ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Under the Radar: Patricia Fietta | Anne Cecile Surga | Danielle Brensinger <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/376318-patricia-fietta?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=PatriciaFietta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Patricia Fietta &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/796677?utm_source=PatriciaFietta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/796677/u3azr9/20140319204210-Guppy.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/796728?utm_source=PatriciaFietta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/796728/y8wnrh/20140319232621-discovery_17.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/796226?utm_source=PatriciaFietta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/796226/y8wnrh/20140318202919-deerbird.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/796742?utm_source=PatriciaFietta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/796742/y8wnrh/20140319234312-Mand_I.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/383978-anne-cecile-surga?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=AnneSurga&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Anne Cecile Surga &ndash; New York</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/830359?utm_source=AnneSurga&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/830359/u3azr9/20140709145809-acsurga7_.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/940709?utm_source=AnneSurga&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/940709/y8wnrh/20150928091210-Fertility_2008__1_.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/888087?utm_source=AnneSurga&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/888087/y8wnrh/20150220193320-Mourneur_2010__1_.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/940711?utm_source=AnneSurga&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/940711/y8wnrh/20150928091227-Fertility_2008__8_.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/385015-danielle-brensinger?utm_source=DanielleBrensinger&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Danielle Brensinger &ndash; Brooklyn</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/815621?utm_source=DanielleBrensinger&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/815621/u3azr9/20140521033010-brensinger.show.1.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/815611?utm_source=DanielleBrensinger&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/815611/y8wnrh/20140521032020-_DSC7333edit.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/815612?utm_source=DanielleBrensinger&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/815612/y8wnrh/20140521032025-_DSC7338edit.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/903505?utm_source=DanielleBrensinger&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/903505/y8wnrh/20150405233923-DSC_0419edit.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 16 Oct 2017 05:51:05 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Aimee Gilmore Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48441-under-the-radar-aimee-gilmore-eva-perez-ann-moody" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/489198-aimee-gilmore?tab=PROFILE" target="_blank">Aimee Gilmore</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>Even now while reflecting back, it is almost impossible to comprehend growing a human life inside me. Carrying her. Nurturing her. Protecting her. My body acclimated; my skin stretched, my womb expanded, my bones strengthened, my mind prepared. What you can only know after is that you will never actually be prepared. Other mothers don&rsquo;t tell you the truth about labor. How can they? It is practically indescribable. It is a visceral experience. It&rsquo;s messy. It&rsquo;s painful. It&rsquo;s unpredictable. It&rsquo;s long. It&rsquo;s very long. I journeyed to an unfamiliar mental space. That was the scariest part, the unknown. Will it hurt? Will I be safe? Will I be able to do this? Will she be safe? Will it take hours? Will it take days? Will I be strong enough to get through it? This array of questioning I imposed on myself revealed the role I was thrust into: Mother. Questioning now performs on a foundational level for my work. I sketch in questions, seeking clarity through examination, yet the answers are immaterial. I allow space for the objects, surfaces, colors, and sounds from my everyday life to enter the work. These are the relics from those first few days, months, and now years of the most significant transformation in my life.&nbsp;Seemingly mundane, commonplace and deep-rooted in their conventional and often clich&eacute;d representation of motherhood, I take inspiration from objects like the breast pump and baby clothes as they operate as the visual cues of the lineage I am now and forever connected to.</p> <p>As she grew within, our first ways of communicating were purely gestural. We moved as one. My body allotted for more space within as needed. As my body grew through connection, her body grew in preparation to separate. For nearly a year, one person exists as two people. Two bodies compressed into one. Two hearts synchronizing rhythms.&nbsp;Two lives sharing breaths. Two strangers cohabiting a sacred space. Intimate strangers. Two lives living solely in a state of waiting. Waiting to separate while growing apart, separating while waiting. The separation is subsequently violent. I was not prepared. For two days, my body strained to release her. I pushed, I ripped, I agonized, I cried, I slept, I moaned, I screamed, I gave up, I recovered, I prevailed. I reached between my legs until I felt her small, slippery body and cradled her in my hand while pulling her to my breast. Separations are never easy but this one was particularly demanding. What I know now after two years is that motherhood exists in a constant state of transitions, a perpetual letting go.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016091844-20171006183321-IMG_2004.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Milkscape</em>, 2017, Breast milk and ink on mylar</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>After pumping in my studio one of the small containers of breast milk spilled onto my desk covering a page in my sketchbook, a library book, and a sheet of Mylar. The residue intrigued me. The milk dried tracing its own movement across the surface. The milk curdled and cracked all while building a collection of organic forms that retained the appearance of a purposeful mark. The slowness of each subsequent spill allowed me the time to question what exactly the breast milk was acting as in these works. My breast milk performed as the material trace of my transition into my new role as mother&mdash;beautiful but messy, quiet and calm yet chaotic and unpredictable, and profoundly abstract while similarly rooted in reality. Produced for her. Only for her. Only from me. Breast milk is the material created from an intimate exchange of body to body. Once again two bodies physically connected but this time my body inside of her body. Two bodies engaged in a continuous exchange. Breast milk acts as the invisible ink of a secret dialogue between mother and child, only revealing its materialness when separated from the body. I struggle to decode this exchange as its power fades through language. To try and connect my experience through language does not suffice. This is where the making becomes pivotal. I am not asking my breast milk to perform as anything other than what it is and what it can do: a liquid, a bodily fluid, a watery material. It dries, it curdles, it fractures, it thickens. It transforms from liquid to solid. It is an element of the earth, of nature, of my body.&nbsp;<em>Milkscapes</em>&nbsp;made from the essence of my body now performing as a mother. These&nbsp;<em>Milkscapes</em>, this collection of imagery reflects this process of archiving a routine through its most essential material and highlights the communication between mother and daughter through abstraction. Perhaps it is through this collection of&nbsp;<em>Milkscapes</em>&nbsp;that I can begin to viscerally suggest the abstract nature of motherhood as the unpredictable nature of breast milk as a material exposes and emphasizes the necessity of letting go.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016091800-20170802203942-IMG_0246.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Milkscape (Thawed)</em>, 2017, Breast milk and ink on mylar</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I think the most important responsibility of an artist is to speak their truth. From there, from this sharing, offers an invitation to know more. Know more about a way of thinking, a way of being, a way of understanding, that we may or may not be accustomed to. From this &ldquo;artist&rsquo;s truth&rdquo; comes great responsibility and great opportunity. I think maybe now more than ever, being able to share objects, images, experiences, that hold and contain the multitude of intentions and perspectives from a specific way of thinking is a real privilege. In this way my work speaks not only for me but for anyone who identifies with it in any way. That power is not lost on me.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;I find that my best works originate from a place of pure imagination and wonder. I try not to put the constraints of the word on any ideas. One of the most magical feelings as an artist is having an idea and delivering it into existence, even though the transition from thought to object is inevitably always a little different and unexpected.</p> <p>I try to allow my ideas to start grand and then scale back as necessary so it&rsquo;s difficult for me to imagine a circumstance where a work I want to make will&nbsp;<em>never</em>&nbsp;happen...but I could imagine one of my huge <em>Milkscape</em> banners waving from the flag pole high above the White House or Congress.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016091729-Maya__2017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Maya, 2017</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.jaykatelansky.com" target="_blank">Jay Katelansky</a>, <a href="http://www.veronicaaperez.com" target="_blank">Veronica A. Perez</a>, and <a href="http://www.aninamajor.com" target="_blank">Anina Major</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>(Image at top: <em>Pushed (Chrome Series)</em>, 2017, Chrome plated baby bottle)</p> Mon, 16 Oct 2017 02:24:46 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Round 8 of the ArtSlant Prize Closes October 23 <p>Round 8 is now open! Apply for your chance at $5k in prizes!&nbsp;<strong>To apply</strong>, sign in to <a href="https://www.artslant.com">artslant.com</a>, click the menu navicon in the upper right&nbsp;and select&nbsp;ArtSlant Prize</p> <p><span style="text-align: justify; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. Up for grabs are exhibition and sales opportunities including inclusion in our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="text-align: justify; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Amazon Art Sales Platform</a><span style="text-align: justify; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, and great exposure&mdash;not to mention cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="line-height: 21px;">Art page</a><span style="line-height: 21px;">. &nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10px;">Image at top:&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/47340-announcing-the-artslant-prize-2016-winners-and-exhibition-at-springbreak-art-show" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Exhibition</a>&nbsp;at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" target="_blank">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a>, March 2017.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">Honorable Mention</span></p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2016:</a>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2015:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2014:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2013:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2012:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Veronica Bruce</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Susan Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2011:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2010:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2009:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> Fri, 13 Oct 2017 07:01:21 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Director Mariano Pensotti Talks Radical Theater 100 Years After the Russian Revolution <p>As we approach the 100-year anniversary of the October Revolution next month, we should consider the legacy of this event and its importance in light of&nbsp;our contemporary social ills. The mass majority of the world finds itself living under conditions that have historically led to revolution: generalized injustice and inequality, economic instability, war, and disconnect between those in power and the people.&nbsp;</p> <p>A universal discontent is currently expressed through the politics of resistance: mass protests on the streets and on social media, symbolic gestures like sit-ins and individual actions, collective and grassroots organizing, and attempts to create safe spaces of autonomy. In some regions, movements like these have led to &ldquo;revolutions&rdquo; and their inevitable companion: the bloody, repressive, and conservative counterrevolution, as was also the case with the ascent of Stalin in the Soviet Union in 1924. Marx famously said of the 1848 French Revolution &ldquo;History repeats itself: the first time as a tragedy, the second time as a farce.&rdquo; Today, when we are way past the &ldquo;third time,&rdquo; what awaits the &ldquo;democratic&rdquo; world? Will we continue pushing for reform, through struggle and conflict, in the plastic system that is our democracy, or is yet another revolution in the making? On this backdrop, the perennial question of art&rsquo;s role in social transformation arises once more. How can contemporary art become a form of resistance to injustice and an instrument of change, not only a depiction of it?</p> <p>For me, the work of Argentine author and director&nbsp;<a href="http://www.marianopensotti.com/">Mariano Pensotti</a>&nbsp;offers a promising response. His interdisciplinary practice is heavily influenced by the&nbsp;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proletcult_Theatre">Proletkult Theater</a>&nbsp;of the Russian Revolution. His latest project,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.marianopensotti.com/ardebrillanteeng.html">Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche (It burns bright in the forests of the night)</a></em>, which debuted earlier this year, chronicles the lives of three contemporary women in Latin America with diffuse connections to the 1917 revolution, and asks us to consider the relevance of its ideologies and principles in contemporary society, specifically Argentina.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171011084301-4e66e475858fdd3eba7b90eb642d7bd9-Pensotti_kfda_2017CTitanne_Bregentzer_RHoK-6.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><a href="http://www.kfda.be/en/archive/detail/arde-brillante-en-los-bosques-de-la-noche" target="_blank">Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels</a>: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;<em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Like the Proletkult Theater, Pensotti combines a multitude of media in his plays and installations including entire films; he places some of his works in the unsuspecting public space; his plots address today&rsquo;s pressing social issues. This mix of form and content recalls Sergey Eisenstein&rsquo;s &ldquo;theater of attractions&rdquo; style. Like the latter, Pensotti raises the spectator&rsquo;s awareness of their own existence by forcing them to &ldquo;co-produce&rdquo; the meaning of the work, yet ultimately leading them to the conclusion he carefully planned.</p> <p>Beyond formal and stylistic approaches inspired by revolutionary theorists, Pensotti is also keenly attentive to the mode of production of the work. Attempting to put his political ideas into practice, Pensotti founded the collective Grupo Marea with set designer Mariana Tirantte. Without relinquishing the director&rsquo;s authorship, the group collaborates on the development of theater plays, installations, and artworks, splitting funding equally among the members, and crediting contributions collectively. With its roots in the collective theater practices of the 1960s, this more egalitarian model of production can serve as an example for improving human relations in the cultural field. It stimulates us to work more collaboratively and less competitively, to attempt resisting the pitfalls of aspirational capitalism and the &ldquo;politics of envy&rdquo; that govern the art world, to recognize each individual&rsquo;s contribution to the whole, thereby truly making the personal political. These small gestures of resistance, if undertaken by a critical mass, can lead to larger, more durable, social transformations.</p> <p>I spoke with Pensotti recently about&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.marianopensotti.com/ardebrillanteeng.html">Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche</a></em>, a work whose artistic merit matches its political force, balancing the two without collapsing into neither pure form nor politics, creating the type of artistic work that responds to the needs of our troubled generation.</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;[The play] has to do with the idea of being a spectator or protagonist of History, but also to address the question of whether witnessing somebody else&rsquo;s story might transform your own.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171010153435-csm_PENSOTTI_2_B100_429b333848.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1507736471038000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHpPmpQB9sSShG_ehsXiuEdbCbp9w" href="https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/" id="m_1814254033904326852yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1507117463731_8083" style="font-size: 12px;" target="_blank">Theater Spektakel</a><span style="font-size:12px;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;<em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Olga Stefan: <em>Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche</em>, your most recent play, asks us to consider, 100 years after the Russian Revolution, where its principles and ideologies are still needed today. To enter into this inquiry you construct a false premise: the story of the daughter of Alexandra Kollontai (the Soviet revolutionary and feminist who wrote extensively on freedom, the body, sexuality, and how capitalist society shapes female identity), who runs away from Stalinist Russia after her mother&rsquo;s death and takes refuge in Misiones, Argentina. This story becomes the thread uniting all three characters in the play. Why did you come up with this premise and why did you need it?</strong></p> <p><strong>Mariano Pensotti:</strong> From the beginning it was clear for me that I didn&rsquo;t want to work with the Russian Revolution just as an historical event, but rather to see how its ideas and principles are still relevant now. And at the same time, I wanted to trace the implications of the Revolution in my own Argentinian context, to move it out of Europe. The Russian Revolution as a whole is extremely difficult to fictionalize: it has actually been done so many times before that I wanted to go in a different direction. That was when I started to get deeper into the story of Alexandra Kollontai and her writings and actions during the Revolution.</p> <table align="left" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Contemporary feminism, especially in Latin America, is quite closely linked to some of the key ideas of the Russian Revolution.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>At a certain point I started to feel that contemporary feminism, especially in Latin America, is quite closely linked to some of the key ideas of the Russian Revolution, even if it doesn&rsquo;t lay in classical Marxism at all. But of course I&rsquo;m a theater director, not a theoretician, and I work with fiction, with some sort of &ldquo;expanded-fiction&rdquo; if you like. I don&rsquo;t do documentary theater either. So I started to imagine stories related to all these topics and I discovered that there was a small community of Russians living in Misiones more or less at the same time of the Revolution and that was the moment where I imagined a fake Kollontai daughter going to live there, trying to create an utopian socialist commune in the crazy Argentinian jungle in the first decades of the twentieth century.</p> <p><strong>OS: Some of your previous titles come from music or quotes. Where does the title of this play come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> It&rsquo;s a very free translation of a William Blake verse from his poem &ldquo;The Tyger.&rdquo; The original verse says &ldquo;burning bright in the forest of the night&rdquo; which has been translated into Spanish in many ways. It&rsquo;s a poem that I like a lot and somehow I think the verse is a nice metaphor of the whole idea of the revolution, the utopia that, like a wild animal in a forest, shines even in the darkest moments.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171011083141-5cb9245f8f51fe82c7db6af6a5e5c9a5-Pensotti_kfda_2017CTitanne_Bregentzer_RHoK.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.kfda.be/en/archive/detail/arde-brillante-en-los-bosques-de-la-noche" style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;" target="_blank">Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels</a><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: The play presents the story of three independent women who nevertheless still suffer from the violence of this male-dominated society, but in different ways. Tell us about the relationship between each character and the type of violence you assign to her.</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> I think what the main characters experience through the stories is a mixture of violence and frustration. The first one, Estela, is a university professor who teaches the Russian Revolution in contemporary Buenos Aires and she&rsquo;s in conflict with herself because she feels her life is much more conventional and bourgeois than what she teaches. She is at a difficult moment in her relationship with her teenage daughter, who has no qualms to take her place in a male-dominated society and sees no contradiction in becoming a sort of doll-sex-object. And at the same time her husband is leaving her for a younger woman, which eventually alienates Estela and leads her to use violence against herself.