan&mdash\;Ruins and Rituals \ ;is part of \;A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn M useum\, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anni versary of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Leadership sup port is provided by Elizabeth A. Sackler\, an anonymous donor\, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation\, the Calvin Klein Family Foundation\, and Mary Jo and Ted Shen. Generous support is also provided by the Taylor Foundation\, the Antonia and Vladimer Kulaev Cultural Heritage Fund\, and The Cowles Charit able Trust.

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LOCATION:Brooklyn Museum of Art\,200 Eastern Parkway \nBrooklyn\, NY 11238- 6052 SUMMARY:Ruins and Rituals\, Beverly Buchanan END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:427371 DTSTART:20161021T110000 DTEND:20161021T180000 LOCATION:Brooklyn Museum of Art\,200 Eastern Parkway \nBrooklyn\, NY 11238- 6052 SUMMARY:Ruins and Rituals\, Beverly Buchanan END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:429555 DTSTART:20161104T000000 DTEND:20170326T000000 DESCRIPTION:

In Iggy Pop Life Class\, Turner Prize‒winning artist Jeremy Deller uses the traditional life dra wing class to stage a performative event with Iggy Pop as model and subject . The exhibition presents the resulting drawings along with works from our historical collections\, chosen by Deller\, that depict the male body\, exa mining shifting representations of masculinity throughout history.
The fifty-three drawings included in the exhibition were created on Fe bruary 21\, 2016\, during a one-day life drawing class\, using Pop as the u nexpected model. The class was held at the New York Academy of Art and incl uded twenty-two artists drawn from New York City&rsquo\;s diverse communiti es\, ranging in age from 19 to 80\, with varying backgrounds and levels of education and experience. The class was led by artist and drawing professor Michael Grimaldi. The participating artists are Jeremy Day\, Jeanette Farr ow\, Margaret Fisher\, Seiji Gailey\, Robert Hagan\, Tobias Hall\, Deirdra Hazeley\, Patricia Hill\, Okim Woo Kim\, Maureen McAllister\, Kallyiah Meri lus\, Guno Park\, Kinley Pleteau\, Angel Ramirez\, Robert Reid\, Mauricio R odriguez\, Danielle Rubin\, Taylor Schultek\, Charlotte Segall\, Andrew She ars\, and Levan Songulashvili.

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Deller &rsquo\;s collaboration with Pop as a nude model is essential to his concep t. A pioneer rock musician&mdash\;as a singer\, songwriter\, musician\, and actor&mdash\;Pop began performing in the 1960s\, becoming known for strenu ous and unpredictable stage performances that often left his body battered and cut. As Deller notes\, "Iggy Pop has one of the most recognizable bodie s in popular culture. A body that is key to an understanding of rock music\ , and that has been paraded\, celebrated\, and scrutinized through the year s in a way that is unusual for a man. It is also fair to say that it has wi tnessed a lot. It was for these reasons that I wanted him to sit for a life class." For Deller\, the life drawing class offered the opportunity to stu dy his body in direct and palpable terms.

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Iggy Pop Life Class is organized by Sharon Matt Atkins\, Vice Director\, Exhibitions and Collections Management\, Brooklyn Museum.

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Generou s support for this exhibition is provided by Mike Wilkins and Sheila Duigna n\, the FUNd\, and Cristina Enriquez-Bocobo.

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The accompanying book is published by the Brooklyn Museum in associ ation with Heni Publishing\, London. This publication is supported by the F UNd.
 \;

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Iggy Pop Life Class is part of A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brookl yn Museum\, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Leadership support is provided by Elizabeth A. Sackler\, an anonymous donor\, the Sta vros Niarchos Foundation\, the Calvin Klein Family Foundation\, and Mary Jo and Ted Shen. Generous support is also provided by the Taylor Foundation\, the Antonia and Vladimer Kulaev Cultural Heritage Fund\, and The Cowles Ch aritable Trust.

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LOCATION:Brooklyn Museum of Art\,200 Eastern Parkway \nBrooklyn\, NY 11238- 6052 SUMMARY:Iggy Pop Life Class\, Jeremy Day\, Jeremy Deller\, Jeanette Farrow\ , Margaret Fisher\, Seiji Gailey\, Robert Hagan\, Tobias Hall\, Deirdra Haz eley\, Patricia Hill\, Okim Woo Kim\, Maureen McAllister\, Kallyiah Merilus \, Guno Park\, Kinley Pleteau\, ángel Ramírez\, Robert Reid\, Mauricio Rodr iguez\, Danielle Rubin\, Taylor Schultek\, Charlotte Segall\, Andrew Shears \, Levan Songulashvili END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:429556 DTSTART:20161104T110000 DTEND:20161104T180000 LOCATION:Brooklyn Museum of Art\,200 Eastern Parkway \nBrooklyn\, NY 11238- 6052 SUMMARY:Iggy Pop Life Class\, Jeremy Day\, Jeremy Deller\, Jeanette Farrow\ , Margaret Fisher\, Seiji Gailey\, Robert Hagan\, Tobias Hall\, Deirdra Haz eley\, Patricia Hill\, Okim Woo Kim\, Maureen McAllister\, Kallyiah Merilus \, Guno Park\, Kinley Pleteau\, ángel Ramírez\, Robert Reid\, Mauricio Rodr iguez\, Danielle Rubin\, Taylor Schultek\, Charlotte Segall\, Andrew Shears \, Levan Songulashvili END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435233 DTSTART:20170120T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION: LOCATION:Bruce Silverstein Gallery\,529 West 20th Street Third Floor\nNew Y ork\, NY 10011US SUMMARY:Monochrome END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:435234 DTSTART:20170120T180000 DTEND:20170120T200000 LOCATION:Bruce Silverstein Gallery\,529 West 20th Street Third Floor\nNew Y ork\, NY 10011US SUMMARY:Monochrome END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438670 DTSTART:20170212T000000 DTEND:20170319T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Bureau is pleased to announce Tom Holmes&rsquo\;s exhibition\, L&rsquo\;Eggo My Eggo®\;\, his third solo at Bureau. The exhibition collides two distinctly American vern acular iconographies of saccharine pop and austere minimalism and introduce s the artist&rsquo\;s recent interest in automatic drawing. Two monumental paintings dominate the gallery walls\, their expressive\, sweeping and jagg ed gestures buzzing atop the smooth graphic of Eggo®\; waffle boxes. The day-glow eruption of color and frenetic movements are reflected in the coo l\, metallic surfaces of foiled rectangular brick grave plots and disquieti ng formations of chromed metal folding chairs.

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Consumables geared towards the supple minds of children have en grossed Holmes for many years\, compelled by the complexity of desire and d read they inspire. His first Trix®\; cereal box urn of 2010 introduced h is incisive and heart-rending blend of funerary pop at his show Silly R abbit: a gravestone and an urn at Dispatch. In these boxes full of pro mise and plenty Holmes recognizes a locus of control and fear: a mirage of candy-pop force fed to us en masse as the innocently complacent subjects of corporate ego and violence. Fear eats us as we children swallow the sugar coated fantasies of our first man-made substance-induced reveries.
\n< br />\nHolmes&rsquo\;s new paintings &ndash\; two shown here of a suite of four &ndash\; feature a vastly scaled-up and flattened waffle box announcin g an explosive fantasy of infantile breakfast joy. The box&rsquo\;s graphic finish serves as ground for a flurry of abstract marks of expanded automat ic drawing. Over the past two and a half years\, working with a hypnotist\, Holmes has sought to excavate the expressive potential of the subconscious mind through automatism\, connecting a deep anxiety and fear of the inevit able with the pure communicative potential of the hand. The movement of the pen vigorously and subtly transcribes the non-verbal. In one composition c omic heroines surf the sprawling lines and colorful passages ushering route s between mind and body\; pop and expressionism.

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If the paintings mine the abstract mind\, Holmes&rsquo\;s scu lpture delineates the limits of the physical body: bodies in formation\, ba rricaded and at rest. In gleaming chrome and silver\, these forms impose ge ometry on the body. For many years\, Holmes has implemented the architectur e of the funerary in his work. Gravestone\, reliquary\, urn and plot sculpt ures assert the power of that final\, permanent application of architecture on the body. Here the rectilinear plot\, composed of jaggy foiled bricks h olds a poetic space of beauty and modesty. The reflective finishes of these new sculptures stresses that of surface and optical over the spatial and w eighty\, deepening the metaphysical nature of the show.
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\nTom Holmes was born in Ozona\, Texas\, lives in Jackson Co. and works in Putnam and Cannon Co. Tennessee. Selected solo exhibitions include &lsquo\;Piss Y ellow / Bars and Stars&rsquo\;\, Bureau New York\; &lsquo\;Temporary Monume nt&rsquo\;\, Kunsthalle Bern\; &lsquo\;Part of This Complete Breakfast: obj ects for a wake&rsquo\;\, Galerie Catherine Bastide\, Brussels\; &lsquo\;Pa inted Bones - some reliquaries&rsquo\;\, Bureau New York\; &lsquo\;Noisy Bo ttom&rsquo\;\, Exile\, Berlin. His work has been included in group exhibiti ons at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center\; Freymond-Guth Fine Arts Ltd\, Zurich\; Palais de Tokyo\, Paris\; Malmö\; Konstmuseum\, Sweden and The Whitney Museum at Altria\, New York. He has been awarded grants and reside ncies from The Pollock-Krasner Foundation\; The Joan Mitchell Foundation\; Ox-Bow and The Edward F. Albee Foundation. His work is in the public collec tions of the Tang Museum of Skidmore College\; Stiftung Kunsthalle Bern\, S witzerland and FRAC Bourgogne\, France.

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The artist wishes to extend special thanks to the following organizati ons: The Haven Foundation\, The Pollock-Krasner Foundation\, The Joan Mitch ell Foundation\, CERF+\, Artists&rsquo\; Fellowship\, Inc.\, Ox-Bow\, and T he Adolph &\; Esther Gottlieb Foundation.

\n LOCATION:Bureau\,178 Norfolk Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:L'Eggo My Eggo®\, Tom Holmes END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:438671 DTSTART:20170212T180000 DTEND:20170212T200000 LOCATION:Bureau\,178 Norfolk Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:L'Eggo My Eggo® END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:437653 DTSTART:20170112T000000 DTEND:20170226T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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A history of sca rs left on the face of a planet. Sooner than later the next dominant spe-ci es would have forgotten what these scars really were. I was dancing on top of a build-ing in Bangkok with my friends and all that is left now is a vid eo and some memories. At the end of &ldquo\;Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3&rdquo\;\, the artist becomes the dro ne. What is left over after the fire is the burnt ground underneath\, barel y any information\, no spirits\, just history.One artist is supported by th e other artist\, so this piece is a tribute to the other artist\, my galler ist.

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K.A. 2017

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The Artist and the other Artist was originally installed as part of Painting with history 3 or two tho usand five hundred and fifty nine years to figure stuff out at Museion \, Bolzano\, IT\, 2016.

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Kor akrit Arunanondchai (b. 1986\, Bangkok\, Thailand) lives and works in New York and Bang-kok. Solo exhibitions of his work have been held at M useion\, Bolzano\, Italy\; S.M.A.K\, Ghent\, BE\; Ullens Center for Contemp orary Art\, Beijing\, CN\; Palais de Tokyo\, Paris\, FR\; Museum of Modern Art\, Warsaw\, PL and MoMA PS1\, New York\, USA. Recent group exhibitions i nclude Berlin Bien-nale\, DE\, Sidney Biennale\, AU\, Beware Wet Paint\, IC A\, London\, UK and Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo\, Turin\, IT\; High Desert Test Sites 2013\, Joshua Tree\, USA\; and Double Life\, Sculpture Ce nter\, New York\, USA.

\n LOCATION:C L E A R I N G Brooklyn\,396 Johnson Avenue \nBrooklyn\, NY 11237 SUMMARY:The Artist and the other Artist\, Korakrit Arunanondchai END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:437654 DTSTART:20170113T000000 DTEND:20170226T000000 DESCRIPTION: LOCATION:C L E A R I N G Brooklyn\,396 Johnson Avenue \nBrooklyn\, NY 11237 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Aaron Garber-Maikovska END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439150 DTSTART:20170204T000000 DTEND:20170312T000000 DESCRIPTION:

In Bella Foster&rsquo\;s exhib ition \;Food of Light \;at CANADA 331\, twenty new paintin gs are presented\, each one a miniature tribute\, the size of a reproductio n in a coffee table book. Rendered in watercolor on paper\, Foster&rsquo\;s compositions possess an intensity that seems to defy the medium. The image ry is not loaded\, per se\, but it does pay mind to politics and awareness.  \;

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Every painting is a collect ion of memories and keepsakes\, symbolic of sharing and friendship\, the bo nd we feel with others\, the desire towards protection. \; When I was a child my mom gave me a used contact lens in a tiny glass vile that I kept as a pet. The more ephemeral a thing\, the more it can bestow on you its ma gical properties from its other existence. \; We care so much about obj ects but that is only because they allow us to. We need to care about somet hing\, to feel connected\, grounded\, alive. \; Foster&rsquo\;s works a re a metaphor for the humble beauty of world history\, told through a femin ist lens.  \;What is it about small things and color\, the tracing of s oft lines to describe a talisman\, a rainbow\, a length of yarn that is so maternal? \; It has to do with creation. With caring about what you bri ng into the world and being positive.

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In these challenging times we take comfort in beauty\, in symbols. The s igns of the march\, the indisputable message of love. Leading with kindness rather than insults. A broken pencil\, the spine of a book. These things a re vulnerable and dependent on our care as we bring them into being\, and r e-bring them again through art. Foster favors objects of knowledge\, color field studies\, fertility statues\, books\, vessels\, fruits\, textiles\, a rtworks. \; Her tender compositions express a dedicated study and appre ciation for secular things. \; A tenderness for the every day and a con templation for every moment.
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\nBella Foster (b.1975\, Los Ange les\, CA) received her BFA from the School of Visual Arts\, New York. Her w ork has been exhibited at \;Venus Over Manhattan\, Los Angeles\; White Columns\, NY\; South Willard\, Los Angeles\, and in CANADA'\;s 2016 Frie ze NY booth\, curated by Katherine Bernhardt. Foster lives and works in Los Angeles.

\n LOCATION:Canada\,333 Broome St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Food of Light\, Bella Foster END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439151 DTSTART:20170204T180000 DTEND:20170204T200000 LOCATION:Canada\,333 Broome St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Food of Light END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439152 DTSTART:20170204T000000 DTEND:20170312T000000 DESCRIPTION:

CANADA is pleased to present&n bsp\;Not a Metaphorical Forest\, \;a solo exhibition by \; Joanna \;Malinowska. Under the guise of humor and makeshift formal arra ngements\, the artist reflects on the complex and highly paradoxical relati ons humans often have with the natural world. Her perspectives range from p layful to grim to apocalyptic. \;
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\nThe central piece of t he exhibition\, \;Still Life\, \;represents an attempt to reconstruct a beaver habitat. &ldquo\;With their essentialist\, no fuss con struction methods\, beavers are amazing sculptors and architects\,&rdquo\; explains Malinowska. Aiming to emulate the resourcefulness of the animals t hat inspired it\, the installation is chiefly built out of discarded Christ mas trees that dominated the cityscape of New York in January. Amid the log s of the installation rests a partly defrosted figure (climate change?)\, l ying belly up\, reminiscent of Hugo Ball in his iconic costume from the 191 6 performance \;Karawane. The artist'\;s inclusion of this figure\, who is considered by Malinowska as a patron saint of rebellion\, s eems to miraculously appear from the heap of logs\, perhaps presented as a much-needed respite in these current times. \;
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\nIn \; His Worshipers Worship a Phantom\, a series of nine watercolors\, Malinowska has created a storyboard from an excerpt from Thomas Bernhard&rs quo\;s novel \;The Loser. \; The passage describes a ficti onalized Glenn Gould chopping down an ash tree that was supposedly obstruct ing his piano practice\, when he could have simply drawn the curtains in hi s room in order to block the tree from his view. Malinowska was struck by t he text due to the farcical yet existential quality of this episode\, seein g it as a condensed representation of the general human condition.
\n< br />\nAnother group of works on paper continue to revolve around the subje ct of fallen trees\, which have been displaced due to human activity\, othe rwise demolished by natural disasters (such as the mysterious Tunguska Blas t in Siberia from 1908). Many of these works draw upon the artist&rsquo\;s recent experience of spending time in Maine.
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\nIn \;We apons of Mass Destruction\, the artist continues to explore her intere st in &ldquo\;leaning&rdquo\; sculptures. The ensemble of simple clay forms includes a sickle - a semi-circular agricultural tool known to humankind s ince the Neolith\, before it became universally associated with the former Soviet Union. The sculpture is a darkly humorous take on the famous asserti on by Albert Einstein regarding types of weapons that would be used in the hypothetical world war IV.
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\nA copy of \;The Brothers Karamazov \;is used by Malinowska to create a shape-shifting sculp ture formed by the pages of the book\, which have been shredded and held in place with hairspray and the force of gravity. The precariousness of this work stands in opposition to the brutal shredding process\, and also allude s to the artist&rsquo\;s continuing interest in the pile format. \;
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\nThe final work on view is a black and white video\, \;O f Beasts and Men\, comprised of found footage obtained from various on line sources that has been manipulated to look historical. It captures inti mate\, unrestrained encounters between people and wild animals (wolves\, be ars\, foxes). These scenes are briefly interrupted by a brutal sequence of a bear being shot. The piece was made in collaboration with C.T. Jasper\, w ith whom Malinowska frequently works\, most notably on \;Halka/Hait i 18°\;48'\;05"\;N 72°\;23&rsquo\;01"\;W \;presen ted in the Polish Pavilion at the 2015 Venice Biennale.
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\nMali nowska'\;s projects have been exhibited in both solo and group exhibitio ns in the United States\, Europe\, Asia and the Caribbean\, at venues such as the Sculpture Center\, Art in General\, Postmasters\, and CANADA in New York\; Espace Culturel Louis Vuitton in Paris\; Saatchi Gallery and Notting ham Contemporary in Great Britain\; Yokohama Museum of Art in Japan\; Centr e for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle and Zachęta&mdash\;National Galler y of Art in Warsaw. She was also included in the 2012 Whitney Biennial. Her most recent museum presentation was \;Relations Disrelations& nbsp\;(2015)\, a two-person survey show with C.T. Jasper at Muzeum Sztuki i n Łó\;dź\, Poland. Malinowska and Jasper continue to collaborate\, an d are currently working on their next series of projects. \;
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\nA graduate of the sculpture departments at Rutgers University and Yale School of Art\, Malinowska has received awards from the John Simon Guggenh eim Foundation\, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation\, and the Polish Ministry o f Culture and National Heritage\, among others. Her work is included in the collections of the Saatchi Collection in London\, Zachęta National Gallery of Art in Warsaw\, the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington\, D.C.\, and Takashi Murakami&rsquo\;s Collection in Japan. \;

\n LOCATION:Canada\,333 Broome St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Not a Metaphorical Forest\, Joanna Malinowska END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080838Z UID:439153 DTSTART:20170204T180000 DTEND:20170204T200000 LOCATION:Canada\,333 Broome St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Not a Metaphorical Forest END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437509 DTSTART:20170131T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Juried by \;Helga Chri stoffersen\, \;The New Museum

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Organized by the \;Women'\;s Caucus for Art

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The Women'\;s Caucus for Art at Ceres Gallery is pleased to present WAGE ON! Women\, Art\, and M oney as the featured exhibition of the 2017 WCA National Conference. It off ers a timely opportunity to address the impact of a changing political and economic landscape.This exhibition extends themes set by the Minnesota WCA Chapter with their expansive "\;Women and Money"\; project and is i ntended to inspire a rich dialogue.

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click here Wage On catalog

\n LOCATION:Ceres Gallery\,547 West 27th Street Suite 201 \nNew York\, NY 1000 1 SUMMARY:Womens Caucus on Art at Ceres Gallery: wage on! women\, money and a rt\, Torey Akers\, Judy Ballance\, Veronica Ceci\, Pauline Chernichaw\, Pal mer Earl\, Christine Giancola\, Julia Gutman\, Dorit Jordan Dotan\, J.J. L’ Heureux\, Jessica Mieles\, Katy Mixon\, Suzanna Scott\, Ember Small\, B St. Marie Nelson\, Genevieve Walker\, Leslie Wallstedt\, Jill Waterhouse\, Ann a Watson\, Heather Weathers and Diana Zipeto END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437510 DTSTART:20170216T180000 DTEND:20170216T200000 LOCATION:Ceres Gallery\,547 West 27th Street Suite 201 \nNew York\, NY 1000 1 SUMMARY:Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439204 DTSTART:20170216T000000 DTEND:20170325T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Cheim & \; Read is pleased to announce an exhibition of new paintings by Ron Gorcho v\, which will open on February 16\, 2017\, and run through March 25.

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\nWith this exhibition\, Gorchov c ontinues his &ldquo\;Arguments with Rectangles\, Flatness and Dimension\,&r dquo\; to invoke the title of a series of works he made in 1966. It was at that moment in his career that he felt compelled to challenge &ldquo\;the a d-hoc acceptance of the rectangle\,&rdquo\; seeking instead &ldquo\;a more intentional form that would create a new kind of visual space\,&rdquo\; as he told the artist Ray Smith in an interview published in the catalogue of a solo exhibition at the Centro Atlá\;ntico de Arte Moderno\, Las Pal mas\, Spain.

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\nIn the same in terview\, Gorchov listed six issues that concerned him at that time\, start ing with &ldquo\;free painted edges&rdquo\; and ending in &ldquo\;synthesis of painting\, sculpture and architecture&rdquo\; &mdash\; explorations tha t continue to fuel his art a half-century later.

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\nIn his new work\, Gorchov expands upon these longstan ding concerns with deeply felt investigations into the color\, scale\, and surface of the distinctive forms he has been developing over the past four decades: the convex/concave canvases that are known as &ldquo\;shields&rdqu o\; or &ldquo\;saddles\,&rdquo\; and the climbing walls of color he builds from multiple paintings\, or &ldquo\;stacks.&rdquo\;

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\nGorchov works on custom-fabricated stretchers tha t eliminate the corners of a conventional canvas: formal endpoints he deeme d extraneous. It was a realization that would lead him to a radical stance against &ldquo\;the ad-hoc acceptance of the rectangle\,&rdquo\; a position not unrelated to the liberation strategies sought by a number of artists a t that time\, such as Frank Stella and his shaped paintings. But Gorchov&rs quo\;s invention is unique in the way it moves painting forward while evoki ng the arts of antiquity &mdash\; from Bronze Age armor to Coptic sarcophag us portraits to Sienese panel painting &mdash\; straddling the past and fut ure within the confines of a formal device.

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\nWhile containing identical elements &mdash\; two amorphous shapes against a monochromatic ground in the shield paintings\, and a sing le field of color encompassing the surfaces of the stacks &mdash\; no two p aintings are alike\, with variations running from nuanced inflections to st ark contrasts. From the bold primary colors of &ldquo\;Prometheus&rdquo\; t o the muted greens of &ldquo\;Ilione\,&rdquo\; or the startling leap in sca le from &ldquo\;Erinna&rdquo\; to &ldquo\;Hippolyte\,&rdquo\; the distances the artist can travel within the self-imposed restrictions of his chosen f ormat are wide and unpredictable.

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G orchov&rsquo\;s impulse to explore his ideas deeply and relentlessly have t urned his work into an inspiration for a new generation of artists\, who re cognize the extent to which his far-reaching investigations within the micr ocosm of his individualized format feel more connected to the 21st century than they do with the postwar era from which they grew.

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Born in Chicago in 1930\, Ron Gorchov has lived and wo rked in New York City since the early 1950s. Following his debut at New Yor k&rsquo\;s Tibor de Nagy Gallery in 1960\, Gorchov has exhibited at the Mus eum of Modern Art\, the Whitney Museum of American Art\, MoMA PS1\, the Que ens Museum of Art\, the New Museum of Contemporary Art\, and Centro Atl&aac ute\;ntico de Arte Moderno\, among other institutions.

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\n LOCATION:Cheim & Read\,547 West 25th St \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Ron Gorchov END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439205 DTSTART:20170216T180000 DTEND:20170216T200000 LOCATION:Cheim & Read\,547 West 25th St \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:436838 DTSTART:20170119T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:

In Danger and Play\, Lisa Alonzo continues her conf rontational narratives seen through the lens of consumption. The title\, ta ken from the Nietzsche quote\, may at first blush seem contrary to the arti st&rsquo\;s activist voice\, however as one see&rsquo\;s the exhibition as an entirety\, it becomes evident she means the idiom to be taken tongue pla nted firmly in cheek.

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Applying acrylic paint to panel through a p astry piping bag\, Alonzo adds new layers of meaning with the symbolic appl ication of the materials used to render the image. Paint as frosting. Paint as pixels. Something to be ingested\; a beautiful cake: sweet\, bright\, a nd non-confrontational on the exterior\, the works hide important questions just below the surface.

