Bigindicator

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In Cambodia, Contemporary Artists Shed Light on Social and Environmental Issues

by Dave Willis
Riding through downtown Phnom Penh in a tuk tuk on my way to Sa Sa Bassac—the leading contemporary art gallery in Cambodia—I saw about 100 people marching in the street, holding signs and chanting slogans while flanked by cops on every side. I asked my guide what it was all about. She told me they were protesting land grabs by developers, who employ arsonists to burn down shanty towns to make way for apartment towers, which often then sit vacant, serving as investments to hide dirty money. Upon my arrival at Sa Sa Bassac I met with the artist Than Sok to learn about his... [more]
Michelle Hold
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Minaa Mohsin Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
This is 5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in Under the Radar, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from Minaa Mohsin.   What are you trying to communicate with your work? We live our lives in the middle of things. The homes we maintain and the items we collect are all documentation of our personal histories for which we seek acknowledgment. Material objects are given life by the meaning we attach to them. With this bestowed power, inanimate objects participate as important... [more]
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Can Collecting Digital Art Make Museums More Competitive?

by Edo Dijksterhuis
Exactly one hundred years after Hugo Ball and Emmy Hennings started Cabaret Voltaire, Zürich was once again the stage of an art revolution. This time it wasn’t Dada, however, but data. On February 13, 2016, The Museum of Digital Art opened its doors on the ground floor of the monumental Herdern Hochhaus. It’s the first physical and virtual museum dedicated to digital art in Europe. Worldwide, there are only a few institutions like it, most of them American. There is, of course, the pioneering Austin Museum of Digital Art (AMODA), founded in 1997 and embellished with a... [more]
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Portrait: Director Daniel Hug Gets Ready for the World’s Oldest Art Fair

by Freunde von Freunden x ArtSlant
This photo portrait was originally published as a longer feature on Freunde von Freunden under the title “Daniel Hug, director of Art Cologne, on the Cologne art scene and the Germans’ passion for collecting.”    “Cologne wasn't cool when I got here—everyone wanted to go to Berlin,” Daniel Hug, the Managing Director for Art Cologne recalls. Yet this “uncool” city on the Rhine has a long and important history with art. Hug explains: Starting in the ’60s, Cologne was the art capital of Germany. The Cologne-based... [more]
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Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Tea Strazicic

by Christian Petersen
Tea Strazicic is a Croatian new media artist currently based in Los Angeles. Much of her work is heavily influenced by Japanese popular culture but distorted through a tripped-out lens of western internet art youth culture. The cuteness of the Kawaii influences is generally offset by a subversive tension that is further explored in her more sculptural digital creations. Strazicic’s feverish visions collide slick digital surfaces with alien cyber organics and contemporary emoji culture. Her work offers a vital reflection of the myriad obsessions of a rapidly rising generation of... [more]
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(In)visibility in New Black Portraiture: Aria Dean and Hamishi Farah in Dialogue

by Audrey L. Phillips
In March 2016, Los Angeles-based artist and writer Aria Dean penned an essay entitled “Closing the Loop” for The New Inquiry about the white monopolization of feminist selfie art. I remember reading the essay and feeling its urgency and necessity at a time when the spotlight on selfie art and culture was (and still is) dominated by white cis-hetero young women. When I think of the canon of feminist art and the “trailblazers” that paved the way for subsequent generations of women artists, I see a very similar process of erasure repeating itself.    Women... [more]
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Under the Radar: Noe Serrano | Anna Kim | Christopher Squier

by The Artslant Team
ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated artist profiles. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission — from our magazine to our residency and prize. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your watchlist. Noe Serrano –... [more]
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Reading Joshua Goode’s Childhood Mythologies in a Post-Fact World

by Zachary Small
If Freud had chosen another profession, he might have become an archaeologist. After all, the mythology of personality has its roots in childhood. Memory is a retroactive alloy, and introspection can sometimes muddy our grasp on the past. Too much nostalgia transforms our beloved childhood mementos (favorite toys, teddy bears, and such) into prescient talismans of the future, justifying our adult delights and detestations. Too much nostalgia and we long for a promised time when America used to be “great,” forgetting it wasn’t so great for everyone. We create and edit our own... [more]
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In Search of a Body: A.K. Burns’ Ode to Endurance

by Osman Can Yerebakan
One of the most unassuming artworks in A.K. Burns’ exhibition and residency, Shabby but Thriving, is perhaps also the best reflection of the artist’s three-month tenure at the New Museum and her concurrent Callicoon Fine Arts exhibition, Fault Lines. Nestled at the end of a corridor on the museum’s fifth floor, Post Times (drop open) straddles the rift between utility and inertia, the body and environment, endurance and decay. A thin wooden latch, running the length of two closet doors is fully plastered with pages of The New York Times, a publication that has become... [more]
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Cristina BanBan Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
This is 5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in Under the Radar, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from Cristina BanBan. What are you trying to communicate with your work? I pay attention to the unique moments of daily life in order to represent personal difficulties or simply exalt some aspects of the mundane, to raise awareness of the type of society in which we are all involved. This, alongside a satisfaction for the aesthetic, is what drives me to work. What is an... [more]
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At Locust Projects, a Tale of Two Factories and Two Artists

by Neil Vazquez
As we seemingly find ourselves spectators to the acceleration of political and environmental decline, two Israeli artists, Rotem Tamir and Omri Zin, are targeting industrial factory processes in an exploratory, performative project. The husband-and-wife team are collaborating for the first time in Larval Acceleration: A Conversation in Chunks at Locust Projects in Miami. The piece encompasses two independent, modular “factories,” each managed and operated by the respective artists. Tamir’s factory produces helium-filled latex balloons, in various organic shapes and... [more]
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Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Sofía Córdova