</p> <table align="right" width="350"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Puppets are struggling all the time to say what they want, to be free while they&rsquo;re being manipulated.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The second character, Sonja, is a young European middle-class woman who decides to join a revolutionary guerrilla movement in Colombia after watching a violent event against a woman. Then, after some experiences of real violence during combat, she went back to Europe and finds how much her family has changed during her absence. Behind an image of tolerance and support she finds out that her relatives &ldquo;sold&rdquo; her. They try to make money by selling her story and forcing her to work by giving workshops for Apple CEOs who had discovered that studying revolutionary techniques helps them improve sales.</p> <p>And the third character is a journalist who works on a political TV show, and to celebrate a promotion decides to do sexual tourism in Misiones with some friends.&nbsp; There, young and poor descendants of Russians sell themselves to middle class ladies from Buenos Aires. At the beginning it looks like a form of violence against the male prostitutes&rsquo; bodies, but when she gets deeper into that world, it is ultimately revealed to be something different, and much more violent.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171010153519-csm_PENSOTTI_1_B100_21030b0bae.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1507736471038000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHpPmpQB9sSShG_ehsXiuEdbCbp9w" href="https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/" id="m_1814254033904326852yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1507117463731_8083" style="font-size: 12px;" target="_blank">Theater Spektakel</a><span style="font-size: 12px;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;<em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: <em>Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche</em> is a film within a play within a puppet theater. You call it a <em>marioshka</em> of &ldquo;fictions within fictions.&rdquo; How are these fictions related and how does the form of each story correspond to its representation of reality? Specifically, the first layer of reality was expressed through a puppet play, with the characters manipulating puppets that are exact replicas of themselves. Puppets are usually recognized as less &ldquo;real,&rdquo; while cinema, which we perceive as the most closely connected to reality, is in fact the most removed in this play&mdash;the third layer, the furthest away from reality. So in fact you used the inverse of expectation.</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> I wanted to use the inverse of expectations in terms of reality and its representations. And I also wanted the puppets to be the main point of view, the one of the audience. As you mention, this is a film within a play within a puppet theater and the beginning and the end are the puppets. There&rsquo;s a lot of theory about the body and its representations inside the piece. I wanted to have the body of the same actors transformed into small puppets that work as doubles, then in the second story, to have them live as people, and then in the third, to appear in a bigger format through the medium of film. It really has to do with the idea of being a spectator or protagonist of History, but also to address the question of whether witnessing somebody else&rsquo;s story might transform your own. And somehow it is also related to the transition from manual labor, the puppets, to a more elaborated form of work, the film.</p> <p>But speaking about theory, I wanted to use a lot of discussions about freedom, the body, social control and biopolitics, which in the mouth of puppets feels less solemn than in a living body&rsquo;s, and also much more contradictory and bittersweet, since they&rsquo;re struggling all the time to say what they want, to be free while they&rsquo;re being manipulated in such a concrete way.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171011083218-b630d96ca52b269814b6a1e8a755f08b-Pensotti_kfda_2017CTitanne_Bregentzer_RHoK-8.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.kfda.be/en/archive/detail/arde-brillante-en-los-bosques-de-la-noche" style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;" target="_blank">Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels</a><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: Your work, which spans theater, cinema, performance art, and installation, is influenced by Prolekult Theater and Sergei Eisenstein&rsquo;s theories.&nbsp; In <em>Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche</em>, the film is an autonomous work of art but also an inherent part of the play. Similarly, in Eisenstein&rsquo;s 1923 theatrical mise-en-scene of Alexander Ostrovsky&rsquo;s 1868 <em>Enough Stupidity in Every Wise Man</em>, he not only adapts the characters to reflect that day&rsquo;s societal realities, but also makes his first film called <em>Glumov&rsquo;s Diary</em>, which is an inherent part of the play yet also a stand-alone work.</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> Eisenstein&rsquo;s mise-en-scene of the Ostrovsky&rsquo;s piece, which I have to admit I didn&rsquo;t know about before starting the research for <em>Arde brillante&hellip;</em> was really the starting point and the trigger of the idea of using a film for the third part. I was reading a book about that experience and when I went to bed that night, I had a strange dream where a group of puppets went to see a theater piece&hellip; I&rsquo;ve always been interested in Eisenstein&rsquo;s ideas about montage and his basic notion that two images form a third one in the mind of the audience.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171011083258-bd90e6c68b49e226857bcb6182c59767-Mariano_Pensotti-1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.kfda.be/en/archive/detail/arde-brillante-en-los-bosques-de-la-noche" style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;" target="_blank">Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels</a><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: You created Grupo Marea, a collective with whom you work on the production of your plays. When we spoke about political theater and how the production of the play is equally important to its content and form, you mentioned that you tried to reflect your politics in the way you relate to your colleagues and co-workers. Please tell us about this further and how you function in Grupo Marea. How do you treat authorship, hierarchy, and collaboration in the group?</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> We were interested in forming a collective of artists from different backgrounds and disciplines working together in theater to explore the limits of fiction. We discuss ideas together from the beginning of each project, not defining the format that we&rsquo;re going to use, keeping that open as much as possible&mdash;afterward it can become a theater piece, an installation, a collaboration with other artists, etc.</p> <p>After some time of discussion, I&rsquo;m the one who writes the stories and the text but I keep on talking with the other members of the group about the concept, independently of their role in the final piece. Even though it&rsquo;s not exactly a classic example of &ldquo;collective creation,&rdquo; it certainly implies a strong amount of ideas coming from all of us. We try to collaborate as much as possible in the general production of everything, and we form a cooperative where we all earn almost the same amount of money at those moments where there&rsquo;s some money involved, which is not always the case.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eWaM51KXoUw" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: </strong><strong>What I loved about&nbsp;</strong><strong><em>Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche</em></strong><strong> i</strong><strong>s that you treat revolutionaries and radical ideologies in a very human way&mdash;you show their hypocrisies, duplicities, and absurdities while highlighting the many important positive and relevant contributions.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Do you think political theater needs to be propaganda, as Eisenstein and many others since believed?&nbsp;How do you see political theater and art today in the context of the long tradition of radical Argentine thinkers who have written on the topic?</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> Well, I have to say that I don&rsquo;t consider my theater to be exactly &ldquo;political theater,&rdquo; but more a theater that likes to discuss political ideas inside the context of fictions and the life of some specific characters. In that sense sometimes I feel closer to a certain literary tradition from the nineteenth century, especially novelists such as Tolstoy, Balzac, or Stendhal that&mdash;making a huge reduction of their goals&mdash;were struggling to create art pieces that were bigger than life, including fictions, but also their lived experiences, discussions of political events of their time, and philosophical ideas&hellip;</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t think political theater needs to be propaganda, but I don&rsquo;t like theater that hides its political ideas too much either. I think I prefer works of art where ideas are quite clear and exposed, and then sometimes contradicted within the same piece.</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think political theater needs to be propaganda, but I don&rsquo;t like theater that hides its political ideas too much either.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In some way I think political art in Argentina, as politics in general, is quite alienated right now. After 10&ndash;12 years of center-left governments in Latin America, with a rebirth of political involvement in every aspect of life, we&rsquo;re now facing a huge reaction from the right. In just two years most of the Latin American countries had turned right, supported by mass media propaganda, dirty tactics, and a lot of opportunism. What is more striking for us is that now there&rsquo;s no military involved in right wing governments, as was the case in the 70s and 80s, but rather CEOs. A new neoliberal experiment is taking place here again and the future looks extremely uncertain. In the best scenario it might create, as a sort of reaction, a political art movement opposing this at some point, but so far I&rsquo;m seeing more apathy and depression than action. As we&rsquo;re now not facing a dictatorship but a right wing government elected by a surprisingly large number of people, the question of &ldquo;for whom&rdquo; we&rsquo;re making art is also in the air. That creates an atmosphere of isolation and the need to find new ways of organization.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171011084233-42e303caa570c8829120215c89b4841b-Pensotti_kfda_2017CTitanne_Bregentzer_RHoK-2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="http://www.kfda.be/en/archive/detail/arde-brillante-en-los-bosques-de-la-noche" target="_blank">Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels</a>: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;<em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: In most of your work the theme of broken utopias seems to be a constant subtext. Dreams that have not materialized. Missed opportunities. What could have been. Disillusionment. Tell us where this preoccupation comes from.</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> It probably has to do with the position of my generation in relation to Argentina. We&rsquo;re the sons and daughter of the revolutionaries who, during the 70s and 80s, were trying to transform the country into some sort of Socialism and were exterminated by the dictatorship. We grew up surrounded by the idea of &ldquo;loss.&rdquo; Not just a physical loss of people [murdered and disappeared by the regime] but also of a lost world, more ideal than real. The contrast between the world our parents fought for and the one we were living in was so huge that it left a permanent mark on many of us.</p> <p>But then there&rsquo;s also something that I consider more universal: no matter where you were born or raised, the feeling that we all have is that we could have been better or happier had we done or experienced things differently. The tragedy of being one and not many. The difference between our expectations of life, of ourselves, and our true reality is for me a wonderful source of fiction.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/51287-olga-stefan?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Olga Stefan</a></p> <p><em>Olga Stefan is an arts writer, curator, and researcher based in Z&uuml;rich.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;</span><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1507736471038000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHpPmpQB9sSShG_ehsXiuEdbCbp9w" href="https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/" id="m_1814254033904326852yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1507117463731_8083" style="text-align: center; font-size: 12px;" target="_blank">Theater Spektakel</a><span style="text-align: center; font-size: 12px;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;<em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span><span style="text-align: center;">. </span><span style="text-align: center; font-size: 12px;">All images &copy; Grupo Marea)</span></p> Wed, 11 Oct 2017 06:30:13 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Larry Madrigal Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/48339-under-the-radar-andrea-rugarli-troy-schooneman-larry-madrigal" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/475391-larry-madrigal" target="_blank">Larry Madrigal</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I am definitely not trying to communicate an explicit message per se. But on a subconscious level, there are some elements in my work that are a direct link my worldview. My interests in portraits comes from a fundamental idea of transcendent dignity within individuals. You could say that I&rsquo;m trying to make a statement about our importance as humans, and that we actually universally matter. Capturing the likeness of a person is therefore very important to my process as well as integrating elements of their life and interests within the image. In recent work, I am moving towards broader themes within the human experience. I am currently working on a painting of a music producer, and hope it captures the pleasure of music, music history, organization of elements, while at the same time, exposing the inner complex world of this particular individual.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009140224-20170120052508-Madrigal_Larry_1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>From Above and Below</em>, 2016,&nbsp;Oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I love hearing how other artists answer this question, as it sheds light on their view of art. It&rsquo;s interesting to hear the language of purpose and responsibility with phrases like, &ldquo;an artist should&rdquo; or &ldquo;should not&rdquo; in these responses, as they imply a universal standard. I would argue that an artist&rsquo;s responsibility is to work hard, and be authentic. Artists have the unique opportunity to expose the internal human experience through visual, poetic, musical, or other avenues. They add an important layer over the mere facts of life.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)? </strong></p> <p>My three-month-old daughter, Marlowe, is by far the most amazing thing my wife and I made thus far:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009140112-Marlowe.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo courtesy of Larry Madrigal</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;ve always wanted to make an Old Master painting. But, I don&rsquo;t think I&rsquo;ll ever get around to it. There are so many other paintings I want to make before that experiment.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.tylergriese.com" target="_blank">Tyler Griese</a> in a fantastic figurative painter exploring the range of human emotions through complex spaces, odd colors, and light.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.deanreynoldsart.com" target="_blank">Dean Reynolds</a> is a brilliant craftsman, pop art rockstar, and incredibly thoughtful artist. His work contains bright colors and wild imagery, yet underneath has a serious and weird vibe.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://jonnicheatwood.com" target="_blank">Jonni Cheatwood</a> is an artist whose number one rule is to have no rules. His abstract work, inspired by Jean-Michel Basquiat, is authentic and raw.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Melancholia</em> (Self Portrait), 2017, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 inches. All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Mon, 09 Oct 2017 07:08:31 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list “It’s Just Art”: Adrian Piper and Rosemarie Trockel Question Art’s Ability to Affect Change <p>A New York City native, Adrian Piper now lives in Berlin after her refusal to return to the States following her inclusion on a TSA &ldquo;suspicious traveler&rdquo; watch list in 2008; Rosemarie Trockel has lived in Germany her entire life. Cursory research suggests the artists&rsquo; affiliation goes little beyond a handful of group exhibitions they were featured in together. Despite the ostensive differences in their backgrounds and artistic practices, their current New York solo exhibitions, located a few blocks from one another on the Upper East Side, share a critical outlook. Enlisting vastly different pictorial languages and artistic strategies&mdash;personal introspection and detached minimalism&mdash;Piper and Trockel question the subversive capacity of art today: <em>Is art enough?</em> they seem to ask.</p> <p><em>Art is Depression</em> is among the most striking works in Trockel&rsquo;s haunting Gladstone Gallery exhibition, <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/452419-plus-quam-perfekt" target="_blank">Plus Quam Perfekt</a></em>. The sculpture, a Plexiglas box encapsulating a pile of &ldquo;wooden&rdquo; ceramic logs, is positioned a few steps away from an actual fireplace&mdash;a romantic remnant from the gallery&rsquo;s previous life as a townhouse. The sculpture plays on notions of convenience and futility. The inoperative fireplace both suffers from and yearns for the artwork containing kindling that will never burn. The impossibility of flames for the fireplace sets the exhibition&rsquo;s tone: the wood is faux, the fire is inconceivable.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009100020-BGG_RT2017_install_02_e.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Rosemarie Trockel, <em>
Plus Quam Perfekt
</em>, September 13&ndash;October 28, 2017, 
Installation view: Gladstone 64
. Copyright Rosemarie Trockel
. Courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels. Photo: David Regen</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Throughout the exhibition, the famously reticent artist maneuvers around mediums and themes in resistance to a conclusion, questioning the logic of even striving for such resolution. Nihilism is commonplace in Trockel&rsquo;s titles: <em>Prisoner of Yourself</em> (2016) hangs like a mirror, yet its glazed ceramic fa&ccedil;ade hinders any reflection; <em>Yes where others say no</em> (2017) conveys the artist&rsquo;s longstanding interest in utilizing archival material with vague connotations. Here, the outsized image of a beautiful blond figure blurs into hazy shades of blue.</p> <p>In her <em>New York Times</em> review of Trockel&rsquo;s 2012 New Museum survey, <em>A Cosmos</em>, Roberta Smith describes the artist&rsquo;s &ldquo;mind-expanding refusal of the standard big-game retrospective&rdquo; and her disinterest in complying with sharply drawn theoretical and philosophical observations. Five years later, Trockel is equally invested in equivocation, if not more so, given her distance from speculative commentary and hesitance to discuss the creative process. In this exhibition, her avoidance of conforming to theoretical frameworks echoes her disbelief in the transformative capacity of art making. Whether the aggravated sociopolitical climate or existentialist reflections hasten this conclusion remains unclear.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009095954-BGG_RT2017_install_09.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Rosemarie Trockel, <em>
Plus Quam Perfekt
</em>, September 13&ndash;October 28, 2017, 
Installation view: Gladstone 64
. Copyright Rosemarie Trockel
. Courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels. Photo: David Regen</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A growing number of artists today are overtly scrutinizing the conviction that art has the potential to help regeneration in society. Kara Walker&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/450966-solo-exhibition" target="_blank">ongoing exhibition</a> at Sikkema &amp; Jenkins Co. kicked off a well-publicized discussion in this vein with its <a href="http://www.sikkemajenkinsco.com/?v=exhibition&amp;exhibition=5970cdfe8fd13" target="_blank">lengthy title and press release</a> penned by the artist. Walker asserted fatigue at the expectations of her, as a Black woman, to make art for social improvement, &ldquo;It&rsquo;s not exhaustive, activist or comprehensive in any way,&rdquo; she defined her exhibition in the press release. Along these lines, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/456142-solo-exhibition" target="_blank">at L&eacute;vy Gorvy</a>, a reinterpretation of Adrian Piper&rsquo;s 1980 performance <em>It&rsquo;s Just Art</em>, exhibited in the form of mixed-media documentation, constitutes a large portion of the artist&rsquo;s solo presentation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009095917-Piper_Mythic_Being__I_Embody_Everything_You_Most_Hate_and_Fear__1975_cropped.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Adrian Piper, <em>The Mythic Being: I Embody Everything You Most Hate and Fear</em>, 1975, Silver print, oil crayon. 8 x 10 inches. Private Collection. &copy; Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Disguised in an exaggerated characterization of a hyper-macho figure in an Afro wig, mustache, and aviator sunglasses, Piper roamed city streets to analyze social discomfort towards Black people in America. &ldquo;I Embody Everything You Most Hate and Fear,&rdquo; reads one of Piper&rsquo;s related forthright drawings. This absorbing multimedia work additionally includes collages created from photographic documentation, diary entries, and speech bubbles. Performing as another character in <em>It&rsquo;s Just Art</em>, this time a female surrogate to the aforementioned masculine character, Piper stares at the camera with a deadpan expression. Her face is painted white and projected onto it are images from the Cambodian genocide, executed by the Khmer Rouge during the mid-1970s. The projection includes thought bubbles conveying thoughts that target and implicate viewers&rsquo; most subdued social phobias and their numbness towards other&rsquo;s agony. &ldquo;But They Establish a Certain Physical Intimacy Between Us Nevertheless (Hesitantly You Agree, Wondering What This Commits You To),&rdquo; one thought reads, protesting the comfort claimed by the powerful. Throughout the performance, Piper addresses her Western audience about the war in the Far East, while speech bubbles deliver uncomfortable assumptions about her spectators. One particularly damning text, &ldquo;Our Confirmation is Gentle and Respectful to The Distance Between Us (You Glance at The News Photos of Cambodian Refugees),&rdquo; could hardly feel more timely. History repeats itself; apathy eclipses militancy.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009100407-LGG_PiperInstall_082817_1988.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Adrian Piper,&nbsp;<em>It&rsquo;s Just Art</em>, 1980, Documentation of the performance Wednesday, April 23, 1980 at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio: performance poster, black and white print on paper; performance diagram; video of the reconstruction of the performance, DVD, 00:24:42. Photo: Tom Powell. Collection of the Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. &copy; Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The press release published on the occasion of Piper&rsquo;s performance of the piece at Artists Space in 1981 emphasizes her &ldquo;use of aesthetics as a distancing mechanism from the political realities of the world&rdquo;&mdash;a strategy that persists today in more recent work like&nbsp;<em>Here</em>&nbsp;(2008&ndash;2015), a set of engraved wall texts in English, Arabic, and Hebrew, reading &ldquo;I was here / We were here / We are here.&rdquo; The incriminating speech bubbles in&nbsp;<em>It&rsquo;s Just Art</em>&nbsp;chime in tune with Trockel&rsquo;s skepticism about what art and activism can achieve. However, Piper&rsquo;s path is loud, vocal&mdash;her work is personal and urgent by necessity. Try as she may to shrug off the pressure of making politically effective art, the stakes are too high for inconclusive, subtle visual narratives like Trockel&rsquo;s.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009095843-LGG_PiperInstall_082817_1824_EDIT.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Adrian Piper, <em>Here</em>, 2008&ndash;2015, Engraved wall text, Site-specific installation comprised of three components, Dimensions variable. Collection of the Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. &copy; APRA Foundation Berlin. Photography by Tom Powel</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The irony is that these artists&rsquo; apparent misgivings about art may actually be suspicion about us, its onlookers: they seem to dare their viewers to take action, but they aren&rsquo;t getting their hopes up. Whether speaking in an outspoken or reticent voice, both artists remain in doubt about the audience&rsquo;s ability and enthusiasm for transformation. Trockel&rsquo;s non-reflective mirror, challenging the viewer with its lifeless surface, and Piper&rsquo;s unabashed textual confrontation of her audience ultimately manifest <em>our</em> failure to heed the message of the art we observe.</p> <p><em>Adrian Piper&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/456142-solo-exhibition" target="_blank">solo exhibition</a> at L&eacute;vy Gorvy continues through October 21.</em></p> <p><em>Rosemarie Trockel&rsquo;s&nbsp;</em><em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/452419-plus-quam-perfekt" target="_blank">Plus Quam Perfekt</a> runs through October 28 at Gladstone Gallery, 64th Street.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/216750-osman-can-yerebakan?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Osman Can Yerebakan</a></p> <p><em>Osman Can Yerebakan is a writer and curator based in New York.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Adrian Piper,&nbsp;<em>It&rsquo;s Just Art</em>, 1980, Documentation of the performance Wednesday, April 23, 1980 at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio: performance poster, black and white print on paper; performance diagram; 15 black and white photographs, silver gelatin prints on baryte paper, marker; 3 paper-text collages, marker on paper; video of the reconstruction of the performance, DVD, 00:24:42. Photo credit for the black and white photographs: Ralph Neri. Photo credit for the installation view: Tom Powell. Collection of the Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. &copy; Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.)</span></p> Mon, 09 Oct 2017 05:55:56 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Our Paris Residency Now Accepting Applications for Winter 2018 Term <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">We are now accepting applications for the February&ndash;March 2018 Paris residency. The <strong>a</strong></span><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">pplication deadline is October 31</strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">, </span><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">2017</strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">The&nbsp;Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency&nbsp;was established in memory of&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/32913">ArtSlant&#39;s Founder who passed away December 8th, 2012.</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;"> Georgia was dedicated to supporting and investing in artists and writers, and had a deep connection with the city of Paris.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;">The Residency selects artists and writers who critically engage with the city of Paris, its history and its potential. It provides an opportunity for awardees to explore the cultural landscape of Paris; to deepen their practice through experimention and research; and to increase exposure of their work to an international audience.</p> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171005162505-georgia-fee-studio.png" width="600" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 10px; font-family: georgia, palatino;">The Georgia Fee Artist | Writer apartment and studio.</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;">Visual artists of all mediums, art writers, and critics, 24 years or older are welcome to apply. Selection is made based on the merit of past work, the potential for future success, the ability to independently develop new work, and the proposed project&rsquo;s relevance to the city of Paris. Recipients will be required to produce a serial, web-based component (blog, visual essay, hypertextual experiment, etc.) which will be hosted on ArtSlant.com.</p> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;">The Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency in Paris provides the recipient with lodging for <strong>2 months in an</strong> <strong>apartment/studio</strong> in the 15th arrondissement, <strong>travel</strong> to and from Paris, and a <strong>$1000/month stipend</strong>. Residents are expected to secure their own travel documents and visas. Requirements depend on country of origin.&nbsp;</p> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/foundation"><strong><span style="background-color:#FFFF00;">Apply here.</span></strong></a></p> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;"><span style="font-size:10px;">Image at top:&nbsp;<span style="text-align: center;">Georgia Fee,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 10px; text-align: center;">50 Kisses</em><span style="text-align: center;">, 2001</span></span></p> Mon, 09 Oct 2017 02:46:16 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Julia San Martin | Zena Blackwell | Mary Jones <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/491273-julia-san-martin?utm_source=JuliaSanMartin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Julia San Martin &ndash; New York</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063402?utm_source=JuliaSanMartin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063402/u3azr9/20170913142905-IMG_2896.JPG" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063398?utm_source=JuliaSanMartin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063398/mf2ji7/20170913142807-IMG_6149_res_normal.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063407?utm_source=JuliaSanMartin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063407/mf2ji7/20170913143141-IMG_6305.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063401?utm_source=JuliaSanMartin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063401/mf2ji7/20170913142826-IMG_6068_res_normal.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/489645-zena-blackwell?utm_source=ZenaBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Zena Blackwell &ndash; Cardiff</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1059088?utm_source= ZenaBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059088/u3azr9/20170811065727-IMG_0023.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1059096?utm_source=ZenaBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059096/mf2ji7/20170811065943-IMG_0234.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1059091?utm_source=ZenaBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059091/mf2ji7/20170811065831-Zena_Blackwell_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1059090?utm_source=ZenaBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059090/mf2ji7/20170811065809-IMG_0229.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/488556-mary-jones-art?utm_source=MaryJones&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Mary Jones &ndash; Iowa</span></a></p> <p><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056678/u3azr9/20170726022347-jones_14thday1_web.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; width: 100%;" /></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1056669?utm_source=MaryJones&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056669/mf2ji7/20170726021438-jones_notes.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1056696?utm_source=MaryJones&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056696/u3azr9/20170726024721-jones_m_thataways_copy.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1056670?utm_source=MaryJones&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056670/mf2ji7/20170726021502-jones_unawares.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 09 Oct 2017 02:44:50 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Katie Torn <p>New York-based new media artist <a href="http://katietorn.com/index.html" target="_blank">Katie Torn</a> makes work suspended in limbo somewhere between our physical and digital realities, as she seamlessly synthesizes filmed or photographed sculptural objects with digitally generated forms. There is strange alchemy at work in Torn&rsquo;s aesthetic, which fuses disposable cultural touchstones of the 80s and 90s with complex, surrealist compositions and ideas. Her work is simultaneously joyful and solemn, perfectly reflecting her love/hate relationship with the modern capitalist world, including her most frequent subject matter: consumer culture and its unstoppable impact on every aspect of our existence.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121256-KTorn_07.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Breathe Deep, </em>2014, Still from single channel video. Commissioned by the Denver Theater District / Denver Digerati 2014</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What toys inspired you as a kid?</strong></p> <p><strong>Katie Torn:</strong> Growing up in the 1980s I was really into the original My Little Pony, The Care Bears, and Glo Worms. I remember watching the shows on television and then making up my own narratives with the toys. There was an active back and forth interplay between my imagination and watching merchandise-driven cartoons. This is why I&rsquo;m so drawn to this type of imagery in my work. I was bombarded by these images when I was first developing my imagination and creativity as a child.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121230-KTorn_10.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Gremlin</em>, 2017, Still from <em>Low Tide</em>, 3-channel video installation</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What are your strongest memories of when you started using the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> My grandfather bought me first computer when I was 12 years old, around 1993. Shortly after I started using the internet and AOL. I would spend hours in chat rooms messaging with strangers with no parental control. I don&rsquo;t think my parents even understood what I was doing. I remember having a sleepover with a bunch of friends and writing provocative things to strange men online in the middle of the night. It was an interesting time to come of age. I imagine many people in my generation experienced sexuality virtually before having physical experiences.</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your current relationship with the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> It&rsquo;s a love/hate relationship. Although I really enjoy being connected to a community of digital artists and being witness to their art-making processes, I am often bored while using the internet. It&rsquo;s a lot less exciting than it used to be when it was new and lawless. Now it&rsquo;s so much part of the everyday humdrum of life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121201-KTorn_12.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Squid</em>, 2017, Still from <em>Low Tide</em>, 3-channel video installation</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first discover the creative possibilities of computers?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> Playing around with editing software in high school. I originally wanted to be a narrative filmmaker, but found myself focusing more on the post-production process. I started by making simple motion graphic animations and mixing that with overly color-corrected video footage. Later in college I realized what I was doing was more inline with video art than filmmaking, so I took off in that direction.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first become aware of the medium of digital art?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> I discovered net art through the website gUrl in the mid 90s. I really loved that site; it provided teenage girls with an alternative to mainstream teenage culture and was also a great database of weird, random net art projects. I wasn&rsquo;t even really aware that I was experiencing digital art at the time, but looking back that was my first experience of it.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121129-KTorn_04.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>#BeachSelfie</em>, 2016, Still from video series @RealSelfCindy. Courtesy of daata-editions.com and the Artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Was there a particular &ldquo;eureka&rdquo; moment for you what you started using programs for 3D animation?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> Definitely! I discovered the potential for 3D animation as a grad student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. <a href="http://www.claudiahart.com/">Claudia Hart</a>&rsquo;s experimental 3D class was producing some pretty interesting stuff and using 3D in a way that I had never seen before. I was making videos of physical sculptures and collaging those together with After Effects. Once I figured out how to bring 3D into my videos in a convincing way it opened up a whole new world of making that was life changing for my practice.</p> <p><strong>CP: How you describe you art school experience?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> Art school can be confusing. There are so many methodologies, and unfortunately many art professors are trying to convince you that their way of making and thinking is the best and only way. My practice went through a lot of changes and I made a lot of really bad stuff as a student. I think you just have to make a lot of work and get as diverse an education as you can. I was lucky enough to have the time and resources to figure it out and I eventually was able to cultivate multiple techniques into a practice that felt right for what I wanted to say.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="533" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/230171738" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="300"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/230171738" target="_blank">On the Beach, Single Channel Video Installation, 2017</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work often features physical elements that you have filmed and manipulated. What differentiates these pieces from your purely digital work?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> As an undergraduate student at Hunter College, I was a painting major at the time but still was interested in moving image. I took a video art class with the artist and writer <a href="http://constancedejong.net/" target="_blank">Constance DeJong</a> and started making videos of my paintings and manipulating them in the computer with editing software. This was also the first time I experimented with sculpture. I began to paint objects and TVs that I included in my videos and made TV sculptures to show those videos on. As I have developed as an artist I find myself being drawn more and more to working with physical elements and I am less interested in purely 3D-rendered works. My true voice is in the mix of the two.</p> <p><strong>CP: Have your considered presenting physical sculptures as the final form of your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> I&rsquo;ve thought about it, but it never really made sense with my concept. I reuse and recycle many of my sculptures to generate my work. My sculptures are modular and I like working with materials that are ephemeral. If they were made permanent I would have to let go of an element of freedom that I relish in while making the work.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121053-KTorn_09.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation shot from the solo exhibition <em>Low Tide</em>, Upfor Gallery, Portland, OR, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your aesthetic?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> My ideas emerge from a physical handmade place. There is a rawness and expressionism there that is visceral, but I also incorporate slick computer-generated imagery. I work with found physical objects and imagery scavenged from online so there is a kind of thrift store digital detritus element to the work. The visual choices that I make are also influenced by a girly aesthetic that was ingrained in me as a child. I am drawn to &ldquo;feminine&rdquo; colors and childlike shapes, yet I mix this with a somewhat cynical vision of the future.</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think the internet has been generally good for humanity?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> I&rsquo;m ambivalent. The internet has really helped people who are isolated and oppressed. It has given them a voice and a community. But on the other hand it has brought together people whose ideas are detrimental to society and it has been used to organize hate groups and spread propaganda on a massive level. Only time will tell if the overall effect has been negative or positive.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="294" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/108084571?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/108084571" target="_blank">BREATHE DEEP</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work seems to simultaneously suggest a fascination and repulsion of consumerist/capitalist culture. Do you struggle with that duality?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> Very much. I love the cartoons and toys I grew up with, while at the same time I am aware I was being manipulated to consume junk that was commercially constructed for &ldquo;females.&rdquo; I also see beauty in the decay and destruction that is caused by capitalism while simultaneously feeling disturbed and saddened. It&rsquo;s a kind of tragic romanticism.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first become aware of these concepts?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> In college I used to make paintings of female figures in dirty snow that was filled with garbage. From the time I started making work that had any meaning it had some element of decay brought on by consumer culture mixed with stereotypical female beauty.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="533" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/172786178" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="300"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/172786178" target="_blank">Mermaid</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Would you describe yourself as a political person?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> My work has had political undertones for quite a while, but it wasn&#39;t until the People&rsquo;s Climate March in 2014 that I began to be politically active other than voting. I heard environmental activists Naomi Klein and Bill McKibben speak at an event and it scared the crap out of me. Their words brought a realness to what I already felt was happening with our planet, but was not ready to face up to.