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Faurschou Foundation (Beijing)

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Ode by a star-struck aficionada

by Paroma Maiti
Wandering through the colorfully gay labyrinths of 798 – by far, the foremost art district in Beijing – on a chilly January afternoon, I stumble onto a grey building, quite out of sync with its neighboring galleries and museums that shine in colourful resplendence. This, however, is it – my pilgrim spot – the Faurschou Foundation, Beijing. Inside its grim and non-glamorous exterior, it is housing an exhibition of Louise Bourgeois’s works – for the first time in China, curated by the artist’s long-time partner Jerry Gorovoy. Stepping inside the premises to witness Bourgeois’s art from up close an... [more]
Posted by Paroma Maiti on 4/8/13
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Ogling Oursler

by Angie Baecker
      A survey of Tony Oursler's work is up at Faurschou Gallery in Beijing in an exhibition titled “Number 7, Plus or Minus 2.” The title has been taken from a seminal 1956 essay written by psychologist George Miller; in the essay, Miller made his case for “the magical number seven” (or thereabouts) as the limit of human capacity for short-term memory. The exhibition—which consists of about seven, plus or minus two works—is intended to serve as an introduction to the artist's works from the Nineties on, including his trademark video installations of faces projected over white forms. If the e... [more]
Posted by Angie Baecker on 4/3/10
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Chinese History and Contemporary Society

    Politically frank and aesthetically poignant, Ai Weiwei’s works deal with Chinese history and contemporary society. His formal practice changes in form and the materials deployed according to the diversity of activities his art embraces. Influenced from his early career by Dada, Duchamp, Jasper Johns, and Andy Warhol, Ai Weiwei’s works have been based on a conceptual approach – on installation and sculpture.The socio-political and economic climate of contemporary China most often serves as starting point for Ai Weiwei’s art, and he uses local materials and resources like reclaimed wood... [more]
Posted by Abhilasha Singh on 10/5/09