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All art is political in the sense that i t influences or is influenced by society&rsquo\;s views. Drawing a parallel between the current partisan climate in America to the stratagems of chess \, Alonzo moves the pieces of a Gothic set through bucolic landscapes and g ritty streets\, inviting dialogue (The invasion of the Goths is widely reco gnized as a major reason for the fall of the Roman Empire) and questioning the manipulation that leads to a possible regime change. Regime normally re fers to governing parties\, here the artist asks us: could it now also refe rence race\, culture\, or gender?

\n LOCATION:Claire Oliver Gallery\,513 West 26th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Danger and Play\, Lisa Alonzo END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:436839 DTSTART:20170119T180000 DTEND:20170119T200000 LOCATION:Claire Oliver Gallery\,513 West 26th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Danger and Play END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438672 DTSTART:20170202T000000 DTEND:20170401T000000 DESCRIPTION:

ClampArt is pleased to announc e the opening of &ldquo\;AnOther Expedition: Monet&rsquo\;s Garden\,&rdquo\ ; Pipo Nguyen-duy&rsquo\;s first solo show in New York City.

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These cyanotype prints of botanical specimens wer e made by Vietnamese-born artist Pipo Nguyen-duy in Claude Monet&rsquo\;s g arden. Nguyen-duy was awarded a grant from The Wallace Foundation and The R eader&rsquo\;s Digest Association to live and work in the garden in Giverny \, France.

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Samples were laid direct ly on to sheets of paper sensitized with a mixture of Ferric ammonium citra te and Potassium ferricyanide. After the chemistry was allowed to dry\, the specimens were exposed by contact with sunlight and then processed there o n site.

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When displayed\, &ldquo\;An Other Expedition&rdquo\; is a simulated natural history museum installation of a fictitious Vietnamese colonial expedition to France. This installatio n includes the cyanotype prints of flora specimen as well as water\, soil\, and other physical elements that were collected from Monet&rsquo\;s garden . The intention is to subvert the historical European Gaze on Asia\, to dec onstruct the invention of photography as a colonial tool\, and finally to q uestion the authority and validity of Western cultural institutional practi ces.

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Pipo Nguyen-duy was born in Hu e\, Vietnam. Growing up within thirty kilometers of the demilitarized zone of the 18th Parallel\, he describes hearing gunfire every day of his early life. He later immigrated to the United States as a political refugee.

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Nguyen-duy has taken on many things in life in pursuit of his diverse interests. As a teenager in Vietnam\, he com peted as a national athlete in table tennis. He also spent some time living as a Buddhist monk in Northern India. Eventually Nguyen-duy earned a Bache lor of Arts degree in economics at Carleton College. He then moved to New Y ork City\, where he worked as a bartender and later as a nightclub manager. Finally\, Nguyen-duy earned a Master of Arts in Photography\, followed by a Master of Fine Arts in Photography\, both from the University of New Mexi co at Albuquerque.

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Nguyen-duy has r eceived many awards and grants including a prestigious Guggenheim Fellowshi p in Photography\; a National Endowment for the the Arts\; an En Foco Grant \; a Professional Development Grant from the College Arts Association\; a N ational Graduate Fellowship from the American Photography Institute\; a Fel lowship from the Oregon Arts Commission\; a B. Wade and Jane B. White Fello wship in the Humanities at Oberlin College\; and three Individual Artist Fe llowships from the Ohio Arts Council. He participated as an artist-in-resid ence at Monet&rsquo\;s garden through The Lila Wallace-Reader&rsquo\;s Dige st Artists at Giverny Fellowship\; as an artist-in-residence at the Headlan ds Center for the Arts in Sausalito\, California\; and participated in Ligh t Work&rsquo\;s Artist-in-Residence program.

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Nguyen-duy has lectured widely and his work is part of many publi c collections in the United States\, Europe\, and Asia. He is currently a p rofessor teaching photography at Oberlin College in Oberlin\, Ohio.

\n LOCATION:ClampArt\,247 West 29th Street Ground Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:AnOther Expedition: Monet’s Garden\, Pipo Nguyen-duy END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438673 DTSTART:20170202T180000 DTEND:20170202T200000 LOCATION:ClampArt\,247 West 29th Street Ground Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:AnOther Expedition: Monet’s Garden END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:429559 DTSTART:20160428T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Energizing the Everyday recognizes the collecting vision of George R. Kravis II and its synergy with Cooper Hewitt&rsquo\;s broad and diverse collection of modern and cont emporary design. An early interest in records and a background in broadcast ing inform Kravis&rsquo\;s enthusiasm for and knowledge of radios\, televis ions\, and technology. As Kravis&rsquo\;s passion for design grew\, he expa nded his collecting efforts beyond American electronic devices to include i ndustrial design and furnishings for the home and office from the United St ates\, Europe and Asia. The exhibition features highlights of the Kravis co llection dating from the early 20th century to the present. From industrial design and furniture to tableware and textiles\, the exhibition makes visu al and material connections across time and geography to relate the far-rea ching impact of design on the enhancement of daily life.

LOCATION:Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum\,2 East 91st Street \nNew Yor k \, NY 10128 SUMMARY:Energizing the Everyday END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:429560 DTSTART:20160930T000000 DTEND:20170401T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Sarah and Eleanor Hewitt   \;were the \;granddaughters of industrialist and inventor Peter Cooper\ , founder of Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. In 1897\, the sisters \;established a museum within Cooper Union and curated its core collection. It was conceived as &ldquo\;a practical working laborator y&rdquo\; where students and designers could go to be inspired by actual ob jects in the four collecting categories then known as Drawings and Prints\, Decorative Arts\, Wallcoverings\, and Textiles. These departments and the objects the Hewitt sisters collected both in the United States and througho ut Europe became the basis for Cooper Hewitt&rsquo\;s permanent collection.

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With an emphasis on participation\, objects could be touched\, moved\, sketched\, photographed\, and measured a nd the museum was open to &ldquo\;anyone who wanted to use it as a place to work and learn.&rdquo\; \;In galleries that were formerly Mr. and Mrs. Carnegie&rsquo\;s bedrooms\, the Hewitt sisters&rsquo\; collecting philoso phy are celebrated with objects they gave to the museum\, or which were acq uired under their guidance\, ranging from prints\, drawings\, and textiles to furniture\, metalwork\, and birdcages.

LOCATION:Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum\,2 East 91st Street \nNew Yor k \, NY 10128 SUMMARY:Hewitt Sisters Collect END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:429562 DTSTART:20160923T000000 DTEND:20170416T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Offering creative\, alternativ e approaches to confronting textile waste\, Scraps: Fashion\, Textiles\ , and Creative Reuse presents the work of three designers who put sust ainability at the heart of the design process: Luisa Cevese\, founder of Ri edzioni in Milan\; Christina Kim\, founder of dosa\, inc.\, in Los Angeles\ ; and Reiko Sudo\, managing director at NUNO in Tokyo. Each designer&rsquo\ ;s practice involves innovative and sophisticated reuse of textile material s and resources\, while engaging in preservation of local craft traditions. Through more than forty works\, the exhibition explores key facets of sust ainability\, such as the efficient use of materials and resources\, the pre servation of local craft traditions and the integration of new technologies in the recycling process.

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#TextileSc raps

LOCATION:Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum\,2 East 91st Street \nNew Yor k \, NY 10128 SUMMARY:Scraps: Fashion\, Textiles\, and Creative Reuse END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:429563 DTSTART:20160930T000000 DTEND:20170226T000000 DESCRIPTION:

The third exhibition of Cooper Hewitt&rsquo\;s series devoted to humanitarian design will examine how des ign is challenging social and economic inequality across America. Curator o f Socially Responsible Design Cynthia E. Smith conducted over two years of field research&mdash\;traveling to shrinking post-industrial cities\, spraw ling metro regions\, struggling rural towns\, along our border\, areas impa cted by natural and man-made disaster\, and places of persistent poverty&md ash\;in search of collaborative designs for more equitable\, inclusive and sustainable communities. Sixty design projects from every region across the U.S. will be organized into the themes of Act\, Save\, Share\, Live\, Lear n\, and Make to showcase the innovative and impactful actions generated thr ough design.

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By the People Credit Lock Up_FINAL

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LOCATION:Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum\,2 East 91st Street \nNew Yor k \, NY 10128 SUMMARY:By the People: Designing a Better America END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:429564 DTSTART:20160930T100000 DTEND:20160930T170000 LOCATION:Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum\,2 East 91st Street \nNew Yor k \, NY 10128 SUMMARY:By the People: Designing a Better America END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:436781 DTSTART:20170119T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Cristin Tierney Gallery is pleased to announce a black box e xhibition of historic photo projections by Peter Campus\, opening Thursday\ , January 19th and on view through Saturday\, March 4th\, 2017. The exhibit ion\, entitled \;peter campus\, circa 1987\, \;will open w ith a reception on Thursday\, January 19th from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. A brunch r eception will be held at the close of the show during Armory Week on Saturd ay\, March 4th from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm\, where the artist will be present.

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Four monumental black and white images of ston es are projected onto gallery walls in the exhibition. Originally gathered nearly thirty years ago from rocky beaches around Montauk Point\, the stone s were collected by the artist in his studio and photographed on spare blac k backgrounds. Shown floating free of context and projected on a large scal e\, the images become ambiguous signifiers\, receptive to a number of assoc iative meanings. Suggestive titles&mdash\;schism\, half-life\, \;and \;affect&mdash\;also underscore the works&rsquo\; open- endedness. Describing this impulse to project one&rsquo\;s own ideas onto t he stones\, Campus stated: &ldquo\;When I&rsquo\;m in nature\, what I&rsquo \;m trying to do is have some resonance between me and what I&rsquo\;m look ing at. I&rsquo\;m not trying to find a great example of a certain kind of stone\, but something that is reflecting the way I feel that particular day . I try to be as blank as I can to allow my own projection to meet what&rsq uo\;s going on in nature.&rdquo\;[1]< /p>\n\n

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The works in \;peter campus\, circa 198 7 \;form a significant departure from the artist&rsquo\;s single-c hannel works and video installations of the 1970s. Whereas Campus&rsquo\; e arlier work often featured himself or friends or performers as the subjects \, in the 1980s he began to turn his camera outward\, instead focusing on o bjects from the external world. Between these two bodies of work came a bre ak of a few years\, during which an exhausted Campus withdrew from the art world. When he returned to his practice in the &lsquo\;80s\, he brought wit h him the conviction that harmony with nature is essential to our identity. Closely linked to a previous group of video and photo projections of human heads\, the stone works can be interpreted as a product of the artist&rsqu o\;s growing interest in the natural landscape.

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Although they were produced as part of a larger group of projections\, the works in \;peter campus\, circa 1987 \;have never been pu blicly viewed before. Other examples from the series were exhibited mainly in Europe\, including a solo exhibition at the Museum Abteiberg in Mö\; nchengladbach\, Germany in 1990\, as well as the group exhibition \;ê\;tre nature \;at the Fondation Cartier pour l&rsquo\;art c ontemporain in 1998 in Paris.  \;The present exhibition marks an introd uction of these key historic works to the United States\, thirty years afte r they were originally conceived.

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peter cam pus\, circa 1987 \;coincides with a major survey of the artist&rsq uo\;s work at the Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume in Paris\, opening Febr uary 14th\, 2017. \;peter campus: video ergo sum \;retrace s Campus&rsquo\; career\, from the experimental video and installation art of the 1970s to his recent video works. Curated by Anne-Marie Duguet\,  \;video ergo sum \;is the artist&rsquo\;s first solo exhibitio n in France\, and it features a new four-channel video commissioned by the museum entitled \;convergence d&rsquo\;images vers le port. \;< /em>

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Peter Campus is widely considered a semina l figure in the history of video and new media art. One of the very first t o pick up a video camera and create art\, Campus'\; works are part of nu merous collections including The Museum of Modern Art\, New York\; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\, New York\; Whitney Museum of American Art\, New York \; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofí\;a\, Madrid\; Hamburger B ahnhof &ndash\; Museum fü\;r Gegenwart\, Berlin\; Tate Modern\, London\ ; Fondation Louis Vuitton\, Paris\; \;Centre Georges Pompidou\, Paris\; Centro Cultural de Arte Contemporá\;neo\, Mexico City\; San Francisc o Museum of American Art\, San Francisco\; Philadelphia Museum of Art\, Phi ladelphia\; Walker Art Center\, Minneapolis\; Kunsthalle Bremen\, Bremen\; Fondation Cartier\; Fondation Berne\; and the Kramlich Collection.

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For more information please contact Candace Moeller at candace@cristintierney.com or +1.212.504.0550.

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[1] \;Peter Campus\, quoted in Barbara McKenzie\, &ldquo\;Peter Campus&rsquo\; photography. Misty world of man and beast\,&rdquo\; \;The Atlanta Constitution\, \;January 22\, 1988.

\n LOCATION:Cristin Tierney Gallery\,540 West 28th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 01 SUMMARY:peter campus\, circa 1987\, Peter Campus END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:436782 DTSTART:20170119T180000 DTEND:20170119T200000 LOCATION:Cristin Tierney Gallery\,540 West 28th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 01 SUMMARY:peter campus\, circa 1987 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437621 DTSTART:20170120T000000 DTEND:20170305T000000 DESCRIPTION:

State (Wolfgang Staehle)\, United Nations (Joan Waltemath)\, Defense (Peter Fend)\, Navy (Marie Lorenz)\, Treasury (S tan Cox)\, Labor (Fred Lonidier)\, Energy (Brian Holmes)\, Media (Coleen Fi tzgibbon)\, Intel (Jakob Boeskov)\, Interior (Alice Outwater) and Education (Franz Vila).
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\nOn November 22\, 2016\, amidst great uncertainty a bout the direction of the United States in the next four years\, a proposal erupted: to launch\, as is parliamentary custom in Britain\, a Shadow Cabi net.
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\nThe Shadow Cabinet\, as in Britain\, would serve as a voice in contrast with\, but not in denial of\, the incoming Administration. On o ccasion\, there could even be similar views\; we do not yet know. We aim now to put on record the views of members of th e most-forward thinking sector\, the daring pioneers\, of the US. For some\ , this sector is called the "\;avant-garde."\;
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\nSome people go on strike. We do not. We do the opposite. We go to work\, in loya l opposition. We call for the Avant-Garde of the United States\, the pionee ring thinkers and inventors and visualizers\, to not object to what has hap pened\, but to project what could instead happen.
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\nUp to four years may be required to wait for enactments.
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\nFor a full st atement\, please visit \;www.shadowcabinet.info.

\n LOCATION:Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space\,120 Essex Street inside Essex Street Market\nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Shadow Cabinet END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437622 DTSTART:20170120T180000 DTEND:20170120T200000 LOCATION:Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space\,120 Essex Street inside Essex Street Market\nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Shadow Cabinet END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439206 DTSTART:20170223T000000 DTEND:20170405T000000 DESCRIPTION:

CUE Art Foundation is pleased to present DOSE\, an exhibition of paintings by Beverly Fishman\, curated by artist Nick Cave. The exhibition is comprised of a series of lum inescent\, geometric forms that resemble the shapes of common pharmaceutica ls. Straddling the line between sculpture and post-painterly abstraction\, Fishman&rsquo\;s optically intense work functions as an avenue for social c ritique\, probing the pharmaceutical industry&rsquo\;s aesthetic decisions and branding strategies.

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Fishman ha s executed many of these pieces on a monumental scale. Finished in glossy s heens\, their beveled edges throw fluorescent reflections onto the gallery walls. Her atmospheric pigments test depth in a three-dimensional space\, d econstructing the illusion of color as a flat phenomenon\, and evoking the corporate iconography of drug manufacturers.  \;

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Nick Cave notes: &ldquo\;Narcotic Euphoria&rdquo\; is the best way to describe Beverly Fishman&rsquo\;s newest body of work. It is a chromium &ldquo\;call-to-arms&rdquo\; delivered with conversely sinister s ubtlety. It engages with the legacies of Frank Stella\, Gary Lang\, and Pet er Max\, all post Joseph Albers\, who brought a hard edge to painting and e xploited color to tap into an affective and human motivational state. But i n this case\, Fishman takes all that happens up in the viewer&rsquo\;s head and envelops the heart and pushes it through the entire nervous system. Th is exhibition uses the familiar\, pharmaceutical shaped\, and multi-faceted forms of "\;the daily dose"\; as the body for her work\, so that h er deceptively logical and internally vetted color combinations can &ldquo\ ;sound off&rdquo\; as the voice. Her masterful and continually shifting use of contrasts&mdash\;color\, shape\, and scale&mdash\;define the spaces\, b oth positive and negative\, that seduce and induce the viewer into insensib le understandings of themselves and the world&rsquo\;s exertion upon them.< /p>\n\n

Beverly Fishman re ceived her BFA from Philadelphia College of Art\, and her MFA from Yale Uni versity. Since 2000\, she has presented over three-dozen one-person exhibit ions at galleries in New York\, London\, Paris\, Berlin\, Thessaloniki\, Ch icago\, St. Louis\, Los Angeles\, and Detroit. She has also exhibited at th e Chrysler Museum\, the Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts\; Boru san Contemporary\; the Detroit Institute of Arts\; the Weatherspoon Art Mus eum\; The Toledo Museum of Art\; and the Columbus Museum of Art. Ms. Fishma n has been awarded numerous honors including the Toledo Museum of Art&rsquo \;s Guest Artist Pavilion Project\; the Hassam\, Speicher\, Betts\, and Sym ons Purchase Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters\; a Guggen heim Fellowship Award\; a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award\; a Nation al Endowment for the Arts Fellowship Grant\; an Artist Space Grant\; and tw o Ford Foundation Grants.
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\nHer work has been reviewed in nume rous art magazines\, newspapers\, and scholarly publications\, including The New York Times\, The Brooklyn Rail\, Artforum\, Huffington Post\, Mod ern Painters\, Artnet Magazine\, Wallpaper*\, GLASS Quarterly\, NY Arts Mag azine\, The Wall Street Journal\,
and Art in America. Barbara Maria Stafford wrote about her work in Echo Objects: The Cognitive Wor k of Images\, as did Joe Houston in Optic Nerve: Perceptual Art of the 1960s.
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\nHer work may be found in many public collections including the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art\, the Chrysler Museum\, the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University\ , The Toledo Museum of Art\, Pé\;rez Art Museum Miami\, the Columbus Museum of Art\, the Detroit Institute of Arts\, Borusan Contemporary\, the Cranbrook Art Museum\, the Maxine and Stuart Frankel Foundation for Art\, t he Pizzuti Collection\, and the U.S. Consulate General in Istanbul. Her wor k is also included in the corporate collections of Progressive Art Collecti on\, DaimlerChrysler Corporation\, Hallmark Art Collection\, Compuware\, UB S Financial Services Inc.\, Cantor Fitzgerald\, and Prudential Insurance Co mpany of America\, among others.

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Sh e is Artist-in-Residence and Head of Painting\, at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan. \;

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Curator Nick Cave is a Messenger\, Artist and Educator working between t he visual and performing arts through a wide range of mediums inclusive of sculpture\, installation\, video\, sound\, and performance. His solo exhibi tions have expanded globally from the United States through France\, Africa \, Denmark\, Asia\, South America\, and the Caribbean. He has been describe d as a Renaissance artist and says of himself "\;I have found my middle and now ... working toward what I am leaving behind."\; Cave received his MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art and his BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute and is currently the Stephanie and Bill Sick Professor of Fashion \, Body\, and Garment at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has earned many other major awards and honors\, most recently receiving the U. S. Department of State International Medal of Arts award.

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This exhibition is accompanied by a 32-page color ca talogue\, which includes texts by Nick Cave\, Beverly Fishman\, and Zachary Small. The catalogue is available online\, and free of charge t o gallery visitors. For more information please contact Programs Director S hona Masarin-Hurst at shona@cueartfoundation.org.

\n LOCATION:CUE Art Foundation\,137 West 25th Street Ground Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Dose\, Beverly Fishman END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439207 DTSTART:20170223T180000 DTEND:20170223T200000 LOCATION:CUE Art Foundation\,137 West 25th Street Ground Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Dose END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439781 DTSTART:20170222T000000 DTEND:20170317T000000 DESCRIPTION:

&ld quo\;I am generated by restlessness · The uninterrupted movement o f the seas of Methymna&rdquo\;

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&ldquo\;Violent Dances Fad e · Choreae Violentae Dissolvvntvr&rdquo\; is Stefano Losi multimedia art a nd poetry project created in Milan in 1991\, and further developed in Londo n and New York. \; It combines sculptures in bronze\, steel\, cast glas s and LED lights\, contemporary music and spoken word\, and linen studies o f the human figure in oils and oxidized metal minerals\, with an epigrammat ic Latin poetry.

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Journalist and writer Marco Mathieu captured its essence as &ldquo\;Timeless. On the contrary\, inside time. And bey ond. · Significant. Blunt. Stirring\, most of all.&rdquo\;

\n LOCATION:DACIA GALLERY\,53 Stanton St. \nNew York \, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Solo Show: SITIS PERPETVA\, Stefano Losi END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439782 DTSTART:20170223T180000 DTEND:20170223T210000 LOCATION:DACIA GALLERY\,53 Stanton St. \nNew York \, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Solo Show: SITIS PERPETVA END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438674 DTSTART:20170210T000000 DTEND:20170311T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Danese/Corey is pleased to ann ounce the opening of Dialogue\, an exhibition of new paintings by Elise Ansel.

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In the more than 150 y ears since J.M.W. Turner&rsquo\;s death\, abstraction has been studied\, re dacted\, reviled\, and reborn as an exhaustive condition of Modernism. With abandon and remarkable vision\, American post-war artists pursued the almo st infinite possibilities of abstraction. Beginning with abstract expressio nism in the mid-forties\, America&rsquo\;s position as the center of the ar t world remained virtually unchallenged until the latter part of the 20th C and the emergence of contemporary art as a dynamic international pursuit. But within the context of broadly based invention and aesthetic freedom\, a bstract expressionism continues to thrive as a source of visual and emotion al discovery. In that sense\, Elise Ansel has become a descendant of two ge nerations of Abstract Expressionism\; America&rsquo\;s aesthetic golden mom ent.

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Ansel converts historical mast erpieces: the early and high Italian and Northern Renaissance\, the Baroque \, Neoclassicism\, French\, German and \;English Romanticism\, transfor ming the visual language of art historical achievement into a fresh iterati on of Abstract Expressionist sensibility. Her physically charged paintings\ , at once forceful and lyrical\, recapture the spontaneity of Franz Kline\, the vivid palette of de Kooning and Richter\, the intense often disquietin g visual poetry of Joan Mitchell and Frank Auerbach.

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Born in New York City\, Elise Ansel received her BA from Brown University and her MFA from Southern Methodist University\, Dallas. I n 2016\, the Bowdoin College Museum of Art presented Distant Mirrors\, an exhibition of her paintings and drawings. Ansel has exhibited widel y in the United States and England. Her work is in the permanent collection s of Brown University\, Bowdoin College\, the Eli Lilly Foundation and Sopw ell House\, St. Albans. Elise Ansel lives and works in Portland\, Maine.&nb sp\;

\n LOCATION:Danese/Corey\,511 West 22 Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY: Dialogue\, Elise Ansel END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438675 DTSTART:20170210T180000 DTEND:20170210T200000 LOCATION:Danese/Corey\,511 West 22 Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:New Paintings END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439038 DTSTART:20170207T000000 DTEND:20170731T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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HIPPO BALLERINA NYC PUBLIC ART  \;UNVEILING

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< span data-term="goog_1379885945" tabindex="0">TUESDAY\, FEB 7\, 2017 : \;1:30 to 2:00 p.m.

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Cynthia Harvey and Students from American Ballet Theatre'\;s \;

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Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School

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WHAT:

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Unveiling ceremony for the NYC Park'\;s Art in the Parks installati on of artist \;Bjorn \;Skaarup'\;s colossal bronze sculpture\,&n bsp\;Hippo Ballerina\, 2016\, on public view from \;Feb 7 through July 31\, 2017.\n

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Photo-op with&n bsp\;Hippo Ballerina (installation mockup image above)\, artist Bj orn \;Skaarup\, former ABT Principal Dancer Cynthia Harvey\, Artistic D irector of the \;American Ballet Theatre Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis (AB T JKO) School\, and seven ABT JKO School students ages 13 - 17.

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WHO:

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Bjorn Skaarup\ , artist

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Wi lliam Castro\, NYC Parks Manhattan Borough Commissioner

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Cynthia Harvey\, Artistic Dire ctor\, \;ABT JKO School

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Ron Cavalier\, President\, Cavalier Galleries

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WHERE:

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Dante Park

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64th Street a nd Broadway\, New York City

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WHEN:

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Tu esday\, Feb 7\, 1:30 to 2:00 p.m.

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Brief 2-minute welcoming remarks will be prov ided at 1: 30 p.m. by the following:

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Artist Bjorn Skaarup\; Cynthia Harvey\, ABT JKO S chool Artistic Director\; William Castro\, NYC Parks Manhattan Borough Comm issioner\, and Ron Cavalier\, President\, Cavalier Galleries.