</p> <p><strong>CP: How autobiographical is your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> My work stems from my own experience and feeling about being a physical body navigating through a toxic landscape caused by capitalism. From a young age, capitalism has promoted behavior in me that is detrimental to me and my environment. My work is autobiographical in that it reflects that I am a female that came of age in the 1990s who is living through the Anthropocene extinction.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121013-KTorn_05.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>#DuckFace</em>, 2016, Still from video series @RealSelfCindy. Courtesy of daata-editions.com and the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why do you think new media art has become a natural home for feminist thinking?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> Throughout history male artists have used art to objectify and commodify women&rsquo;s bodies. Right now you see a wave of young female artists and entrepreneurs using new media, in particular the internet, to reclaim ownership and control over their own images of their bodies. Because the internet cuts out the middle man to reach a wider audience, it has the potential to supersede the traditional patriarchal power structures.</p> <p><strong>CP: Your recent collages feature directly painted elements on canvas. What inspired you to explore the most traditional of art mediums?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong>&nbsp;I studied classical figurative painting and drawing starting from the age of 13, and it&rsquo;s something that I have wanted to incorporate back into my work for a while. For me, 3D animation has a connection to traditional painting. With painting the artist is manually rendering light and form; in 3D animation the computer is doing it for you. Both are attempting to replicate nature and reality and can be used to create worlds that are viewed through a picture plane. With the collage work, I was experimenting with transforming my digital collage technique of video and 3D renders into a physical process on paper. For both I am combining elements from multiple sources: painted imagery, 3D renders, photographs, and found images. These elements are brought together to exist in the same space through the use of light and shadow.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004120754-KTorn_14.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Trikonasana (Pose 5)</em>, 2017, Photo collage, paint, canvas paper, 22 x 28 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How influenced are you by Surrealism?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong>&nbsp;Surrealism employs the rules of reality, like how light and shadow give objects depth, to create imagined worlds that reflect certain truths about the world that cannot be expressed in a literal way. I&rsquo;m interested in how surrealism uses the familiar, but makes it appear unsettling to get at something about human nature. You see this in a lot of super realistic 3D-rendered work, animation that falls into the uncanny valley. Coming from a painting background, I am influenced by 20th century art that makes a connection between the human figure and technology. For example, the Surrealist Yves Tanguy, Cubism, and the Italian Futurist Umberto Boccioni.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004120725-KTorn_13.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Lotus (Pose 7)</em>, 2017, Photo collage, paint, canvas paper, 22 x 28 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How do you think the wider art world views new media art?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> I&rsquo;m always shocked when I go to art fairs because there are usually very few digital art pieces. I think the art world is interested in the ideas that new media brings to the table, but there is still a push to turn those ideas into saleable objects. For instance, the term &ldquo;Post-Internet&rdquo; was hot topic for a while&mdash;it described works that are about the internet or use digital methods but whose output fits into traditional categories like painting and sculpture.</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe you personal experiences in the &ldquo;art world&rdquo;?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> I have had some very positive experiences working with curators, galleries, and other artists. However, if you look at gallery rosters, most have one or two young new media artists, and usually that artist is white and male. This isn&rsquo;t true for all galleries, but you still see it a lot. I had a gallery once tell me that they were interested in representing me because they were looking to represent more women, yet they wanted my work to be less &ldquo;girly.&rdquo; They wanted to know if I was willing to make my work less feminine in order to work with them. It&rsquo;s pretty absurd how superficial the art world can be sometimes, ha.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004120651-KTorn_20.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Half Moon (Pose 1)</em>, 2017, Photo collage, paint, canvas paper, 16 x 20 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong>&nbsp;I&rsquo;m working on a longer format animation that has an experimental narrative structure. It&rsquo;s about a female character who attends a yoga retreat in order to cope with her body deconstructing in a decaying environment. This is the first time in a while that I&rsquo;ve been able to work on something without a deadline and it has allowed me more freedom to experiment.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: 3 Katie Torn, <em>#BathroomSelfie</em>, 2016, Still from video series @RealSelfCindy. Courtesy of daata-editions.com and the Artist. All images courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 04 Oct 2017 05:59:20 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Derek Weisberg Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/47856-under-the-radar-annie-lindberg-derek-weisberg-sofia-donovan" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from</em><em> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/14164-derek-weisberg" target="_blank"><em>Derek Weisberg</em></a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>We are all here with a limited time and capacity and we all exist with the knowledge that one day that bell will ring and our last breath will expire. How do we operate and move though life knowing this?&nbsp;With this awareness, how do we strive toward achievements and growth on all levels of our being? How do we move though &ldquo;the mud,&rdquo; as Beckett says, or &ldquo;the funk of life,&rdquo; as Dr. Cornell West calls it?&nbsp;And, how do we do this as elegantly, beautifully, kind, invested, and responsible as possible?&nbsp;</p> <p>Life can be lonely, hard, complicated, and ugly.&nbsp;How do we wrestle with pain, longing, dysfunction, fragility, and vulnerability?&nbsp;How do we find truths in the face of these hardships and realities?&nbsp;How do we cope with human atrocities and extreme injustice, from local and personal relationships to the grandest of scale?&nbsp;</p> <p>Art provides a unique opportunity and experience to communicate powers beyond ourselves; it can traverse time, place, gender, race.&nbsp;It has the ability to touch the core and reach the deepest places of our existence.&nbsp;Through my art I attempt to tackle these questions and to kiss these truths.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171002122837-DW1.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>To be as honest to his/her voice and to communicate those truths (at that time) as best as possible in whatever material, or medium, is appropriate. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>Well I don&rsquo;t have a child and I can&rsquo;t keep a plant alive so I can&rsquo;t add pictures of those things.&nbsp;The idea of &ldquo;greatest&rdquo; is a difficult one for me.&nbsp;But I will include a link to a video I made with friend and frequent collaborator, Shaun Roberts. It&rsquo;s a video piece which was a great surprise, different from my normal practice and something which I like a lot:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ErzSr0RXzoQ" width="700"></iframe>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Derek Weisberg and Shaun Roberts, <em>Life Mask, His Face Was Only A Memory of His Former Face</em>, 2015</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>There is no never. If there is a work that I really want to make, I will find a way to make it.&nbsp;I don&rsquo;t and won&rsquo;t ever have a reason why I will never make something.&nbsp;However, I would like to mention a challenging large-scale project which I would like to make:&nbsp;It is an epic-like dance/performance working with a choreographer, dancers, and musicians.&nbsp;I would like be involved on all aspects of creating the piece but primarily create stage props/sculptures as part of the performance. But I can&rsquo;t say this will never happen,&nbsp;because&nbsp;I&rsquo;m confident that if I really feel it is important to make this work, I will.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Doesn&rsquo;t the internet know about everybody? Theses are friends&nbsp;whose&nbsp;work and practice I admire:</p> <p>Mike Lay:&nbsp;<a href="http://padlaversusmoij.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">http://padlaversusmoij.tumblr.com</a><br /> Erin Riley:&nbsp;<a href="http://erinmriley.com/home.html" target="_blank">http://erinmriley.com/home.html</a><br /> Brett Amory:&nbsp;<a href="http://brettamory.com/" target="_blank">http://brettamory.com</a><br /> Lucien Shapiro:&nbsp;<a href="http://lucienshapiro.com/" target="_blank">http://lucienshapiro.com</a><br /> Stephen De Staebler:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.stephendestaebler.com/" target="_blank">http://www.stephendestaebler.com</a><br /> Maria Moyer:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mariamoyer.com/" target="_blank">http://www.mariamoyer.com</a></p> <p>OOOPPS, did you say 3???</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Mon, 02 Oct 2017 05:31:31 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Reprinting the Poem That Kindled a Modernist Tradition <table> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width: 100%; padding-bottom: 10px;"> <table border="0" style="line-height: 30px; width: 100%; float: center;"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;">Our Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence, Shoshana Kessler, read H<span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: large;">ope Mirrlees&rsquo; modernist poem,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia; font-size: large;">Paris</em><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: large;">&nbsp;(1919) as a .pdf in university but wanted to hold the out-of-print work in her hand. So she </span>spent an inspired two months in Paris this summer re-printing the modernist masterpiece. These four essays<span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: large;">&nbsp;from her project &ldquo;Printing Paris&rdquo;&nbsp;</span>chronicle her experience.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;"><strong>Enrollment for the Winter 2018 Paris Residency is now open through October 31.&nbsp;</strong><strong>Apply <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">here</a>.</strong></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: left; width: 100%; padding-bottom: 10px;"> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-large; line-height: 30px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-large; line-height: 30px;"><em><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48199-printing-paris-exhuming-a-modernist-masterpiece?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant" style="text-decoration: none; color: #000000;">PRINTING PARIS: EXHUMING A MODERNIST MASTERPIECE</a></strong></em></p> <img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170925164912-20170714142201-Paris_Hope_Mirrlees_1920-1.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;"><span font-size:="" new="" style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">Virginia Woolf, who originally typeset and published Hope Mirrlees&rsquo;&nbsp;</span><em font-size:="" new="" style="font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">Paris </em>in 1920<span font-size:="" new="" style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">, called the poem &ldquo;obscure, indecent and brilliant.&rdquo; Nearly a century later, Shoshana Kessler argues for the importance of this radical and overlooked work, setting out to retrace the steps taken by Mirrlees and reinterpret the pages parsed by Woolf.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: large;">&ldquo;</span><span background-color:="" new="" style="font-size: 18px; font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">One of the most captivating elements of letterpress printing is the ability to <a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/48199-printing-paris-exhuming-a-modernist-masterpiece?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">get under the skin of a text</a>,</span><span font-size:="" new="" style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">&rdquo; she writes.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: left; width: 100%; padding-bottom: 10px;"> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-large; line-height: 30px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-large; line-height: 30px;"><em><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48323-printing-paris-the-route-part-1?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant" style="text-decoration: none; color: #000000;">THE ROUTE (PART 1)</a></strong></em></p> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48323-printing-paris-the-route-part-1?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/48323/p66fzh/20170814085548-Paris_-_Chemin_de_fer_metropolitain_-_Ligne_2_Sud_-_Corvisart.JPG" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; width: 100%;" /></a> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;"><span background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" times="">The poem moves through the city in a single day, beginning in an ambiguous Metro line, passing under the Seine, moving through galleries, Parisian institutions, nightlife, bars, cinema, streets. In researching and re-printing&nbsp;<em>Paris</em>, Shoshana reads the poem like a map, charting a modern-day course through the city and literally retracing Mirrlees&rsquo; steps. &ldquo;By my estimations,&rdquo; she tallies, &ldquo;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48323-printing-paris-the-route-part-1?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">I have walked around 70,000 steps and recorded about 10 hours of said wandering</a>.&rdquo;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: left; width: 100%; padding-bottom: 10px;"> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-large; line-height: 30px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-large; line-height: 30px;"><em><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48353-printing-paris-the-route-part-2?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant" style="text-decoration: none; color: #000000;">THE ROUTE (PART 2)</a></strong></em></p> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48353-printing-paris-the-route-part-2?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/48353/p66fzh/20170822144455-man-with-pigeons-in-paris-france.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; width: 100%;" /></a> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;"><span background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="font-family: Georgia, Times, " times=""><em>Paris </em></span>&ldquo;<span background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="font-family: Georgia, Times, " times=""><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48353-printing-paris-the-route-part-2?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">takes itself as visual experiment, exploring its own role in archiving this specific period of Parisian history</a>.&rdquo; The poem addresses the 400,000 deaths due to the Spanish Flu. Through formal experimentation reminiscent of Mallarme and Apollinaire, Mirrlees communicates a contraction in time&mdash;a halting and sputtering&mdash;leaving Paris to wonder if it must yet atone for the horrors of The Great War.&nbsp;Yet, humanity regains the upperhand in the form of Louis Pasteur and the flight of concrete pigeons and </span><em background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">Femme volantes.</em></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: left; width: 100%; padding-bottom: 10px;"> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-large; line-height: 30px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-large; line-height: 30px;"><em><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48379-printing-paris-the-route-part-3?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant" style="text-decoration: none; color: #000000;">THE ROUTE (PART 3)</a>&nbsp;+ NOTES ON PRINTING</strong></em></p> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48379-printing-paris-the-route-part-3?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/48379/p66fzh/20170901135714-IMG_2902.JPG" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; width: 100%;" /></a> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;">In the final installment, the view of the poet and the poem itself become radically altered. Suddenly, Mirrlees is above it all. From within the poetic trance, from a point high above the city, <i>Paris</i> is remapped. Shoshana adds, &ldquo;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/48379-printing-paris-the-route-part-3?utm_source=03222017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=magazine&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">from this spot, we never retouch the ground</a>.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td width="50%"> <p style="text-align: left;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170315115057-Artboard_1.jpg" style="padding-right: 10px;" width="100%" /></p> </td> <td width="50%"> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;">The Georgia Fee Artist/Writer Residency provides the recipient with an apartment in Paris for 2 months, travel expenses, and a stipend to be used for materials and other costs.&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: left;">The application period for the Winter 2018 Residency (February 1&ndash;March 30) runs October 1-31. More info and application available <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">here</a>.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 02 Oct 2017 08:00:04 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Patricia Fairon | Magdalen Chua | Jade Fenu <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/457889-patricia-fairon?utm_source=PatriciaFairon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Patricia Fairon &ndash; Buenos Aires</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1007904?utm_source=PatriciaFairon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1007904/u3azr9/20160918213306-Beryl_____________________1_X_1_20_m.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1000252?utm_source=PatriciaFairon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1000252/y8wnrh/20160725163335-Mariana______________1m_X_0_80m.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1042009?utm_source=PatriciaFairon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1042009/y8wnrh/20170413013825-Spring_Morning_______1m_X_1_20m.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1018217?utm_source=PatriciaFairon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1018217/y8wnrh/20161124002120-Noturno_______0_80m_X_1m.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/491465-magdalen-chua?utm_source=MagdalenChua&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Magdalen Chua &ndash; Leipzig</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063673?utm_source=MagdalenChua&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063673/u3azr9/20170915092325-Seashells_Lite_installation_view.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063676?utm_source=MagdalenChua&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063676/y8wnrh/20170915092902-01._Starsmish-front.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063677?utm_source=MagdalenChua&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063677/y8wnrh/20170915092926-03._Fo_lio_sil-front.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063678?utm_source=MagdalenChua&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063678/y8wnrh/20170915093130-05._Grenreef-front.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/396438-jade-fenu?utm_source=JadeFenu&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Jade Fenu &ndash; Paris</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1064194?utm_source=JadeFenu&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1064194/u3azr9/20170918181332-Current_II.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1004902?utm_source=JadeFenu&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1004902/y8wnrh/20160829224006-No_sugar_Baby___web.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1042229?utm_source=JadeFenu&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1042229/y8wnrh/20170414092648-Hunter_s_Night_web.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1041538?utm_source=JadeFenu&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041538/y8wnrh/20170409223953-Our_best_Friend.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 09 Oct 2017 00:53:25 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list On Art and Music’s Enduring Love Affair and the Practice of Solange <p>I remember being the only person in the screening room at the Block Museum as I watched <em><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMZSCfqOxVs" target="_blank">The End of eating Everything</a></em> (2013), the first piece that greeted me at the entrance of the exhibition <em>Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey</em>. The animation looped almost two complete times before anyone else joined me in the room. During the first loop, I squinted at the image until I realized that the beautiful head from which these living-locks or tentacles were growing, the head attached to this swelling, insatiable creature&rsquo;s body was that of musician and producer <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XczdrcLUxMA" target="_blank">Santigold</a>, whose songs had blessed my ears on my drive up to see the exhibition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wMZSCfqOxVs" width="560"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:10px;">Wangechi Mutu,&nbsp;<em><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMZSCfqOxVs" target="_blank">The End of eating Everything</a>,&nbsp;</em>2013.