by Christian Petersen
Sofía Córdova is a Puerto Rican multi-media artist and musician currently based in Oakland, California. Her work collides the sacred, mystical, and ancient with the disposable obsessions of our consumer age. These juxtapositions are not arbitrary, though; Córdova draws distinct lines between the ultra-traditional and the hyper-modern to tell a deeply engaging story mediated through the lens of a Puerto Rican artist living in the United States. Córdova frequently reflects on her Caribbean heritage to explore both her own identity as well as the complexity of the... [more]
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They Had Whole Buildings For That (Now We Use Diapers)

by Christina Catherine Martinez
What year is it, anyway? Only 90s kids would know. Only 80s kids would know. Only Gen-X or Y or Z-ers would know. Jon Rafman might know, but he also knows that prolepsis, anachronism, and non-location are more suitable benchmarks for this twisted ouroboros we’ve made of time. At Sprüth Magers in Los Angeles, the juxtaposition of immersive films by Rafman and Stan VanDerBeek, made decades apart, charts a rising threshold of popular vision that correlates to a kind of political decline—the history of cinema as protracted backfire. Activist VanDerBeek made the majority of... [more]
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Under the Radar: Winnie Chan | Suzanne Dittenber | Young Eun Kang

by The Artslant Team
ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated artist profiles. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission — from our magazine to our residency and prize. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your watchlist. Winnie Chan – London &... [more]
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Bex Ilsley Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
This is 5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist in the ArtSlant network whose work we love. This week we seek answers from Bex Ilsley. Bex Ilsley received an ArtSlant Prize 2016 Honorable Mention. We’re presenting Bex’s work this week at SPRING/BREAK Art Show.   What are you trying to communicate with your work? Something about what it’s like to always live one step removed from yourself. I experience this sensation of always watching myself while I perform the person I am. I had built this largish following on social media... [more]
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Facing the Black Mirror: Sean Fader’s Awesome Year

by Andrea Alessi
Oscar Wilde famously suggested great art “reveal beauty and hide the artist.” For the 2017 BLACK MIRROR exhibition at SPRING/BREAK, more than 100 curators will feature artworks that explore the dance of identity the artist undergoes—between showing what’s unseen and hiding in plain sight—especially in the face of modern technology, political unrest, and glimmers from ghosts of Art History’s past. ArtSlant is exhibiting the ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners at SPRING/BREAK. In partnership this uniquely site-specific, curatorial fair, we’re featuring... [more]
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Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Martina Menegon

by Christian Petersen
Martina Menegon is an Italian new media artist and educator currently based in Vienna, Austria. Her art explores “the instability and ephemerality of the human body as well as the alienation from physicality in today’s digital age, questioning the gap between real and virtual, flesh and data.” Menegon’s expression of these ideas range from uncanny scenes of endless, undulating fleshy figures to far more personal depictions of her own digitally distorted physical form. Her work reveals the ever-evolving relationship between all of us and the inescapable digital world,... [more]
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Natalia Zuluaga Kicks Off ArtCenter/South Florida’s Latest Chapter with “An Image”

by Audrey L. Phillips
When ArtCenter/South Florida opened on Lincoln Road in 1984, in the heart of South Beach, the street was “nearly abandoned and severely dilapidated.” Today the center, which hosts exhibitions, classes, and a studio residency program, is credited with kickstarting the revitalization of the mall and its surrounding area. Following the appointment of Natalia Zuluaga as Artistic Director this August, ArtCenter itself is getting something of a revitalization. Dynamic changes are underway as the promising Bard Center for Curatorial Studies graduate begins her tenure with an ambitious... [more]
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The Artist Positioning Himself as Richter’s Crown Prince

by Edo Dijksterhuis
Next year Eberhard Havekost turns fifty: time to balance the books. The press release for his current solo at KINDL positions Havekost “among the most important German artists of his generation.” The artist himself probably doesn’t agree with an accolade this generic, especially when it’s accompanying the kind of self-confident display of painterly power that is Inhalt. The show takes up two full floors and doesn’t leave much wall space unused. The works on show are so diverse, they could have been created by three or four different artists. Most recognizable... [more]
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Beverly Buchanan and the Architecture of Blackness

by Jessica Lynne
October saw the launch of A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The series’ first two exhibitions honor two unique feminisms. Today, we’re taking a look at them both: Beverly Buchanan’s Ruins and Rituals and Marilyn Minter’s Pretty/Dirty.   How might we understand a spatial and architectural discourse that marks a black subjectivity? This is the question that lingers in my thoughts as I... [more]
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Relentlessly Dissecting Beauty, Marilyn Minter Gets at the Guts of Glamour

by Olivia B. Murphy
October saw the launch of A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The series’ first two exhibitions honor two unique feminisms. Today, we’re taking a look at them both: Beverly Buchanan’s Ruins and Rituals and Marilyn Minter’s Pretty/Dirty.   A woman just beginning to show the signs of a life well-worn, with deeply impressed laugh lines and a made-up face sagging ever so slightly,... [more]
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Genevieve Gaignard: “You’re Not That, But You’re Not Not That.”

by Alex Anderson
Los Angeles, September 2016: Genevieve Gaignard is a magician. She sees you and she sees you seeing her. Revealing our experience and understanding of race, gender, sexuality, and their complex perceptions under the western heteropatriarchal gaze, the Los Angeles-based artist uses self-portraiture and sculpture to find truth in the abstract aporia of identity. The characters she creates and portrays engage with the aesthetic language of Afropunk, substance chic Hollywood glamor, and the suburban working class of generations past to create layered caricatures of the myriad ways people see her... [more]
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