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Hippo Ballerina NYC Public Art Installation Details

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Hippo Ballerina \;will be plant ing her sizable slippered feet across from Lincoln Center beginning \;< span data-term="goog_1379885949" tabindex="0">February 7. Part of NY C Parks'\; Art in the Parks Program\, the over 15-foot tall\, copper tut u-clad bronze sculpture by Danish artist Bjorn Skaarup (Skaarup'\;s firs t US public art installation) will be on public view through \;July 31\, 2017. \;

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Hippo Baller ina Companion Exhibition

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Over 15 fellow animal bronze sculptures including a balancing bear\, scootering cheetah\, and pogoing kangaroo will dazzle visi tors with their fancy footwork as part of Cavalier Gallery'\;s companion exhibition\, \;Bronze Creatures Great and Small\, opening&nbs p\;the same day nearby at 3 West 57 Street\, and on view through \;March 17\, 2017.

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For the ins tallation and exhibition press release\, \;click here\, and video on the making of Hippo Ballerina\, \;click here.

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Dance With Hippo Ballerina Photo Contest

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From \;Feb. 7 to March 31\, 2017\, visitors who follow \;@Dancewithhippoball erina \;on Instagram\, and post their photos \;posing with  \;Hippo Ballerina \;on their Instagram pages using the hashtag #Dancewi thhippoballerina will have the chance to win a limited-edition \;Hi ppo Tightrope Dancer \;etching by the artist\, and two tickets to a ballet performance at Lincoln Center. Photo contest entry rules: \;photo contest. \;For more info: \;www.facebook.com/Dancewithhippoballerin a.

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Hippo Ballerina Unve iling Partners

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Cavalier Galleries

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Cavalier Galleries was founded in 1986 by Ronald C avalier Jr.\, who was introduced to the art world by his father\, owner of the Cavalier Renaissance Foundry whose clients has included the Met\, MoMA\ , and Hirshorn museums.  \;Located in New York City\; Greenwich\, CT\; and Nantucket\, MA\, Cavalier Galleries has organized outdoor sculpture pla cements for the public to enjoy\, including the 2014 installation of Jim Re nnert'\;s \;sculpture\, \;THINK BIG\, at Union Square P ark. \;www.cavali ergalleries.com

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NYC Parks'\; Art in the Parks

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NYC Parks'\; Art in the Parks program has consistently fostered the creation and installation of t emporary public art in parks throughout the five boroughs. Since 1967\, NYC Parks has collaborated with artists and arts organizations to produce over one thousand public artworks in New York City parks. \;www.nyc.gov/parks/art

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American Ballet Theatre Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School

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The American Ballet Theatre Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School aims to provide the highest quality ballet training\, consistent with the styli stic requirements of American Ballet Theatre\, and to provide dancers with a rich knowledge of classical technique and the ability to adapt to all sty les and techniques of dance.

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\n The ABT Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School serv es approximately 415 students and encompasses a \;Pre-Professional Divi sion for dancers ages 12-18 and a Children'\;s Division \;for dancer s ages 3-12. Classes include classical ballet technique\, pointe\, partneri ng\, men'\;s class\, character\, modern technique\, variations and Pilat es. In addition\, students participate in the ABT JKO School Wellness Lectu re Series\, designed to educate students and their parents on subjects faci ng aspiring professional dancers. \;www.abt.org

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Press Contacts:

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Nicole St raus Public Relations

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Cecilia Bonn\, \;212-734-9754\, \;917-434-4406\, \;Cbonn@nyc.rr.com

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NYC Parks

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Maeri Ferguson\, \;212 -360-1311\ , \;Maeri .Ferguson@parks.nyc.gov

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American Ballet Theatre

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Ke lly Ryan\, Director of Press and Public Relations
\n 212-477.3030 ext. 3235 \, \;KRyan@abt.org

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 \;\n LOCATION:Dante Park\,64th Street and Broadway \nNew York\, NY 10023US SUMMARY:Hippo Ballerina NYC Public Art Installation\, Bjorn Skaarup END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439039 DTSTART:20170207T133000 DTEND:20170207T140000 LOCATION:Dante Park\,64th Street and Broadway \nNew York\, NY 10023US SUMMARY:Hippo Ballerina NYC Public Art Installation END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437702 DTSTART:20170119T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:
Andy Warhol&rsquo\;s fascina tion with the feature and shape of women&rsquo\;s lips can be traced back t o his earliest personal work as well as his work as a commercial illustrato r.  \; It flourished in his most iconic works such as the paintings of Marilyn Monroe\, Elizabeth Taylor\, and even Chairman Mao\, where Warhol wo uld highlight his subjects&rsquo\; lips\, outlining and coloring each pair of lips in ways that made them the focal point of each painting.  \;(As if to prove this point\, in 1962 he made the painting &ldquo\;Marilyn&rsqu o\;s Lips&rdquo\;&ndash\; a diptych that isolated and repeated Marilyn&rsqu o\;s lips 168 times.)  \;The painting is now in the collection of the H irschorn Museum.
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For four decades\, the depiction of l ips were a touchstone for Warhol&mdash\;a signature trademark that he retur ned to again and again in varied forms.  \;It is tempting to read into this.  \;Were his renderings of lips an expression of the artist&rsquo\ ;s sublimated need for love\, or sex\, or communication?  \;Was he inte rested in the individuality of each pair of lips?  \;The form?  \;T he suggestiveness?  \;Or all of the above?
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While W arhol had started doing occasional commissioned portraits in the 1960s\, by the 1970s it had become his main source of income and a relentless focus o f his attention. To make these portraits he would take a Polaroid picture o f the sitter which was then transferred to an enlarged silkscreen. Tracing simple outlines onto the canvas first\, Warhol would underpaint the mouth a nd eye area so that when the silkscreen was applied on top those features w ould stand out. As always\, it was his subject&rsquo\;s lips that intereste d Warhol the most\, so much so that in 1975 &ndash\; always the avid bookma ker &ndash\; Warhol created three different unique albums printing and/or c ollaging images of more than 60 different pairs of lips onto the album page s. It is from one of these three books that these works come. (Of the other two\, one is now in the collection of The Warhol Museum and the other rema ins with the Warhol Foundation.)
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The process is unusua l. The lips are silkscreened onto various different tapes\, from masking ta pe to packing tape to scotch tape\, and then placed and adhered on to the 8 x 8 1&frasl\;2&rdquo\; page. Because of the thin width of most of the tape s the substrate tape is laid down in layers. Sometimes the tape is laid dow n roughly and unevenly\, sometimes the tape is trimmed to the outer edges o f the lips. But the very handmade nature of each collage stands in interest ing counterpoint to Warhol&rsquo\;s proclaimed interest in the machine made artwork and the hands-off approach he increasingly adopted throughout his career.
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Until one of the &ldquo\;Lips&rdquo\; albums w as exhibited at The Warhol Museum and subsequently the Morgan Library in th eir &ldquo\;Warhol &ndash\; by the Book&rdquo\; shows (2015 &ndash\; 2016) these particular types of work were virtually unknown. However\, we now can see these unique collages as pure Warhol &ndash\; isolated\, mysterious\, and glamorous. Repeating and varying the form\, hovering between figurative and abstraction\, each singular piece tells its own story and presents its own seductive identity in true Warhol fashion. \;
\n LOCATION:Danziger Gallery\,95 Rivington Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Lips\, Andy Warhol END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437703 DTSTART:20170118T183000 DTEND:20170118T200000 LOCATION:Danziger Gallery\,95 Rivington Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Lips END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437612 DTSTART:20170209T000000 DTEND:20170325T000000 DESCRIPTION:

David K rut Projects is pleased to present /'\;atmes\,fir/\, a group exhibition featuring three emerging abstract artists from South Africa: Mongezi Ncapha yi\, Robyn Penn\, &\; Jacob Van Schalkwyk. In this exhibition&ndash\;whi ch takes its title from the phonetic spelling of the word Atmosphere&ndash\ ;all three artists respond to the dynamic climate of contemporary South Afr ica\, primarily through the use of painterly abstraction.

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Mongezi Ncaphayi\, a painter-printmaker and accompli shed jazz musician\, uses splashes of color amidst repeated lines\, pattern s and forms that undulate like sounds and rhythm&ndash\;harkening to the mo dernist relationship of painting to jazz. Notably map-like\, Ncaphayi&rsquo \;s paintings\, prints and drawings are made using memory and intuition to retrace the contours of his large collection of maps.

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Robyn Penn\, another painter-printmaker from Johannesbur g\, has been long fixated on the subject of the cloud and the dire situatio n surrounding the Earth&rsquo\;s atmosphere. Over time\, her cloud depictio ns have gone from hyperrealistic to scratchy\, energetic\, gestural\, nebul ous compositions of marks made using a sophisticated yet often acidic use o f color. Her newest etchings and prints exist somewhere between the beautif ul and the brutal\, where skyscapes of color and line become politically ch arged meditations on climate change denial.

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Using lithographic ink\, Jacob van Schalkwyk mends scenes of color . From CMYK scale to ultra-violet\, the palette is pulled from natural and artificial landscapes seen in Cape Town. In the studio\, these colors are m ixed in large batches\, then rolled\, splashed\, dripped\, or splattered up on the surface of the paper. One may recognize the bright orange of a const ruction zone barrel\, the pale pink of a beach Sunset\, the tar black of as phalt\, the pewter of a kicked stone. These random instances of color coale sce\, crisscross\, and merge into a sense of place: decomposition\, 3am\, n oise\, the guessing and second guessing of the studio.

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For more information please contact info@davidkrut.com.

\n LOCATION:David Krut Projects\,526 West 26th Street\, #816 \nNew York\, NY 1 0001 SUMMARY:/'atmes\,fir/\, Mongezi Ncaphayi\, Robyn Penn\, Jacob van Schalkwyk END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437613 DTSTART:20170209T180000 DTEND:20170209T200000 LOCATION:David Krut Projects\,526 West 26th Street\, #816 \nNew York\, NY 1 0001 SUMMARY:/'atmes\,fir/ END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439208 DTSTART:20170223T000000 DTEND:20170325T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Musical Performance by \;< strong>Claire Chase \;and \;Pauchi Sasaki\, March 2\, 2017\, 6:30pm

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On Thurs day\, March 2\, David Nolan Gallery will host a musical performance with ac claimed flautist Claire Chase in conjunction with a special installation of drawings by Jorinde Voigt. On view from February 23 through March 25\, the installation contains new works from Voigt&rsquo\;s latest series\, So ng of the Earth. As part of this collaboration\, Voigt prepared a seri es of reproductions of a vast 26-foot-long\, \;multi-part drawing\, The Shift (Song of the Earth) I-VIII (2016) which\, in turn\, were in dividually annotated and used by Chase as musical scores. \;Interpretin g the imagery and colors within the work\, Chase translates these visual&nb sp\;cues as varying pitches and melodic shifts.

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The art historian Fiona McGovern has written the following abo ut Voigt&rsquo\;s new series: &ldquo\;What does it mean to be on earth? Jor inde Voigt&rsquo\;s new cycle of works Song of the Earth\, in allu sion to Gustav Mahler&rsquo\;s Das Lied von der Erde\, devotes its elf to this question in an all-encompassing way. [The works] represent an a bstracted form of lived experience and theory and constitutes the basis for the ensuing musical interpretation. For Voigt\, both drawings and musical transformation are systems of conceptualization that have major parallels d ue to their abstraction as well as their formal construction. Both may be c omprehended as processes that translate reality.&rdquo\;

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Works from the series\, Song of the Earth\, have previously been presented at Hamburger Bahnhof\, Berlin and Kunstraum Innsbruck in Austria. A survey of Voigt'\;s recent work\, entitled A New Kind of Joy\, is concurrently on view at Kun sthalle Nü\;rnberg. Works by the artist are represented in a number of major public collections\, including the Art Institute of Chicago\; Centre Pompidou\, Paris\; Kunsthaus\, Zurich\; The Morgan Library &\; Museum\, New York\; Museum of Modern Art\, New York\; Pinakothek der Moderne\, Munic h\; Staatliche Graphische Sammlung\, Munich\; and Kupferstichkabinett\, Ber lin\, among others. Voigt lives and works in Berlin

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Flautist Claire Chase\, described as &ldquo\;the young sta r of the modern flute&rdquo\; by The New Yorker\, is a soloist\, c ollaborative artist\, and activist for new music. Over the past decade she has given the world premieres of over 100 new works for flute\, many of the m tailor-made for her\, and\, in 2012\, she was awarded a MacArthur Fellows hip. Chase co-founded the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) in 2001 and\, in collaboration with her creative partner Joshua Rubin\, serves as the organization&rsquo\;s Co-Artistic Director in addition to playing over fifty concerts a year as an ensemble member. She has performed throughout t he US\, Europe\, Asia and the Americas\, and recently began Density 203 6\, a 23-year project to commission a new body of repertory for the fl ute leading up to the 100th anniversary of Edgard Varè\;se'\;s Density 21.5 \;(1936). She lives in Brooklyn. \;

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\ n LOCATION:David Nolan Gallery\,527 West 29th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Song of the Earth\, Jorinde Voigt END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439266 DTSTART:20170224T000000 DTEND:20170415T000000 DESCRIPTION:

David Zwirner is pleased to present \;Al Taylor: Early Paintin gs\, the artist'\;s sixth solo exhibition with the gallery. This ex hibition offers a rare opportunity to view Taylor'\;s \;paintings ex hibited together for the first time. Featuring a selection of canvases crea ted between 1971 and 1980\, the presentation of this relatively unknown bod y of work reveals a connection with the underlying painterly concerns found in the artist'\;s \;overall practice and provides a broader underst anding of his \;oeuvre as a whole.

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Taylor began his studio practice as a painter and continued to paint on canvas through 1984. Althou gh he is more widely known for the three-dimensional works he started makin g in 1985\, the artist insisted that he was a painter&ndash\;not a sculptor &ndash\;and maintained that his constructions did not "\;come from any sculptural concerns. [They come] from a flatter set of traditions."\;&s up1\; \;Throughout his career\, whether he worked on canvas\, drawings and prints\, or sculpture\, Taylor'\;s creative process was fundamentall y grounded in the formal concerns of painting.

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The works includ ed in \;Al Taylor: Early Paintings \;were executed during a tim e when the medium itself was hotly contested. With the rise of Minimal and Conceptual practices\, at the outset of the 1970s painting was relegated to merely a means of radical reduction or\, alternatively\, an antiquated mod e of figurative expression. Young painters like Taylor\, along with his con temporaries&ndash\;including his close friends Stanley Whitney\, Brice Mard en\, and Harriet Korman&ndash\;had to work through not only these daunting developments\, but also the ever-present legacy of the recent past\, specif ically Abstract Expressionism\, Pop art\, and Color Field painting. Taylor& #39\;s paintings unite abstract compositions with narrative undertones impl ied by the juxtaposition of formal elements. While they subtly embody reduc tion and restraint\, these works resist stasis with their hints of idiosync ratic playfulness. Borrowing from disparate movements and styles\, the arti st&rsquo\;s carefully composed paintings do not fit within any one category \, but rather manifest a productive tension between flatness and depth\, as well as figuration and abstraction that is wholly his own.

\n\n< p 0px="" background-color:="" color:="" font-size:="" margin:="" padding:=" " sans="" style="box-sizing: border-box\; border: 0px\; font-variant-numeri c: inherit\; font-stretch: inherit\; line-height: 1.25rem\; text-align: jus tify\;" text-align:="" vertical-align:="">In Taylor'\;s earliest canvases\, spare motifs are utilized to demarcate sp ace\, prefiguring the perspectival shifts and abstraction of vision that wo uld come to characterize much of his later three-dimensional work. In \ ; Untitled \;(1971)\, an unbroken line of multi-colored links dances and bounds across the surface of the canvas\, never allowing viewers to or ient themselves within the composition \;and defying the emphasis on fl atness adhered to by preceding painting movements. The palette and linear c onfiguration of this early painting seem to anticipate Taylor'\;s colorf ul broomstick sculptures\, such as \;Untitled (Pick-Up) #2 \;(1 990)\, which often appear to vacillate between three and two dimensions.

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As early as 1975\, Taylor began a series of paintings consisting of multiple\, differently sized panels joined together to create proportion al compositions that incorporate the blank space occupied by the wall. In u npublished notes from 1978\, the artist described this period of transition in his work as "\;a new phase"\; \;in his paintings\, "\;i n which the outside parameter of the canvas is as important as the inside p arameter\; in the new work\, canvas support versus wall support are merged and carry equal considerations."\; \;Unlike other artists who worke d with shaped canvases in those years as a means of emphasizing the object- like quality of painting\, Taylor'\;s intention was to underscore the wa y in which the unity of formal elements\, proportional relationships\, and visual interplay could engage with intuitive\, sometimes even poetic\, mean ing. For example\, in \;Marriage \;(1975)\, the artist sets up a series of visual rhymes using a deceptively simple connecting structure. By pairing two mismatched\, rectangular linen panels&ndash\;a taller\, wide r one to the left of a shorter\, narrower one on the right&ndash\;and by on ly painting sections of the raw linen with proportionately different sized bands of white paint that cut across the center of each panel and yet meet at their joined middle\, the artist sets up myriad associations for the vie wer.

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In later works from 1979 and 1980\, Taylor focused more in tently on bold color juxtapositions and playful imagery to delineate space and activate the canvas. Both painterly and sculptural\, these works posses s a fluid rhythm that opens up multiple perspectives. In \;Mendoza& nbsp\;(1980)\, several hues of brilliant blue are interrupted by whimsical forms painted in vibrant yellow\, green\, and&ndash\;most prominently&ndash \;white that\, in combination\, evoke an illusion of depth. As John Yau not es in the catalogue published on the occasion of this exhibition\, "\;U ninterested in narrowing his options\, he remained engrossed by the relatio nship between the visual and the visceral\, paint and object\, the literal and the imagined&hellip\;.By pushing back against the literal\, and the min imalist mode of critical thinking then in favor\, Taylor quietly and confid ently announced that he was interested in creating a space for himself. He made a space in which things fit and don'\;t fit together."\;

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A fully illustrated catalogue will be available from David Zwirner Bo oks\, featuring a broad \;selection of Taylor'\;s early paintings an d including new scholarship on the artist by poet and art critic John Yau\; as well as an oral history conversation conducted by Mimi Thompson between artists \;Stanley Whitney and Billy Sullivan&ndash\;all of whom knew T aylor well during his lifetime.

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Al Taylor \;was born in 1948 in Springfield\, Missouri\, and studied at the Kansas City Art Institute. He moved to New York in 1970\, where he would co ntinue to live and work until his death in 1999. His first solo exhibition took place in 1986 at the Alfred Kren Gallery in New York. His work would g o on to be shown in numerous exhibitions in America and Europe\, including solo exhibitions at the Kunsthalle Bern (1992)\, the Kunstmuseum Luzern (19 99)\, the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung Mü\;nchen at the Pinakothek de r Moderne\, Munich (2006 and 2010)\, the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art\, H umlebæ\;k\, Denmark (2011)\, the Santa Monica Museum of Art (2011)\, a nd the High Museum of Art\, Atlanta (2013). In 2014\, The Philip Johnson Gl ass House in New Canaan\, Connecticut\, presented \;Six Panels: Al Taylo r\, curated by Robert Storr. A survey \;of the artist'\;s work\ , organized by the High Museum of Art\, will open in Atlanta in 2017.

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The Estate of Al Taylor has been represented by David Zwirner since 2007. Taylor'\;s work can be found in a number of prominent public colle ctions\, including the British Museum\, London\; Centre Georges Pompidou\, Paris\; Glenstone\, Potomac\, Maryland\; the High Museum of Art\, Atlanta\; the Menil Collection\, Houston\; The Morgan Library &\; Museum\, New Yo rk\; The Museum of Fine Arts\, Houston\; Museum Folkwang\, Essen\; The Muse um of Modern Art\, New York\; National Gallery of Art\, Washington\, D.C.\; Staatliche Graphische Sammlung München\, Munich\; and the Whitney Museum of American Art\, New York.

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On February 25 at 11 AM\, \;John Yau \;will be leading a guided tour of the exhibition. This event is open to the public. Yau is an American poet who w rites about art\, collaborates with artists\, and is the publisher of Black Square Editions. His most recent book is \;Catherine Murphy \; (2016)\, the first monograph on this celebrated artist. Yau was an Arts Edi tor of \;The Brooklyn Rail \;from 2007 to 2011\, prior to co-fo unding \;Hyperallergic Weekend\, an online magazine\, to which he c ontributes regularly. He has two books forthcoming\, \;Thomas Nozkowski< /em>\, the first monograph on this influential artist\, and \;The Wild C hildren of William Blake\, essays on artists and poets. Yau is also pr ofessor of critical studies at Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers Un iversity.

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¹\;Al Taylor\, unpublished artist'\;s statemen t\, July 1990.

\n LOCATION:David Zwirner 537 W 20th\,537 West 20 Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Early Paintings\, Al Taylor END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439267 DTSTART:20170224T180000 DTEND:20170224T200000 LOCATION:David Zwirner 537 W 20th\,537 West 20 Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Early Paintings END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439268 DTSTART:20170224T000000 DTEND:20170415T000000 DESCRIPTION:

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of works by Joh n McCracken at the gallery'\;s 537 West 20th Street location in New York . Drawn primarily from the last decade of the artist'\;s career\, the wo rks on view explore varying articulations of seriality within the artist 9\;s diverse oeuvre\, and the way in which he engaged formal concerns\, suc h as verticality\, surface\, and particularly color\, as a means of composi ng simple\, but deeply resonant sculptures and installations.

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M cCracken occupies a singular position within the recent history of American art\, as his work melds the restrained formal qualities of Minimalist scul pture with a distinctly West Coast sensibility expressed through color\, fo rm\, and finish. He developed his early sculptural work while studying pain ting at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland in the late 19 50s and early 1960s. While experimenting with increasingly three-dimensiona l canvases\, the artist began to produce objects made with industrial mater ials\, including plywood\, sprayed lacquer\, and pigmented resin\, creating the highly reflective\, smooth surfaces that he was to become known \; for.

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For McCracken\, color was an integral element of his pract ice\, writing in 1966\, "\;I think of color as being the structural mat erial I use to build the forms I am interested in&hellip\;I have found that a certain range of mainly primary and secondary colors and a certain combi nation of color intensity and transparency and surface finish provide me wi th the expressive means I want."\;¹\; \;He considered similar o r even identical forms executed in differing hues to be entirely individuat ed artworks that engage with their surroundings in a distinct way. By group ing such forms&mdash\;sometimes within larger installations&mdash\;he was a ble to explore the effects of repetition and difference\, while pursuing pr operties of "\;clarity\, conciseness\, and effectiveness\,"\; \ ;in his work. As the artist \;elaborated\, "\;In distilling my idea s I was doing something analogous to making poetry&mdash\;trying\, in a way \, to say the most with the least."\;²\;

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The exhibition will present key examples from three discrete groups of work&mdash\;leanin g multi-part wall pieces\, wall-mounted multi-part reliefs\, and freestandi ng columns&mdash\;that McCracken created outside of his iconic "\;plank s."\; On view will be a selection of the artist'\;s "\;Beam" \; \;works\, each comprising multiple tall narrow components that lean against the wall\, first exhibited in his 2008 solo presentation at David Z wirner\, but illuminated in his sketchbook as early as the 1970s. Some mult i-part works\, such as \;Space \;(2008)\, consist of a rhythmic combination of an array colors\, here blue and green\; while others like&n bsp\;Song \;(2008) explore tonal\, more subtle variations within a single color\, in this case red\; still others like the all-white work  \;Chakra \;(2008) are monochromatic. Titles are likewise employed a s a pictorial metaphor in McCracken'\;s lesser-known wall reliefs\, such as \;Fire \;(2007)\, created for documenta 12 in 2007\, and&nb sp\;Light \;(2004)\, which exist in the interstices of painting and sculpture. Finally\, a grouping of four eight-foot tall freestanding colum ns\, arranged in a configuration similar to the artist&rsquo\;s 2004 exhibi tion at the gallery\, explores the phenomenological relationship between wo rk\, viewer\, and architecture through their outsized stature.

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& sup1\; John McCracken: Sketchbook \;(Santa Fe: Radius Books\, 2008 )\, p. 66 1/2.

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²\; John McCracken and Matthew Higgs\, " \;Interview\,"\; \;in \;Early Sculpture/John McCracken. Exh . cat. (New York: Zwirner &\; Wirth\, 2005)\, p. 8.

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Beginnin g in the 1960s\, \;John McCracken \;(1934 -2011) exhibited steadily in the United States and abroad\, and his early w ork was included in groundbreaking exhibitions such as \;Primary Structu res \;at the Jewish Museum\, New York (1966)\, and \;American S culpture of the Sixties \;at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (1967). In 1986\, the major survey \;Heroic Stance: The Sculpture of Joh n McCracken 1965-1986 \;was organized by P.S.1 Contemporary Art Ce nter\, Long Island City\, New York\, and traveled to the Newport Harbor Art Museum (now the Orange County Museum of Art)\, Newport Beach\, California\ ; Fine Arts Gallery\, University of California\, Irvine\; and the Contempor ary Arts Museum Houston\, Texas. In 2011\, his work was the subject of a la rge-scale retrospective at Castello di Rivoli\, Turin. Other significant so lo shows include the Inverleith House\, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (200 9)\; Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst (S.M.A.K.)\, Ghent (2004)\; Hochsc hule fü\;r Angewandte Kunst\, Vienna\; and the Kunsthalle Basel (both 1 995).