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><span>Transported from my speakers to the screen, Santigold was playing the role of what has been interpreted as a metaphor for Mother Earth, culture, and the nature of human beings simultaneously. She was an abused and unwell vessel looking for nourishment and gliding through a polluted universe. An organism snarling, on a warpath, she was devouring and recklessly lashing out at everything circling in front of her. She was eating her way to a slow, painful implosion and eventual rebirth. The piece is a sobering and haunting reflection of the rattling environmental and consumption-driven circumstances we find ourselves in. </span></p> <p><span>I didn&rsquo;t read Santigold&rsquo;s presence in my stereo and then in the museum as a coincidence. I reveled in the moment of these worlds colliding, as if it were by design. Elements of my music library were present on the walls, re-contextualized, and intentionally framed in a large, dark room that encouraged quiet thought, mental digestion, and solitude. In fact, seeing Santigold&rsquo;s face there wasn&rsquo;t a surprise. She is an artist whose work exudes aesthetic and conceptual prowess but just so happens to exist in much more accessible digital and physical arenas that are innate to the music industry. Given her music videos, album covers, style, and sound, her being at the Block felt natural. It was like she&rsquo;d been there all along. And arguably she has&mdash;through this collaboration with Wangechi Mutu, but also with other artists like Kehinde Wiley for the cover of the album </span><em><a href="http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/28/cover-art-santigolds-new-album-cover-revealed/?mcubz=1" target="_blank">Master of My Make-Believe</a></em> (2012) for which she somehow convinced Wiley to do something that he rarely does: make a woman the subject of his painting.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170927171941-Santigold-Maser_to_my_make_believe.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:10px;">Cover art for <em>Master of My Make-Believe</em>, Santigold in collaboration with Kehinde Wiley.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><span>This more recent example is one of many that demonstrates how musicians have been claiming space and strolling into the physical and intellectual spaces of Visual Art, usually through their everyday relationships with and proximity to visual artists, filmmakers, and performance artists. And artists sometimes do the same&mdash;lending their ideas and aesthetics to musicians through the visuals that surround the sound. Even the language becomes shared between them. We can describe a visual artist&rsquo;s process by waxing poetic around how they create rhythm through improvisation, how the colors they use cause a visual vibration, or the ways in which artists sample and remix from the great wells of history and visual culture. We can talk about a song as a complex collage with gritty texture, and then interrogate the alignment with or divergence from current or classic approaches to composition.</span></p> <p><span>In many ways, fluid maneuvering around distinguishing lines contradicts how we&rsquo;re taught to define, sort, and categorize ideas for the sake of communication and education. Once we begin to move outside of the classroom or other spaces that are in the business of organizing thought and information, it becomes clear that the world doesn&rsquo;t operate so neatly. The dividing lines and boxes are permeable and they dissolve, suggesting that they may have always been unstable or an illusion. As the lines disappear we are asked to unlearn our self-imposed limitations and confines.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="" src="https://media.pitchfork.com/photos/5931bf7131bcdd1242929661/master/w_790/a75a17d4.png" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:10px;">Cover of Solange&#39;s album&nbsp;<em>True</em>, created in collaboration with Mickalene Thomas.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><span>Solange is of this tribe&mdash;one that demands and promotes an expanded understanding of art&rsquo;s definitions and refuses to follow any rules that interrupt the frequency she&rsquo;s operating on. Although she may not have planned it this way, art has taken permanent residence in her practice; the cover of the album </span><em><a href="https://open.spotify.com/album/50kvbvxJnx4YeSiNvABNqB" target="_blank">True</a></em> was created with artist <a href="http://mickalenethomas.com">Mickalene Thomas</a>, her hair has been styled by photographer and masterful hair braider <a href="http://shanicrowe.com" target="_blank">Shani Crowe</a>, and the videos that she and her husband directed were infused with the cinematographic eye of <a href="https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/the-profound-power-of-the-new-solange-videos" target="_blank">Arthur Jafa</a>. The past year has taken her from the stages of Pitchfork, Afropunk, Essence Festival, Panorama, <em>Saturday Night Live</em>, the Kennedy Center, and Radio City Music Hall to the galleries and auditoria of the P&eacute;rez Art Museum, Menil Collection, Guggenheim Museum, Tate Modern, and soon the <a href="https://www.chinati.org" target="_blank">Chinati Foundation</a> in Marfa, Texas, which was founded by artist Donald Judd.</p> <p><span>Her recipe of visual art, music, and art direction has noticeably evolved over the years through the careful attention she pays to and what she demands of the environments in which she performs. And she&#39;s obviously aware of how film enhances her vision for her albums. The evolution is also evident when you look at the creation and continued growth of Saint Records and the project </span><a href="http://saintheron.com" target="_blank">Saint Heron</a>, which started off as a compilation album released in 2013 but stretched into the curatorial realm through orchestrated events and installations in various cities. This past summer Saint Heron planted seeds in Chicago through a collaboration with the Stony Island Arts Bank and an installation at Pitchfork.</p> <p><span>Even with the elasticity of language between the two, it is hard to avoid challenges, roadblocks and miscommunication when dancing on the line between art and music, especially when you&rsquo;re a transdisciplinary artist moving through different venues. Each new platform comes with its own varied and unpredictable logistical processes, acoustic qualities, production requirements, and restrictions. Working how she does sometimes requires shapeshifting, flexibility, reassessment, and the courage to hold your ground in order for everything to be as right as it can possibly be and to maintain a complete vision.</span></p> <p><span>Solange&rsquo;s performance on&nbsp;<em>Saturday Night Live</em> proved to be a learning experience for her, particularly when she received push-back for how many people would join her on stage. She remembers that &ldquo;trying to navigate [venues] where maybe they&rsquo;re used to a certain formula was really challenging. [The experience at SNL] helped me to then say, &lsquo;Why am I trying to put this performance in these spaces when I can deliver them in spaces where the context takes on the work itself?&rsquo;&rdquo; She started pushing to present and test performances and ideas in museums and institutions, citing how Judd&rsquo;s belief that &ldquo;the work takes on the space that it&rsquo;s around&rdquo; deeply resonates with how she wants her work to function in all venues. The private performance at the </span><a href="http://time.com/4786319/solange-guggenheim-performance/" target="_blank">Guggenheim</a> in May was one of the opportunities she used to continue to meld her ethos with her practice, seeing the museum as a space where her vision could possibly breathe while also testing the comfort level of this kind of cultural institution. &ldquo;Having the opportunity to go to the Guggenheim and have 100 Black bodies roll through that joint like, &lsquo;This is our shit&rsquo;&mdash;that opened up the conversation.&rdquo; To those of us watching from a distance and scrolling through the documentation, she makes it look easy and undeniably necessary. I can&rsquo;t help but to imagine a flow of Blackness swirling effortlessly and lingering throughout the building that day.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:32.5% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BUSByzsBuRy/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by Solange (@saintrecords)</a> on <time datetime="2017-05-19T17:06:08+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">May 19, 2017 at 10:06am PDT</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>Solange mentioned this memory while in conversation with </span><a href="http://brittjulious.tumblr.com" target="_blank">Britt Julious</a> at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago for the MCA Talk series earlier this month. During the talk she tracked her career&rsquo;s progression and how she landed where she is now&mdash;a court of expression where artistic integrity, freedom, experimentation, and strong conviction hold high ranks.</p> <p><span>It was evident that it took a long time to get to this point. She shared the gratitude she had for the people who encouraged her to follow her ideas, but she also described the hesitation she felt when taking control of the contexts in which her work was being placed because of the stigma and obstacles that assertive women are often subjected to. &ldquo;As Black women [and as] Black women artists, we have to fight twice as hard. We have to move quicker, faster, more beautifully, and more gracefully than [what&rsquo;s demanded] of anyone else. I think knowing that and being clear on that has been helpful for me to navigate&hellip;in a much more fearless way [and work] through the fear because it&rsquo;s still there.&rdquo; When she started working on </span><em><a href="https://open.spotify.com/album/3Yko2SxDk4hc6fncIBQlcM" target="_blank">A Seat at the Table</a></em> she decided that it was essential to have creative control over everything&mdash;from beginning to end, top to bottom. This might be why it all feels so seamless and focused&mdash;from the velvety vocals that open track one to the sultry and luscious tempos, music videos, liner notes, lyrics, publications, online projects, and stage productions. They&rsquo;re crystal clear translations of her aesthetic that speak directly to and riff off of one another and point to her deep interest in scenography and sacred geometry.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:31.666666666666664% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BODysbBhyX0/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by Solange (@saintrecords)</a> on <time datetime="2016-12-16T01:16:27+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Dec 15, 2016 at 5:16pm PST</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>Her art and politics mix just as her disciplines and genres do. Black freedom fighters, activists, and political icons like Assata Shakur and Malcolm X have been intentionally inserted into her work over the years. &ldquo;One of the things that I try to remind people is that from my first album, </span><em><a href="http://saintheron.com/featured/the-revisit-solanges-solo-star/" target="_blank">Solo Star</a></em>, to <em><a href="https://open.spotify.com/album/6MsVbAqh2A9i7jYvPOsGNx" target="_blank">Hadley St</a></em>.&hellip;I&rsquo;ve had so many cultural Black icons built into the landscape of my work from day one.&rdquo; But she also acknowledges that sometimes a call-out in the name of justice must go beyond artistic subtleties and be much more explicit. At times, it will spill out into other parts of your life. &ldquo;I have, in the past, had issues with artists who are like, &lsquo;I just put it into my work.&rsquo; You cannot fight for the cause and position yourself as someone who really does want to fight for the cause and then say, &lsquo;I don&rsquo;t want to talk about it.&rsquo; I think I have learned the power of when to speak, how to speak, who to speak to, and when not to. And that has given me a lot of peace in my practice of self care.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:28.10185185185185% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BLKe1cnhESe/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by Solange (@saintrecords)</a> on <time datetime="2016-10-05T02:03:26+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Oct 4, 2016 at 7:03pm PDT</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>One of these moments of speaking up with words and silence came up in August following clashes at a Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the arrest of </span>Takiyah Thompson, one of the activists who brought down a Confederate monument in Durham, North Carolina. Shortly after Solange sent out a comment in support of Thompson&rsquo;s actions, Twitter became a much less lovely place; she <a href="https://www.spin.com/2017/08/solange-deletes-twitter-charlottesville-response/" target="_blank">deleted</a> her Twitter account in what appeared to be a gesture of solidarity, a deep-seated exhaustion, and ultimately for her own self-preservation. In just a few clicks and through choosing to quiet the noise by laying her account to rest, Solange had utilized silence to make a loud statement that reverberated through dozens of major music platforms that may not have spoken so quickly and directly about white supremacy and racism otherwise.</p> <p><span>From the list of questions asked by Julious, I found the most perceptive and resonant to be the one that almost wasn&rsquo;t asked. It came at the end when January Parkos Arnall from the MCA staff whispered that there was time for one more question. Julious used that opportunity to ask, &ldquo;Do you feel a sense of responsibility or that you have to live up to something as not only a Black artist but as a Black woman artist&mdash;which puts so much pressure, responsibility, and expectations on you? ...how do you navigate around that while still maintaining a sense of self?&rdquo;</span></p> <p><span>To answer the question, Solange brought up Kara Walker&rsquo;s recent </span><a href="http://sikkemajenkinsco.com/files/pdfs/5259_KW2017-PR.pdf" target="_blank">artist statement</a> which was embedded into a biting and facetious press release for her show at <a href="http://sikkemajenkinsco.com/?v=exhibition&amp;exhibition=5970cdfe8fd13" target="_blank">Sikkema Jenkins and Co.</a> in New York. I include it here, in full, because it deserves a full read:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;"><span>I don&rsquo;t really feel the need to write a statement about a painting show. I know what you all expect from me and I have complied up to a point. But frankly I am tired, tired of standing up, being counted, tired of &ldquo;having a voice&rdquo; or worse &ldquo;being a role model.&rdquo; Tired, true, of being a featured member of my racial group and/or my gender niche. It&rsquo;s too much, and I write this knowing full well that my right, my capacity to live in this Godforsaken country as a (proudly) raced and (urgently) gendered person is under threat by random groups of white (male) supremacist goons who flaunt a kind of patched together notion of race purity with flags and torches and impressive displays of perpetrator-as-victim sociopathy. I roll my eyes, fold my arms and wait. How many ways can a person say racism is the real bread and butter of our American mythology, and in how many ways will the racists among our countrymen act out their Turner Diaries race war fantasy combination Nazi Germany and Antebellum South &ndash; states which, incidentally, lost the wars they started, and always will, precisely because there is no way those white racisms can survive the earth without the rest of us types upholding humanity&rsquo;s best, keeping the motor running on civilization, being good, and preserving nature and all the stuff worth working and living for?</span></p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;"><span>Anyway, this is a show of works on paper and on linen, drawn and collaged using ink, blade, glue and oil stick. These works were created over the course of the Summer of 2017 (not including the title, which was crafted in May). It&rsquo;s not exhaustive, activist or comprehensive in any way.</span></p> <p><span>Citing this statement in her response, Solange understood how the weight of the responsibility and awareness that Walker is speaking to can get agonizingly heavy. But she added that she doesn&rsquo;t feel like her consciousness is a responsibility or a burden. Her actions and activism are embedded in her Blackness and womanness. She went on to say, &ldquo;</span>no matter what I do, where I am&mdash;if I&rsquo;m in Sweden or on Pluto&mdash;I&rsquo;m still a Black woman. So my work will always be through the lens of a Black woman. It might not deal with identity, it might not deal with pain or racism, but it will always be through this lens of a Black woman&rsquo;s body.&rdquo;</p> <p><span>Walker&rsquo;s statement, positioned next to Solange&rsquo;s response to Julious&rsquo; question, makes visible a duality that is deeply felt by many Black women, particularly Black women artists. It&rsquo;s a sense of fatigue and responsibility that is inextricably intertwined with a core calling and drive to express our experiences, whether they be joyous, meditative, restorative, and/or painful. Speaking up and for ourselves is often an inherent and arguably hereditary impulse. But expressing our words and holding our words in our throats has equally disastrous potential. But we usually take the risk to say&mdash;or decidedly and strategically not say&mdash;something. Speaking specifically to you, women artists of color, I hear time and again how we often feel the responsibility of having to articulate our experiences of being of color and of being women before we&rsquo;re able to speak on or show interest in anything else, let alone express the endless number of other ways in which we exist in this world as human beings, daughters, mothers, fighters, sisters, sister-friends, healers, thinkers, disruptors, houses, pathways, mountains, creators, and the ones who made all of this and everyone in it possible. Mutu had Santigold embody Mother Earth, right? The requests for us to publicly negotiate and grapple with our relationship and adjacency to our hue and gender is relentless. But it won&rsquo;t defeat us or even break our collective stride.</span></p> <p><span>The kind of relentlessness that I&rsquo;m interested in is the one that involves the generative and historically enduring love affair between art, music, and politics&mdash;especially from those like Solange who put Black women first. The fire and the light will be sustained as long as artists like her, Santigold, Mutu, and countless others are regularly breaking bread, sharing intellectual space, being hardcore stans of one another, and building cultural economies together free of fences and boundaries. And as long as we, the Black and Brown women of the world, are willing to remain devoted to our wellness, our visions and our connections to one another, being ready to (re)claim our shouts, silence, and seats at all the tables while at the same time constructing our own tables, we will most certainly </span><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTtrnDbOQAU" target="_blank">be alright</a>.</p> <p><em><span>All of Solange&rsquo;s and Britt Julious&rsquo; quotes are from the event </span></em><span>MCA Talk: Solange Knowles</span><em><span>, at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago on September 13, 2017. In some cases, the quotes were lightly edited for clarity and length. </span></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p background-color:="" font-size:="" line-height:="" new="" times="">&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/277796-tempestt-hazel?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Tempestt Hazel</a></p> <p background-color:="" font-size:="" line-height:="" new="" times=""><em><a href="http://tempestthazel.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tempestt Hazel</a>&nbsp;is an independent curator, writer, artist advocate, travel addict, and co-founder of Sixty Inches From Center, a Chicago-based online arts publication.</em></p> Thu, 28 Sep 2017 02:00:33 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Ayana V. Jackson’s Photographs Are Monuments to History’s Unmemorialized Black Women <p>Ayana Velissia Jackson is a photographer and video artist who makes amendments to a traditionally one-sided history of race and gender in photography. In her practice, Jackson positions her body as subject in order to create a new time/space in which she may interrogate tropes of the Black body in photography. Her recent Cape Town exhibition at Gallery MOMO, <em><a href="https://www.gallerymomo.com/exhibition/intimate-justice-in-the-stolen-moment/" target="_blank">Intimate Justice in the Stolen Moment</a></em>, is a visual dialogue that speaks to ideas of race, gender, pleasure, escapism, and creating monuments for the Black femme in history. Jackson&rsquo;s photography is not only a questioning of what it means to be a subject, but also a question of the photographer: what happens when the eye of the &ldquo;othered&rdquo; or &ldquo;erased&rdquo; becomes the director?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170925152430-Wild_as_the_Wind.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Wild as the Wind</em>, 2015, Archival pigment print. All images courtesy of the artist and Gallery MOMO, Cape Town</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Jessica Lanay: Your photography is an active interrogation of time and space. Your previous series <em><a href="https://www.ayanavjackson.com/poverty-pornography" target="_blank">Poverty Pornography</a></em> reminds me of the visual investment the Western World has in seeing the suffering Black body. What is the focus of <em>Intimate Justice in the Stolen Moment</em>?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ayana V Jackson:</strong> Well, the literal and figurative jumping point for this series and the exhibition is a piece that I did called <em>Wild is the Wind</em> that was made while I was in Paris in the summer of 2015. It was in the middle of the Black Lives Matter protests and grand jury results were coming in. I remember feeling completely paralyzed; I felt stuck and I had this desire to feel unstuck. So, I decided to do these movement studies, where I was literally in the courtyard jumping around. <em>Intimate Justice</em>, the title, comes from my friend Shatema Threadcraft and her book <em><a href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/intimate-justice-9780190251635?cc=nl&amp;lang=en&amp;" target="_blank">Intimate Justice</a></em>. Between that particular instance of me wanting to see and feel weightlessness and movement in the face of injustice and reading Shatema&rsquo;s book which is about the Black female body politic, where she is listing injustices against the Black woman&rsquo;s body&mdash;I felt this need to address that further, and that is how the exhibition came about. I needed, in myself, to find space, and air, and lightness.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170925152507-Demons-Devotees-I--750x722.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Demons/Devotees I</em>, 2012, Archival pigment print, 112 x 112 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: Do you think that context of the times changes the ways photographs are consumed? Or that time will change how your photographs are viewed?</strong></p> <p><strong>AVJ:</strong> Definitely. There is a work in [my series] <em>Archival Impulse</em> called <em>Demons/Devotees</em>&nbsp;that is based on <a href="http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ism/exhibitions/brutal-exposure/alice-seeley-harris.aspx" target="_blank">that photograph</a> of Alice Seeley Harris where she is standing on that mountain top with all the children. When I saw the photograph of Harris I was disgusted, but what also struck me was how differently anyone looks at that image now. All of that discursive symbolism in that photo leads to the idea of her as a savior and the children as savage. Now, for the most part&mdash;well, in Trump&rsquo;s America, who knows?&mdash;I think that most people would look at that photograph with a sense of frustration, suspicion, or anger. I definitely think that context and time have everything to do with it. And with my work, it is the same. I am quite curious, in 50 years, how my work will be discussed. There is a part of me that hopes that it will be rendered meaningless. I would hope that there is a generation that comes about that doesn&rsquo;t understand why it would be necessary.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170925152914-how_sweet_the_song.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>How sweet the song</em>, 2017, Archival pigment print on German etching paper, 119 x 109 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: When I look at your photographs they look as if they have been taken with 19th century cameras. What is the process like for creating photography like this? What it is like to photograph yourself in movement?</strong></p> <p><strong>AVJ:</strong> It isn&rsquo;t as exciting as one would think. First time it happened it was completely random, I was going for a stop motion image, and somehow it happened between the time of day and the exposure. But, it kinda just happened and so when I went to make the new ones I had a sense of how to control it. It is a combination of shutter speed and motion. I was a gymnast&mdash;if you watch tumblers for example, you have to isolate parts of your body in order to create certain kinds of movement. There was a lot of me trying to jump and still myself in mid-air while moving the skirt at the same time. And pacing myself in terms of the timer. There are milliseconds that make the difference in how the photograph ends up. I shot the new stuff in Paris this spring and it was really hot and I was dressed in all these clothes. At one point one of my legs seized up because I am also landing on the same foot every time&mdash;it was extremely physical, but I liked it. It is like dancing. I like the idea of these women in free space, in jovial and playful space.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170925171730-LUCY-PRINT-486x750.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Lucy</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">, 2017, Archival pigment print on German etching paper, 70 x 110 cm</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: In <em>Intimate Justice</em>, you pose to hint towards some famous images of women in art history. Examples are <em>Lucy</em>, pointing towards <em><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie-Guillemine_Benoist#/media/File:Marie-Guillemine_Benoist_-_portrait_d%27une_negresse.jpg" target="_blank">Portrait of a Negress</a></em> by Marie-Guillaume Benoist, and <em>Anarcha</em> pointing towards Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingre&rsquo;s painting <em><a href="http://www.louvre.fr/en/oeuvre-notices/bather-known-valpincon-bather" target="_blank">The Bather</a></em>. What relationship are you seeking to establish between these famous images and your poses?</strong></p> <p><strong>AVJ:</strong> Those are pretty much my exact reference points, definitely with <em>Portrait of a Negress</em>, but also with <em>The Bather. </em>I was also thinking of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_(slave)" target="_blank">the back of the whipped man</a> [Gordon] that was an illustration and there is another one of a woman as well and they are in the same position. There is a part of me that wants to change the meaning of those images and those illustrations. From what I understand about <em>Portrait of a Negress</em> is that there was this incredible scandal with that painting having been rendered: because she rendered a Black woman with the same kind of beauty and artistry that she would render her more aristocratic clients. The outrage that that painting evoked, for me, was also something that needs to be addressed and corrected. I wanted the works to be a bit familiar in that sense. It was a bit of a test in terms of my audience and whether or not they can accept this rendering: is it possible to see the Black woman&rsquo;s body as simply beautiful, as light, as free, as not in pain, as not suffering? Can one actually absorb this imagery purely as beauty as opposed to some kind of mimicry of something that is denied the Black body?</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="493" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-iGgmgMiuB0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Clip from&nbsp;<em>Compared to What</em>, from the&nbsp;<em>Intimate Justice in the Stolen Moment&nbsp;</em>series</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: Can you describe for us the mental and emotional process you go through when you are photographing yourself? How are your feelings and the final product related?</strong></p> <p><strong>AVJ:</strong> All of the work comes from an emotional space. Pretty much every new work is me working through something that was left open-ended or problematic in the artwork from before. The ground zero would probably be the <em><a href="https://www.ayanavjackson.com/leapfrog" target="_blank">Leapfrog</a></em> series which came out of a traumatic experience that I needed to work through. I began to work through why I felt the need to do that and then these other projects came through. It&rsquo;s in the conceptual phase of the work that I am most emotional, where I am figuring out how to address what was left untouched. With <em><a href="https://www.ayanavjackson.com/to-kill-or-allow-to-live-2016" target="_blank">To Kill Or Allow to Live</a></em> it was also the same day that I made <em>Wild is the Wind</em>. In that one I decided to be more specific and talk about injustice and the justice system. The blindfolding had to do with Lady Liberty and the time piece had to do with the recurrence of this rather than justice. In the photograph I was, in a <em>Matrix</em>-type way, dodging these bullets of injustice and ultimately surrendering with my hands up. The moment of creation is oddly uninteresting; the emotions essentially come back once the work is up and in the defending of the work. It is hard to undo that. What I want the work to do has not happened yet. I am still working from a place of pain.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170925152943-Ayana-V.-Jackson_Anarcha_2017-1050x1500.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><em>Anarcha</em>, 2017, Archival pigment print on German etching paper, 70 x 110 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: What does it mean for your body to inhabit the imaginary frame of Black women who have become important to history such as Lucy and Anarcha, the enslaved experimental subjects of surgeon <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Marion_Sims" target="_blank">J. Marion Sims</a>? Or Nina Simone&rsquo;s Saffronia? Is that healing for you?</strong></p> <p><strong>AVJ:</strong> It definitely is healing for me. And the more I get to spend time with them the more I am soothed by them. Whether they are real or imagined there is a part of me that is giving these women a moment that they deserved. There are these imaginary beings that are there, they are energies. With Lucy and Anarcha though, I am thinking through monuments when I was making those works last year on a residency. There were all of these protests about monuments and <em>where are the monuments to them?</em>&mdash;there are statues of Sims all over the country. I started off working with the actual speculum, I don&rsquo;t know where it is going to go, but I was thinking of monumentalizing these women. I made Saffronia at the same time, but I could not work with Betsy [another subject of Sims&rsquo;] at the time for some reason. Stepping into these women, embodying these women, and giving face to these women is a form of homage.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170925171855-SAFFRONIA-PRINT-750x577.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="font-size: 12px;">Saffronia</em><span style="font-size: 12px;">, 2017, Archival pigment print on German etching paper, 130 x 100 cm.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: Do your photographs suggest a relationship between humanity and unseen leisure?</strong></p> <p><strong>AVJ:</strong> Mostly, when I am thinking about leisure, I am thinking about <em>the right to</em> leisure. Again, back to <em>Poverty Pornography</em> and <em>Archival Impulse</em>, I suffer to see the Black body that is not at work or laboring. The right to have leisure is a human right. I do see a relationship between the two. When you are worked to death, when you are worked like an animal, there is no space for that. There have to be these stolen moments. Being enslaved, in terms of the Black American experience, is not the totality of our being. This work is about the future, not the present. It is my plea to humanity. It is too late for me, even if I woke up tomorrow and all of the injustices against the Black body were to somehow be eradicated, I would somehow still have my memory of my relationship to the injustices. The gravity of it still hurts my heart. In a way it is too late for me and those of us living in a racialized society, it is too late for us as well; it is all about the future.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170925172442-moments_of_sweet.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="font-size: 12px;">Moments of Sweet Reprieve</em><span style="font-size: 12px;">, 2017, Archival pigment print on German etching paper, 130 x 100 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em><a href="https://www.gallerymomo.com/exhibition/intimate-justice-in-the-stolen-moment/">Intimate Justice in the Stolen Moment</a> ran from July 27&ndash;August 27, 2017 at Gallery MOMO, Cape Town.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490259-jessica-lanay?tab=REVIEWS">Jessica Lanay</a></p> <p><em>Jessica Lanay is a poet and short story writer from the Florida Keys living in Pittsburgh. Her work can be found in Salt Hill Journal, Tahoma Literary Review, and is forthcoming in Fugue and The Common.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Ayana V. Jackson, <em>Labouring under the sign of the future</em>, 2017, Archival pigment print on German etching paper, 119 x 109 cm</span><span style="font-size:12px;">. All images courtesy of the artist and Gallery MOMO, Cape Town)</span></p> Wed, 27 Sep 2017 06:15:59 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Santina Amato Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48186-under-the-radar-nando-alvarez-perez-santina-amato-priya-thoresen" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/222365-santina-amato" target="_blank">Santina Amato</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I am wanting to capture the delight in things I felt as a child: the absolute thrill of watching things transform, move, grow, change. I grew up in an Italian immigrant household in Australia and participated in the process of cooking for the family with my mother. Watching her make dough was one of my absolute favorite things to experience as a child. The way her body moved, kneading the soft, white material, folding it over and onto itself, pushing the dough into existence with her whole body, was captivating. My imagination would run wild waiting for the dough to rise and transform, as it was left it alone in a bowl on my bed, covered in blankets.</p> <p>My work is embedded in psychoanalytical thinking and so there is a perverseness to the work, but I think that is only because we are adults looking at the work and have the experience of sex and how it affects us as humans. Desire/horror, strangeness/foreignness, intimacy and vulnerability, self and Other, presence and absence&mdash;these are the underlying themes in my work. I am interested in how we transform, both psychologically and physically, throughout our lives by our experiences of life itself and how that transformation can be either a delight or horrific.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170922131644-20170613201527-3O9A0036a_copy.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Untitled Dough Project (Self Portrait)</em>,&nbsp;2015, Video still, Duration 00:08 loop</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;m not one to dictate how others should and shouldn&rsquo;t exist in the world but I do enjoy Marina Abramovic&rsquo;s <a href="https://hirshhorn.si.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/An-Artists-Life-Manifesto.pdf" target="_blank">An Artist Life Manifesto</a>. For me, being an artist is about <em>owning</em> the unconventional, the unruly, the natural inclination to live a life outside of society&rsquo;s expectations based on gender, race, age, sexual orientation, and the role people assign to you simply because it is convenient to them. I have lived a non-chronormative life, so the saying &ldquo;you are never too old&rdquo; is totally relevant with my existence.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)? </strong></p> <p>I think I ate it! I&rsquo;m a huge cook and when I&rsquo;m not in the studio making art, I make food. But in terms of my arts practice, my latest work is always the greatest thing I&rsquo;ve ever made because it has eventuated as a result of all my previous works. It holds the history of my research, my stumblings, my successes, my failures, my experience. And so my greatest work that I have ever made continues to become, to transform, to change, to move, to grow, and to be continually created.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a a="" allowfullscreen="" dough="" frameborder="0" from="" height="360" href="https://vimeo.com" https:="" mozallowfullscreen="" on="" p="" player.vimeo.com="" project="" self="" target="_blank" untitled="" video="" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="640"><span style="font-size:12px;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="360" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/231582711" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="640"></iframe></span></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><a href="https://vimeo.com/231582711" target="_blank">Re-Performing Sculpture 1</a></em>, 2017, Video Still, Duration 61:05<br /> On view September 2&ndash;October 1 at Governors Island Art Fair. Building 405A. Open every weekend in September.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>Never say never because when you do, I will be more determined to make it happen!</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>My bestie <a href="http://www.katyagrokhovsky.net/" target="_blank">Katya Grokhovsky</a>, who has been profiled on Artslant and was a recent showcase winner (we were both finalists in the same category!). We met in Australia in undergrad at the Victorian College of the Arts and both of us came to America soon after graduating. We have now graduated from the same undergraduate and graduate programs (School of the Art Institute of Chicago) so I consider her my art twin. Her work is messy and all just &ldquo;too much,&rdquo; reminding me of a quote from Jill Soloway&rsquo;s TV series adaptation of Chris Kraus&rsquo; <em>I Love Dick</em>: &ldquo;I was born into a world that presumes there is something grotesque, unspeakable about female desire. And now all I want is to be undignified, to trash myself. I want to be a female monster.&rdquo;</p> <p><a href="https://www.mohadesehrahimitabar.com/" target="_blank">Mohadeseh Rahimitabar</a> was a peer of mine at SAIC and has just moved to NYC. She is an exceptional craftsperson and her thesis work had its foundation in an Iranian proverb: اگر دو پا داري ، دو تا ديگه هم قرض كن و فرار كن The English translation is: If you have two legs, borrow another pair and run. There is an elegance to her work and a desire to touch. She finishes the wood in her sculptures to a seductive finish.</p> <p><a href="http://liz-mccarthy.com/?page_id=405#1" target="_blank">Liz McCarthy</a> was recommended to me by one of my mentors here in Chicago. It so happened that she was assigned to be the ceramic tech at <a href="http://www.acreresidency.org/" target="_blank">ACRE</a> residency program at the same time I was to be artist in residence. I had never worked with ceramics and learnt a lot from this spunky woman. Her <em>Whistles Built For Many</em> sculpture series invites viewers to blow inside the ceramic vessels, their breath mixing, merging, and swirling around together, as they commune in sound. I just LOVE this idea.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;</em><em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<em><a href="https://vimeo.com/231582711" target="_blank">Re-Performing Sculpture 1</a></em>, 2017, Video Still, Duration 61:05)</span></p> Mon, 25 Sep 2017 14:07:06 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Haya Ogura | Rebecca Kaufman | Lesley Blakelock <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490558-haya-ogura?utm_source=HayaOgura&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Haya Ogura &ndash; Tokyo</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1061555?utm_source=HayaOgura&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061555/u3azr9/20170831003255-201707no5_30.png" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061556?utm_source=HayaOgura&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061556/mf2ji7/20170831003609-20140901_web_pinkoi_.png" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061558?utm_source=HayaOgura&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061558/mf2ji7/20170831003619-20140903_web_pinkoi_.png" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061559?utm_source=HayaOgura&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061559/mf2ji7/20170831003638-20140904_web_iichi_.png" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/489829-rebecca-kaufman?utm_source=RebeccaKaufman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Rebecca Kaufman &ndash; Oakland</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1059507?utm_source= RebeccaKaufman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059507/u3azr9/20170815033853-Kaufman_Rebecca_CMYK.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1059509?utm_source=RebeccaKaufman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059509/mf2ji7/20170815033859-Kaufman_Rebecca_Immaterial_Girl.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1059516?utm_source=RebeccaKaufman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059516/mf2ji7/20170815033924-Kaufman_Rebecca_Untitled__CRT_TV_.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1059506?utm_source=RebeccaKaufman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059506/mf2ji7/20170815033852-Kaufman_Rebecca_DNA.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/488348-lesley-blakelock?utm_source=LesleyBlakelock&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Lesley Blakelock &ndash; UK</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1056616?utm_source=LesleyBlakelock&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056616/u3azr9/20170725222129-Goodnight_kiss.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="75%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1056617?utm_source=LesleyBlakelock&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056617/mf2ji7/20170725222129-Hot_flush_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1056618?utm_source=LesleyBlakelock&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056618/mf2ji7/20170725222153-Hot_flush_2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1056621?utm_source=LesleyBlakelock&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056621/mf2ji7/20170725222301-Hot_flush_3.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Thu, 21 Sep 2017 11:44:53 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Andrea Crespo’s Latest Film Unpacks Dangerous Misrepresentations of Autism <p><em>[intensifies]</em>, Andrea Crespo&rsquo;s video installation, which opened at <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/events/show/454761-intensifies">Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler</a> during Berlin Art Week, runs for one hour. It has a linear plotline, with silent dialogue written over the image. The aesthetics are sparse;&nbsp;the film flickers through still shots of institutional interiors, revealing an interrogation in which the minds and bodies of people with autism are charted and managed by the State.&nbsp;In the gallery, the artist emphasizes this bodily control with clinical and military sensibilities, installing a site-specific graph of a five-step anxiety scale, repurposed from the Homeland Security Advisory, that is now used in special-education programs. Nine drawings accompany the installation.</p> <p>The video was first shown at <a href="https://listart.mit.edu/exhibitions/list-projects-andrea-crespo">List Projects</a>, MIT, in 2016, and its main character, Alan, is a composite of different autistic individuals Crespo has encountered in life and fiction. <em>[intensifies]</em> follows Alan as he receives various diagnoses, as he grows up and visits a series of psychologists (the main playground of his life), and as he is instructed, or rather, pressured to be synchronized with other children. Alan often falls into silence, submerged into rapture by shooter video games, the powder on ranch-flavored potato chips, puzzles, and cryptology. Over the course of the film, set amidst a backdrop of post-9/11 surveillance hysteria and tightening national borders, the viewer questions Alan&#39;s construction as both a future enemy of the United States and an outsider to his community.</p> <p><em>[intensifies] </em>analyzes the stereotypes surrounding autistic individuals as characteristically taciturn, as being almost inhuman, mechanical. Ironically, the pressure to become more human pushes the disabled body further into the wrenching gears of the cybernetic machine, leading the audience instead to the realization that they, too, are part of its rotations.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170919131449-2017_AC_KTZ_intensifies_exhibition_view_1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Andrea Crespo, <em>[intensifes]</em>, Installation view at Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin, 2017. Courtesy the artist; Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Vanessa Gravenor: I was struck by the banality contained within the film&rsquo;s scenography; to me, it appeared reminiscent of scenes from Middle America, middle-class white institutional settings.</strong></p> <p><strong>Andrea Crespo:</strong> The images are mostly drawn from Wikipedia Commons. I thought it would be appropriate to use these sorts of images as Wikipedia contributor&rsquo;s are disproportionately on the spectrum. These images exist as banal reference points for that relationship. There is a growing cultural association between the repetitive indexical tasks of information entry and autistic laborers who are often working for free. People seem to believe that autistic people are especially privileged in our technological milieu, but this is overstated, as only a minority of us are getting paid to work in the tech industry (overall, we experience higher rates of unemployment).</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170919131758-2016_AC_Homecoming.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Andrea Crespo,