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McCracken&rsquo\;s work has been prominently featured in major group exhibitions worldwide\, most recently in three shows organized as part of the 2011 region-wide initiative \;Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980 \;at the Getty Center\, Los Angeles\; Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego\, La Jolla\, California\; and Pomona College Mus eum of Art\, Claremont\, California. Other group exhibitions include \; T ime &\; Place: Los Angeles 1957-1968\, Moderna Museet\, Stockholm ( 2008)\; \;documenta 12\, Kassel\, Germany (2007)\; \;The Los Ang eles Art Scene\, 1955-1985\, Centre Georges Pompidou\, Paris (2006)\; and \;A Minimal Future? Art as Object 1958-1968\, Museum of Contemp orary Art\, Los Angeles (2004).

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Work by the artist is held in p rominent international collections\, including the Art Gallery of Ontario\, Toronto\; The Art Institute of Chicago\; Castello di Rivoli\, Turin\; Los Angeles County Museum of Art\; Musé\;e d&rsquo\;art contemporain de M ontré\;al\; Musé\;e d&rsquo\;art moderne et contemporain (MAMCO )\, Geneva\; Museum of Contemporary Art\, Los Angeles\; The Museum of Moder n Art\, New York\; Orange County Museum of Art\, Newport Harbor\, Californi a\; Palais des Beaux-Arts\, Brussels\; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art\; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\, New York\; and the Whitney Museum of Americ an Art\, New York.

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David Zwirner has represented the work of Jo hn McCracken since 1997. This is the seventh solo presentation of his work at the gallery.

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On March 11 at 11 AM\, \;Matthew Higgs \;will be leading a guided tour of the exhibition . Higgs is an artist\, writer\, and curator based in New York. Since 2004\, he has been the Director of White Columns\, New York'\;s oldest alterna tive art space. Over the past twenty-five years\, Higgs has organized more over 250 exhibitions and projects with artists in Europe and North America. A regular contributor to Artforum\, Higgs'\;s writing has appeared in m ore than fifty books\, exhibition catalogues\, and journals including texts on John McCracken\, Kay Rosen\, Christian Marclay\, John Baldessari\, Eliz abeth Peyton\, Ken Price\, and Lucas Samaras\, among others. Higgs is a for mer Director of Exhibitions at London'\;s Institute of Contemporary Arts \, and he was the curator at the CCA Wattis Institute\, San Francisco betwe en 2001 and 2004. He has taught extensively over the past twenty years both in the United States and United Kingdom\, and he has appeared on a number of juries including the 2006 Turner Prize at Tate Britain.

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For all press inquiries\, contact
\nKim Donica at David Zwirner
\n+1 212 727 2070 \;kim@davidzwirner.com

\n LOCATION:David Zwirner 537 W 20th\,537 West 20 Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, John McCracken END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439269 DTSTART:20170224T180000 DTEND:20170224T200000 LOCATION:David Zwirner 537 W 20th\,537 West 20 Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437704 DTSTART:20170225T000000 DTEND:20170415T000000 DESCRIPTION:

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition o f new work by Raymond Pettibon\, on view at 519 West 19thStreet in New York . It coincides with the largest show of the artist'\;s work to date at t he New Museum in New York (on view from February 8 through April 9\, 2017)& mdash\;his first major museum exhibition in the city&mdash\;which will trav el to the Bonnefantenmuseum Maastricht\, The Netherlands and the Garage Mus eum of Contemporary Art\, Moscow. The artist'\;s tenth solo show at Davi d Zwirner\, \;TH'\; EXPLOSIYV SHOYRT T \;follows his collabo rative presentations with Marcel Dzama at the gallery in both London and Ne w York last year.

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Pettibon'\;s work embraces a wide spectrum of American high and low culture\, from the deviations of ma rginal youth to art history\, sports\, religion\, politics\, sexuality\, an d literature. Taking their point of departure in the Southern California pu nk-rock scene of the late 1970s and 1980s and the do-it-yourself aesthetic of album covers\, comics\, concert flyers\, and fanzines that characterized the movement\, his drawings have come to occupy their own genre of potent and dynamic artistic commentary.

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The exhibition i ncludes drawings and collages&mdash\;a relatively new introduction within t he artist'\;s oeuvre&mdash\;in Pettibon'\;s characteristic bold style . The title (here rewritten using the artist'\;s personalized spelling) refers to a 1963 book by legendary American football coach Homer Rice\, whi ch details his variation on the so-called T-formation\, the precursor to mo st modern offensive formations in the sport. The potent and aggressive asso ciations of the phrase are echoed throughout the works on view\, which shre wdly address facets of contemporary American life.

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In keeping with Pettibon'\;s practice\, most of the works pair image a nd text\, with each informing the other in a circular fashion. Ranging from a few words to a number of paragraphs\, the often rhythmic prose reflects the artist&rsquo\;s longstanding interest in poetry and philosophy. Quoting freely from sources such as John Ruskin\, Walt Whitman\, Jacques Derrida\, the Bible\, and social media\, and often adding self-coined expressions\, the handwritten words complement Pettibon'\;s bold imagery in adding hum or and unexpected layers to the subject matter. Vintage cartoons by artists such as Charles Addams and Peter Arno are a new influence behind some of t he works included in the exhibition\, presenting an additional narrative co mponent to his motifs.

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On the occasion of the exh ibition\, David Zwirner Books is pleased to announce the second printing of  \;Raymond Pettibon: Homo Americanus. Published last year for the a rtist'\;s major European traveling retrospective organized by the Deicht orhallen Hamburg &ndash\; Sammlung Falkenberg\, the first edition has now s old out.

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Born in 1957 in Tucson\, Arizona\, \ ;Raymond Pettibon \;graduated with a degree i n economics from the University of California\, Los Angeles in 1977.

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Opening February 8\, 2017 at the New Museum is \;A P en of All Work\, a major solo exhibition of Pettibon'\;s work featu ring over seven hundred drawings from the 1960s to the present\, marking th e artist'\;s first museum survey in New York and the largest presentatio n of his work to date (through April 16\, 2017). The show will travel to th e Bonnefantenmuseum Maastricht\, The Netherlands.

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Pettibon'\;s work has been exhibited widely throughout the United State s and abroad. In 2016\, the Deichtorhallen Hamburg &ndash\; Sammlung Falcke nberg in Hamburg organized \;Homo Americanus\, a major museum surve y of Pettibon'\;s work\, encompassing over six hundred works from every part of the artist'\;s career\, the majority of which have never been sh own before. The show traveled to Museum der Moderne Salzburg\, where it is currently on view through February 12\, 2017. A large-scale\, comprehensive publication by David Zwirner Books\, created in close collaboration with P ettibon\, accompanied the exhibition. Prominent venues which have held solo exhibitions of the artist&rsquo\;s work include the Kumu Kunstimuuseum\, T allinn\, Estonia (2015)\; Kunstmuseum Luzern\, Lucerne\, Switzerland (2012) \; Kestnergesellschaft\, Hanover (2007)\; Kunsthalle Wien\, Vienna\; Centro de Arte Contemporá\;neo de Má\;laga\, Spain (both 2006)\; Muse um of Contemporary Art San Diego\, La Jolla\, California\; and the Whitney Museum of American Art\, New York (both 2005). In 1998\, he had his first A merican museum presentation\, organized by The Renaissance Society at the U niversity of Chicago in collaboration with the Philadelphia Museum of Art\, which traveled to The Drawing Center\, New York and the Museum of Contempo rary Art\, Los Angeles.

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He has participated in a number of group exhibitions worldwide\, including the Istanbul Biennial (20 11)\; Liverpool Biennial (2010)\; SITE Santa Fe\, New Mexico (2010 and 2004 )\; Venice Biennale (2007 and 1999)\; Whitney Biennial\, Whitney Museum of American Art\, New York (2004\, 1997\, 1993\, and 1991)\; and documenta XI\ , Kassel\, Germany (2002).

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Museum collections whi ch hold works by the artist include the Centre Georges Pompidou\, Paris\; H amburger Bahnhof &ndash\; Museum fü\;r Gegenwart\, Berlin\; The Israel Museum\, Jerusalem\; The Museum of Modern Art\, New York\; San Francisco Mu seum of Modern Art\; Tate\, London\; Whitney Museum of American Art\, New Y ork\; among others. Pettibon lives and works in New York.

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For all press inquiries\, contact
\nKim Donica +1 \;212 \;727 \;2070 \;kim@davidzwi rner.com

\n LOCATION:David Zwirner- 519 W. 19th\,519 W. 19th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 11 SUMMARY:TH 'EXPLOSIYV SHOYRT T\, Raymond Pettibon END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437705 DTSTART:20170225T180000 DTEND:20170225T200000 LOCATION:David Zwirner- 519 W. 19th\,519 W. 19th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 11 SUMMARY:TH 'EXPLOSIYV SHOYRT T END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437705 DTSTART:20170225T180000 DTEND:20170225T200000 LOCATION:David Zwirner- 519 W. 19th\,519 W. 19th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 11 SUMMARY:TH 'EXPLOSIYV SHOYRT T END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439264 DTSTART:20170223T000000 DTEND:20170422T000000 DESCRIPTION:

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings an d drawings by Alice Neel curated by Hilton Als. On view at the gallery'\ ;s 525 and 533 West 19th Street spaces\, the selection includes works that the artist made during her five decades of living and working in upper Manh attan\, first in Spanish (East) Harlem\, where she moved in 1938\, and\, la ter\, the Upper West Side just south of Harlem\, where she lived from 1962 until her death in 1984.

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Known for her portraits of family\, fr iends\, writers\, poets\, artists\, students\, singers\, salesmen\, activis ts\, neighbors\, and more\, Neel (1900-1984) created forthright\, intimate\ , and\, at times\, humorous paintings that have both overtly and quietly en gaged with political and social issues. In this exhibition\, Als brings tog ether a selection of Neel'\;s portraits of African Americans\, Latinos\, Asians\, and other people of color. Highlighting the innate diversity of N eel'\;s approach to portraiture\, the selection looks at those often lef t out of the art historical canon and how the artist captured them\; as Als writes\, "\;what fascinated her was the breadth of humanity that she e ncountered."\;

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Alice Neel\, Uptown \;explores Neel& #39\;s interest in the extraordinary diversity of twentieth century New Yor k City and the people amongst whom she lived. The selected portraits includ e cultural and political figures admired by Neel\, among them playwright\, actor\, and author Alice Childress\; the sociologist Horace R. Cayton\, Jr. \, whose 1945 \;Black Metropolis: A Study of Negro Life in a Northern Ci ty \;is among the key academic studies of the African American urb an experience in the early twentieth century\; the community activist and c ultural advocate Mercedes Arroyo\; and the academic Harold Cruse\, known fo r co-founding (with LeRoi Jones) Harlem'\;s Black Arts Theater and for h is widely-published academic book \;The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual  \;(1967). Other figures include neighbors and acquaintances\, suc h as an anonymous nurse\; a ballet dancer\; a young art student\; a taxi dr iver\; a traveling businessman\; a local boy (Georgie Arce) who ran errands for Neel and who sat for her on several occasions\; and other children and their families.

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< span style="color:#000000\;">Following the presentation at David Zwirner\, the exhibition will travel to Victoria Miro\, London\, where it will be on view from May 18 &ndash\; July 29\, 2017. David Zwirner Books and Victoria Miro are jointly publishing an \;accom panying catalogue\, which will inc lude essays by Hilton Als on individual portraits and their sitters\, in ad dition to new scholarship by Jeremy Lewison.

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From the start Alic e Neel'\;s artistry made life different for me\, or not so much differen t as more enlightened. I grew up in Brooklyn\, East New York\, and Crown He ights during the 1970s when Neel\, after years of obscurity\, was finally g etting her due. I recall first seeing her work in a book\, and what shocked me more than her outrageous and accurate sense of color and form&mdash\;di d we really look like that? We did!&mdash\;was the realization that her sub ject was my humanity. There was a quality I shared with her subjects\, all of whom were seen through the lens of Neel'\;s interest\, and compassion . What did it matter that I grew up in a world that was different than that which Linda Nochlin\, and Andy Warhol\, and Jackie Curtis\, inhabited? We were all as strong and fragile and present as life allowed. And \;Neel& nbsp\;saw.

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In the years since her death\, viewers young and old have experienced the kind of thrill I feel\, still\, whenever I look a t Neel'\;s work\, which\, like all great art\, reveals itself all at onc e while remaining mysterious. In recent years\, I have been particularly in trigued by Neel'\;s portraits of artists\, writers\, everyday people\, t hinkers\, and upstarts of color. When she moved to East Harlem during the 1 930s Depression\, Neel was one of the few whites living uptown. She was att racted to a world of difference and painted that. Still\, her work was not marred by ideological concerns\; what fascinated her was the breadth of hum anity that she encountered in her studio\, on canvas.

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But b y painting the Latinos\, blacks\, and Asians\, Neel was breaking away from the canon of Western art. She was not\, in short\, limiting her view to peo ple who looked like herself. Rather\, she was opening portraiture up to inc lude those persons who were not generally seen in its history. \;A lice Neel\, Uptown\, the first comprehensive look at Neel'\;s portraits o f people of color\, is an attempt to honor not only what Neel saw\, but the generosity behind her seeing. \;-Hilton Als

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Alice Neel \;was born in 1900 in Merion Square\, Penns ylvania and died in 1984 in New York. Although she exhibited sporadically e arly in her career\, her work has been shown widely from the 1960s onwards. In 1971\, a comprehensive solo exhibition of Neel'\;s paintings was hel d at her alma mater Moore College of Art and Design\, Philadelphia\, and in 1974\, she had her first retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American A rt\, New York. It was followed by a large-scale presentation of eighty-thre e paintings in 1975 at the Georgia Museum of Art\, The University of Georgi a\, Athens. In 1978\, the Graham Gallery\, New York organized the first ret rospective dedicated to the artist'\;s works on paper and in 1979\, a su rvey of her paintings was co-hosted by the University of Bridgeport and The Silvermine Guild of Artists in Connecticut. To celebrate the centenary of the artist'\;s birth\, the Philadelphia Museum of Art organized a solo e xhibition of Neel'\;s work\, which debuted in 2000 at the Whitney Museum of American Art before traveling to the Walker Art Center\, Minneapolis\, Minnesota\, amongst other venues. In 2010\, \;Painted Truths\, whic h thematically surveyed over sixty paintings spanning fifty-five years\, wa s organized by the Museum of Fine Arts\, Houston in Texas and traveled to t he Whitechapel Gallery\, London and Moderna Museet Malmö\;\, Sweden. In 2016\, the Ateneum Art Museum\, Helsinki organized \;Painter of Modern Life\, a major museum survey of the artist&rsquo\;s work featuring app roximately seventy paintings. It traveled to the Gemeentemuseum\, The Hague and will open in March 2017 at the Fondation Vincent Van Gogh in Arles\, F rance before concluding at the Deichtorhallen Hamburg. The Estate of Alice Neel has been represented by David Zwirner since 2008\; this is her fourth solo exhibition with the gallery. Her work is included in numerous museum c ollections internationally.

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Hilton Als \;became a staff writer at \;The New Yorker \;in 1996\, a theatre critic in 2002\, and chief theatre critic in 2013. His first book\ , \;The Women\, a meditation on gender\, race\, and personal identi ty\, was published in 1996. His most recent book\, \;White Girls\, discusses various narratives around race and gender and was nominated for a 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism. Als has taught at We sleyan\, Wellesley\, Smith\, and the Yale School of Drama\, and his work ha s appeared in \;The Nation\, The Believer\, \;and \;The New York Review of Books. \;In 2016 he produced a six-month survey of art and text at The Artist'\;s Institute\, New York\; the same year he o rganized \;Desdemona for Celia by Hilton\, an exhibition of work by Celia Paul\, at the Metropolitan Opera&rsquo\;s Gallery Met\, in New York. In 2015 Als co-curated\, with Anthony Elms\, at the ICA Philadelphia\, a r etrospective of Christopher Knowles'\; work. He is also the co-author of Robert Gober'\;s 2014-15 Museum of Modern Art retrospective catalogue\,  \;The Heart is Not a Metaphor. He lives in New York City.\n LOCATION:David Zwirner- 525 W. 19th\,525 W. 19th Street (between 10th Ave. and West St.)\nNew York\, NY 10011-2808 SUMMARY:Uptown\, Alice Neel END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439265 DTSTART:20170223T180000 DTEND:20170223T200000 LOCATION:David Zwirner- 525 W. 19th\,525 W. 19th Street (between 10th Ave. and West St.)\nNew York\, NY 10011-2808 SUMMARY:Uptown END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439262 DTSTART:20170223T000000 DTEND:20170422T000000 DESCRIPTION:

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings and drawings by Alice Neel curated by Hilton Als. On view at the gallery'\;s 525 and 533 West 19th Street spaces\, the selection includes works that the artist made during her five decades of living and working i n upper Manhattan\, first in Spanish (East) Harlem\, where she moved in 193 8\, and\, later\, the Upper West Side just south of Harlem\, where she live d from 1962 until her death in 1984.

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Known for her portraits of family\, friends\, writers\, poets\, artists\, students\, sing ers\, salesmen\, activists\, neighbors\, and more\, Neel (1900-1984) create d forthright\, intimate\, and\, at times\, humorous paintings that have bot h overtly and quietly engaged with political and social issues. In this exh ibition\, Als brings together a selection of Neel'\;s portraits of Afric an Americans\, Latinos\, Asians\, and other people of color. Highlighting t he innate diversity of Neel'\;s approach to portraiture\, the selection looks at those often left out of the art historical canon and how the artis t captured them\; as Als writes\, "\;what fascinated her was the breadt h of humanity that she encountered."\;

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Alice Nee l\, Uptown \;explores Neel'\;s interest in the extraordinary di versity of twentieth century New York City and the people amongst whom she lived. The selected portraits include cultural and political figures admire d by Neel\, among them playwright\, actor\, and author Alice Childress\; th e sociologist Horace R. Cayton\, Jr.\, whose 1945 \;Black Metropolis: A Study of Negro Life in a Northern City \;is among the key academic studies of the African American urban experience in the early twentieth ce ntury\; the community activist and cultural advocate Mercedes Arroyo\; and the academic Harold Cruse\, known for co-founding (with LeRoi Jones) Harlem '\;s Black Arts Theater and for his widely-published academic book \ ; The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual \;(1967). Other figures inclu de neighbors and acquaintances\, such as an anonymous nurse\; a ballet danc er\; a young art student\; a taxi driver\; a traveling businessman\; a loca l boy (Georgie Arce) who ran errands for Neel and who sat for her on severa l occasions\; and other children and their families.

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Following the presentation at David Zwirner\, the exhibition will travel to Victoria Miro\, London\, where it will be on view from May 18 &ndash\; J uly 29\, 2017. David Zwirner Books and Victoria Miro are jointly publishing an \;accompanying catalogue\, which will include essays by Hilton Als on individual portraits and th eir sitters\, in addition to new scholarship by Jeremy Lewison.

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From the start Alice Neel'\;s artistry made life different f or me\, or not so much different as more enlightened. I grew up in Brooklyn \, East New York\, and Crown Heights during the 1970s when Neel\, after yea rs of obscurity\, was finally getting her due. I recall first seeing her wo rk in a book\, and what shocked me more than her outrageous and accurate se nse of color and form&mdash\;did we really look like that? We did!&mdash\;w as the realization that her subject was my humanity. There was a quality I shared with her subjects\, all of whom were seen through the lens of Neel&# 39\;s interest\, and compassion. What did it matter that I grew up in a wor ld that was different than that which Linda Nochlin\, and Andy Warhol\, and Jackie Curtis\, inhabited? We were all as strong and fragile and present a s life allowed. And \;Neel \;saw.

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In th e years since her death\, viewers young and old have experienced the kind o f thrill I feel\, still\, whenever I look at Neel'\;s work\, which\, lik e all great art\, reveals itself all at once while remaining mysterious. In recent years\, I have been particularly intrigued by Neel'\;s portraits of artists\, writers\, everyday people\, thinkers\, and upstarts of color. When she moved to East Harlem during the 1930s Depression\, Neel was one o f the few whites living uptown. She was attracted to a world of difference and painted that. Still\, her work was not marred by ideological concerns\; what fascinated her was the breadth of humanity that she encountered in he r studio\, on canvas.

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But by painting the Latin os\, blacks\, and Asians\, Neel was breaking away from the canon of Western art. She was not\, in short\, limiting her view to people who looked like herself. Rather\, she was opening portraiture up to include those persons w ho were not generally seen in its history. \;Alice Neel\, Uptown\, the first comprehensive look at Neel'\;s portraits of people of color\, is an attempt to honor not only what Neel saw\, but the generosity behind h er seeing. \;-Hilton Als

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Alice Neel \;was born in 1900 in Merion Square\, Pennsylvania and died in 1984 in New York. Although she exhibited sporadically early in her career\, her work has been shown widely from the 1960s onwards. In 1971 \, a comprehensive solo exhibition of Neel'\;s paintings was held at her alma mater Moore College of Art and Design\, Philadelphia\, and in 1974\, she had her first retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art\, New York. It was followed by a large-scale presentation of eighty-three painti ngs in 1975 at the Georgia Museum of Art\, The University of Georgia\, Athe ns. In 1978\, the Graham Gallery\, New York organized the first retrospecti ve dedicated to the artist'\;s works on paper and in 1979\, a survey of her paintings was co-hosted by the University of Bridgeport and The Silverm ine Guild of Artists in Connecticut. To celebrate the centenary of the arti st'\;s birth\, the Philadelphia Museum of Art organized a solo exhibitio n of Neel'\;s work\, which debuted in 2000 at the Whitney Museum of Amer ican Art before traveling to the Walker Art Center\, Minneapolis\, Minnesot a\, amongst other venues. In 2010\, \;Painted Truths\, which themat ically surveyed over sixty paintings spanning fifty-five years\, was organi zed by the Museum of Fine Arts\, Houston in Texas and traveled to the White chapel Gallery\, London and Moderna Museet Malmö\;\, Sweden. In 2016\, the Ateneum Art Museum\, Helsinki organized \;Painter of Modern Life\, a major museum survey of the artist&rsquo\;s work featuring approximate ly seventy paintings. It traveled to the Gemeentemuseum\, The Hague and wil l open in March 2017 at the Fondation Vincent Van Gogh in Arles\, France be fore concluding at the Deichtorhallen Hamburg. The Estate of Alice Neel has been represented by David Zwirner since 2008\; this is her fourth solo exh ibition with the gallery. Her work is included in numerous museum collectio ns internationally.

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Hilton Als \;became a staff writer at \;The New Yorker \;in 1996 \, a theatre critic in 2002\, and chief theatre critic in 2013. His first b ook\, \;The Women\, a meditation on gender\, race\, and personal id entity\, was published in 1996. His most recent book\, \;White Girls\, discusses various narratives around race and gender and was nominated f or a 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism. Als has taught a t Wesleyan\, Wellesley\, Smith\, and the Yale School of Drama\, and his wor k has appeared in \;The Nation\, The Believer\, \;and \;The New York Review of Books. \;In 2016 he produced a six-month survey of art and text at The Artist'\;s Institute\, New York\; the same year he organized \;Desdemona for Celia by Hilton\, an exhibition of wor k by Celia Paul\, at the Metropolitan Opera&rsquo\;s Gallery Met\, in New Y ork. In 2015 Als co-curated\, with Anthony Elms\, at the ICA Philadelphia\, a retrospective of Christopher Knowles'\; work. He is also the co-autho r of Robert Gober'\;s 2014-15 Museum of Modern Art retrospective catalog ue\, \;The Heart is Not a Metaphor. He lives in New York City.

\n LOCATION:David Zwirner- 533 W. 19th\,533 W. 19th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 11 SUMMARY:Uptown\, Alice Neel END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439263 DTSTART:20170223T180000 DTEND:20170223T200000 LOCATION:David Zwirner- 533 W. 19th\,533 W. 19th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 11 SUMMARY:Uptown END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437751 DTSTART:20170209T000000 DTEND:20170311T000000 DESCRIPTION: LOCATION:DC Moore Gallery\,535 West 22nd Street 2nd Floor\nNew York\, NY 10 011 SUMMARY:Perennials & Portraits\, Robert Kushner END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437752 DTSTART:20170209T180000 DTEND:20170209T200000 LOCATION:DC Moore Gallery\,535 West 22nd Street 2nd Floor\nNew York\, NY 10 011 SUMMARY:Perennials & Portraits END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:440181 DTSTART:20170223T000000 DTEND:20170401T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Denise Bibro Fine Art\, Chelsea\, NYC\, c elebrates this rare opportunity to present works from three influential pho tographers who documented Miami&rsquo\;s history in the making from the 50& rsquo\;s through the 70&rsquo\;s.

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M iami was a very different city before the 1940&rsquo\;s\; during WWII\, Miami was flooded with thousands of soldiers serving in the war effort. The natural landscape of the ocean and its beaches as w e know were present\, but the colorful\, eccentric\, lively and diverse Mia mi we know today was just a seed. Nevertheless\, the word quickly got out\, particularly from the soldiers that were housed in the hotels: Miami was a place to visit and enjoy. These photographers archived people\, events and phenomena that have facilitated the development of the Miami we know today &hellip\;. Seductive\, warm\, exciting\, risk taking\, and multicultural. S timulation and growth in Miami was busting and seeing no turning back.