 <i>Homecoming</i>, 2016, Graphite on paper. Courtesy the artist; Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin; Downs and Ross, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>VG: There&rsquo;s something odd in these types of medical spaces which dominate the scenes in your video; there is a sensory overload even though it is an extremely flat, null environment. It could often be conflated with something mystical, though it often feels like a non-place or junk space architecturally. Something very strange happens when your body enters the cybernetic circuit we call the medical industrial complex.</strong></p> <p><strong>AC:</strong> Definitely. I sometimes myself err towards a depressed affect that neurologically normal people like to characterize as &ldquo;deadened&rdquo; or &ldquo;machine-like&rdquo; (I, myself, was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome in 2005). Since the middle of the twentieth century autism has been linked to cybernetics and machinery, and these linkages were forged through the sciences as well as cultural representations. This is partly why this dehumanizing &ldquo;deadness&rdquo; gets misattributed to our behaviors and social illegibility.</p> <p>I think that is one of those things that is interesting and particularly disturbing to me: how people generally tend towards metaphorization of disabled people&rsquo;s embodied experiences; and this occurs in mass media as much as contemporary art, most often to our detriment. In <em>[intensifies]</em> I invoked many of these common metaphors in order to test and break them if not channel our symbolic potential in service of autism advocacy. I take special care to do this in a way that does not mask our humanity or turn us into flat objects that solely exist to reflect on social or technological conditions. We are more than that: we are not machines, we are human beings who are more often than not in pain and isolation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170918163245-2016_AC_intensifies_still.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Andrea Crespo, <em>[intensifes]</em>, 2016, Digital video, 1:00:57. Courtesy the artist; Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin; Downs and Ross, New York.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>VG: These adjectives like &ldquo;deadened&rdquo; or &ldquo;machine-like&rdquo; lead the main character to become a type of enemy because of alienation or being perceptually on the margins. I think this plays into the grander narrative you&rsquo;ve set up where this type of enemy or these drives are being created through different technology and social circuits the character encounters. Different events happen through the course of the film like the announcement of 9/11 as well as classroom lockdowns due to a suspected shooter. Alan is prompted to wonder if the others think he in fact is the assailant or the enemy to the so-called domestic American State.</strong></p> <p><strong>There&rsquo;s a historical connection to Alan Turing, who shares the same name as the main character Alan. Turing was highly skilled mathematically, a founder of computing technology, an agent of the state, and yet became an outlaw character at the end of his story. Why did you choose this as a foil for your present-day narrative?</strong></p> <p><strong>AC:</strong> I think it&rsquo;s a combination of the historical narrative and also the personal. When I was in middle school I went to group therapy and one of the people in group therapy was named Alan. He was autistic and into computers.&nbsp; He was also scapegoated and expelled from his school because of his errant behavior. This is a bit of a coincidence. Alan is sort of a composite of myself and other autistic people I&rsquo;ve personally met if not just encountered online. Sometimes we do align with those stereotypes but perhaps not in the violent ways that people expect. With Alan Turing, his alleged social clumsiness and technological prowess has turned him into a symbol of the post-WWII alignment between autism or the autistic body and &ldquo;cybernetic subjectivity.&rdquo; Brutto Bettelheim was a psychoanalyst who did work in the post-war era and was one of the first people who wrote about this connection with Joey &ldquo;the machine boy,&rdquo; a patient he, perhaps errantly and violently, turned into a metaphor to advance his ideas about industrialization and warfare&rsquo;s effects on humanity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170918170054-2017_AC_intensifies_exhibition_view_2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Andrea Crespo,&nbsp;<em>[intensifes]</em>, Installation view at Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin, 2017. Courtesy the artist; Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>VG: Turing is an important figure because of cybernetics but also because of his writing, which in turn influenced post-human discourse as we know it today through people like Rosi Braidotti and N. Katherine Hayles, who in some part built on his work. Ironically the cybernetic circuit that Hayles talks about in <em>How we became post human</em> proves to be a closed loop; everybody is part of its circuit&mdash;there is no exit. Paradoxically it is in your film that one really notices that the &ldquo;norm&rdquo; or perfect model turns out to be a machine, an anxiety scale formulated around the anxiety generated by terrorism and airplanes.</strong></p> <p><strong>AC:</strong> Definitely. The enforcement of compulsory able-bodiedness assumes the expectation that the body will perform as a well-functioning machine amongst a world of machines.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170919131832-2016_AC_Never_Forget__Again.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Andrea Crespo,
&nbsp;<em>Never Forget, Again</em>, 2016, graphite on paper. Courtesy the artist; Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin; Downs and Ross, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>VG: Why did you use 9/11 as the major demarcated event of the film?</strong></p> <p><strong>AC:</strong> I think there are two events that really shaped national affect at the turn of the millennium towards anxiety, fear, and risk-preparedness. That was Columbine and 9/11. These events created a generalized tension and expectation that there will be violence at any place at any given time. The homeland security scale was adopted as a mechanism against terrorism. In my research I found that this scale has been adopted by some special education teachers to manage the affect of the autistic body, which becomes a microcosm of the national body and the management of its affect.</p> <p>Again, in invoking the autistic body as a &ldquo;machine,&rdquo; Alan conceives himself as an airplane that at any given point might be neurologically &ldquo;hijacked&rdquo; and be subject to behaving unpredictably. In such an atmosphere of anxiety and fear, someone like Alan sets off alarms and red flags, regardless of the probability of actual violence occurring.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170919131513-2017_AC_KTZ_intensifies_exhibition_view_6.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Andrea Crespo,&nbsp;<em>[intensifes]</em>, Installation view at Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin, 2017. Courtesy the artist; Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>VG: The video is installed with seats that have been acquired from the MIT List Projects. The colors of these seats reflect the anxiety scale, the range from 1 to 5 that was purposed from the homeland security scale. The humorous implication is that the viewer is supposed to rate their anxiety while watching the video.</strong></p> <p><strong>AC:</strong> I was interested in how a student&rsquo;s body could be indexed through color-coding just as citizenry and its affective/emotional states can be indexed through a color system. I wanted to concretize that in a specific way&mdash;especially how in educational environments where you more severely see the sorting of people based on the ability of people. And really, not just ability, but manageability and co-operability.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170919131850-2016_AC_Bullycide.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Andrea Crespo, 
<em>Bullycide</em>, 2016
, Graphite on paper. Courtesy the artist; Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin; Downs and Ross, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>VG: There&rsquo;s one scene in particular that I wanted to touch upon. Through the course of the film, you find out that Alan likes to play video games. There&rsquo;s an uncertain dialogue that challenges the groundedness of perspective, particularly in the film&rsquo;s shooter simulation game sequence. I began to try to analyze the dimension of realness of the sound. Are the gunshots coming from the game? Are they coming from somewhere else? </strong></p> <p><strong>The dimension of realness, or the gaming aspect that violence tends to have today is well-trodden terrain for artists such as Harun Farocki, who perhaps did the most work to analyze the relation the video game has to the actual training simulations armies use. His work has essentially proven that there is no &ldquo;real&rdquo; violence. Everything is simulation. So why don&rsquo;t we kill in game? Or rather, in order to wage war now, why do we have to first establish reality as fiction?</strong></p> <p><strong>AC:</strong> Again I was really trying to touch on these cultural associations that everyone sort of knows but we don&rsquo;t know where they come from. I think it is the connection between video games and mass shootings; the connection [to the autistic or otherwise neurologically deviant individual] has been forged since Columbine. Mass shootings and video games have triangulated with mental illness. There is an actual real connection, as you said, with the military industrial complex and entertainment industries but they assume that the player is someone who is normal and has a nervous system which operates normally and can create a barrier between fiction and reality, etc.</p> <p>There are certain toxicities in the environment that are integral to the smooth cybernetic functioning of our defense and entertainment industries. However, the neurologically deviant person becomes like a wrench in the works, or perhaps, they are conceived as always having the potential to act as &ldquo;glitches,&rdquo; to use a computational term. As a result, the same cultural products that are supposed to breed soldiers who channel that violence outwardly and abroad in service of the nation-state can go &ldquo;autoimmune&rdquo; and channel that violence within a domestic context.</p> <p>It is this characterization of vulnerable and disabled individuals that creates an atmosphere of anxiety-induced scapegoating and exclusion. The reality is that people with mental illnesses are more likely to be victims of rather than perpetrators of violence and aggression.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/429088-vanessa-gravenor?tab=REVIEWS">Vanessa Gravenor</a></p> <p><em>Vanessa Gravenor is an artist and critic living in Berlin.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Andrea Crespo, <em>[intensifes]</em>, 2016, Digital video, 1:00:57. Courtesy the artist; Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin; Downs and Ross, New York)</span></p> Tue, 19 Sep 2017 07:46:02 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Dain Mergenthaler Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/48067-under-the-radar-romily-alice-walden-dain-mergenthaler-katya-grokhovsky" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/415736-dain-mergenthaler" target="_blank">Dain Mergenthaler</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I think that my cartoony, frilly, animated work is a ploy to coax viewers into looking at the world around them with fresh, queer eyes: to look under rocks and into subway grates and at lamp posts and between train cars and find a new, alien world that is dangerous and sexy and scary at the same exact time that it is benign and gray. I&rsquo;ve become quite obsessed with this manipulation in hopes that I can warp our immutable circumstances within consumerism and life after industrialization. By using weaving, felting, net-making, and other anachronisms, I try to lend some bargaining power to my color palettes and materials, but also to prod viewers into thinking about our surroundings created in the past while envisioning a future.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>An artist hovers somewhere in between selfishly and with great hubris surrendering their life for the pursuit of the enlightenment of themselves, and with a profound humility and humbleness, asking others to listen while they speak. However, the artist has a responsibility to give a voice to more than just their own work.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170915145725-Mergenthaler-Dain_Kat-Lyfe-2010_955__1_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Kat Lyfe</em>, 2010, Handwoven rayon (doublecloth), 36 x 18 inches. Photo: Max Schwartz</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Every time I&nbsp;finish&nbsp;something I think it&rsquo;s the greatest, but this work has continued to mean a lot to me. It was one of the first big-deal weavings I made, but also I just love looking at old work and seeing the themes and ideas that continue to be present in my work now.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>I want to categorize, inventory, and archive all of the objects in my possession, but I&rsquo;m much too disorganized, and worse: I&rsquo;m too attached to using them.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.margarethull.com/" target="_blank">Margaret Hull</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.rarabernstein.com/" target="_blank">Laura Bernstein</a>, &amp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.katyfischer.com/" target="_blank">Katy Fischer</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <i>How to Tie a Knot</i>, 2017, Video)</span></p> Mon, 18 Sep 2017 06:38:36 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Where Is Ana Mendieta? Inspiring a New Generation of Artists Today <p>On the 8th of September, 1985, Cuban-American performance and multi-media artist Ana Mendieta fell naked from the window of her 34th floor apartment. The fatal fall occurred in the presence of her then husband, minimalist sculptor Carl Andre, who was subsequently charged with her murder. Despite evidence, including Mendieta&rsquo;s acute fear of heights, which would have presumably kept her at a distance from the apartment&rsquo;s large sliding glass windows, and witness statements claiming they heard an audible struggle, Andre was acquitted by a judge three years later on grounds of reasonable doubt.</p> <p>For many of Mendieta&rsquo;s close friends, family members, and contemporaries this acquittal far from solidified Andre&rsquo;s innocence. Rather, they saw the case as mishandled and representative of larger problems plaguing both the art world and justice system. During the trial, as Andre&rsquo;s account of the evening continued to morph and contradict itself, his lawyers were quick to use the contents of Mendieta&rsquo;s highly intimate artwork to prove her instability and likeliness to self harm. Despite the controversy, Andre&rsquo;s career suffered only slightly. Particularly in Europe, where he spent a significant amount of time following the acquittal, he continues to enjoy both critical and institutional success. The familiarity of this story and the inequalities it represents inspired support for Mendieta in great numbers, and actions in her defense at the time of Andre&rsquo;s trial would soon lay the foundation for a longstanding tradition of activism that continues in her name today.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170915083908-ana_fliers.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">WHEREISANAMENDIETA flyer</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Though Mendieta&rsquo;s career was not ended as abruptly as her life, its momentum was significantly slowed. She was once a pioneer in her field, fearlessly tackling subjects like mortality and violence against women&mdash; topics scarcely touched by her contemporaries at the time&mdash; through the lens of emerging genres like land and body art. While Mendieta has been featured in a number of major solo retrospectives, most recently the <a href="http://www.artic.edu/exhibition/ana-mendieta" target="_blank">Art Institute of Chicago&rsquo;s <em>Ana Mendieta</em></a> in 2011, by nearly every conventional metric her career has achieved less consistent and high-profile attention than Andre&rsquo;s.</p> <p>It was 1992 when the first protest of Mendieta&rsquo;s erasure from the art world was organized. The&nbsp;<a href="http://archives.nypl.org/mss/3376" target="_blank">Women&rsquo;s Action Coalition</a>&nbsp;gathered 500 protesters outside of New York&rsquo;s Guggenheim Museum on an opening day, holding a banner which read &ldquo;Carl Andre is in the Guggenheim. Where is Ana Mendieta?&rdquo; They also pervaded the invite-only opening gala, dispersing pictures of Mendieta around some of Andre&rsquo;s exhibited sculptures. Three years later, the Guerilla Girls released a poster calling Andre &ldquo;the O.J. of the art world.&rdquo; More recently, on the 25th anniversary of her death, NYU&rsquo;s department of performance studies threw a&nbsp;<a href="http://hemisphericinstitute.org/hemi/en/past-events/713-where-is-mendieta" target="_blank">symposium</a>&nbsp;inspired by this action titled &ldquo;Where is Ana Mendieta?&rdquo; Addressing both the significant impact her work had in subsequent years on feminist art as well as the suspicious and controversial conditions of her death, this 2010 symposium featured panel discussions from curators, professors, and artists as well as original work and archives of Mendieta&rsquo;s from A.I.R. Gallery. In 2014&nbsp;<a href="https://www.diaart.org/" target="_blank">Dia Art Foundation</a>&nbsp;hosted a Carl Andre&nbsp;<a href="https://www.diaart.org/about/press/dia-art-foundation-to-present-carl-andre-sculpture-as-place-19582010-may-5-2014march-2-2015/type/text" target="_blank">retrospective</a>&nbsp;which was&nbsp;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EznmPOhPnK4" target="_blank">protested</a>&nbsp;by feminist group&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/nowavetaskforce/" target="_blank">No Wave Performance Task Force</a>&nbsp;who poured animal blood outside the gallery as an homage to her art practice and reminder of her death.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170915083622-guerilla-girls-ana-mendieta.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://www.guerrillagirls.com/" target="_blank">Guerilla Girls</a>, 1995</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Founded in London in 2016 by a group of female and non-binary artists and activists <a href="https://www.facebook.com/Whereisanamendieta-579715112153559/" target="_blank">WHEREISANAMENDIETA</a> is carrying on this longstanding tradition of rallying around the artist to keep her work and story alive. Though they have organized a number of high profile protests over the past year at Carl Andre exhibitions in London and Berlin at institutions like the <a href="http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/carl-andre-648" target="_blank">Tate Modern</a> and <a href="http://www.smb.museum/en/exhibitions/detail/carl-andre-sculpture-as-place-1958-2010.html" target="_blank">Hamburger Bahnhof</a>, their activism is not reserved exclusively for acts in defiance of Andre. Instead, they center Mendieta herself. Inspired by her art, with its strong thread of self documentation, this loose collective has been <a href="https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=867309680060766&amp;id=579715112153559">building an archive</a> of work from artists who feel her story resonates with them. Self- and collective documentation of those who bear the weight of systemic oppression, they believe, is a radical act of resisting erasure. The group is currently raising funds to launch this digital archive online.</p> <p>The word resonance seems to be essential to Mendieta&rsquo;s life after death. Being a woman of color, refugee from the Cuban revolution, victim of domestic violence, and artist whose scathingly vulnerable artwork was used to prove her instability, she echoes the stories of so many who suffer under societal biases that infect both the art world and beyond. For <a href="https://twitter.com/livwynter?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor" target="_blank">Liv Wynter</a>, an artist and founding organizer of WHEREISANAMENDIETA, similar experiences of domestic violence resonated with her and moved her to organize in support. &ldquo;My motive was basically to make noise, to remember our sister who has passed, and to demand acknowledgement for how many murderers and abusers, most of whom are white men, occupy these galleries,&rdquo; she explains.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170915084938-Daimler_Contemporary.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">WHEREISANAMENDIETA organizers prepare for an action outside a Carl Andre exhibition at Daimler Contemporary in Berlin in June. The action was shut down before it could even begin.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Wynter connects with the artist as a survivor of domestic violence herself who makes work about intense feelings, emotions, and abuse. Nevertheless, she wanted to be clear that she is not occupying or claiming Mendieta&#39;s story, which includes the identifiers of race and the trauma of forced migration. &ldquo;The aim,&rdquo; Wynter says, &ldquo;of both the zine that we initially published and the archive we are going on to create is to platform and project voices who feel other connections to Ana.&rdquo;</p> <p>For artist, cultural theorist, activist, and University of Amsterdam Cultural Analysis PhD candidate <a href="http://nineyamamotomasson.tumblr.com/biocontact" target="_blank">Nine Yamamoto-Masson</a> it was also through resonance that Ana Mendieta became not only a source of creative influence and inspiration but also a symbol of the toxic effects of oppressive societal patterns rooted in patriarchy, white supremacy, and ableism. Yamamoto-Masson has contributed to WHEREISANAMENDIETA&rsquo;s <a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B543es7FPf0SYTRIZU80V1NXcUJVRjN1ckNYTzl2UFY2eXpF/view" target="_blank">zine</a>, and also offered a poem which was read during the group&#39;s original Tate London protest. She has been a physical presence in subsequent Berlin actions where she is based. She also recognizes the problematic nature of projecting on or appropriating other people&rsquo;s traumatic stories. Nevertheless the personal parallels Yamamoto-Masson has experienced first hand as a woman of color, immigrant, survivor of intimate partner and sexual violence are consequences of the same systems of structural oppression that harmed Mendieta and continue to harm countless others. &ldquo;I have lost too many good people I loved to these structural violences and seen too many good people suffer, while violent men (especially violent white men) face little to no legal and social consequences for their violent actions.&rdquo; she explains. &ldquo;For me this is unacceptable, and it is not an option for me personally to sit idly by.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170915085050-ana_fliers_3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">WHEREISANAMENDIETA flyer</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Berlin-based artist and a founder member of the city&rsquo;s satellite group, <a href="http://naomibisley.com/" target="_blank">Naomi Bisley</a> raises the question of complicity in explaining her connection to WHEREISANAMENDIETA. She expounds that stories of violence against women are often those traded between peers in hushed tones; they are not the stories given attention to by mainstream media, they are not the stories which appear in our history books. &ldquo;These are stories created by the dynamics at play in all levels of a society that disproportionately and systematically penalizes black and brown people, that dismisses survivors, that excludes women/non-binary/trans people, while violent white men get away with minimal or no legal consequences for their violent actions,&rdquo; Bisley says. &ldquo;Of course the art world is included in this structure, and every single gallery/institution/individual who participates in it without speaking out is complicit.&rdquo;</p> <p>Activists who see parallels to themselves, their peers, and their loved ones in Mendieta&rsquo;s narrative refuse to be complicit; they will not let her death or work fade into the distance. It is this determination that keeps the movement alive. Separate groups acting decades apart have now informed a global movement, have provided it with a name, traditions, and a goal not only to bring Mendieta into all conversations circling Andre but also to build new things on the inspiration of her practice. Wherever there is Carl Andre, wherever there is erasure of artists who are women, non-binary, or of color, there is also WHEREISANAMENDIETA&mdash;anyone who wants to pose this question to a gallery or institution can act under that name. Where a history dictated by patriarchy, white supremacy, and ableism once existed there is now an archive, building and documenting a new, more just history. For those who seek the stories of Mendieta&rsquo;s disciples there is now a zine. As the last line of WHEREISANAMENDIETA&rsquo;s manifesto reads: &ldquo;A violent white man over a dead woman of color, this is a rhetoric we encounter constantly, daily, and it must end.&rdquo;</p> <p>More details about WHEREISANAMENDIETA&rsquo;s digital archive and submitting artwork can be found on their Facebook page <a href="https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=867309680060766&amp;id=579715112153559" target="_blank">here</a>. Submissions can be directed to whereisanamendieta@gmail.com.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;Maya-Roisin Slater</p> <div><em>Maya-Roisin Slater is a Canadian-born, Berlin-based writer and editor with a focus on arts and culture. She writes for publications like Creators, Teen Vogue, Crack Magazine, and others. More of her writing can be found at&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://maya-roisin.com/work&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1505916241210000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHMvaoVJDYdGWUPNXsUwd-6NmSukA" href="http://maya-roisin.com/work" target="_blank">maya-roisin.com/work</a>.</em></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: WHEREISANAMENDIETA organizers prepare for an action outside a Carl Andre exhibition at Daimler Contemporary in Berlin in June. The action was shut down before it could even begin.)</span></p> Tue, 19 Sep 2017 07:12:22 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list An Exhibition of Afro-Cuban Art Unmasks the Legacy of Racism in Cuba <p>At the heart of the exhibition <a href="http://www.withoutmasks.org/" target="_blank"><em>Sin M</em><em>&aacute;</em><em>scaras</em> (<em>Without Masks</em>)</a>, currently at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana, is the inherent contradiction between socialism&rsquo;s ideals of equality and the lived experiences of racism for Cuban artists of African descent. Centering the Afro-Cuban experience, its complex social and political history, and the censorship of voices seeking to expose inequalities, <em>Sin M&aacute;scaras </em>is described as the largest and most comprehensive exhibition dedicated to contemporary Afro-Cuban art to date. It features some 150 artworks by 40 Cuban artists living on, and outside the island. Their work gives a diverse account of the subjects of racism, religion, Afro-Cuban identity, and the firm ties between Cuba and Sub-Saharan Africa.</p> <p>The exhibition&rsquo;s underlying themes derive from the history of Cuba&rsquo;s African descendants, who were seized predominantly from West Africa. Since their uprooting, the country&rsquo;s legacy of subjugation and deep-seated racial bias has persisted, evolving over centuries. First as slaves, then as obedient second-class citizens during US Hegemony, the marginalization of the country&rsquo;s Black population&mdash;despite claims to the contrary&mdash;continued well after the Cuban Revolution in 1959.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170913155957-7._NASAKO.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n Manso,&nbsp;<em>Nasak&oacute; inici&oacute; (Nasak&oacute; did initiate)</em>, 1986, Collography and dry print on heavy paper, 432 x 563 mm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Seen implicitly as a division of class, the ill treatment of Black and mixed Cubans on the eve of revolution was considered both counter-socialist and counterrevolutionary. Shortly after his arrival to power, Castro launched&nbsp;<a href="http://www.coha.org/revolutionary-racism-in-cuba/" target="_blank">a series of campaigns</a>&nbsp;aimed at eliminating racial disparities socially and economically. The core issue of racial inequality, however, continued to fester: Castro&rsquo;s reforms tackled unequal opportunities among minorities, but they never addressed the historical, cultural, and structural conditions that gave rise to it. After deeming his efforts successful, Castro pronounced that any further discussion of racism could &ldquo;divide the nation,&rdquo; and would be considered a crime against the regime. This led to the continued masking and erasure of the experiences of Cubans of color.</p> <p>The long-lasting effect of their repression is, of course, linked to key factors&mdash;namely, Spain and United States&rsquo; strong influence over Cuba. In his essay &ldquo;Nuestra Am&eacute;rica (Our America),&rdquo; written in 1891, the Cuban author and visionary Jose Mart&iacute; called for the rejection of their imperial values in favor of a politically and culturally autonomous Latin America. Necessary for this reform would be Cuba&rsquo;s unity, including the casting aside of identifiers such as Black, White, or Mulatto. &ldquo;There can be no racial animosity, because there are no races,&rdquo; Mart&iacute; proclaimed. Platitudes like &ldquo;race is not an issue&rdquo; and &ldquo;<a href="http://www.coha.org/revolutionary-racism-in-cuba/">we are all Cuban</a>&rdquo; have been common refrains over the past century and a half.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170915125246-5._EL_MUNDO.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Manuel Arenas, <em>El mundo</em>, 2003, Collage, ash, and acrylic on card, 80 x 100 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Essential to the 1959 Revolution was forging the color-blind sentiment that Mart&iacute; called for. Cubans came together to fight for the same cause, one that would affect all, rather than some fragments of the island&rsquo;s population. For Cubans of color, however, it soon became evident that the temporary sense of unity failed; racism persisted after the revolution and to this day.</p> <p><em>Sin M&aacute;scaras</em>, curated by Cuban writer, art critic, and researcher, Orlando Hernandez, openly discloses the precarious nature of Cuba&rsquo;s history, revealing how the problems of marginalization still play out in the daily lives of Cubans of color. Hernandez recently spoke with me about the unique opportunity it provides audiences&mdash;both in Cuba and further afield&mdash;to grasp a tradition that is as definitive of Cuba as the more common images it projects abroad: revolutions, Ch&eacute;, and Buena Vista Social Club. Previously installed in Johannesburg (2010) and Vancouver (2014), the show has now landed on &ldquo;home ground&rdquo; in Havana, bringing with it a number of works never before exhibited in the country. The artworks belong to the extensive private collection of the South African entrepreneur, Chris von Christierson, who has amassed over 450 contemporary pieces that aim to reveal fundamental truths that are commonly unknown, &ldquo;masked,&rdquo; or underrepresented about contemporary Cuban society. Since its inception, the collection was intended to travel to&nbsp;locations historically tied to Sub-Saharan Africa, highlighting topics pertinent to the Black diaspora.&nbsp;Many of the artworks are politically explicit, but others have a more implicit political tone: the very act of depicting the social and cultural realities of Afro-Cuban life makes evident the diverse visions and voices of an underrepresented community.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170913155850-1._AFRICAN_ABSTRACT.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Pedro Alvarez, <em>African Abstract</em>, 2003, Oil on canvas, 146 x 348 cm (six panels)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The aim of the Havana installment, as Hernandez explains in the exhibition&rsquo;s press release, is to show the other side of Cuban culture, &ldquo;meaning Black tradition, the African inheritance.&rdquo; That is, a legacy that arrived with slavery, leaving deposits of tradition and religion that are central to the Cuban cultural fabric today. This sentiment is traced in Hernandez&rsquo;s curatorial choices&mdash;instead of exhibiting the works thematically, they are grouped hierarchically by the artists&rsquo; ages. Deceased and eldest are presented first, echoing Afro-Cuban religious practices during ceremonial rites. The works in <em>Sin M</em><em>&aacute;</em><em>scaras</em>, most of which were produced in the last three decades, include painting, photography, installation, and video by a number of well-known artists such as Roberto Salas and Carlos Garaicoa. The collection also includes work by less famous artists, favoring the amassed representations of a marginalized community over institutionally revered works.</p> <p>This exhibition is not the first within, or outside, the country to consider issues of race and identity. The exhibit <em>Queloides</em> (2011) that took place in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, focused entirely on the persistent, and deeply ingrained issue of racial discrimination in Cuban socialist society. A number of the show&rsquo;s participating artists are also present in <em>Sin M</em><em>&aacute;</em><em>scaras</em>, such as Belkis Ay&oacute;n Maso and Manuel Arenas. Nevertheless, showcasing such works inside Cuba is no simple task. Government authorities have often censored public discussion of issues concerning the country&rsquo;s racial inequality or Afro-Cuban religions, as both these subjects are a threat to the dominant socialist ideology. &ldquo;It is important to know that after 1959 (Cuban Revolution), the Afro-Cuban religions of Abaku&aacute;, Oche e If&aacute;, and Palo Monte, were censored and despised by popular thought, since the prevailing ideology was scientific and atheist,&rdquo; says Hernandez. &ldquo;Added to that is that the religion has always been practiced by the poor and the African population, and has been considered malevolent and associated with black magic. Cult art representations have helped us understand its cultural, aesthetic, and symbolic relevance.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170913155739-VC___BEDIA___KINDEMBO.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Jos&eacute; Bedia, <em>Kindembo Sarabanda Malongo Yaya Arriba Ntoto</em>, 2009</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Despite socialism&rsquo;s firm rejection of religion, Cubans persisted in practicing traditional African beliefs carried over by the estimated 600,000 slaves brought to the country. Thus, representing Afro-Cuban religions in visual art belongs to a long tradition, with artists such as Wifredo Lam as a forerunner in the 1960s. Since the 80s and 90s, the number of artists interrogating this subject have increased. On display at <em>Sin M</em><em>&aacute;</em><em>scaras</em> are paintings by Jos&eacute; Bedia and Manuel Mendive whose works allude to religious symbolism and Blackness, themes inextricably linked within Afro-Cuban culture. Bedia&rsquo;s <em>Kindembo Sarabanda Malongo Yaya Arriba Ntoto</em> (2009) is a large painting depicting the primary sacred object in the Palo Monte religion: a large vessel containing consecrated items. The painting shows an x-ray image of the vessel&rsquo;s contents which include sticks, herbs, animals, soil, chain, a human skull, and tools. In the background, a stylized image of a Black man&rsquo;s figure appears, with arms stretched in a gesture of embrace. This painting is quintessential for understanding the underlying presence of Afro-Cuban religions on almost every level of contemporary Cuban society and their perseverance despite popular rejection.</p> <p>Hernandez says that &ldquo;another theme that emerged strongly in the mid-1990s with artists such as Manuel Arenas, Alexis Esquivel, and Elio Rodriguez, is the subject of racial conflict. The artists commented on social discrimination, racial stereotypes, and racism that is still present in the mentality in parts of the Cuban society.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170913155656-4._CUIDADO_NEGRO.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Manuel Arenas, </span><em style="font-size: 12px;">Cuidado Hay Negro</em><span style="font-size: 12px;">, 1993&ndash;2011, Acrylic on cardboard, 55 x 75 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This is exemplified in Manuel Arenas&rsquo; painting <em>Cuidado Hay Negro (Be Careful, There Is A Black Man)</em>. The likely self-portrait is obscured by the bold letters, categorizing the depicted man as a subject of potential harm. The insidious association between Blackness and danger lingers in Cuba, as it does in many other places in the Western world today.</p> <p>Pervasive racism and the misunderstanding or hostility towards non-Western religious practices are global issues, says the curator. By addressing them, the exhibition transcends the boundaries of the Cuban experience, as these problems thrive in other locations such as the United States and most of Latin America. This exhibition has the potential to highlight how non-Cuban artists in other places are dealing with similar issues unique to their region, calling forward art&rsquo;s capacity for social activism.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170913155632-8._UN_PASEO.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Alexis Esquivel Berm&uacute;dez, La Paix de Cuito Cuanavale o (<em>un paseo por el parque Lenin despu&eacute;s de la victoria)</em>, 2011, 114 x 175 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Can this show have an impact on its audience in Havana, opening as it does onto the nation&rsquo;s &ldquo;masked&rdquo; or unspoken truths about its relationship to Afro-Cuban traditions? Hernandez thinks so:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">It has been our main goal, to unmask some situations and conflicts, which have been veiled over time, disguised or misinterpreted. Cuban people that visited the exhibition immediately recognized how important is to talk openly, and without fear from art that tackles problems of racism, discrimination, and racial stereotypes that still exist in Cuba and everywhere else. The exhibit has shown how important it is to passionately express the strong tradition of Afro-Cuban religions that most of us share, in spite of the color of our skin, or our professional or economic situation, and also in spite of the socialist ideology that has been imposed as an official rule for the last 60 years. I think that the public needs to know that at least some artists, curators, and art collectors, are interested in the same problems they confront in their daily lives.</p> <p>The exhibition&rsquo;s very presence in Havana marks a modest improvement on the problems described&mdash;it is, after all, taking place in the National Museum of Fine Art, a high profile location attracting many daily visitors: local art enthusiasts, students, artists, scholars, foreign tourists, and art collectors. For the local viewer, the show is clear, powerful, and symbolic&mdash;a move in the right direction towards exposing silenced voices and invisible subjects. It gestures to the end of a long tradition of mis- or non-representation. The collection&rsquo;s display on &ldquo;home ground&rdquo; is crucial for its local audience and for a young generation of Cuban artists who can see that, as Hernandez mentions, there are people in the art community&mdash;artists, collectors, curators, scholars&mdash;dedicated to social change.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170913155554-12._VC___ALOM___PALABRAS.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Juan Carlos Alom, <em>Sin palabras (Without words)</em>, 1996, 105 x 82.5 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Mobilizing artwork to visualize marginalized communities and to expose injustices is especially necessary today in places other than Cuba. Just a short distance away, across the water, one of the world&rsquo;s superpowers and emblems of success faces similar issues despite radically different political and historical circumstances. Expressing a sincere belief in the power of art to reveal and amplify the things societies would rather keep hidden, Hernandez hopes that <em>Sin M</em><em>&aacute;</em><em>scaras </em>will one day travel to the United States, Brazil, or Peru, where he says racism and intolerance still thrive, regardless of the counties&rsquo; economic, political, or cultural distinctions.</p> <p><br /> &mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/396844-yoli-yoanna-terziyska?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Yoli (Yoanna) Terziyska</a></p> <p><em>Yoli is an art writer working in Toronto, London, and Havana.</em></p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Rene Pe&ntilde;a, <em>White Pillow</em> from the series <em>Untitled Album</em>, 2007, Photography, Digital print, 100 x 133 cm. All images courtesy of the von Christierson Collection of contemporary Afro-Cuban art.)</span></p> Fri, 15 Sep 2017 09:57:15 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list