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Andy Sweet photographed the mostly-Jewi sh community that made up Miami Beach. Many Jews came from the Northeast\, particularly New York\, but most were European immigrants or children of im migrants. Miami became their playground\, a place to enjoy one another\, sh are experiences\, and enjoy their success and fruits of their labor in a wa rm place. For many it was a place where they carried on the same traditions they had before the war in Eastern Europe.

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Charles Trainor documented important events in Miami\, including t he Beatles first visit to the United States as they were approaching anothe r level of stardom\, having already achieved considerable success in Englan d and in other parts of Europe. His photos of the Beatles included their fa mous meeting with Muhammad Ali. President Kennedy contacted him to request a copy of a portrait of the President he shot in Miami.

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Bunny Yeager was a model and trend setting pin-up phot ographer. She developed the use of the selfie\, way before it was fashionab le. Besides photographing herself\, she photographed the models she worked with and befriended\, including the infamous Betty Page. Some of the most f amous of these photos took place in Miami and a theme park in Boca Raton\, Florida. Bunny taught her friend Sammy Davis Jr. how to photograph models i n 1955\, at a time when they couldn&rsquo\;t be seen together in a restaura nt. Bunny&rsquo\;s photos were trendsetting for the time. Yeager wrote book s on photography\, and worked for Playboy and other publications when there were few women who dared to enter the field. Her work was contemporary\, s eductive\, and feminine but classy\, in a way her male counterparts seldom achieved.

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\n LOCATION:Denise Bibro Fine Art\,529 West 20th Street 4W\nNew York\, NY 1001 1 SUMMARY: Vintage Miami: Three Master Photographers' Vision of Miami 1950's- 1970's\, Andy Sweet\, Charles Trainor\, Bunny Yeager END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:440182 DTSTART:20170302T180000 DTEND:20170302T200000 LOCATION:Denise Bibro Fine Art\,529 West 20th Street 4W\nNew York\, NY 1001 1 SUMMARY: Vintage Miami: Three Master Photographers' Vision of Miami 1950's- 1970's END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437235 DTSTART:20170126T000000 DTEND:20170226T000000 DESCRIPTION: LOCATION:Denny Gallery\,261 Broome Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Prefaces\, Jordan Tate END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437236 DTSTART:20170126T180000 DTEND:20170126T200000 LOCATION:Denny Gallery\,261 Broome Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Prefaces END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438676 DTSTART:20170210T000000 DTEND:20170312T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Derek Eller Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of \;Night\, a solo exhibition by Aly son Shotz. \;Reflecting an ongoing interest in the ineffable properties of light\, \;Night \;is comprised of works in an array of material s which transmogrify as a result of variations of light within darkness. &n bsp\;

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The show'\;s centerpiece i s \;Object for Reflection\, \;a large-scale woven sculpture sited i n the main gallery. \;With minimal gallery lighting\, the sculpture res ponds specifically to the changing light of the winter sun. Comprised of th ousands of tiny aluminum pieces hand folded around stainless steel rings\,& nbsp\;Object for Reflection \;appears at times solid and opaque or tran slucent depending upon the time of day. Available light acts upon the alumi num circles like pixels on a screen\, in constant but subtle motion\, under scoring the mutability of the light itself. The colors of night become appa rent: darkness is not simply black\, but rather a spectrum of black: inky d arkness\, silvery moonlight\, deep blue.

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Rooted in the tradition of monumental metal sculpture by \; artis ts such as Serra or Di Suvero\, \;Object for Reflection \;re-imagin es the notion of what a large-scale metal sculpture should look like: inste ad of being a solid heavy welded object\, it is comprised of many parts ent wined together- flexible\, sagging\, responsive to light. \; \;Orig inally two dimensional\, the sculpture is made up of connecting geometric p lanes\; these planes become three dimensional as they respond to gravity\, space\, tension\, weight and materiality.

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Temporal Shift\, frosted vinyl installed on the gallery storefront w indow\, represents two orbits of the earth around the sun depicted by a dou ble oval. The shadow created by the movement of the actual sun across the s ky\, shining through the window projects this shape into the gallery at var ying positions.  \;Every hour throughout the exhibition reflects a subt le re-positioning of the shape\, functioning like a kind of clock or sundia l.  \; \;

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The \;Broken Dark Earth \;wall works are created by letting porcelain slabs stretch and break within the heat of the kiln. Woven porcelain &ldquo\;fabric&rdquo \; patches hold the broken pieces together to keep them from drifting farth er apart. \; Again\, shifting light subtly changes the color of each wo rk and creates an ephemeral shadow layer onto the panels.

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This will be Alyson Shotz&rsquo\;s seventh solo show at the gallery.  \;Her work will be included in the upcoming exhibitio n Art &\; Space \;at Guggenheim Museum Bilbao\, and her large outdoo r work \;Scattering Screen \;is currently on view as part of \; Art in the Garden \;at Blue Star Contemporary Art\, San Antonio\, TX.&n bsp\; She has had recent solo exhibitions at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fi ne Art\, Philadelphia\, PA\; Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art\, Charles ton\, SC\; and Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum\, Hamilton College\, Clinton\, NY.  \;Shotz was a Stanford University Research Fellow at the Arts Inst itute\, Stanford University from 2014-2015.  \;Her work is in numerous institutional collections including The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\, New York\, NY\; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden\, Washington\, DC\; India napolis Museum of Art\, Indianapolis\, IN\; Storm King Art Center\, Mountai nville\, NY\; and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art\, San Francisco\, CA.< /p>\n LOCATION:Derek Eller Gallery\,300 Broome Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Night\, Alyson Shotz END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438677 DTSTART:20170210T180000 DTEND:20170210T200000 LOCATION:Derek Eller Gallery\,300 Broome Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:429565 DTSTART:20161105T000000 DTEND:20170730T000000 DESCRIPTION:

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Dia presents Hanne Darboven&rsquo\;s Kulturgeschichte 1880&ndash\;1983 (Cultural History 1880&ndash\;1983\, 1980&ndash\;83) at Dia: Chelsea at 545 West 22nd Street in New York City. \; The presentation o ffers audiences the opportunity to experience this important work from Dia& rsquo\;s permanent collection\, which has not been on view in the United St ates for over a decade.

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Cultural History 1880&ndash\;1983 features 1\,590 framed works on paper and 19 sculptural objects. The framed works on paper include photographs of doorwa ys\, daily newsmagazine covers\, images of cameras and Hollywood celebritie s\, touristic postcards\, the contents of an exhibition catalogue on postwa r art\, and documentation of prior installations of the work. The specifici ty of the materials chosen embodies a blending of the personal and the publ ic\, telling the story of society at large\, while also presenting an autob iography of Darboven herself. From the covers of Der Spiegel with their emphasis on war and brutality\, to the racial overtones seen in the s lave figures and rainmaker sculptures\, to the postcards presenting a bucol ic and pastoral prewar Germany\, there is a narrative of trauma and recover y that runs throughout Darboven&rsquo\;s work. For the viewer\, \;C ultural History 1880&ndash\;1983 can be an all-encompassing and overwh elming experience\, physically impossible to take in at once. It is the mag num opus of an artist whose work remains lesser known than her Minimalist a nd Conceptual peers\, particularly so within the United States.&nbs p\;

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LOCATION:Dia Art Foundation\,535–545 West 22nd Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Kulturgeschichte 1880-1983\, Hanne Darboven END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:429566 DTSTART:20161105T000000 DTEND:20170730T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Dia presents an exhibition of Kishio Suga&rsquo\;s work at Dia:Chelsea at 541 West 22nd Street in New York City. Suga is a founding member of Mono-ha (School of Things)\, which emerged in Japan in the 1960s and 1970s and dev eloped in parallel with Postminimal and Land art in the United States and A rte Povera in Europe&mdash\;movements at the core of Dia&rsquo\;s permanent collection. Curated by Jessica Morgan and Alexis Lowry\, this is \;Sug a&rsquo\;s first solo museum show in the United States. \;

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In this exhibition\, Suga responds to the buildin g&rsquo\;s unique history as a marble-cutting facility by recreating his&nb sp\;Placement of Condition \;(1973)\, a signature installation of cut stones that lean precariously away from each other\, but are bound together with wire into a mutually dependent and stable network. This work is on view alongside a selection of other significant historical installati ons and new works conceived specifically for Dia that explore issues of bal ance and structure and that respond to the physical parameters of the space . His new commission investigates material equilibrium through a series of interweaving metal rods that are perched on top of wooden uprights.  \;

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LOCATION:Dia Art Foundation\,535–545 West 22nd Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Kishio Suga END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:377233 DTSTART:20150601T000000 DTEND:20170506T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Dia Art Foundation Pre sents Robert Irwin&rsquo\;s Excursus: Homage to the Square3< /em>

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The presentation of Rob ert Irwin&rsquo\;s Excursus: Homage to the Square3 (199 8&ndash\;99) at Dia:Beacon will mark the return of the work to public view\ , approximately fifteen years after its premiere at Dia Center for the Arts in New York City. Beginning on June 1\, 2015\, audiences will be able to e xperience Irwin&rsquo\;s "site-conditioned" installation in the museum whos e master plan he created. The new installation of Excursus: Homage to t he Square3 was developed specifically for Dia:Beacon and wi ll be accompanied by a symposium and a publication.

&ldquo\;Excursus: Homage to the Square3
is one of the most import ant displays of Irwin&rsquo\;s environmental installations that&mdash\;thro ugh the manipulation of existing architecture&mdash\;explore physical\, sen sory\, and temporary states\,&rdquo\; commented Jessica Morgan\, Director\, Dia Art Foundation. &ldquo\;It is a great privilege to install this work a t Dia:Beacon and return it to public view\, highlighting for audiences the unique interconnections between Irwin&rsquo\;s artistic and architectural p ractices.&rdquo\;

The work began as a site-specific installati on titled Prologue: x183 that occupied an entire floor of Dia Center for the Arts\, Dia&rsquo\;s former exhibition space in New Yo rk City\, during the spring of 1998. The piece featured white fluorescent l ights that were installed within eighteen cubic chambers and defined by flo or-to-ceiling scrims\; the windows were covered with custom-fabricated blue -and-gray theatrical gels\, providing visitors with a maze-like environment of subtly changing shadows to explore. Months into the installation\, Irwi n took the opportunity to further incorporate color into the piece by wrapp ing each set of fluorescent lights in complex combinations of vividly color ed gels. This new work was retitled Excursus: Homage to the Square 3 in reference to Josef Albers&rsquo\;s celebrated series. Irwin &rsquo\;s layered use of colored gels was directly informed by Albers&rsquo \;s method of creating idiosyncratic hues through overlaid layers of transl ucent paint treatments. Excursus: Homage to the Square3 was acquired by Dia in 2000.

The new installation of Excu rsus: Homage to the Square3 at Dia:Beacon will represent a singular manifestation of Irwin as an artist. Moving from his interior gall ery layouts and flow patterns to the architectural interventions evident th roughout the building to the landscaped gardens and forecourt that he desig ned\, audiences will have the opportunity to experience an environment in w hich Irwin has touched virtually every facet.

&ldquo\;Excu rsus: Homage to the Square3 invites audiences to explore th e work of art. What is so unique is that there is no beginning\, middle\, o r end. Audiences can enter the work from a variety of entry points\,&rdquo\ ; said Yasmil Raymond\, Curator\, Dia Art Foundation. &ldquo\;It has been s uch an honor to work closely with Irwin\, a pioneer of the L.A.-based Light and Space movement of the 1960s\, to reconceive this project for Dia:Beaco n and create a long-term plan that will allow Dia to share this work with f uture generations.&rdquo\;

Maintaining Dia&rsquo\;s philosophy of displaying single-artist presentations for extended periods of time\, < em>Excursus: Homage to the Square3
be on view at Dia:Beacon for two years.

Symposium
A symposium on Excursus: Homage to the Square3 is scheduled for fal l 2015.

Publication
A book will be pro duced as the next volume in the core series documenting the collection of D ia Art Foundation.

Funding
The install ation of Robert Irwin&rsquo\;s Excursus: Homage to the Square3 is made possible by lead support from the National Endowment for th e Arts and Cindy and Howard Rachofsky. Major support is provided by The Bro wn Foundation\, Inc.\, of Houston and Dia&rsquo\;s Commissioning Committee: Marguerite S. Hoffman\, Jill and Peter Kraus\, and Leslie and Mac McQuown. Additional support is provided by the New York State Council on the Arts\, a State agency\, and Pace Gallery.

LOCATION:Dia:Beacon\, Riggio Galleries\,3 Beekman Street \nBeacon\, NY 1250 8 SUMMARY:Excursus: Homage to the Square3\, Robert Irwin END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:377234 DTSTART:20150601T110000 DTEND:20150601T160000 LOCATION:Dia:Beacon\, Riggio Galleries\,3 Beekman Street \nBeacon\, NY 1250 8 SUMMARY:Excursus: Homage to the Square3\, Robert Irwin END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:430698 DTSTART:20161001T000000 DTEND:20170531T000000 DESCRIPTION:

The Edward Hopper House is pleased to present the restaging of Edward Hopper&rsquo\;s bedroom. The bedroom in which Hopper spent the fi rst 28 years of his life is transformed into a showcase designed in period style by Architectural Digest featured designer\, Ernest de la Torre\, and architect\, Walter Cain.

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 \; \; \; \; \; \;  \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \;  \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \;&nb sp\; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \;& nbsp\; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \ ;

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The staging of Hopper&rsquo\;s bedroom is a fitting acknowledgeme nt of the profound impact the space had on his artistic development. Growin g up with a view of the Hudson River from his bedroom window\, young Edward Hopper was inevitably drawn to its banks. He would spend hours at the vill age docks and shipyards\, sketching and watching the building and rigging o f boats. The activity on the river is captured in many of Hopper&rsquo\;s e arly drawings and paintings\, and boats and seascapes remained common subje cts in his art throughout his life.

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Also central to his artistic development was the so-called &ldquo\;Hudson River light&rdqu o\; of Nyack. The strong rays of morning sunlight streaming through the eas t facing windows of his bedroom would create shifting patterns of light and shadow on the floor and walls. Hopper incorporated these tangible blocks o f sunlight into early paintings and many of his later masterpieces. Visitor s to this showcase will be able to appreciate all the unique features of th e bedroom that so inspired Edward Hopper and led him on his creative path.& nbsp\; Due to the historic nature of the house and other limitations\, the second floor room is only accessible by the stairs. \;

LOCATION:Edward Hopper House Art Center\,82 North Broadway \nNyack\, NY 109 60 SUMMARY:Renowned designer Ernest de la Torre and architect Walter Cain to r eimagine Edward Hopper’s bedroom in his Nyack home END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:430699 DTSTART:20161001T180000 DTEND:20161001T200000 LOCATION:Edward Hopper House Art Center\,82 North Broadway \nNyack\, NY 109 60 SUMMARY:Renowned designer Ernest de la Torre and architect Walter Cain to r eimagine Edward Hopper’s bedroom in his Nyack home END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438287 DTSTART:20170202T000000 DTEND:20170311T000000 DESCRIPTION: LOCATION:Edward Thorp Gallery\,531 W 26th Street 2nd Floor\nNew York\, NY 1 0001US SUMMARY:Selected Works on Paper\, 1985-2016\, Edward Finnegan END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438288 DTSTART:20170202T180000 DTEND:20170202T200000 LOCATION:Edward Thorp Gallery\,531 W 26th Street 2nd Floor\nNew York\, NY 1 0001US SUMMARY:Selected Works on Paper\, 1985-2016 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438291 DTSTART:20170202T000000 DTEND:20170311T000000 DESCRIPTION: LOCATION:Edward Thorp Gallery\,531 W 26th Street 2nd Floor\nNew York\, NY 1 0001US SUMMARY:Project Room: Outsider Works END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437708 DTSTART:20170119T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Edwynn Houk Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of Valé\;ri e Belin&rsquo\;s newest series\, All Star. \; The exhibition o f eleven large-scale color photographs will be on view 19 January- 4 March\ , 2017.

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For this series\, Belin uti lizes the fantastical world of vintage comic books as the inspiration for m ultilayered portraits that are both visually and psychologically complex.&n bsp\; To create the works\, Belin first styles and photographs her models i n dramatic lighting reminiscent of film noir. \; Then\, selecting from an extensive collection of vintage comics\, she overlays the image with the chosen comic cover before further abstracting the pictorial surface with h er own graphic patterns. \; Bursting in from the background\, the world s of the comics interweave with the texture of the portraits to create a so phisticated composition in which variations of movement\, line\, depth of f ield and scale are all combined within one surface. \;

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The series continues Belin&rsquo\;s investigations of the ideas of surface\, beauty\, artifice\, and disorder that have become consistent themes in her practice\; however\, in this new body of work she takes her considerations further to explore the disarray of not only the p hysical but also a mental world that is chaotic\, saturated\, and obsessive .

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Borrowing from the tradition of p op artists such as Roy Lichtenstein\, Belin utilizes graphic and exuberant comics as a source for greater psychological exploration. \; Ranging fr om the empowered story of Super Girl to the dramatic passion seen in the image Confessions of the Lovelorn\, each comic tells a diff erent story and supplies an alternate narrative for the woman pictured.&nbs p\; Belin imagines these women in a reality apart from\, yet connected to\, the fantastical realm of the comics\, and she likens the spiraling composi tion of imagery to the flurry of ideas and imaginings within the women&rsqu o\;s minds.  \;

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Through her combination of the darker film noir depicti on of the model with the glowing idealism of the comics\, Belin constructs a new genre where the distinctions between polar ideals such as good and ev il\, right and wrong\, and joy and despair become more elaborate and ambigu ous.

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In coordination with th e show\, the artist will participate in a conversation with Quentin Bajac\, Chief Curator of Photography at MoMA\, at the Albertine bookstore on 28 Fe bruary at 7pm. \; The event is free and open to the public.

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Valé\;rie Belin (b 1964\, Boulogne-Billa ncourt\, France) has exhibited extensively both domestically and abroad\, a nd in 2015 the artist was awarded the coveted sixth annual Prix Pictet for her work exploring the theme of Disorder. \; The award followed Belin&r squo\;s major retrospective exhibition Les images intranquilles (Unquie t Images) presented by Centre Pompidou\, Paris from June - September 2 015. \; Additional major exhibitions include the 2008 solo show which t ravelled to Huis Marseilles\, Museum of Photography\, Amsterdam\; the Maiso n Europé\;enne de la Photographie\, Paris\; and the Musé\;e de l&rsquo\;Elysé\;e\, Lausanne. \; In 2009\, the Peabody Essex Muse um\, Salem\, MA presented Made-up\, the artist&rsquo\;s first solo museum s how in the United States. Valé\;rie Belin&rsquo\;s work has been feat ured in extensive group exhibitions worldwide\, including presentations at the Mori Art Museum\, Tokyo\; the Museum of Modern Art\, New York\; and the Seattle Art Museum\, Washington. \; Her work is inlcuded in numerous p rivate and public collections\, including the Musé\;e d&rsquo\;art Mo derne de la ville de Paris\, Kunsthaus Zü\;rich\, Los Angeles County Mu seum\, Museum of Modern Art\, New York\, and the San Francisco Museum of Mo dern Art. Belin lives and works in Paris.

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\n LOCATION:Edwynn Houk Gallery\,745 Fifth Avenue\, 4th Floor \nNew York\, NY 10151 SUMMARY:All Star\, Valérie Belin END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438653 DTSTART:20170216T000000 DTEND:20170525T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Elisa Contemporary Art is plea sed to present "\; Through her Eyes: A Southern California Perspect ive of our World "\;. This two-woman show features two Southern Ca lifornia Abstract artists Kimber Berry and Stephan ie Cate. It will open on February 16th and run through May 25th. O ur artists interpret the universe in art &ndash\; revealing their impressio ns of our environment on earth both naturally created and impacted by our h uman interactions\, as well as our surrounding planets.

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The exhibit will include two series by Kimber Berry - Liquid Landscapes and Plastic Gardens. Berry&rsquo\;s wor k represents the intersection of technology\, nature and humanity. Her pain tings are boldly colorful\, in constant motion and multi-dimensional. She m asterfully integrates cut and layered digital elements imposed on paper and vinyl with pure paint creating a dance between the virtual world and the o rganic universe.

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According to Berry \, the Liquid Landscapes &ldquo\;are an organic somewhat abstr act ocean-like environment selected for its peaceful calming effect and bec ause it helps in opening up the mind to other levels of being. Our lives ar e made up of constructed environments.&rdquo\; These worlds are create d with a combination of digitally altered photographs of her paint strokes collaged in with her actual Acrylic paint.

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In the Plastic Gardens series\, Berry explores the human i mpact on our natural environment &ndash\; how we relate to and manipulate n ature. &ldquo\;How are we\, as a society\, going to create harmony and balance with the Earth? Is the creation of plastic gardens enough to offset the damage we'\;re doing?.. I'\;ve constructed this series of painti ngs inspired by these plastic gardens. Plastic refers both to the materials I use\, but also to the flexibility of these organic environments to exist and take any form the gardener wishes. Continuing my exploration of digita l and paint\, reality and illusion\, new and old technology to take a close r look into the duality of societal expansion and growth. Using digitally m anipulated photographs of paint\, natural and plastic organic plants and fl owers along side and embedded in actual paint\, the highly manipulated surf aces of my paintings illustrate how highly manipulated nature has become. W e need to ask ourselves what is our true relationship with nature?&rdquo\;

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From emerging Los Angeles art ist\, Stephanie Cate\, we&rsquo\;ll be traveling far into space&hellip\;app roximately 390 million miles&hellip\;and more precisely to the planet Jupit er. The exhibit will feature the Europa series\, both paintings on Wood Panel\, and studies on paper. This series is based on the moon\, Euro pa and Cate&rsquo\;s fascination with this planet\, it&rsquo\;s structure a nd the potential for life.

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Europa ( Jupiter II) is the sixth-closest moon of Jupiter and the sixth-largest moon in the Solar System. Europa was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei and was named after Europa\, mother of King Minos of Crete. Europa - an icy moo n of Jupiter - is slightly smaller than Earth'\;s moon. It is unique in the solar system\, being thought to have a global ocean of water in contact with a rocky seafloor. If the ocean is proven to exist\, Europa could be a promising place to look for life beyond Earth.

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Its surface is smooth and bright\, consisting of water and ice criss-crossed by long\, linear fractures. This texture and movement is bol dly captured within Cate&rsquo\;s brushstrokes. Like Earth\, Europa is thou ght to have an iron core\, a rocky mantle and an ocean of salty water benea th its ice crust. If this ocean exists\, the tides might also create volcan ic or hydrothermal activity on the seafloor\, supplying nutrients that coul d it suitable for living things.

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About the Artists:

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Kimber Berry

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Kimb er is a Los Angeles artist\, who is part of the "\;Flow Movement\," \; a term coined by Art Critic (and curator) Peter Frank. Her artwork is vi brant and dynamic mixed media combining acrylics\, resins and digitally alt ered photographs of her paint-strokes. As a native of LA\, Kimber loves to blur the line between what is real and what is illusion.

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She has received a lot of positive attention from art critics and curators on the West Coast and has been featured in solo and g roup shows in New York\, LA\, Atlanta and London. She has been part of rece nt exhibits at the Riverside Museum and the Huntington Beach Art Center in California.

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Her work is in public a nd private collections around the world. Kimber has been featured in Hampto ns Cottages &\; Gardens\, Ocean Home\, Art Ltd\, Luxe Interiors +Design\ , Flaunt\, New York Times and CBS News.

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She received her MBF from University of Southern California and MFA fr om Claremont Graduate University. In 2013\, she created an installation at Terminal 3 at LAX. Kimber is also part of the Artists Pension Trust .

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Stephanie Cate

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Stephanie Cate is an abst ract painter based out of Los Angeles\, California. She spent most of her c hildhood in France\, before relocating to Los Angeles\, California at fourt een. She spent a couple of years as an apprentice for a muralist in Santa M onica\, painting large scale murals for casinos in Las Vegas and private re sidences before she decided to pursue her own artistic path. She attended M assachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston\, receiving a BFA in paint ing.

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Being surrounded by the histor y and architecture of France as a child and the grand decaying beauty of fo rmer centuries left an early impression on her that still influences her wo rk to this day. After working for over a decade in a photographic based mix ed-media process\, Stephanie returned to her original love of pure abstract ion to delve in further and reconnect with freshness and liberation of text ure\, line\, shape and color.

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Steph anie'\;s work is in public and private collections including Kelly Wears tler\, Renee Zellweger\, Annabeth Gish

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Mr. Avi Amiel (President\, Art Collector International Magazine)\, Rasa Center for Yoga( Oregon)and Wynn Tower Suites (Las Vegas)

\n LOCATION:Elisa Contemporary Art Gallery\,5622 Mosholu Avenue (near 256th St reet/Riverdale Library)\nRiverdale\, NY 10471 SUMMARY:Through Her Eyes: A Southern California Perspective of our World\, Kimber Berry\, Stephanie Cate END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435957 DTSTART:20170121T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Elizabeth Dee is pleased to present the fifth solo show of new paintings by Carl Ostendarp at the new gallery s pace in Harlem. \; There will be an opening on Saturday\, January 21st from 5-8PM. Over the past two decades\, Ostendarp has mined sources as vari ed as Pollock&rsquo\;s drips\, Newman&rsquo\;s zips\, American color fields \, Pop Art\, and Surrealism to forge his own unique and influential brand o f abstract painting. \;

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In an o ngoing study of the formative period of painting between the mid sixties an d mid seventies\, Ostendarp continues to explore contexts ranging from the emotional\, historical and conceptual. \; He often responds directly to the physical gallery space \;through the spatial embodiment of his pai ntings.  \;In this new exhibition\, Ostendarp looks more specifically a t artists he has studied for decades\, particularly Ad Reinhardt'\;s lat e black paintings at the Jewish Museum exhibition of 1966\, Lee Lozano&rsqu o\;s wave paintings at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1970\, and Bar nett Newman'\;s Stations of the Cross\, which was shown in the legendary exhibition \;Lema Sabachthani (organized by Lawrence Alloway) at the Guggenheim Museum that same year. Beyond Newman&rsquo\;s p ersonal relationship to religion and \;radicality\, this show addressed the theme of the Holocaust through his abstract methods. Ostendarp describ es this interest for the exhibition: "\;The exhibition as a whole is in tended as \;a response to the social\, political and psychological stat e of society\, not as an \;expressionistic gesture but as an \;expr ession.&rdquo\;

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The sizes\, aspect ratios and locations of the works in this show are deduced from the archite ctural geometry of the gallery for the purpose of creating one complete pai nting installation\, in order to present the work as a thematic group cycle . The large paintings are divided into two integrated groups\, all with loo sely painted\, semi-transparent grounds (applied with a mop). All of the wo rks in the exhibition contain thin-stained fields in contrast to opaque are as\, derived from the same color of gray\, which calls to mind newsprint\, documentary film and photography. The works in the first group share a sign ature horizon drip-line image that the artist has mainly produced in mural- installation works of the last 10 years\, rooted in the iconography of Oste ndarp&rsquo\;s first stand-alone paintings of the mid 90&rsquo\;s. In these works\, the opaque areas are located at the bottom of the canvasses\, in w hat would be understood to be the &ldquo\;ground&rdquo\; which the &ldquo\; seeping painting&rdquo\; is yet to cover. Their overall effect relays a sen se of entropy and restlessness in the image.

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In the second group of works\, the paintings feature opaque paint ing words on similarly loose grounds. The words retain the character of &ld quo\;voices\,&rdquo\; being sourced from hand-drawn cartoons and embodying meaning as expression. Not found in any official language dictionary\, thes e expressions are not words but technically referred to as ejaculations\; v ocal sounds that are pre-language such as &ldquo\;ACK!\,&rdquo\; &ldquo\;EC H!\,&rdquo\; &ldquo\;ARGH\,&rdquo\; &ldquo\;MMP!\,&rdquo\; etc.  \;Acco rding to Ostendarp\, &ldquo\;these [are] expressions that summon up or refe r to unwilled responses like disgust and outrage.&rdquo\;

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Ostendarp has had over 33 solo exhibitions and parti cipated in over 170 group shows internationally. \;According to Howard Halle\, "\;Ostendarp was part of a wave of Yale-trained painters during the early-to-mid-&rsquo\;90s\, who took a dyspeptic approach to reviving v arious art-historical genres.&rdquo\; \;The artist is a founding member of the Elizabeth Dee Gallery.  \;Recent exhibitions include: \;Blanks \;at Elizabeth Dee\, New York\; \;Everything Falls Faster than an Anvil \;at Pace Gallery\, London\; and \;P op Abstractions \;at Garth Greenan Gallery. He has been a professo r\, teaching at several schools\, including \;The Cooper Union\, prior to his 17 years at Cornell. Ostendarp received his B.F.A. from Boston Unive rsity and his M.F.A. from Yale University. \; He currently directs the Graduate Program of Art at Cornell University.

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For more informati on\, please contact Martha Scott Burton\, Gallery Assistant\, at marthascott@elizabethdee.com.

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\n LOCATION:Elizabeth Dee Gallery\,2033/2037 Fifth Avenue \nNew York\, NY 1003 5 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Carl Ostendarp END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435958 DTSTART:20170121T170000 DTEND:20170121T200000 LOCATION:Elizabeth Dee Gallery\,2033/2037 Fifth Avenue \nNew York\, NY 1003 5 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437594 DTSTART:20170121T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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In its newest initiative\, Elizabeth Dee is pleased to present\, Selections\, an exhibit ion series designed to bring visibility to the dynamism of today&rsquo\;s e merging artists. Works included in Selections are chosen by esteemed curato rs\, who are actively engaged with the up and coming artistic voices shapin g our society. Elizabeth Dee has invited culturally influential curator Lar ry Ossei-Mensah to organize the inaugural edition of Selections\, which wil l be open to the public starting Saturday\, January 21st from 5-8PM.

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The inaugural installment of Selections f eatures the work of four artists based in Harlem and the South Bronx: Derek Fordjour\, Emily Henretta\, Lucia Hierro and Kenn y Rivero. \;

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Ossei-Men sah has selected a group of artists whose rigorous approach to experimentat ion pushes the boundaries of their practice in response to a continuously s hifting landscape that challenges tradition and is ripe with possibilities. Via a creative lens that explores a myriad of topics from the autobiograph ical to environmental\, these artists&rsquo\; inquisitive approach to their practice results in work that spans a broad range of mediums\, such as fel t\, works on paper\, sculpture and collage. \;

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Derek Fordjour (b. 1974) mines the allegor ical relationship between art and sports to investigate questions of value with relation to personal self-worth and notions of winning and losing&mdas h\;in how they are derived\, consumed and maintained. \;

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Emily Henretta (b. 1982) uses di scarded materials imbued with a certain history to re-manufacture &\; re -contextualize objects that evoke the structures which support and challeng e human life\, architecture\, technology\, weather and landscape. By augmen ting the form of her materials\, Henretta models a space that is neither en tirely of the past or of the future. \;

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Lucia Hierro (b. 1987) explores the body as a col lection of fragmented signifiers\, such as language\, taste and culture. &n bsp\;Hierro probes these ideas through the utilization of a broad spectrum of techniques that include digital media\, collage and felt painting constr uctions. \;

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Kenny River o (b. 1981) investigates ideas of hope\, loss and memory through c oded gestures based on certainty and fiction. Rivero invents narratives tha t seek to find the truth based on his experiences that reality fails to add ress.

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Larry Ossei-Mensah is a Ghanaian-American independent curator and cultural critic who u ses contemporary art and culture as a vehicle to redefine how we see oursel ves and the world around us. He has organized exhibitions at commercial and nonprofit galleries throughout New York City featuring a roster of critica lly acclaimed artists including Firelei Baez\, ruby amanze\, Hugo McCloud a nd Brendan Fernandes to name a few. Ossei-Mensah is also the Co-Founder of ARTNOIR\, a global collective of culturalists who design multimodal experie nces aimed to engage this generation&rsquo\;s dynamic and diverse creative class. He has documented contemporary art happenings for various publicatio ns and his writings have profiled some of the most dynamic visual artists w orking today&mdash\;Derrick Adams\, Mickalene Thomas\, Kehinde Wiley\, Lorn a Simpson and street artist JR.

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For questions\, please contact Martha Scott Burton\, Gallery Assistant\, at ma rthascott@elizabethdee.com.

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\n LOCATION:Elizabeth Dee Gallery\,2033/2037 Fifth Avenue \nNew York\, NY 1003 5 SUMMARY:Selections by Larry Ossei-Mensah\, Derek Fordjour\, Emily Henretta\ , Lucia Hierro\, Kenny Rivero END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437595 DTSTART:20170121T170000 DTEND:20170121T200000 LOCATION:Elizabeth Dee Gallery\,2033/2037 Fifth Avenue \nNew York\, NY 1003 5 SUMMARY:Selections by Larry Ossei-Mensah END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:440183 DTSTART:20170127T000000 DTEND:20170312T000000 DESCRIPTION:

HRH P.R.'\;s work explores society&rsquo\;s obsession with sensationalism. Throughout his work\, the a rtist argues that sensation poisons empathy and that it makes people numb a nd void of critical thought.
\nBattle for Cultivation highlights three chapters of the artist&rsquo\;s work.

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In the BGGH (By the Greater Grace of Hatred) series\, the artist argues that by using humankind&rsquo\;s natural draw to sensation\, the media bea rs responsibility for numbing its public by providing them with an avalanch e of sensational (crime) articles. Because the sole purpose is increasing t he company'\;s profit margin\, the actual cause of the crime\, is never reported about nor is anything ever done about it. Truly compelling\, the w ork is composed with semi-transparent images of the victim\, the crime scen e and the murderer. They are strategically placed and merged into one portr ait\, creating a powerful\, ghostly image. Within the series\, RNPF\, addre sses the murder of movie star Ramon Novarro\, an actor best known for his r ole opposite Greta Garbo in Mata Hari. SMLRW\, pictures the murder of Sal M ineo\, who co-starred with James Dean in Rebel Without a Cause and Giant\, while PPPGP addresses the murder of Italian film director\, poet and writer Pier Paulo Pasolini. NOLK consists of nine pieces installed in a grid\, wi th each piece being a direct reference to the murder of Ernst Rö\;hm&rs quo\;s entire S.A. division of the Nazi party in 1934. The artist focuses o n everything that photography is incapable of telling you about its subject s. His pictures of murderers and the murdered are ambiguous. Perpetrators a nd victims merge\, since it is difficult to distinguish one from another\, yet they are never really anonymous.

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Applying the same technique as in the BGGH series\, MMO (male models obje ctified) is a reaction against a strongly resurging chauvinism. Objectifyin g women is perceived as normal as breathing. It is matter-of-fact to the po int of banality. Objectifying men however is immediately equated with homos exuality. A prejudice\, which is not applied to the objectification of wome n. With MMO\, the artist addresses the double standard as well as the sensa tion caused by the use of nude male models in fashion spreads\, which is se verely criticized by many (male) commentators.

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WTD2 (We Take a Dump too) consists of an installation of person ally autographed photographs by male celebrities. Like moths to a flame\, t he artist traps those flocking to the portraits by taking advantage of the fact that the public is not allowed to touch artworks. Should the viewer be allowed to touch the photographs\, on the reverse\, they would find a full frontal nude shot of the subject pictured on the front. In what is basical ly a reversal of the message in the tale of the emperor'\;s new clothes\ , the artist only offers the viewer the clothed image of the subject\, leav ing them to project the qualities they choose onto the person portrayed.

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Like with the use of his tag (an acro nym of his name)\, the artist&rsquo\;s works have acronyms for titles. He e xplains that acronyms predate the Christian era. They became more prevalent in the 20th century and have since become more commonly used trough text m essaging on mobile phones. Like with a pictogram\, they are intended to be recognized immediately\, but according to the artist\, their increased use is becoming a tool of separation\, leaving a great number of people in the dark. HRH P.R. extends this thought to the way art is viewed. We are far re moved from Matisse'\;s statement: the first thing a painter should do is tear out his tongue. Necessarily or unnecessarily\, visual art is often ac companied by explanations\, something the artist illustrates by using an ac ronym for a title. This automatically triggers the need for explanation. Wh at does not need explanation is how HRH P.R. strives for truth and justice with a body of work that aims to foster communication with the viewer. The registering of images is manifested as a dateless act\, while the iconograp hy provides a different\, deeper\, more fully experienced relation to the o bject\, that tells of loss\, destruction\, disappearance and controversy. T he beauty of it all lies in the fact that\, ultimately\, the viewer is draw n into what could be described as\, a complex poem.

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HRH P.R. was born in 1981 in Dillon\, S.C. After finishing High School\, he moved to Saginaw\, Michigan\, where he currently lives an d works. This is the artist'\;s first solo exhibition.

\n LOCATION:envoy enterprises\,87 Rivington Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Battle for Cultivation\, HRH P.R. END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:440184 DTSTART:20170210T000000 DTEND:20170312T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Opening Reception: February 10 \, 7-9 PM

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Essex Flowers is pleased to present Dust Stutter\, an exhibition of work by Andres Laracuente and Me gan Pahmier.

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Dust remains invisible until enough of it accumulates. It both announces and obscures the place w here it gathers\, alerts us to the edges of things while simultaneously sof tening or clouding them. Likewise the works shown here shift our attention from their surfaces to their mechanisms of support and their relations to t heir immediate surroundings. Both artists have developed practices that att end very closely to the particular qualities and associations of their chos en materials\, designing encounters that give primacy to tactility and spat ial awareness.

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Pahmier'\;s piece s rely on slight movements: extruding a single coil of clay\, allowing mois ture to escape the skin\, trapping a shallow space under a plexi box. She d escribes her approach as "\;a mode of attention\, an engagement with ma teriality that is neither practical or instrumental\, but concerns itself w ith the possibility of being and acting with matter\, rather than upon it.& quot\;

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With his recent work Laracue nte takes an interest in materials that function as second skins: clothing\ , poly packaging and industrial coatings. He refers to a process of "\; augmentation or multiplication\, creating third skins and redundancy."\ ; By defamiliarizing commonplace objects and exploiting their unique capabi lities\, he forefronts the multitude of states related to the cooperation o f inside-outside\, surface-substance. In the work "\;Poly-cooperation P ointed Areas\,"\; the heat sealed lines bind the lightweight poly fiber providing structural integrity\, lending presence to an indistinct materia l.

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In both artists'\; work\, the raw materials on display do their intended jobs - preserving\, capturing\, linking - and yet remain somehow unaffected. They are spent\, but assert t heir own autonomy by resisting transformation.

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Andres Laracuente is currently based in New York. H is practice is cross-disciplinary\, with recent emphasis on sculpture and n ew media. Laracuente has exhibited in the US\, Europe and Asia. His work ha s been featured in the New York Times\, and Document Journal. Upcoming exhi bitions will be held at The Knockdown Center Brooklyn\, Galerie Yukiko Kawa se Paris (Mar 2017) and Galerie Veda\, Florence (May 2017).

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Megan Pahmier lives and works in New Y ork. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from Maryland Insti tute College of Art and completed her Master of Fine Arts at Hunter College . Her work has been shown at institutions such as the Corcoran Gallery of A rt\, The Smithsonian American Art Museum\, and the School 33 Art Center. Mo st recently her work was included in the New York exhibitions Drawing for S culpture at TSA Gallery and Future Fossils at Dutton Gallery as well as Han d\, Finger\, Digit at The Old Hairdressers in Glasgow\, Scotland. Her work will be included in the upcoming exhibition\, Occasional Table at the Knock down Center in Queens\, NY.

\n LOCATION:Essex Flowers\,19 Monroe \nNew York\, NY 10002US SUMMARY:Dust Stutter\, Andres Laracuente\, Megan Pahmier END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435501 DTSTART:20170119T000000 DTEND:20170513T000000 DESCRIPTION:

The FLAG Art Foundatio n presents Cynthia Daignault: \;There is nothing I could say that I haven&rsquo\;t thought before\, \;< /em>on its 10th \;floor gallery from \;January 1 9 &ndash\; May 13\, 2017. \; Daignault&rsquo\;s new \;seri es of paintings &ndash\; part \;solo exhibition\, virtual group show\, and curatorial project &ndash\; resulted from collaborating with \;30 a rtists\, including: Cory Arcangel\, Sadie Barnette\, Carol Bove\, Robert Go ber\, Josephine Meckseper\, Jonathan Monk\, \;Fred Wilson\, \;and m any more. As it&rsquo\;s now rarer to experience a physical art object than its surrogate\, the exhibition explores the role of the virtual in contemp orary art\, as well as \;ideas of \;agency\, \;collaborative ap propriation\, \;and the traces we leave behind.

\n LOCATION:FLAG Art Foundation\,545 West 25th Street 9th Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:There is nothing I could say that I haven’t thought before\, Cynthi a Daignault END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435502 DTSTART:20170119T180000 DTEND:20170119T200000 LOCATION:FLAG Art Foundation\,545 West 25th Street 9th Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:There is nothing I could say that I haven’t thought before END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435503 DTSTART:20170119T000000 DTEND:20170513T000000 DESCRIPTION:

The FLAG Art Foundatio n presents tapestries and paintings by internationally acclaimed a rtists Etel Adnan | Gerhard Richter\, on its 9th floor gal lery from January 19 &ndash\; May 13\, 2017. The exhibitio n initiates a conversation \;between two masters of \;contemporary painting\, from the vastly different backgrounds of Beirut and Germany\, wh o continue to challenge the concept of working in a single style or media\, translating their explosive color abstractions and painting processes to c anvas\, ceramic\, \;glass\, and tapestry.

\n LOCATION:FLAG Art Foundation\,545 West 25th Street 9th Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Joint Exhibition\, Etel Adnan\, Gerhard Richter END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435504 DTSTART:20170119T180000 DTEND:20170119T200000 LOCATION:FLAG Art Foundation\,545 West 25th Street 9th Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Joint Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:440185 DTSTART:20170216T000000 DTEND:20170401T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Taking Meas ure is the latest series of photographs by Neil Folberg that investigates themes that have occurred throughout his career. \ ; The eighteen photographs featured explore the relationship between man\, nature\, and the cosmos\, an assertion of a theme that in one way or anothe r has continued throughout his work. \; Whether in the physical form or in a more symbolic one\, Folberg&rsquo\;s dramatic color prints explore th e limitless possibilities of life\, our imaginations\, and the universe bey ond our reach. \; Often drawn to remote lands\, Folberg made all but on e of the photographs in Iceland.
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\nFolberg traveled to the Far oe Islands in 2015 to photograph a solar eclipse. \; After a week in Ic eland\, he rented the last available cottage on the islands in the village of Saksun at the northern tip of Streymoy Island. \; Using Google Earth \, he found the exact time and position the eclipse would occur outside his cottage. \; At 9:40 am on March 19\, 19.5 degrees above the horizon\, the sun would silently disappear behind the moon. \; Satellite data ind icated there would be scattered clouds. \; Using the app on his phone\, he followed the path of the sun. \; He didn&rsquo\;t expect it to grow dark so quickly nor was he prepared for the drop in temperature. \; Th en the eclipse was over and light returned. \;
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\nClock work Universe symbolically begins this journey\, guiding Folberg to ta ke measure along the way. \; Sunstone is a luminous image of a crystal Vikings used to determine the location of the sun with an acute de gree of accuracy when it could not be seen. \; In Solar System a universe of multiple earth-like planets varying distances from a sun res ts on volcanic rock formations and hints at the notion of creation. \; The artist&rsquo\;s presence inserts\, both literally and figuratively\, an element of control. \; Folberg&rsquo\;s theme culminates in I Am t he Lighthouse\, where he is seen next to an unlit lighthouse with the sun hidden behind the clouds. \; Yet another sun\, bright and glowing\, emanates from his face. \; Taking Measure is a powerful series that ex plores the complexity of our existence and the beauty that surrounds us.
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\nNeil Folberg was born in San Francisco in 1950\, but spent mos t of his childhood in the Midwestern United States\, becoming interested in photography around 1966. \; In 1967\, he began studies with Ansel Adam s\, the American landscape photographer. \; In 1968\, Folberg enrolled at the University of California at Berkeley \; \; which led through a program of individualized study with William Garnett to a B.A. in Photog raphic Field Studies.
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\nIn 1979\, Folberg made Israel his home land. \; He began photographing in the Sinai\, working there until Sina i was returned to Egyptian control. His desert landscapes have been collect ed together along with a text that Folberg wrote in a book titled In a Desert Land: Photographs of Israel\, Egypt and Jordan by Neil Folberg& nbsp\; published by Abbeville Press of New York in 1987.  \;
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\nHe had a major exhibition at the Musé\;e Nicé\;phore Ni&ea cute\;pce in Chalon-sur-Saone\, France in 1990/91. In 1992\, he was commiss ioned by the Aperture Foundation to photograph synagogues all over the worl d\, published by Aperture Press\, New York. \; The book\, And I Sha ll Dwell Among Them: Historic Synagogues of the World was accompanied by travelling exhibitions in Europe and the United States and publication o f a portfolio of EverColor pigment transfer prints by Aperture Press and Vi sion Editions.
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\nHe \;returned to black-and-white work wit h his series of photographs of starry night landscapes set in ancient ruins and scenes of the Middle East. \; This work has been collected togethe r in the book\, \;Celestial Nights: Visions of an Ancient Land (Aperture Press\, New York 2001). The traveling exhibition\, circulated by Aperture\, was shown in a dozen museums throughout the world\, including v enues\, in France\, the U.S. and more recently\, the Museum of Photographic Arts in Japan
.

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\n LOCATION:Flomenhaft Gallery\,547 W.27th St. Suite 200\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Taking Measure\, Neil Folberg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437233 DTSTART:20170120T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:

A group exhibition of work by \;Cedric Chr istie\, Shaun McCracken\, Carol Robertson and Richard Smith. \;< /p>\n LOCATION:Flowers Gallery NY\,529 West 20th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SUMMARY:Color Shape Surface\, Cedric Christie\, Shaun McCracken\, Carol Rob ertson\, Richard Smith END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437713 DTSTART:20170118T000000 DTEND:20170305T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Foley Gallery \;together with The Proposition are pleased to present Blood Orang e\, a solo exhibition of Balint Zsako'\;s new work s.

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The large watercolor paintings o n paper depict groupings of interacting nude figures. \; Rendered in a spectrum of bright hues and gray monochromes\, the bodies change color or d ensity in the areas where they come together. \; Precisely aligned eyes \, heads\, hands and feet\, raise the question of whether the figures agree in their action or struggle for control through open-ended narratives.

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The paintings show complex figure arra ngements absent of landscapes or objects. \; The selective overlapping of figures refers to both the conflict and the unity inherent in struggles for identity and agency.

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Ba lint Zsako \;was born in Hungary\, grew up in Canada\, and cur rently lives in Brooklyn. \; He studied fine art at Ryerson University in Toronto. \; His works are featured in Phaidon&rsquo\;s Vitamin D2 dr awing anthology and are in the Permanent collections of the Nerman Museum\, The Weatherspoon Art Museum and the Museum of Old and New Art. \; He w as \;long listed for The Sobey Award\, Canada'\;s largest art prize in 2014.

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Blood Orange will remain on view through March 5th\, 2017. \; Foley Gallery is open Wedn esday through Saturday\, 11 &ndash\; 6pm\, Sunday 12 \; - 6. \; To request images\, please contact the gallery at 212.244.9081 or info@foleygallery.com

\n LOCATION:Foley Gallery\,59 Orchard Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Blood Orange\, Balint Zsako END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437714 DTSTART:20170118T180000 DTEND:20170118T200000 LOCATION:Foley Gallery\,59 Orchard Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Blood Orange END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437715 DTSTART:20170118T000000 DTEND:20170305T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Fole y Gallery is pleased to present Figure 8\, a group exhibition featuring work by Phyllis Cedar\, Andrea Joyce Hei mer\, Veronica Mortellaro\, Michelle King dom\, Tahir Carl Karmali\, Elisabeth Higg ins O&rsquo\;Connor\, Rachell Sumpter and collabo rative team Walter Martin and Paloma Munoz.

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The artists in Figure 8 share an appreciation for storytelling and detail that is visually presen t in their narratives. Photography and painting are joined alongside mixed media\, embroidered scenery and cast polyurethane snow globes.

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By using thread as mark making\, M ichelle Kingdom explores &ldquo\;psychological landscapes&rdquo\; in her small-scale embroidered scenes. Her choice of medium simultaneously undermines and honors this tradition.  \; \;&ldquo\;Jua Kali&rdquo\ ; is Swahili for &ldquo\;Fierce Sun&rdquo\;\, and photographer Tahi r Carl Karmali personifies ideas he feels represent Nairobi\, Keny a&rsquo\;s Jua Kali world. The images are created to look as if his subject s have adorned themselves with found objects\, a mix of junk and super huma nness.

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Andrea Joyce Hei mer creates autobiographical work using acrylics and penc il on panel. Her work reflects on the secretive\, oppressive nature of ster eotypes. \; Walter Martin and Paloma Munoz create small\, detailed scenes in snow globes. They are best known fo r their &ldquo\;Travelers&rdquo\; series\, which depicts ordinary people in unfortunate situations.

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Doodl es are often dismissed as a way to help us relax and express our subconscio us. For Phyllis Cedar\, doodling is a serious art form. Ce dar transforms her drawings into characters that amplify attitude and emoti on. \; By working with ink\, Veronica Mortellaro f eels she is able to let go and embrace imperfections and happy accidents th at come with her medium of choice. Her work mines the universal human exper ience &ndash\; the body in both its strength and fragility.

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Elisabeth Higgins O&rsquo\;Conno r works two and three dimensionally. She transforms commo n textile wearables into oversize mixed media creatures. \; In her work\, Rachell Sumpter targets glob al warming\, women\, family issues\, and technological influence.  \;Gr oups reflect and gather in scenes that are bright and colorful\, despite th e grim content

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Figure 8 < /em>will remain on view through March 5th\, 2017. \; Foley Gallery is o pen Wednesday through Saturday\, 11 &ndash\; 6pm\, Sunday 12 \; - 6.&nb sp\; To request images\, please contact the gallery at 212.244.9081 or info @foleygallery.com

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\n LOCATION:Foley Gallery\,59 Orchard Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Figure 8\, Phyllis Cedar\, Andrea Joyce Heimer\, Tahir Carl Karmali \, Michelle Kingdom\, Veronica Mortellaro\, Walter Martin & Paloma Munoz\, Elisabeth Higgins O’Connor\, Rachell Sumpter END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437716 DTSTART:20170118T180000 DTEND:20170118T200000 LOCATION:Foley Gallery\,59 Orchard Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:Figure 8 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435507 DTSTART:20170119T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:

David Humphrey has been making paintings of conversations and using the idea of conversa tion as a method since he first began showing in the nineteen eighties. Fam ilies\, amorous partners\, animal predators and pets\, co-workers and all m anner of social groups have conversed (and continue to) in his work over th e last three decades. By mixing images found in electronic or print media w ith imagined subjects\, or by performing types of painting (like gestural a bstraction or photo-projection) as self-collaboration\, Humphrey builds a d ialog with others into his process.

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These new works stoke conversations between abstract forms and a variety o f human or animal protagonists. Locations talk to people\, recognizable ima ges chat with paint smears while looping gestures address spectators within the picture. &ldquo\;I&rsquo\;m glad we had this conversation&rdquo\; was overheard by Humphrey on a crowded street and he thought it seemed neither glad nor a conversation\, and that the &ldquo\;we&rdquo\; was bossily one s ided. Humphrey celebrates the slippery ways images don&rsquo\;t always mean what they seem to be saying. His work promotes the open-ended conversation s that happen between us and the objects and people around us\, virtually a nd physically.

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About the Artist
\nDavid \; \;Humphrey \;(b. 1955) has been the subject of 44 solo exhibitions including McKee Gallery\, NY\; Sik kema Jenkins\, NY\; Fredric Snitzer Gallery\, Miami\; and Contemporary Art Center\, Cincinnati. His work is in the collections of several museums and public collections including Walker Art Center\, Minneapolis\; Carnegie Mus eum of Art\, Pittsburgh\; The Metropolitan Museum of Art\, NY\; Museum of F ine Arts\, Boston as well as the Saatchi Gallery\, London. \;He is curr ently teaching in the MFA program of Columbia. He was awarded the Rome Priz e in 2008.

\n LOCATION:Fredericks & Freiser\,536 W 24th St. \nNew York\, NY SUMMARY:I'm Glad We Had This Conversation\, David Humphrey END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439209 DTSTART:20170223T000000 DTEND:20170415T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Friedman Benda is pleased to announce Assemblage 5\, Faye Toogood&rsquo\;s first solo exhibition with the gallery and in the United States.

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Faye Toogood&rsquo\;s Assemblage 5 takes on a pantheistic tone\, tapping into age-old an imist notions of the elements water\, earth and moon. Lithium-barium crysta l\, cob composite\, and silver nitrate bronze personify the nature of these elements and mark a trio of firsts in Toogood&rsquo\;s material language. The British designer&rsquo\;s signature explorations of geometry and form a re visible throughout.

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Inspired by primitive elements and archetypes\, works in this ser ies draw imagery from cups\, pews\, spoons\, and beads. Spoon Chairs and Pew Benches build on and transmute the reassuringly chunky forms of Toogood&rsquo\;s Roly-Poly furniture designs. The iconic Element Table is transformed into a pair of molded pieces that pla y with negative space\, wherein shaped voids suggest the missing polyhedron s of earlier collections. A series of Cup Stools and Side Tabl es upend conventional thought about seating and the drinking vessel. S culptural archaic relics\, such as a hand-formed\, oversized solitaire game and wearable tapestries\, evoke the naï\;ve abstraction of parietal ar t and reinforce the strong spiritual character of Assemblage 5.

\n LOCATION:Friedman Benda\,515 West 26th St. 1st Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Assemblage 5\, Faye Toogood END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439210 DTSTART:20170223T180000 DTEND:20170223T200000 LOCATION:Friedman Benda\,515 West 26th St. 1st Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Assemblage 5 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437720 DTSTART:20170119T000000 DTEND:20170305T000000 DESCRIPTION:

frosch&\;portmann is deligh ted to present The Old Man and the Sheep\, the gallery&rsquo\;s se cond solo exhibition by Brooklyn based artist Peter Caine.

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&ldquo\;This country is the greatest country in the entire world\, I honestly feel that way. We have freedoms that no other pe ople have.&rdquo\; &mdash\;Peter Caine

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At the dawn of the inauguration of the next President of the United Sta tes of America\, the artist presents his electrifying musings on the state of the union today. Peter Caine\, once deemed &ldquo\;beyond irreverent&rdq uo\; by The New York Times&rsquo\; Holland Cotter\, pushes his rebellious b oundaries to even greater lengths\, as he focuses his attention on Presiden t Elect Donald Trump. Through the prism of his fantastical vision\, the art ist portrays the former reality television star in multiple symbolic repres entations\, inviting the viewer on a journey to the new White House like no other.

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The artist\, whose iconic k inetic sculptures have been included in two Greater New York exhib itions at MoMa PS1\, has created dramatic new works inspired by the recent divisive election. As the viewer enters the gallery space\, motion sensors activate the artist&rsquo\;s large scale sculptures. Carefully created and handcrafted by Caine\, air pistons animate Mr. Trump in various scenarios i ntended to provoke thought\, discussion\, and perhaps a smile. The artist d eftly walks a fine line exploring serious contemporary political issues uti lizing his inimitable sense of humor and visual style.

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A curious combination of objects\, including a brick wa ll\, a mysterious hole\, a bucket\, a golden cup\, a watermelon\, a sheep\, and a president all commingle in Caine&rsquo\;s vibrant universe. Peter Ca ine has created a thoughtful study of the tumultuous political landscape of contemporary America. Whether the viewer regards the exhibition as a tonic for troubled times\, or is offended\, the artist is thrilled to exercise h is American right to freedom of speech and share his singular artistic visi on of the newest leader of the free world. Peter Caine&rsquo\;s art extends from the gallery to his You Tube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/read yourDogstaff.

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The artist\, who is a lso a dog trainer and comedian\, shares his wit and wisdom regularly\, so b e certain to continue the experience of the exhibition by exploring his vid eo works online.

\n LOCATION:Frosch & Portmann Gallery\,53 Stanton Street \nNew York\, NY 1000 2 SUMMARY:The Old Man and the Sheep\, Peter Caine END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437721 DTSTART:20170119T180000 DTEND:20170119T200000 LOCATION:Frosch & Portmann Gallery\,53 Stanton Street \nNew York\, NY 1000 2 SUMMARY:The Old Man and the Sheep END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435962 DTSTART:20170117T000000 DTEND:20170225T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Everyone on the edge of th e Grand Canyon was afraid his neighbor\, his friend\, would jump. I liked t o imagine jumping. I ran for the edge\, vaulted the guard rail\, flung myse lf into space\, feet first\, sleeves flapping.
\n&mdash\;David Re ed

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Gagosian New York is pleased to present an exhibition of early brushmark paintings by David Reed. Curated b y Katy Siegel and Christopher Wool\, this presentation follows the exhibiti on'\;s premiere at the Rose Art Museum\, Brandeis University. This is Re ed&rsquo\;s first exhibition with the gallery.

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&ldquo\;Painting Paintings (David Reed) 1975&rdquo\; reunites m any canvases first shown in 1975 at Susan Caldwell Gallery\, New York\, whi ch had a strong impact on Christopher Wool\, then a young artist. More than forty years later\, Reed&rsquo\;s paintings are complemented by a group ex hibition of artists who were similarly exploring the relationship between p rocess and image-making in painting\, drawing\, sculpture\, and film.

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When Reed came to New York from Southern California in the 1960s\, he entered an art world that was skeptical about the ability of painting to be forward-looking. The young artist sympathize d with the humanist\, even metaphysical current in painters like his teache rs Philip Guston and Milton Resnick\, even as he admired the deadpan materi ality of contemporaneous experiments in sculpture and film. Seeking to make paintings that were as direct as a poured steel sculpture\, between 1974 a nd 1975 he prepared tall\, vertical canvases\, either as single panels or a s many as five panels bolted together\; the height of the canvases was dete rmined by the door to his studio\, the widths by the limit of his own reach . Working wet into wet\, Reed then painted primarily black or red strokes f rom left to right\, top to bottom\, and sometimes diagonally\, quickly fill ing the canvas.

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These works\, prese nted on the sixth floor of Gagosian'\;s Madison Avenue location\, descri be particular moments\, suggesting both the stillness of the resulting imag e and the suspended motion of their making. In #49 (1974) red stro kes melt into one another on the left side\, but become drier and more auto nomous as they move to the right. In the center\, splatters express a tremo r frozen in time\, as Reed removed the canvas from the wall while it was st ill wet\, and dropped it. Inevitably\, the pure immediacy of the moment van ishes\, becoming an image of itself.

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These fundamental questions of process and image in art inform the group exhibition presented on the fifth floor. Charcoal drawings by Joyce Pensato and a blackboard painting by Cy Twombly reveal layers of gesture and erasu re\; Andy Warhol&rsquo\;s Rorschach (1984) alludes to the hidden m eaning behind abstraction\; Pendulum (1976)\, a Super 8 film by Ja mes Nares\, documents a sphere swinging perilously through a desolate Lower Manhattan street\; Barry Le Va has installed his On Center Shatter-or- Shatterscatter (within the Series of Layers Pattern Acts) (1968&ndash\ ;71)\, stacking panes of glass and smashing all but the top pane with a sle dgehammer. Jack Whitten&rsquo\;s The Speedchaser (1975) was made w ith a specialized tool designed to spread paint across the entire surface o f the canvas with a single gesture. The evidenced actions that run through these works all find parallels in Reed&rsquo\;s paintings\, which evoke dir ect human activity\, but also inevitably become images as well. The paintin g by Reed included in the group exhibition\, #78-2 (1975)\, a slen der canvas with a thick black vertical stroke on an off-white ground\, is e choed\, surprisingly\, in Sigmar Polke&rsquo\;s Streifenbild IV (S tripe painting IV\, 1968)\, with its four pastel strokes on a mauve ground.

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The most recent works in the exhib ition\, Wool&rsquo\;s Untitled (1995)\, and Josh Smith&rsquo\;s Untitled (2004) and Untitled (2006)\, resonate with Reed&rs quo\;s 1975 paintings in specific ways. Wool&rsquo\;s painting is a picture created through physical and material action\; the small Smith canvases we re originally used as palettes for larger works\, then repurposed as painti ngs themselves. For Wool\, Reed&rsquo\;s approach to painting represents a cyclical continuation between generations. In bringing these works together \, Siegel and Wool follow Reed&rsquo\;s example\, challenging linear concep tions of artistic influence and encouraging viewers to trace alternative ti melines in swinging arcs\, dripping strokes\, and reconfigured blots.

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Artists exhibited include: David Reed\, Barry Le Va\, James Nares\, Joyce Pensato\, Sigmar Polke\, Dieter Roth\, Jo el Shapiro\, Josh Smith\, Cy Twombly\, Andy Warhol\, Jack Whitten\, and Chr istopher Wool.

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&ldquo\;Painting Pai ntings (David Reed) 1975&rdquo\; is accompanied by an in-depth\, fully illu strated book\, which expands on the themes of the exhibition\, describing t he paintings\, and also reflecting on the complex relations between past an d present. It includes texts by Richard Hell and Reed\, as well as an exten sive conversation between Siegel and Wool.

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David Reed was born in 1946 in San Diego\, Califor nia and currently lives and works in New York. His work is featured in inst itutional collections worldwide\, including the Albright-Knox Art Gallery\, Buffalo\; The Art Institute of Chicago\; Centre Georges Pompidou\, Paris\; FRAC &ndash\; Auverge\, Clermont Ferrand\; Museum fü\;r Moderne Kunst\ , Frankfurt am Main\; Kunstmuseum St. Gallen\; The Metropolitan Museum of A rt\, New York\; Museum of Contemporary Art\, San Diego\; National Gallery o f Art\, Washington\, DC\; Orange County Museum of Art\, Newport Beach\; Vir ginia Museum of Fine Art\, Richmond\; Roswell Museum and Art Center\, NM\; Sammlung Goetz\, Munich\; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\, New York\; and Ulr ich Museum of Art\, Wichita\, KS\, among others. Recent solo institutional exhibitions include &ldquo\;David Reed - You look good in blue\,&rdquo\; Ku nstmuseum St. Gallen\, Switzerland (2001\, traveled to Kunstverein Hannover \, Germany)\; &ldquo\;Leave Yourself Behind. Paintings and Special Projects 1967&ndash\;2005\,&rdquo\; Ulrich Museum of Art\, Wichita State University \, KS (2005\, traveled to Roswell Museum and Art Center\, NM\; Luckman Gall ery\, California State University\, Los Angeles)\; &ldquo\;David Reed: Live s of Paintings\,&rdquo\; Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery\, Reed Coll ege\, Portland\, OR (2008)\; &ldquo\;David Reed &ndash\; Heart of Glass\, P aintings and Drawings 1967&ndash\;2012\,&rdquo\; Kunstmuseum Bonn\, Germany (2012)\; &ldquo\;The Mirror and The Pool\,&rdquo\; Kunstmuseum Krefeld\, M useum Haus Lange\, Germany (2015)\; &ldquo\;Two by Two: Mary Heilmann &\ ; David Reed\,&rdquo\; Museum fü\;r Gegenwart\, Hamburger Bahnhof\, Ber lin\, Germany (2015)\, and &ldquo\;David Reed: Vice and Reflection &ndash\; An Old Painting\, New Paintings and Animations\,&rdquo\; Pé\;rez Art Museum\, Miami\, FL (2016).

\n LOCATION:Gagosian Gallery - 980 Madison Ave.\,980 Madison Ave. \nNew York\, NY 10075 SUMMARY:Painting Paintings (David Reed) 1975\, David Reed END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435963 DTSTART:20170117T180000 DTEND:20170117T200000 LOCATION:Gagosian Gallery - 980 Madison Ave.\,980 Madison Ave. \nNew York\, NY 10075 SUMMARY:Painting Paintings (David Reed) 1975 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439154 DTSTART:20170208T000000 DTEND:20170325T000000 DESCRIPTION: LOCATION:Gagosian Gallery @ Park & 75\,821 Park Avenue \nNew York\, NY 1002 1 SUMMARY:Reverb\, Mark Tansey END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439290 DTSTART:20170208T180000 DTEND:20170208T200000 LOCATION:Gagosian Gallery @ Park & 75\,821 Park Avenue \nNew York\, NY 1002 1 SUMMARY:Reverb END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435413 DTSTART:20170119T000000 DTEND:20170311T000000 DESCRIPTION:

A painting is simply a scr een between the producer and the spectator where both can look at the thoug ht processes residing on the screen from different angles and points in tim e. It enables me to look at the residue of my thinking.
\n&mdash\ ;Katharina Grosse

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Gagosian is pleas ed to present new paintings and sculpture by Katharina Grosse. A prominent figure on the international art circuit\, this is her first gallery exhibit ion in New York and at Gagosian\, following a series of significant public commissions in the U.S. in recent years.

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Grosse approaches painting as an experience in immersive subjectivity . With a spray gun\, she disconnects the artistic act from the hand\, styli zing gesture as a propulsive mark. The resulting pictures are distinct\, bu t never predetermined. Spatial tensions rise through shifts in chromatic te mperature. Challenging boundaries\, she reintroduces her body as an active agent within a vision of contemporary existence that is at once physically isolated and densely networked.

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Emb racing the events and incidents that arise as she paints\, Grosse opens up surfaces and spaces to the countless perceptual possibilities of the medium . While she is widely known for her temporary and permanent in situ work\, which she paints directly onto architecture\, interiors\, and land scapes\, her approach begins in the studio. With calculated focus\, she all ows new patterns and procedures in her paintings to emerge from action\, fu rther multiplying this potential with stencils cut from cardboard and thick foam rubber&mdash\;tools with which to develop further cuts\, layers\, and perspectival depths. Grosse&rsquo\;s gestures unfold all at the same time in unmixed acrylic colors\, engulfing the viewer in a toxic sublime.

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In this exhibition\, selected works from several interconnected suites of untitled paintings produced during the las t twelve months demonstrate this constant interaction of process and materi al. Base shapes migrate from one painting to another\, appearing in new lay ers or fusing into clusters that advance and retreat. The paintings record Grosse&rsquo\;s ongoing choices about color\, density\, and velocity. In on e group\, monadic forms proclaim their specific hues within larger zones of color. A red shape takes its place amidst expressive jewel-toned streaks. A plane of cerulean blue opens\, or perhaps closes\, to a black and yellow void. In other more complex orchestrations\, these coloristic moments becom e so compelling that the canvas\, which supports it all\, is easily forgott en.

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A recent cast metal sculpture s prawls across the floor\, its torqued and rippled surface hosting overlappi ng sprays and drips. White space splices through encrusted abstraction and fluid propulsions refute the boundaries of each plane. Between driftwood an d space junk\, the sculpture transforms as one moves around its smooth cres ts and sharp-edged cavities. Grosse compresses the natural\, the industrial \, and the technological\, generating fields of color that hover between th ree and four dimensions.

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Ka tharina Grosse was born in 1961 in Freiburg/Breisgau\, Germany and currently lives and works in Berlin. Her work is featured in the collectio ns of Museum of Modern Art\, New York\; Albright-Knox Art Gallery\, Buffalo \, NY\; Staatliche Museen zu Berlin\; QAGOMA\, Australia\; Pé\;rez Ar t Museum Miami\, FL\; Istanbul Modern\, Turkey\; and Centre Georges Pompido u\, Paris\, as well as commissions for public and private buildings in the US and Europe.

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Recent solo institut ional exhibitions include "\;Hammer Projects: Katharina Grosse\,"\; UCLA Hammer Museum\, Los Angeles (2001)\; "\;Der weisse Saal trifft si ch im Wald\,"\; Kunstmuseum St. Gallen\, Switzerland (2002)\; "\;Pe rspectives 143: Katharina Grosse\,"\; Contemporary Arts Museum\, Housto n (2004)\; "\;Constructions à\; cru\,"\; Palais de Tokyo\, Pa ris (2005)\; "\;Atoms Outside Eggs\,"\; Serralves\, Museu de Arte C ontemporâ\;nea\, Porto (2007)\; "\;Hello Little Butterfly I Love Y ou What'\;s Your Name\,"\; ARKEN&mdash\;Museum for Moderne Kunst\, C openhagen (2009)\; "\;One Floor Up More Highly\,"\; Mass MoCA\, Mas sachusetts (2010)\; "\;Third Man Begins Digging Through Her Pockets\,&q uot\; MOCA\, Cleveland (2012)\; "\;Two younger women come in and pull o ut a table\,"\; De Pont Museum of Contemporary Art\, The Netherlands (2 013)\; "\;WUNDERBLOCK\,"\; Nasher Sculpture Center\, Dallas (2013)\ ; "\;Inside the Speaker\,"\; Museum Kunstpalast\, Dü\;sseldorf (2014)\; "\;yes no why later\,"\; Garage Museum of Contemporary Art \, Moscow (2015)\; "\;Seven Hours\, Eight Rooms\, Three Trees\,"\; Museum Wiesbaden\, Germany (2015)\; and Museum Frieder Burda\, Germany (201 6). Grosse'\;s recent site-specific installations include Untitled Trump et\, 2015 for the 56th Biennale di Venezia (2015) and Rockaway! for MoMA PS 1'\;s "\;Rockaway!"\; program (2016). \;

\n LOCATION:Gagosian Gallery- 24th St.\,555 West 24th Street \nNew York\, NY SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Katharina Grosse END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435414 DTSTART:20170119T180000 DTEND:20170119T200000 LOCATION:Gagosian Gallery- 24th St.\,555 West 24th Street \nNew York\, NY SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437615 DTSTART:20170202T000000 DTEND:20170311T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Galerie Lelong is pleased to announce Silence\, a solo exhibition of work by Jaume Plensa. The exhibition presents Plensa&rsquo\;s installat ion and monumental sculpture in a new configuration\, where the source mate rial for the work appears \;alongside the finished sculptures. For the first time\, Plensa incorporates reclaimed wood beams as a framework and ma jor component of his work.

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Continui ng his exploration of contemporary portraiture\, most notably with Chicago& rsquo\;s Crown Fountain and most recently with Looking Into My Dreams\, Awilda at the Perez Art Museum Miami\, Jaume Plensa created an ensemble of seven heads made of timber salvaged from an old building. Th e heads\, modelled after individual young women from Asia\, Europe\, and La tin America\, are treated with an unevenly burnt patina\, which draws influ ence from both Eastern and Western iconography.

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The exhibition fully speaks to Plensa&rsquo\;s sensitivity to medium and how his use of new materials evolved to inform his life-long sea rch for a universal depiction of a reflective inner world.  \;In placin g the sculptures in proximity to architectural remains\, Plensa forges a co nnection between spirit and matter\, the historic and the contemporary\, un derlining his ongoing pursuit to understand the beauty in everyday life.

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Plensa also addresses how silence\, a s a visual and auditory negative space\, is an ever-shrinking commodity of today&rsquo\;s world: &ldquo\;One of my obsessions is silence\, silence as a key need. And in a very noisy world\, silence should be produced\, must b e &lsquo\;made\,&rsquo\; because it does not exist\; an inner silence so th at people return to be with themselves.&rdquo\; The importance of creating silence in everyday life is manifested in the works presented in the smalle r gallery: a series of eight bronze heads that embody the proverbial princi ple &ldquo\;hear no evil\, see no evil\, speak no evil.&rdquo\; The use of hands in these sculptures also refers to Plensa&rsquo\;s earlier works\,&nb sp\;like Jumeaux (2001) and En Tí\; (2004).

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Jaume Plensa is one of the most respected and renowned sculptors working today. In addit ion to a long career of exhibition in traditional museums and galleries\, h e is a respected innovator and pioneer for his projects engaging with publi c space\, which can now be found in over fourteen countries around the worl d. Plensa&rsquo\;s celebrated sculptures can be seen in Albright Knox Art G allery\, New York\; Pé\;rez Art Museum Miami\, Florida\; Millennium P ark\, Illinois\; Olympic Sculpture Park\, Washington\; Toledo Museum of Art \, Ohio\; Burj Khalifa\, United Arab Emirates\; BBC Broadcasting Tower\, Lo ndon and St. Helens\, England\; Mori Art Museum\, Tokyo and Ogijima\, Japan \; Shanghai IFC Mall\, China\; Bastion Saint-Jaume\, France\; amongst many other sites worldwide.

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Solo exhibit ions of Plensa&rsquo\;s work have been presented at prestigious institution s around the globe\, including the Nasher Sculpture Center\, Texas\; Palaci o Velá\;zquez\, Reina Sofia Museum\, Spain\; Institut Valencia d&rsqu o\;Art Moderne\, Spain\; Musé\;e Picasso\, France\; Yorkshire Sculptu re Park\, England\; and the Espoo Museum of Modern Art\, Finland. Jaume Plensa: Human Landscape recently traveled to the Cheekwood Botanical Garden &\; Museum of Art\, Tennessee\; Tampa Museum of Art\, Florida\; a nd Toledo Museum of Art\, Ohio. The Max Ernst Museum in Brü\;hl\, Germa ny recently presented the major solo exhibition The Inside View. Jaume Plensa: Together was presented at the Basilica San Giorgio Maggiore in Italy as a collateral event of the 56th Venice Biennale and received the G lobal Fine Arts Award. Forthcoming projects include a new sculpture commiss ioned by the Virginia Museum of Fine Art\, which will be unveiled on April 27\, 2017\, and a major solo exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in Sain t-Etienne\, France\, which opens on March 10\, 2017.

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On view through March 11\, 2017.

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\n LOCATION:Galerie Lelong\,528 W. 26th St. \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Silence\, Jaume Plensa END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437616 DTSTART:20170202T180000 DTEND:20170202T200000 LOCATION:Galerie Lelong\,528 W. 26th St. \nNew York\, NY 10001 SUMMARY:Silence END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437617 DTSTART:20170201T000000 DTEND:20170228T000000 DESCRIPTION: LOCATION:Galerie Richard\,121 Orchard St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:The Wild West END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437618 DTSTART:20170201T180000 DTEND:20170201T200000 LOCATION:Galerie Richard\,121 Orchard St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SUMMARY:The Wild West END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439807 DTSTART:20170128T000000 DTEND:20170318T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Thirteen Gallery35 artists (including sever al from Murray Hill) have invited 13 guest artists to combine their artwork in this new exhibit fittingly titled Invitational! A vari ety of media and subject matter will be shown! \;

\n LOCATION:Gallery35\,30 East 35th St. \nNew York\, NY 10016US SUMMARY:Invitational\, Laura Abella\, Susan Aranoff\, Beth Barry\, Marilyn Boddewyn\, Yanka Cantor\, Cari Clare\, John Connors\, KAREN FITZGERALD\, De nise Fryburg\, Geoffrey Gneuhs\, Susan Harris-Demmet\, Teresa Hommel\, Dan Jay\, Stephen C. Jones\, Jeremy Leggend\, Valerie Lynch\, Ellen Mandelbaum\ , Wendy Moss\, Lorena Pachón\, Kara Peer\, Rick Perez\, Lois Ross\, Florina Sbircea\, Ingrid Sletten\, Carol Summar\, Malcolm Varon END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:439808 DTSTART:20170218T180000 DTEND:20170218T200000 LOCATION:Gallery35\,30 East 35th St. \nNew York\, NY 10016US SUMMARY:Invitational END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437724 DTSTART:20170207T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:

George Billis Gallery is pleas ed to welcome Kenny Harris at the New York location.This exhibition will ru n from February 7 - March 4\, 2017. The opening reception will be held at t he George Billis Gallery located at 525 West 26th Street between 10th and 1 1th avenues on Thursday\, February 9th from 6-8 pm. Gallery hours are Tuesd ay through Saturday\, 10 &ndash\; 6pm.

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Kenny Harris&rsquo\; new paintings evoke the light and mood of architec tural spaces from his travels around the world. He is fascinated with subtl e light effects and expressive painterly surfaces\, focusing on interiors o r cityscapes. His dynamic paint application describes the way light pours t hrough a space\, with scrapes and impasto embodying the texture of the surf aces depicted. The paint itself becomes plaster and wood\, or a glint of li ght reflecting off a dull surface worn smooth with age. The locations chose n for these paintings span the globe from Lisbon to Italy\, London\, Paris\ , Havana\, and Istanbul. Harris has been traveling and painting for many ye ars\, and this body of work reflects the many disparate spaces that capture his eye for light and texture.

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His wife\, fellow painter Judy Nimtz\, appears in many of the small paintings& mdash\;in the act of painting at her easel or in other quiet moments. For h is large compositions Harris chose to focus on Havana\, Cuba as his subject . The colorful emptiness of it&rsquo\;s arcades and interiors evoke a still ness charged with meaning. The Cuban people are waiting in anticipation for what is to come\, and these empty spaces are emblematic of this suspense. Harris&rsquo\; paintings are at once both modern and nostalgic.

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The George Billis Gallery marks its 20th year in the Chelsea Art district and its sister gallery is located in the burgeo ning gallery district of Culver City in Los Angeles. For more information\, please contact the gallery via e-mail at gallery@georgebillis.com or visit our website at www.georgebillis.com

\ n LOCATION:George Billis Gallery- NY\,525 West 26th Street \nNew York\, NY 10 001 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Kenny Harris END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437725 DTSTART:20170209T180000 DTEND:20170209T200000 LOCATION:George Billis Gallery- NY\,525 West 26th Street \nNew York\, NY 10 001 SUMMARY:Joint Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438977 DTSTART:20170207T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:

George Billis Gallery is pleas ed to announce Sarah Williams and her new paintings at the New York locatio n. This exhibition will run from February 7 - March 4\, 2017. The opening r eception will be held at the George Billis Gallery located at 525 West 26th Street between 10th and 11th avenues on Thursday\, February 9 from 6-8 pm. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday\, 10 &ndash\; 6pm.

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Strong emotions can be prompted by a place. Ove r time\, ways of life shape and define the people and the spaces in which t hey live. Williams is drawn to areas and structures that show character acq uired from the history and memory of the people that formed that environmen t. Aesthetically she is interested in light sources and the play of light o n surfaces. This led her to paint nightscapes of familiar yet isolated and unremarkable buildings\, rooms and scenes located in rural \; areas clo se to her home.

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She uses darkness t o edit out extraneous information and provide the viewer with the essence o f the place. Portraying these settings as nightscapes allows Williams to co nvey the emotional tone of the painting. The viewer&rsquo\;s location is no t \; specifically implied because of the light source within the painti ngs. They must find their own way and decide their own approach when out in the rural night depicted in these works. While Williams renders her subjec t in a representational \; manner\, she likes to fracture the form and accentuate the light through brushwork. This approach makes these settings visually captivating and eerily mysterious at the same time. The viewer sta rts to unravel the mood of the painting not only \; with the primary ar ea of focus\, but through the combination of the secondary and even tertiar y areas of focus. A viewer&rsquo\;s eyes must adjust so they will be able t o see these subtle nuances that complete the character of the place. The ar tistic language applied to slightly familiar yet hauntingly isolated areas permits her to transform the common place and make the insignificant signif icant.

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The George Billis Gallery ma rks its 20th year in the Chelsea Art district and its sister gallery is loc ated in the burgeoning gallery district of Culver City in Los Angeles. For more information\, please contact the gallery via e-mail at gallery@georgeb illis.com or visit our website at www.georgebillis.com.

\n LOCATION:George Billis Gallery- NY\,525 West 26th Street \nNew York\, NY 10 001 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Sarah Williams END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438978 DTSTART:20170209T180000 DTEND:20170209T200000 LOCATION:George Billis Gallery- NY\,525 West 26th Street \nNew York\, NY 10 001 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438979 DTSTART:20170207T000000 DTEND:20170304T000000 DESCRIPTION:

George Billis Gallery is pleas ed to welcome Santiago Medina at the New York location. This exhibition wil l run from February 7- March 4\, 2017. The opening reception will be held a t the George Billis Gallery located at 525 West 26th Street between 10th an d 11th avenues on Thursday\, February 9 from 6-8 pm. Gallery hours are Tues day through Saturday\, 10 &ndash\; 6pm.

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Master sculptor Santiago Medina&rsquo\;s Tuscany inspired Italian stai nless steel masterpiece sculptures are at marquee public art venues such as Harvard\, Stanford\, Tufts and Washington University among many others. He is the only Colombian-American sculptor to have a permanent monumental scu lpture at Harvard University. His avant-guard sculptures have been displaye d at major worldwide art fairs such as at Art Basel Week Miami\, Wynwood Ar t Fair\, Houston Art Fair\, Palm Beach International Art Fair\, Arte Americ a\, NY Art Context and Context Art Miami.

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Medina summarizes his artistic passion as &ldquo\;I bring inert stai nless steel to life by creating timeless masterpieces full of light and mov ement for art lovers&rdquo\;. Also an accomplished physician with brain ima ging expertise\, Medina distinctively uses advanced medical imaging technol ogy such as Computerized Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MR I) \; to scan his sculptures and subsequently enhance their volumetric appeal and sculptoric form. Therefore\, Medina brings powerful artistic exp ression\, technological sophistication and physician sensitivity to his bea utiful artwork. This uniqueness allows him to create vibrant masterpiece th at will transcend generations.

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The George Billis Gallery marks its 21st year in the Chelsea Art district and i ts sister gallery is located in the burgeoning gallery district of Culver C ity in Los Angeles. For more information\, please contact the gallery via e -mail at gallery@georgebillis.com or visit our website at www.georgebillis.com

\n LOCATION:George Billis Gallery- NY\,525 West 26th Street \nNew York\, NY 10 001 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Santiago Medina END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:438980 DTSTART:20170209T180000 DTEND:20170209T200000 LOCATION:George Billis Gallery- NY\,525 West 26th Street \nNew York\, NY 10 001 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435997 DTSTART:20170127T000000 DTEND:20170325T000000 DESCRIPTION:
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Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by Wan gechi Mutu. The title for this exhibition comes from the Gikuyu words for m ud and trees\, the prima materia for this body of work. Expanding her sculptural practice\, this installation proposes an alternative to the systemic modes of representation in both Western and Eastern traditions by reimagining and recontextualizing the relations between the body\, the natu ral world\, and social forces. Well known for collages of hybrid forms draw n from folklore\, popular culture\, and art history\, this new work marks a n evolution in Mutu&rsquo\;s critique of the construction of self-image. Th e complex texture and form that these figures offer prompt inquiry into the relationship between human existence and environment\, producing interacti ons both intimate and challenging.

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Mutu transforms the gallery sp ace into a terrestrial cosmology that spans the microscopic to the mythic. Drawn from the dirt and brush in areas around her studio\, she conjures a w orld replete with chimerical paradox. Faces of women\, ornamental footwear\ , and patterned spheres evoking viruses emerge from natural materials that elaborate on the traditions of makonde carving. Embracing the raw physicali ty of her surroundings\, she mobilizes the earth as a continuation of her o wn complex intersectional identity and artistic query. Adding gravity to th ese roughhewn totems\, each invokes the psychic and social struggle for con trol over bodies through capitalism\, the fetish\, and disease. Seating of grey blankets grounds the installation\, inviting audiences &ldquo\;to ente r a place and re-think themselves.&rdquo\;

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This environment sets the stage for two new cast bronze sculptures that directly confront the myt hs of representation. A large-scale sculpture of an nguva\, a wate r-woman of East African folklore\, is at once familiar and otherworldly. Ba sed on the transformation of the aquatic dugong\, an herbivore closely rela ted to the manatee\, into the siren of superstition\, Mutu staves off the d isappearance of biological diversity and traditions of mythmaking by coales cing what she calls &ldquo\;the cross-pollination of ideas&rdquo\; into obj ects of desire. In another work\, Second Dreamer (2016)\, she chal lenges the stasis of the bust and the appropriation of African masks throug h a self-portrait that captures the potential of psychic life. In this way\ , Mutu&rsquo\;s sculpture acts as a corrective to a violent cultural consci ousness\, while offering an alternative narrative of embodiment and being i n the world.

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Born in Nairobi\, Kenya\, Wangechi Mutu received her MFA from Yale University. Her work has been the subject of numerous solo s hows\, including\, &ldquo\;Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey&rdquo\;\, whi ch traveled to: Brooklyn Museum\, New York\; Nasher Museum of Art\, Durham\ , North Carolina\; Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami\; and Block Museu m\, Evanston\, Illinois. Other solo exhibitions include: SITE\, Santa Fe\; Museum of Contemporary Art\, Sydney\; Musé\;e d&rsquo\;Art Contempora in de Montré\;al\; Deutsche Guggenheim\, Berlin\; Wiels Center for Co ntemporary Art\, Brussels\; Art Gallery of Ontario\; Museum of Contemporary Art\, San Diego\; Kunsthalle Wien\; and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art . Mutu is the recipient of Deutsche Bank&rsquo\;s &ldquo\;Artist of the Yea r&rdquo\; award\, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Grant\, the Joan Mit chell Foundation Painters &\; Sculptors Award\, and the American Federat ion of Arts&rsquo\; Leadership Award. In the coming year\, Mutu will presen t solo exhibitions at Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens\, Deurle\, Belgium and The Con temporary Austin\, Texas. \;

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\n LOCATION:Gladstone Gallery - 21st St.\,530 West 21st St. \nNew York\, NY 10 011 SUMMARY:Ndoro Na Miti \, Wangechi Mutu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435998 DTSTART:20170127T180000 DTEND:20170127T200000 LOCATION:Gladstone Gallery - 21st St.\,530 West 21st St. \nNew York\, NY 10 011 SUMMARY:Ndoro Na Miti END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435868 DTSTART:20170110T000000 DTEND:20170401T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Exami ning the New York art scene during the fertile years between the apex of Ab stract Expressionism and the rise of Pop Art and Minimalism\, \;Inv enting Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City\, 1952&ndash\;1965&n bsp\;is the first show ever to survey this vital period from the vanta ge point of its artist-run galleries&mdash\;crucibles of experimentation an d innovation that radically changed the art world. With more than 200 paint ings\, sculptures\, installations\, drawings\, photographs\, ephemera\, and films\, the show reveals a scene that was much more diverse than has previ ously been acknowledged\, with women and artists of color playing major rol es. It features works by abstract and figurative painters and sculptors\, a s well as pioneers of installation and performance art. Artists range from well-known figures such as Jim Dine\, Red Grooms\, Allan Kaprow\, Alex Katz \, Yayoi Kusama\, Claes Oldenburg\, Yoko Ono\, and Mark di Suvero\, to thos e who deserve to be better known\, including Emilio Cruz\, Lois Dodd\, Rosa lyn Drexler\, Sally Hazelet Drummond\, Jean Follett\, Lester Johnson\, Bori s Lurie\, Jan Mü\;ller\, and Aldo Tambellini.

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Inventing Downtown& nbsp\;is curated by Melissa Rachleff\, clinical associate professor in NYU& rsquo\;s Steinhardt School.

\n LOCATION:Grey Art Gallery\,New York University 100 Washington Square East\n New York\, NY 10003 SUMMARY:Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City\, 1952–19 65\, Emilio Cruz\, Jim Dine\, Lois Dodd\, Rosalyn Drexler\, Sally Hazelet D rummond\, Jean Follett\, Red Grooms\, Lester Johnson\, Allan Kaprow\, Alex Katz\, Yayoi Kusama\, Boris Lurie\, Jan Müller\, Claes Oldenburg\, Yoko Ono \, Mark di Suvero\, Aldo Tambellini END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:435869 DTSTART:20170109T190000 DTEND:20170109T210000 LOCATION:Grey Art Gallery\,New York University 100 Washington Square East\n New York\, NY 10003 SUMMARY:Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City\, 1952–19 65 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437214 DTSTART:20160827T000000 DTEND:20180107T000000 DESCRIPTION:

In her stone sculptures\, Zimm erman balances the sensuous materiality of \;magnificent \;slabs&nb sp\;of quarried stone with other key elements such as water\, light\, and l andscape. \; Zimmerman&rsquo\;s sculptures reference her attraction to archaic architectural form\, a subject also captured in her lush black and white photographs on display in the East Gallery. These photographs\, taken during her travels in places such as Peru\, India\, and Egypt\, are joined by images of her many public sculptures\, allowing the viewer to make the connection between her large scale public works and the form\, light and co mposition seen in her black and white photography.

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Beginning in February 2017\, the exhibition continues in th e West Gallery which will further explore Zimmerman'\;s works on paper\, juxtaposing works from the artist&rsquo\;s \;Elemental \; series\, including topographical photographic collages\, ink and wash drawi ngs of moving water\, and pastel drawings of clouds from her \;Heav en'\;s Breath \;series.

\n LOCATION:Grounds For Sculpture\,18 Fairgrounds Road (mailing address) 126 S culptors Way (GPS location)\nHamilton\, New Jersey 08619 SUMMARY:Wind\, Water\, Stone\, Elyn Zimmerman END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437215 DTSTART:20161023T000000 DTEND:20170402T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Ned Smyth\, a pioneer in publi c art\, will exhibit his work in the Museum Building. Like Zimmerman\, Smyt h developed a fascination with stone. In his youth\, Smyth was influenced b y classical architecture and sculpture while accompanying his father\, a pr ominent art historian\, on his travels in Europe. In recent years\, Smyth c ame across some small stones that he collected long ago and had since forgo tten. His imagination was captured by the shapes of these stones that seeme d reminiscent of the classical images of his youth.

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Featured in this exhibition are eight large sculptural wor ks which draw inspiration from the huge cache of stones that he has collect ed for more than 35 years. \; These sculptures\, and several smaller st one installations\, are accompanied by more than half a dozen large format black and white photographs that further explore Smyth&rsquo\;s powerful ob session with definition\, texture\, and scale. \;An installation of cem ent and pigment based paintings on panel offer an important glimpse at the possible origins of the large stone works.

\n LOCATION:Grounds For Sculpture\,18 Fairgrounds Road (mailing address) 126 S culptors Way (GPS location)\nHamilton\, New Jersey 08619 SUMMARY:Moments Of Matter\, Ned Smyth END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080839Z UID:437216 DTSTART:20161023T000000 DTEND:20170402T000000 DESCRIPTION:

This annual exhibition offers a glimp se into the future of contemporary sculpture as some of the most talented s culpture students\, selected from hundreds of domestic and international ar t programs\, exhibit their award-winning work in the 22nd ISC &\; GFS co llaborative exhibition. \; The Outstanding Student Achievement in Conte mporary Sculpture Award is sponsored in part by Gertrud and Heinz Aeschlima nn\, Doris and Donald Fisher Fund\, Johnson Art &\; Education Foundation \, New Jersey State Council on the Arts\, and the Jon and Mary Shirley Foun dation.

\n LOCATION:Grounds For Sculpture\,18 Fairgrounds Road (mailing address) 126 S culptors Way (GPS location)\nHamilton\, New Jersey 08619 SUMMARY:International Sculpture Center’s 22nd Annual Outstanding Student Ac hievement Awards in Contemporary Sculpture Exhibition END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080840Z UID:437217 DTSTART:20170121T000000 DTEND:20170423T000000 DESCRIPTION:

This juried exhibition of amat eur photographs\, all sharing sculpture as subject matter\, has become an a nnual exhibition at Grounds For Sculpture. On display in the Education Gall ery\, Focus on Sculpture promotes sculpture as seen by members of the commu nity through their photographs. Participation in this juried show is limite d to amateur photographers 18 years of age and older. The prospectus is ava ilable to all on the Grounds For Sculpture website and only digital submiss ion will be accepted through the Grounds For Sculpture website. \; The primary requirement is that the images depict sculpture or present the subj ect in a sculptural manner.

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Each ye ar a different professional in the field of photography is invited to selec t the works for the exhibition from those submitted. This year&rsquo\;s jur or is Danielle Austen\, an award-winning fine art photogra pher specializing in intimate portraits of the environment.

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\nELIGIBILITY
\nFocus on Sculpture is open to amateur photographers age 18 and older. \; Entr ies are limited to two per person. \; Professional photographers\, empl oyees and volunteers of Grounds For Sculpture (GFS) and their families are not eligible for entry. \; Amateur status is defined by the following c riteria: the artist is not currently showing in the photography medium\, th e artist is not represented by a gallery\, the artist does not function as a professional photographer (e.g. newspaper photographer)\, and the artist is not retired from a professional photography career. \; The primary r equirement is that the images depict sculpture or present the subject in a sculptural manner. \; Participants agree that work displayed in the exh ibition will not be for sale and will remain on display through the duratio n of the exhibition.

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\nJUROR

\nDanielle Austen is an award-winning fine art photog rapher specializing in intimate portraits of the environment. Educated and trained in the fine arts and photojournalism\, Austen&rsquo\;s work has bee n published in local\, regional\, and national newspapers and magazines\, i ncluding LIFE magazine&rsquo\;s\, &ldquo\;The Year in Pictures.&rd quo\;

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Returning to her fine art roo ts\, she has attended six Artist-in-Residencies across the United States at locations including the Rocky Mountain National Park\, Great Smoky Mountai ns National Park\, Acadia National Park\, Everglades National Park\, and wa s a Fellowship recipient at the Vermont Studio Center. In 2014\, she was th e co-creator and curator of the &ldquo\;NJ350 Elements&rdquo\; exhibition d isplayed outdoors around the Duke Farms Environmental Center in Hillsboroug h\, NJ.

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Austen has won awards both in her photojournalism and fine art work. In 2013\, she was a national winn er of Canon&rsquo\;s &ldquo\;Project Imaginat10n&rdquo\; photo competition with Director Ron Howard. Celebrity director\, Biz Stone\, the co-founder o f Twitter\, chose her winning image to help inspire his short film\, &ldquo \;Evermore&rdquo\; which premiered October 2013 in NYC.

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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
\nAll photogr aphs must show sculpture or an image in a sculptural manner\, be made withi n the last two years\, and could not have been previously shown at GFS.&nbs p\; All works selected for exhibition must arrive matted with white matboar d and framed in black wood or black metal frames behind plexi or glass and be ready to hang with wire attached. \; Works must be no larger than 24 inches in any one direction.

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Pleas e remember that this gallery is family-friendly and all work displayed must be suitable for young viewers. Any work that does not meet these requireme nts will not be eligible for display.

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AWARDS

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Best in Show Award $250
\nMerit Award $150\nHonorable Mention Award $75

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INSURANCE
\nAll entries are insured f or replacement value only from the time of delivery until the designated pi ckup date. Grounds For Sculpture assumes no responsibility for works left a fter the pickup date.

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REPRO DUCTION RIGHTS
\nGrounds For Sculpture reserves the right to reproduce any entry for publicity purposes.

\n LOCATION:Grounds For Sculpture\,18 Fairgrounds Road (mailing address) 126 S culptors Way (GPS location)\nHamilton\, New Jersey 08619 SUMMARY:Education Gallery Exhibition: Focus on Sculpture END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080840Z UID:437218 DTSTART:20170121T100000 DTEND:20170121T180000 LOCATION:Grounds For Sculpture\,18 Fairgrounds Road (mailing address) 126 S culptors Way (GPS location)\nHamilton\, New Jersey 08619 SUMMARY:Education Gallery Exhibition: Focus on Sculpture END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080840Z UID:435999 DTSTART:20170202T000000 DTEND:20170401T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Hauser &\; Wirth will prese nt an exhibition dedicated to the synergistic relationship that existed bet ween visual artists and composers living in New York City during the years following World War II. Curated by Douglas Dreishpoon\, Chief Curator Emeri tus at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery\, the exhibition features works by Lou ise Bourgeois\, John Cage\, Morton Feldman\, Philip Guston\, Franz Kline\, Joan Mitchell\, and David Smith &ndash\; mavericks who pushed the boundarie s of their respective mediums to new realms of abstraction. Part of a large r coterie of creative individuals who shared a common ethos\, these artists naturally sought each other out\, socializing\, exhibiting\, and supportin g each other&rsquo\;s ideas. Paintings\, sculptures\, prints\, and drawings will be contextualized by a selection of musical scores and ephemera.

\ n LOCATION:Hauser & Wirth 69th Street New York\,32 East 69th Street \nNew Yor k\, NY 10021 SUMMARY:Nothing and Everything: Seven Artists\, 1947 – 1962\, Louise Bourge ois\, John Cage\, Morton Feldman\, Philip Guston\, Franz Kline\, Joan Mitch ell\, David Smith END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080840Z UID:436000 DTSTART:20170202T180000 DTEND:20170202T200000 LOCATION:Hauser & Wirth 69th Street New York\,32 East 69th Street \nNew Yor k\, NY 10021 SUMMARY:Nothing and Everything: Seven Artists\, 1947 – 1962 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080840Z UID:438438 DTSTART:20170211T000000 DTEND:20170325T000000 DESCRIPTION:

Heather Gaudio Fine Art is pleased to annou nce its upcoming exhibition Tula Telfair: Invented Landscapes\, fe aturing a group of evocative and awe-inspiring paintings. \;  \;Thi s the Telfair&rsquo\;s second solo exhibition at the gallery which will run from February 11th to March 25th.  \;The public is invited to attend a n opening reception for the artist on Saturday\, February 11th\, from 5-7pm .

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As a child\, Telfair travelled extensively with her parents\, e xperiencing dramatic changes in environments and contrasting climates withi n short time frames. \; These globe-trotting years were to have a profo und effect on Telfair and her artistic development.  \; \; \;Te lfair paints fantastical landscapes conjured from memories and emotions she experienced in her journeys &ndash\; these images are not actual places th at exist nor locations she visited. \;  \; \;Her use of photo-r ealism is purely technical and heightens the notions that these images are eerily familiar yet not quite fully known. The absence of any human presenc e limits the narrative in her canvases\, further allowing the viewer to bri ng their own personal experience to the work.  \;Created in a large sca le\, Telfair&rsquo\;s formidable paintings are about feeling the landscape much as they are about their visual presence.

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Telfair grew up in Africa\, Asia and Europe before returning to the United States. \; She has had a prolific artistic career\, with her paintings having been the sub ject of numerous solo and group exhibitions. \; Her work has been exten sively written about and is in many notable private\, public and corporate collections.  \;She is also a professor of art at Wesleyan Uni versity and resides and works in Lyme\, Connecticut. \;

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This exhibition was made possible with the generous collaboration of Forum Galle ry in New York City.

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A 160-page monograph published by Abrams ent itled Tula Telfair: Invented Landscapes accompanies this exhibitio n.  \; \;It includes essays by Henry Adams\, J. Michael Fay and Mic hael S. Roth.

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&ldquo\;I start by painting skies on several ca nvases at once. The inspiration for them comes from memories of sensations I&rsquo\;ve had in nature. \; Once a group of five or more images is un derway\, I&rsquo\;ll create a tonal underpainting in saturated color of lan dforms that I think will work effectively with what is happening above the horizon line. \; One of my goals for a body of works is to create an at mospheric mood that varies dramatically from one painting to the next. &rdquo\;

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Heather Gaudio Fine Art specializes in emerging and established artists\, offering painting\, works on paper\, pho tography and sculpture. The gallery provides a full-range of art advisory s ervices\, from forming and maintaining a collection\, to securing secondary market material\, to assisting with framing and installation. The focus is on each individual client\, selecting art that best serves his or her visi on\, space\, and resources. The six exhibitions offered every year are desi gned to present important talent and provide artwork appealing to a broad r ange of interests. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday\; 10:30am to 5 :30pm\; and by appointment. \;

\n LOCATION:Heather Gaudio Fine Art\,21 South Avenue \nNew Canaan\, CT 06840 SUMMARY:"Tula Telfair: Invented Landscapes"\, Tula Telfair END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTAMP:20170225T080840Z UID:438439 DTSTART:20170211T170000 DTEND:20170211T190000 LOCATION:Heather Gaudio Fine Art\,21 South Avenue \nNew Canaan\, CT 06840 SUMMARY:"Tula Telfair: Invented Landscapes" END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR