ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Heather Dewey-Hagborg and Chelsea Manning Publish Comic in Last Push for Obama Clemency <p>Heather Dewey-Hagborg is perhaps best known for her project&nbsp;<em>Stranger Visions</em>, a dystopian romp into the world of cheap genetics technology and surveillance culture where she was able to create facial masks of New Yorkers from bits of gum and hair left by individuals on the streets.</p> <p>Unfamiliar? Read <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46776-heather-dewey-hagborg-questions-dna-as-big-data" target="_blank">our interview with her</a> from last year to catch up.</p> <p>Today, she released a comic, <em>Suppressed Images</em>, in collaboration with Army whistle-blower Chelsea Manning and illustrator Shoili Kanungo as one final push to gain clemency from out-going President Barack Obama. Manning has been <a href="http://news.vice.com/story/chelsea-manning-is-on-obamas-short-list-for-his-final-acts-of-clemency" target="_blank">reported</a> to be on his clemency&nbsp;shortlist.</p> <p>The comic tells the story of how Dewey-Hagborg came to work with Manning on&nbsp;<i background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">Radical Love: Chelsea Manning</i>, a project initiated by Paper Magazine to create a DNA portrait of Manning, since the Army would not allow any portraits of her to be taken.</p> <p>When asked about the significance of this act of visual representation, Dewey-Hagborg said, &ldquo;As Chelsea has described elsewhere, our current society depends a lot on visibility. To be&nbsp;invisible&nbsp;is, in a sense, to cease to exist. This is the power of a person&rsquo;s image which the prison strips her of. The idea behind the piece was to give her back some of the visibility and power she was stripped of.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Chelsea is such an inspiration to me personally,&rdquo; Dewey-Hagborg continued. &ldquo;I really wanted this comic book to show her incredible spirit and resilience and sense of humor. The media really doesn&rsquo;t capture this. I want people to see her humanity, in addition to her brave act.&rdquo;</p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170117164916-explanation-large-1.jpg" /></p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170117164927-2.jpg" /></p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170117170628-2__1_.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The comic is another vector in a <a href="https://www.freechelsea.com/" target="_blank">wider campaign</a> urging Obama to grant Manning clemency. Here&rsquo;s hoping this goal will come to fruition.</p> <p><em>Read the entire comic&nbsp;<a href="https://suppressedimages.net/" target="_blank">here</a>.</em></p> <p><strong>UPDATE</strong>: President Obama has&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/17/us/politics/obama-commutes-bulk-of-chelsea-mannings-sentence.html?hp&amp;action=click&amp;pgtype=Homepage&amp;clickSource=story-heading&amp;module=a-lede-package-region&amp;region=top-news&amp;WT.nav=top-news" target="_blank">commuted Chelsea Manning&#39;s prison sentence</a>, she will be released on May 17th.</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/153044-joel-kuennen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Joel Kuennen</a></p> <p><em>Joel Kuennen&nbsp;is the Chief Operations Officer and a Senior Editor at ArtSlant.</em>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 17 Jan 2017 23:22:11 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Ella Goerner | Matthew Penkala | Ben Pederson <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/474870-ella-goerner?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Ella Goerner &ndash; Berlin</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024137?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024137/u3azr9/20170110165145-Ella_Goerner_room_shave_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_sis.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024147?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024147/mf2ji7/20170110180835-Ella_Goerner_room_dialogue_metals_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_sis_more.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024148?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024148/u3azr9/20170110180933-Ella_Goerner_Nugget_sis_2_8_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024146?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024146/mf2ji7/20170110180632-Ella_Goerner_Better_Than_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/337-matthew-penkala?utm_source=MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Matthew Penkala &ndash; Los Angeles</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869568?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869568/u3azr9/20141130185408-dont_put_me_in_a_box_cosmonaut_web.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869573?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869573/mf2ji7/20141130185752-waiting_for_the_shipwreck_high.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869577?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869577/mf2ji7/20141130191322-crime_i_did_content.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869574?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869574/mf2ji7/20141130185801-the_universal_will_sigh_high.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/397930-benjamin-pederson?utm_source=BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Ben Pederson &ndash; Brooklyn, NY</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840032?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/370f5af81138ccebb73b275188d07c72/tumblr_nkx1ioNA781u07vo6o1_1280.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840035?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840035/mf2ji7/20140812191537-BP11.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840040?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840040/mf2ji7/20140812191609-BP14.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840027?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840027/mf2ji7/20140812191506-BP2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20160210150305-prize-radar-logo-2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Tue, 17 Jan 2017 18:30:28 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Rise Up, Nasty Women: Artists Respond to Trump <p>&ldquo;Literally the day the election results were announced I started working on the exhibit,&rdquo; says artist and curator Indira Cesarine. Next week, her Tribeca gallery,<a href="http://untitled-space.com/uprise-angry-women-group-show/"> The Untitled Space</a>, opens the exhibition <em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</em>, featuring work by 80 women-identifying artists addressing the social and political climate in America today.</p> <p>Cesarine wasn&rsquo;t the only one sparked into immediate action.</p> <p>&ldquo;Hello female artists/curators! Lets organize a NASTY WOMEN group show!!! Who&#39;s interested???&rdquo; artist<a href="http://www.roxannejackson.com/"> Roxanne Jackson</a> posted on Facebook a few days later. She had no idea just how overwhelming the interest would be: within an hour she had 300 responses. Jackson and curator<a href="http://jessamynfiore.com/"> Jessamyn Fiore</a> got to work on the <a href="http://nastywomenexhibition.org/"><em>NASTY WOMEN Exhibition</em></a>, which opened at the Knockdown Center in Queens on Thursday and runs through the weekend.</p> <p>Some exhibitions take months, if not years to plan. But these two shows, both timed to lead up to Donald Trump&rsquo;s inauguration on January 20, tapped into something that we&rsquo;ll likely see a lot more of over the next four years: a pressing need to respond. These exhibitions are remarkable, not for their curatorial research and selectivity, but in their urgency and passion. In each case, organizers came up with an idea and mobilized hundreds of artists and collaborators with barely a month&rsquo;s notice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">&ldquo;We included them all.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>Both exhibitions began with open calls shared widely in social media. Cesarine says <em>UPRISE </em>&nbsp;is the first open-call show her gallery has organized: &ldquo;I felt it was important for the <em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</em> exhibit to reflect how women in America are feeling right now, and to have artists from all over the country from diverse backgrounds represented in the exhibit.&rdquo; She ultimately received more than 1,800 submissions from some 400 woman-identifying artists. Due to the space limitations of the Lispenard Street gallery, she curated the submissions down to 80 artworks by as many artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170113184746-__JORDIE_OETKEN_-__In_Solidarity__-_The_Untitled_Space_UPRISE_-_ANGRY_WOMEN_EXHIBIT.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Jordie Oetken,&nbsp;<em>In Solidarity</em>. Exhibited in <i>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</i></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><em>NASTY WOMEN</em> took a different curatorial approach. &ldquo;This is not a traditional show,&rdquo; says Fiore. &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve never worked on an exhibition where I said &lsquo;Everyone is included.&rsquo;&rdquo; But when she began the project, she knew her role was not about making selections. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s more about inclusivity. It&rsquo;s about bringing all these diverse voices together&mdash;and I do look at these works <em>as voices</em>. The art is an action that these women have made. So we included them all.&rdquo; But Jackson and Fiore could not anticipate how widely their call to action would resonate: they had to close the submission period early after receiving some 1,000 artworks by nearly 700 artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">&ldquo;There is no better point in time to enact change than during a cultural rupture.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>&ldquo;As I watched Roxanne&rsquo;s Facebook post blow up, I saw that other people are feeling this too&mdash;that we have to <em>do something</em>. And do it now,&rdquo; Fiore recalls. These exhibitions tap into an enormous and growing sentiment: how can we respond?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170113185314-05.Jen-Schwarting.jpg" style="text-align: center;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Jen Schwarting,&nbsp;<em>WAKE UP</em>, 2016. Exhibited in <i>NASTY WOMEN</i></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In mass actions, be they group exhibitions or the imminent<a href="https://www.womensmarch.com/"> Women&rsquo;s March on Washington</a>, it&rsquo;s clear that diverse congregations of women are looking for ways to register discontent, to be seen and heard, to be held to account. There is also a search for commonality, solidarity, and belonging in these undertakings. &ldquo;Art can challenge the status quo and shed light on the issues our society is facing today,&rdquo; says Cesarine. &ldquo;It is an important time in history for women to join together to fight for our rights and ensure that they continue to progress. It is important for Trump&rsquo;s sexist, racist behavior to not become normalized.&rdquo;</p> <p>These are not the first exhibitions of their kind. In 2014 and 2015, eighteen Missouri galleries staged<a href="http://api.ning.com/files/ahs5JtVtSPUbjA1yyiGCZ1FAHRVtv9tMVMidC2NJbrkVNvCCtuuAcO3V-vwA8v0X-aZRsuPA0B3lUGlabDaBps42bUbvC*TT/HUDSMediaPoints.pdf"> <em>Hands Up, Don&#39;t Shoot: Artists Respond</em></a>, in which more than 100 artists considered the killing of Michael Brown. That December, immediately following the non-indictment of Daniel Pantaleo, the police officer who killed Eric Garner, the Brooklyn non-profit Smack Mellon rearranged their exhibition schedule and put out a call for work responding to police brutality, racism, and social justice. The resulting show, <em>Respond</em>, featured 200 artworks from over 600 proposals.</p> <p>Urgency and scale are essential to these actions. &ldquo;There is no better point in time to enact change than during a cultural rupture,&rdquo;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/41814"> wrote Joel Kuennen about <em>Respond</em></a> for ArtSlant at the time. He continued, &ldquo;This is part of the mandate of contemporary culture: to express with as many images and words as experienced time will allow.&rdquo; In the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/23/arts/smack-mellon-and-grey-art-display-art-sparked-by-politics.html" target="_blank"><em>New York Times</em></a> Holland Cotter concluded that &ldquo;it&rsquo;s the show as a whole, its massed voice, that is so impressive, and heartening.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170113182207-IMG_9220.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>NASTY WOMEN Exhibition</em>, Installation in Progress at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo: Jessamyn Fiore&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>UPRISE</em> and <em>NASTY WOMEN </em>are, indeed, each greater than the sum of their parts. The very gesture of amassing so many voices is a protest, a rising up to be heard. Like <em>Respond</em>, <em>UPRISE </em>will be hung salon-style, a cacophony of mediums, positions, and voices. <em>NASTY WOMEN</em>, on the other hand, aimed for an even more unified, monumental experience. Ten twelve-foot-high letters spelling <em>N-A-S-T-Y W-O-M-E-N</em> span the vast hall of the Knockdown Center. This scaffolding-like installation provides walls and shelves for more than 700 artworks, each no larger than a foot in any dimension.</p> <p>The project&rsquo;s dimensions are, in fact, even more expansive than that: There are currently 27<a href="http://nastywomenexhibition.org/other-nasty-venues/">&nbsp;confirmed venues</a>&nbsp;(and counting) organizing related &ldquo;nasty&rdquo; shows across the United States and abroad. Most exhibitions will take place this month, but a number are scheduled throughout the Spring.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">&ldquo;Wherever you are is the place to start.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>Following the election, clients began asking<a href="http://www.bethpickens.com/"> Beth Pickens</a>, an LA consultant to artists and cultural non-profits, whether making art was enough. Should they quit art making and, say, go to law school or run for office? In response, Pickens put together the pamphlet &ldquo;Making Art During Fascism,&rdquo; which concludes: &ldquo;Your work will be more important than ever. You have no idea who needs to see/hear/feel what you are making.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170113185352-11.johanna-braun_slumberparty.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Johanna Braun,&nbsp;<em>Slumber Party</em>, 2016. Exhibited in <i>NASTY WOMEN</i></span></p> <p><br /> &ldquo;Wherever you are is the place to start. Art is going to help people through this time,&rdquo; Pickens said in a<a href="http://www.callyourgirlfriend.com/episode-74-pump-up-2017"> recent interview</a>. &ldquo;The things we&rsquo;re called to do&mdash;we have to continue doing them no matter the political reality because that will help us add new actions into our lives.&rdquo; She encouraged people to take stock of what they have to offer: &ldquo;Is it time? Is it money? Is it a particular skill or tools or physical space? Is it previous experience in activism or leadership or organizing?&rdquo;</p> <p><em>NASTY WOMEN</em> and <em>UPRISE</em> are triumphs in this sort of thinking. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s been pretty phenomenal how it&rsquo;s come together,&rdquo; says Fiore, who normally works on shows with a much longer lead in time. Due to the incredible generosity of artists, woodworkers, technicians, venues, and others donating their skills and resources, the <em>NASTY WOMEN</em> team was able to achieve things that would have been challenging even under normal circumstances. This generosity, she says, speaks to how &ldquo;things are different right now, and how this is a different type of exhibition.&rdquo;</p> <p>Does Fiore get the sense that the open call, or the political climate in the States, has mobilized women artists who do not normally make political work?</p> <p>&ldquo;Absolutely,&rdquo; says Fiore. Many artists wrote that they made work after the election, or especially for the exhibition. Some divulged, &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve only ever made work, but I never wanted to show it until now.&rdquo; Others, like a writer, said they don&rsquo;t normally make visual art at all. &ldquo;To me that&rsquo;s a very powerful statement.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">&ldquo;We&rsquo;ve been describing it as a visual art protest.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>These exhibitions are not, however, just cries into a dark night. There are tangible benefits, like cold, hard, cash in the hands of worthy organizations. 100 percent of <em>NASTY WOMEN</em>&rsquo;s proceeds will go to Planned Parenthood, and a portion of <em>UPRISE</em>&rsquo;s earnings will benefit <a href="http://www.eracoalition.org/">ERA Coalition</a>&rsquo;s Fund for Women&rsquo;s Equality. The Coalition continues to push for passage and ratification of the<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal_Rights_Amendment"> Equal Rights Amendment</a>, which would prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170113185411-09.Priscilla-Stadler_ungrabbale.jpg" style="text-align: center;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Priscilla Stadler,&nbsp;<em>Ungrabbale</em>, 2016. Exhibited in <i>NASTY WOMEN</i></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;People said we should get famous artists so we could raise more money,&rdquo; Fiore recalls. But the <em>NASTY WOMEN </em>organizers wanted the spirit of inclusivity and equality to extend to the show&rsquo;s audience. Priced from $10, all works cost $100 or less. &ldquo;I wanted everyone to be able to participate through the <em>buying </em>of the works as well. We&rsquo;ve been describing it as a visual art protest.&rdquo;</p> <p>Open call, rapid, inclusive, non-profit, cash-and-carry&mdash;these attributes do not reflect typical art world systems. Museums&mdash;accountable to trustees and reliant on the allocation of exhibition budgets years in advance&mdash;cannot respond nearly as deftly to pressing contemporary issues. Political art may be <a href="https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-at-art-basel-in-miami-beach-dealers-test-whether-art-market-can-take-a-more-political-turn">trending in the market</a> post-election, but we can hardly count on commercial galleries with seasonal schedules, demanding collectors, and obligations to represented artists to switch up their model. Can we?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">Artists Respond:</strong></p> <p>Prominent themes in both the submissions and final exhibition, says Cesarine, include &ldquo;works on subjects of rage, rape culture, protest, equality, reproductive rights, subjects addressing stereotypes of women and gender roles, as well as of course anti-Trump art.&rdquo; Fiore echoes this sentiment (down to the &ldquo;very funny&rdquo; selection of anti-Trump work). In particular, she says <em>NASTY WOMEN</em> includes many works &ldquo;exploring female identity and our position in society in one way or another, often considering the history of the oppression of women.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170113181857-__Mila_Rochenner__Wrong_Side_Feelings__-_THE_UNTITLED_SPACE_-_UPRISE_-_ANGRY_WOMEN_EXHIBIT.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Mila Rochenner,&nbsp;<em>Wrong Side Feelings</em>, 2015. Exhibited in <i>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</i></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Sculptor <a href="http://www.milarochenner.com/" target="_blank"><strong>Mila Rochenner</strong></a> was born in Brazil and says she identifies with her German Jewish and Indian heritage. She submitted her sculpture <em>Wrong Side Feelings</em> (2015) to <em>UPRISE </em>in response to her experiences of sexism, racism, and xenophobia. &ldquo;This senseless violence forces you to revise your identity. If I know about others&rsquo; suffering, I know I am not alone.&rdquo; Her sculpture reflects a period of pain when she was sexually harassed by an influential teacher during her master&rsquo;s program.</p> <p>She says she doesn&rsquo;t believe art can single-handedly affect political or social change, but that it&rsquo;s &ldquo;one tool we have to open a door for discussion. Art affects civil discourse by directing and propositioning ideas that haven&rsquo;t yet found their way into mass conscious, mainstream thinking.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170113175933-11.Katya-Grokhovsky.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Katya Grokhovsky, <em>Hotness (Approval Pending)</em>, 2016. Video still. Exhibited in <em>NASTY WOMEN</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.katyagrokhovsky.net/" target="_blank"><strong>Katya Grokhovsky</strong></a>&rsquo;s video <em>Hotness (Approval Pending)</em> (2016), featuring a faceless female torso, trapped in a glitchy loop, expresses her frustration with a lifetime of objectification and &ldquo;the patriarchal regime constantly violating the freedom of the woman&rsquo;s body, health, and life choices.&rdquo;</p> <p>She wholeheartedly believes art can affect social issues. &ldquo;Artists have a responsibility to engage through their work, to not give in to apathy, to ignite, to shed a beam of light into the darkest corners of our world,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;Art can heal, can energize, can lead to revolutions, can challenge the status quo, in diverse, beautifully humane ways, which do not involve any violence or violation of anyone&rsquo;s rights. A simple positive change of energy in the room created by an artwork, can lead to the most beautiful change of a heart and life.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170114074833-SarupaSidaarth_DarkMatter.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Sarupa Sidaarth,&nbsp;<em>Dark Matter.</em> Exhibited in&nbsp;<em>UPRISE / NASTY WOMEN</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>For <a href="http://www.sarupasidaarth.com/" target="_blank"><strong>Sarupa Sidaarth</strong></a>, whose portrait <em>Dark Matter</em> takes on themes of racism, colorism, and xenophobia, forcing these issues into the light is not a new preoccupation. &ldquo;It is important to find creative ways to coexist,&rdquo; she explains. &ldquo;We don&rsquo;t live in an egalitarian society. By participating I am sharing my way of seeing.&rdquo;</p> <p>Can her work affect change? &ldquo;I think of art as storytelling. When the viewer confronts a work of art, at the very least there is a dialogue between an idea, artist and the viewer.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170113180949-__Parker_Day_God_Bless_America_-_THE_UNTITLED_SPACE_-_UPRISE_-_ANGRY_WOMEN_EXHIBIT_lowres.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Parker Day,&nbsp;<em>God Bless America</em>. Exhibited in&nbsp;<em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Los Angeles-based photographer <a href="http://www.parkerdayphotography.com/" target="_blank"><strong>Parker Day</strong></a> says she&rsquo;s glad to be a part of an all-women show &ldquo;that goes beyond the baseline fact that we all identify as female.&rdquo; She went on: &ldquo;There are lots of click-baity articles and reductive shows that are &lsquo;all women&rsquo; but&hellip; <em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN </em>has teeth to it and a strong point of view.&rdquo;</p> <p>Her photograph <em>God Bless America</em> is part of <em>ICONS</em>, a series of 100 portraits of misfit characters, who &ldquo;demand attention and will not be denied.&rdquo; &ldquo;My work is fueled by a gentle undercurrent of rage,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;It&#39;s about saying fuck you to the &lsquo;real world&rsquo; and how things have been and forging your own world.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Art is power. Art is strength,&rdquo; Day asserts. &ldquo;It can shift how people see themselves and the world around them. When we feel differently, we act differently.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170113180551-__ALYSON-PROVAX-_I_thought_It_would_be_different_by_now_-_THE_UNTITLED_SPACE_-_UPRISE_-_ANGRY_WOMEN_EXHIBIT-_lowres.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Alyson Provax,&nbsp;<em>I thought it would be different by now</em>, 2016. Exhibited in&nbsp;<em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://alysonprovax.com/" target="_blank"><strong>Alyson Provax</strong></a> submitted <em>I thought it would be different by now</em>, which she made within a week of the election results, because she felt &ldquo;a sense of community from being part of a show focused on women&rsquo;s anger.&rdquo; The work reflects on her sadness and feeling of culpability following the election. Provax says she was surprised by how hard Clinton&rsquo;s loss hit her. &ldquo;I realized that I had been blindly expecting history to simply move in the direction that I believed that it should. Donald Trump&rsquo;s victory felt a bit like falling into another world. But alongside those feelings of course I also realized the fallacy of trusting history to move in the direction I want it to. Actions are important.&rdquo;</p> <p>She cites way the film <em>The Day After</em> reportedly affected President Ronald Reagan&rsquo;s feelings about nuclear war. &ldquo;Art can change our perception and understanding of things on a personal level, and this can have great repercussions.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">&ldquo;And angry.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>Fiore ended our conversation saying, &ldquo;there are a lot of women who are <em>scared</em>. They&rsquo;re scared. And angry. They feel disconnected. And this show for them is a way to make that connection, to show solidarity, to represent themselves with other women.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>The</em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/436964-nasty-women-nyc-art-exhibition"> <em>NASTY WOMEN Exhibition</em></a><em> runs at The Knockdown Center in Queens from January 12&ndash;15.</em></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/436831-uprise-angry-women"><em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</em></a><em> runs at The Untitled Space from January 17&ndash;28.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS">Andrea Alessi</a></p> <p><em>Andrea Alessi is Managing Editor of ArtSlant.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Sat, 14 Jan 2017 12:56:05 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In Commanding Prints, Afro-Cuban Artist Belkis Ayón Unites Mythology and Cultural Critique <p><em>Nkame</em>, a salutation that translates to &ldquo;<a href="http://www.fowler.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Nkame-Press-Release_long-FINAL.2.pdf" target="_blank">greeting</a>&rdquo; in the Abaku&aacute;n language, welcomes Belkis Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s first solo show in the United States to the Fowler museum. After Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s death in 1999, the Afro-Cuban artist&rsquo;s body of work was declared a&nbsp;<a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20081205054721/http://www.csupomona.edu/~kellogg_gallery/critics/ayon.html" target="_blank">patrimony</a>&nbsp;by the Cuban government and was not allowed out of the country until recently. Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s mysterious black-and-white prints appear as an obscure treasure that has just been uncovered, so it is fitting that her work be centered on the mythology of the Abaku&aacute;, an Afro-Cuban all-male secret society similar to the Masons.</p> <p>Ay&oacute;n used Abaku&aacute;n myths as the scaffolding for her striking visual universe. The fact that the religious society&rsquo;s stories and rituals were hidden and repressed under communist rule paralleled the overlooked social, gender, and racial inequalities Ay&oacute;n and others like her experienced.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112124046-Belkis.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ay&oacute;n at Havana Galerie, Zurich, August 23, 1999. Photo: Werner Gadliger</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The exhibition plays a video of&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n filmed one year before her tragic death by suicide at the age of 32. She is meticulously crafting a print in a process singular to her, brought on by socioeconomic restraints and her own perfectionism. Because art materials were not readily available to Ay&oacute;n at the height of Cuba&rsquo;s economic crisis, she had to create new methods of printmaking. Her collographs are a mixture of collage and lithography, pastiched from little bits of paper and glue that form the varied textures in her work. She also preferred to combine multiple prints together so she could gain more control over her intricate large-scale works. Contrasting patterns of fish scales, flora, and animal prints create vibrant textures that enrich her dramatic imagery and masterful technique. The work&rsquo;s esoteric subject matter adds another layer to her work.</p> <p>Ay&oacute;n used the mythology of the Abaku&aacute; as the aesthetic language of her work after learning about them in high school. According to her sister, the artist did extensive research into the Abaku&aacute;, but did not adhere to or mean to accurately represent their ideology. Instead, she created her own imagery from the stories of the Abaku&aacute; and combined them with the symbols and structures of Christianity and Catholicism. She also included women in her depictions, subtly making larger social criticisms. &ldquo;The intolerance, sacrifice, impotence, dogmatism, censorship and fear that Belkis portrayed through the Abaku&aacute; myth, however, clearly referenced what she herself experienced, as did those who shared her social, political, and cultural circumstances,&rdquo; Cristina Vives, Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s friend and the guest curator of this show, writes in the catalogue.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125230-93.14.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>Sin t&iacute;tulo (Sik&aacute;n con chivo) (Untitled (Sik&aacute;n with Goat))</em>, 1993, Collograph.&nbsp;Courtesy: Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Many critics of her time mistakenly interpreted&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s work as folkloric illustrations of Abaku&aacute;n myths, but Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s choice of subject matter had nothing to do with her own religious ideology. No other known artist at the time had focused on the secret society, which allowed Ay&oacute;n to freely interpret its stories. Through the language of a society rife with hidden meanings, she was able to meditate on larger issues of sexism and racism.</p> <p>Ay&oacute;n&nbsp;did this by focusing on the female figure of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fowler.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Nkame-Press-Release_long-FINAL.2.pdf">Sik&aacute;n</a>, whom Ayon saw as an alter-ego. Sik&aacute;n, like all of the figures in Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s world, is mouthless, reflecting both the actual myth of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fowler.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Nkame-Press-Release_long-FINAL.2.pdf">Sik&aacute;n</a>&nbsp;and the silencing of Black women in society. Sik&aacute;n was a princess who accidentally captured a fish while drawing water from the river. She heard the fish&rsquo;s loud bellow, an utterance that turned out to be the mystical voice of the deity Abaku&aacute;. Because women were not permitted to hear this sound, Sik&aacute;n was sworn to secrecy. When she told her fianc&eacute; the sacred knowledge, she was condemned to death.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125000-91.08.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>La cena (The Supper)</em>, 1991 Collograph. Courtesy:&nbsp;Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Sik&aacute;n is represented throughout&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s work as a Christlike figure, most notably in <em>La Cena (The Last Supper) </em>(1991) which seats Sik&aacute;n in the center of a long table surrounded by male and female apostles. Other triptychs such as <em>Perfidia (Perfidy)</em> (1998) illustrate her mouthless figures participating in Abaku&aacute;n consecration ceremonies which prepare for but do not depict the sacrifice of Sik&aacute;n.</p> <p>While in Abaku&aacute;n mythology Sik&aacute;n violates a secret of the brotherhood, in Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s world she is a martyr. She allows her heroine to live, albeit trapped in the patriarchal society&rsquo;s rituals. In later works, Sik&aacute;n becomes increasingly fearful of her place in this society, such as the not-so-subtly named <em>Dejame Salir (Let me out!)</em>&nbsp;(1997), a circular print of Sikan being consumed by flames. A goat, a symbol of sacrifice, lurks closely behind. The dread that pervades Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s later works also coincides with the artist transitioning from large to smaller circular prints. &ldquo;The action took place within a structure she had never used before. What was really happening, however, was much deeper: space was closing in on her,&rdquo; writes Cristina Vives.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125409-97.04.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>Dejame salir (Let me Out!)</em>, 1998, Collograph. Courtesy: Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>There is some speculation that Ayon, like Sik&aacute;n, put herself at risk by exposing the secrets of the&nbsp;Abaku&aacute;, though with only 21,000 members, the society did not hold very much religious or political power, especially under the communist leadership of the time. Yet, a woman betraying a patriarchal network does convey something universally fearful. Sik&aacute;n infiltrating the Abaku&aacute; could also be a metaphor for the struggle of an Afro-Cuban woman trying to exist in an art world that excluded and misunderstood her for decades.</p> <p>It is possible to read Sik&aacute;n&rsquo;s tragic journey as parallel to&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s encroaching depression, which she kept secret even to those closest to her, though her life and work still leave many mysteries that are just now beginning to be uncovered. With changing US-Cuba relations, <em>Nkame</em> will hopefully mark the beginning of her work being more widely researched and exhibited.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125822-91.10.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>Nlloro (Weeping)</em>, 1991, Collograph.&nbsp;Courtesy: Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452094-sola-agustsson?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Sola Agustsson</a></p> <p><em>Sola Agustsson is a writer based in Los Angeles. She studied at UC Berkeley and has contributed to Bullett, Flaunt, The Huffington Post, Alternet, Artlog, Konch, and Whitewall Magazine.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Installation view, <em>Nkame: A Retrospective of Cuban Printmaker Belkis Ayón</em>, Fowler Museum at UCLA, 2016. Courtesy the Estate of Belkis Ayón. Photo: Reed Hutchinson)</span></p> Thu, 12 Jan 2017 16:07:34 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Jenyu Wang Answers 5 Questions <div class="article-text section"><em>Welcome to <strong>5 Questions</strong>. Each week, we&rsquo;re sending five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/47134-under-the-radar-danielle-williamson-jenyu-wang-anna-fafaliou" target="_blank"><strong>Under the Radar</strong></a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from&nbsp;<strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/211043-jenyu-wang?tab=PROFILE" target="_blank">Jenyu Wang</a></strong>.</em> <p>&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>In retrospect, it feels as if I&rsquo;ve been pushing EPs out there for years, all of them love songs. So far my message has been about sharing intense desires and their loss.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>Hmm. Always wondered if art and responsibility were compatible, or mutually exclusive. The supremely difficult challenge for me has been to stay passionate, stay argumentative, yet stay tender (big Jenny Holzer fan). Those eventually become my responsibilities to my practice.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Is... this a trick question? In response, I made this (see image) just now. Let me tell you if it&rsquo;s the greatest in one second&mdash;</p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170111192400-IMG_1070.JPG" style="width: 500px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;ve wanted a tattoo for years. It is really not happening.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.pythagorasfilm.com/" target="_blank">Deborah Stratman</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumiko_Takahashi" target="_blank">Rumiko Takahashi</a> (manga artist), <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sasha_Grey" target="_blank">Sasha Grey</a> (everyone knows her, though).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <hr /> <p><em background-color:="" box-sizing:="" new="" times=""><span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source%3DRadar%26utm_medium%3Dimage%26utm_campaign%3DSubs&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1484665060014000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGQrSnozFywPOm-8TIqV7SKfodpnw" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="box-sizing: border-box; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source%3DRadar%26utm_medium%3Dimage%26utm_campaign%3DMag&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1484665060014000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEu4lj90Y5zLpf4-B1klk2PWIVyBQ" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="box-sizing: border-box; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1484665060014000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGeuhfQu-BjGZ9fTVnpKDeykvKPRA" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="box-sizing: border-box; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source%3DRadar%26utm_medium%3Dimage%26utm_campaign%3DPrize&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1484665060014000&amp;usg=AFQjCNFWkXtTroFkNof3USoOSw-HbCD4Aw" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="box-sizing: border-box; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;</span></em><em background-color:="" box-sizing:="" new="" times=""><span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1484665060014000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG49mVRcOxfgL5BoPGLeb_QWCjVxQ" href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="box-sizing: border-box; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></span></em></p> </div> Mon, 16 Jan 2017 17:38:56 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Martina Menegon <p><a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/">Martina Menegon</a> is an Italian new media artist and educator currently based in Vienna, Austria. <a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/bio">Her art explores</a> &ldquo;the instability and ephemerality of the human body as well as the alienation from physicality in today&rsquo;s digital age, questioning the gap between real and virtual, flesh and data.&rdquo; Menegon&rsquo;s expression of these ideas range from uncanny scenes of endless, undulating fleshy figures to far more personal depictions of her own digitally distorted physical form. Her work reveals the ever-evolving relationship between all of us and the inescapable digital world, as well as a complex, autobiographical representation of one artist&rsquo;s journey through it.</p> <p>I asked Menegon about her history of using computers to make art, the origins of her fascination with the human body, and the difference between selfies and self-portraits.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111132734-2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>, 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What were your earliest memories of computers?</strong></p> <p><strong>Martina Menegon:</strong> Some years ago my mother was a graphic designer, often freelancing, so as far as I can remember, we always had a computer at home for her to work. Me and my brother were allowed to use it when she didn&rsquo;t need it for work. I remember once I wanted to clean up the desktop and somehow I trashed everything (including the Macintosh HD icon) and the computer never started up again. It was terrifying and I must admit, back then I blamed my little brother (shame on me!).</p> <p><strong>CP: When and why did you first go online?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I honestly cannot remember. It must have been early and probably just because it was finally possible to go online at home. My earliest memory of going online is during my first year of high school, when I opened my first blog where I was writing and posting pictures everyday (back then I was very much into writing little poems or short texts). But I already knew how to use the internet so I must have been online way before this memory.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><br /> <img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131135-3.I_ll_Keep_You_Warm_and_Safe_in_My_People_Zoo__3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131024-5.I_LL-KEEP-YOU-WARM-AND-SAFE-IN-MY-PEOPLE-ZOO-x-Paper-Thin-V2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon, <em>I&rsquo;ll Keep You Warm and Safe in My People Zoo</em>, 2016, VR installation Sounds by&nbsp;Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first think about computers as a creative tool?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I guess it always was for me. My mother&rsquo;s computer only had software she needed for work (Illustrator, Photoshop, etc.) and she also installed for me and my brother the amazing &ldquo;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kid_Pix">Kid-Pix</a>.&rdquo; I was always playing and drawing and creating with it since I can remember. I always treated computers as creative tools somehow.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you start to experiment with 3D?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> It was in 2008 during my study in Visual and Performing Arts at the IUAV University in Venice. I followed a 3D animation class where I learned how to model and animate and render in Cinema4D. It was such a fun experience, and I never stopped working with 3D since then. I think I even repeated the class just for the fun of it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111132915-7.SPLITS-ARE-PARTED.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Splits Are Parted</em>, 2016, Interactive installation,&nbsp;sounds by&nbsp;Stefano D&#39;Alessio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How and why did the human body, and your own body, become such a constant theme in your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I think it always was. I can&rsquo;t say why. I think many different aspects and events of my life brought me to focus a lot on the human body: growing up as a synchronized swimmer, going to art school, experimenting with some performance art, studying performance and interactive art in Venice, being in Second Life, etc.</p> <p>In general I am quite a shy person, always scared of exposing myself publically. This is way I rarely ended up performing in real life. But for some reason, exposing myself in a digital realm does not bother me much. Maybe the only challenge for me is at openings, where people watch or interact with my 3D-scanned body and I am next to it. I sometimes try to blend in with the gallery walls :-P</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131341-1.Virtual_Narcissism_-_making_of.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>&nbsp;(making of), 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How has the digital age changed our relationship with the human body? How do you think the digital age has changed your relationship with your own body?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I will not speak for others, but for me, the digital age gave me the possibility of exploring my body in many different ways: through audio, photo, videos, slow-mo, 3D, etc. It made it possible for me to augment and expand the relationship I had with my body. Sometimes I think it&rsquo;s my body that changed my relationship with the digital age: as I am more and more anxious in memorizing its changes and visualizing its data, I feel the urge to explore different techniques and tools.</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think Virtual Reality will distort this relationship even further? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I think VR is going to create another way for us to relate to our body and it is not going to be necessarily a distortion, just another form. And I am definitely interested in exploring this.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Pzd2UI9_pHg?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your project <em><a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/post/144465199907/virtual-narcissism-various-multimedia" target="_blank">Virtual Narcissism</a></em> feels very autobiographical.</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> <em>Virtual Narcissism</em> is definitely autobiographical. It started as an experiment and ended up being an ongoing project, based on my digital archive of 3D-scanned selfies. In real life, I am generally a very shy person: I feel very uncomfortable being photographed or filmed. When I am alone I am of course less self-conscious, and it&rsquo;s virtually sculpting those moments that interests me the most at the moment.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="360" src="//giphy.com/embed/3o6ZtnBPZyoiR2c9tS" width="480"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>&nbsp;(making of), 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p><strong>CP: What do you think is the difference between a self-portrait and a selfie? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> When I 3D scan myself, I never really think ahead about what kind of pose or where to sit. I usually plug in my Kinect, open the software, and it gives me 10 seconds to find a pose before the scan starts. I want to be as spontaneous as I can, given that a scan takes a bit longer than a photograph to be done. The results are untouched; all my <em>Virtual Narcissism</em> scans are uploaded as the software puts them out. There is no selection. All my scans are going to be uploaded in my Sketchfab account. So if we stick with the common distinction that sees self-portraiture as a representation of a person and a selfie as an insight into a person&rsquo;s life, then I should consider my work as selfies. But I am not sure this distinction is valid anymore.</p> <p><strong>CP: You regularly collaborate with certain artists. Why is collaboration important to you and your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I always loved collaborating with other artists, I think it is a great way to grow artistically as well as share knowledge. I am very fond of this. I never hide my process in art making&mdash;I believe in sharing. I guess this is also why I love teaching. Of the many collaborations I do with artists, two are regular and very important to me and my art. One is with <a href="http://cargocollective.com/stefanodalessio/" target="_blank">Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio</a>, with whom I create interactive installations and some performances. Even when we work separately, I regularly ask him for support in programming or audio design. My collaboration with <a href="http://www.exile.at/ko/" target="_blank">Klaus Obermaier</a> started back in 2010, after I took his <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_(software)" target="_blank">Max/MSP</a> workshop in Venice, where I learned how to create interactive tools for art practice. It was an important event in my artistic career, a major turning point. His works have been influencing me since then.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KzDifurF9wQ?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Klaus Obermaier, Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio, and Martina Menegon, <em>EGO</em>, Interactive installation, 2015</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Tell us about your experience playing Second Life? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> Second Life has been and still is a big and important experience and influence for my art. It was the first place where I experienced tridimensional glitches, the frustration of being stuck in a wall, having an arm passing through my body, etc. It was also the place where I started socializing, as I had a little shop where I was selling clothes and furniture. I was part of a design community that created amazing artistic events, and I was always trying to go to art performances and installations there as well.</p> <p>I was a Second Life resident for almost 10 years, and the only reason I am using the past tense is because I somehow destroyed my poor virtual me for an art project: I wanted to record the result of me attaching everything I owned in Second Life to my avatar (thousands of different hair styles and colors, clothes, shoes, animations, furniture, houses, etc.). I somehow overloaded the system and my avatar started changing, then transformed into a white cloud, and then the software crashed. Since then, whenever I try to open Second Life, the app crashes. I tried some solutions I found online but nothing worked. I will try to contact the Linden Lab soon, because I have to admit, I miss being in Second Life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-ibWVK9QBco?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon, <em>Ouch!</em>, 2014</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How is the new media art scene in Vienna ?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I have to admit most new media works I see here in Vienna are mainly in university exhibitions or small art spaces. In general I have the feeling there is not really a community here for new media, yet. But I guess it&rsquo;s just a matter of time. Just before Christmas, for example, at the Angewandte Innovation Lab (AIL) there was a very nice exhibition, <em><a href="http://www.ailab.at/archive/the-age-of-experience/" target="_blank">The Age of Experience</a></em>, featuring among others <em>The Legible City</em> by Jeffrey Shaw and a great work by Ip Yuk-Yiu, <em>S for Sisyphus</em>. I have to say I felt almost &ldquo;at home&rdquo; while visiting.</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you have coming up in 2017?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> Apart from exhibitions and teaching, I will definitely keep working on new developments in&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>. I am currently working on a VR version of it, struggling around with some intricate scripting in Unity3D. I plan to play around with some augmented reality projects as well, as soon as the VR one is done. In general, I will keep working.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>I&#39;ll Keep You Warm and Safe in My People Zoo #2</em>, 2016, Video loop. All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 11 Jan 2017 17:01:05 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In a Gentrifying London Neighborhood, Artists Connect Personal and Global Displacement <p>It&rsquo;s a decidedly vulnerable act many of us have experienced: the frantic search for something in your bag, bent over or on your knees in airport or a train station, personal articles spread out around you as you hunt for missing keys or passport, maybe trying to keep certain items hidden&mdash;tampons, condoms, echoes of bodies and sexuality deemed too personal for public exposure.</p> <p>Berlin-based artist Tanja Ostojić&rsquo;s ongoing project <em>Misplaced Women?</em>, first performed in Zagreb in 2009,&nbsp;centers on a simple but familiar choreography Ostojić both undertakes herself and delegates to other performers: the careful unpacking and repacking of a bag, the turning inside-out of things, in public spaces. Often performed by Ostojić or her delegates in sites of transit&mdash;airports, train terminals, bus stops&mdash;the performances sometimes take place without audiences, though just as often as not, they occur under the suspicious gaze of security personnel. <a href="https://misplacedwomen.wordpress.com/" target="_blank"><em>Misplaced Women?</em></a> evokes not only the physical borders suggested by her chosen sites, but the borders between the personal and the public these moments expose.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170110122424-IMG_4516.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Hilary Williams. Photo: Teresa Albor</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Anyone who re-performs the project can submit to&nbsp;an&nbsp;<a href="https://misplacedwomen.wordpress.com/category/stories/" target="_blank">archive of stories</a>&nbsp;and images. Additionally, Ostojić holds workshops and invites individual artists to perform the piece or to expand on its score. Its <a href="http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/whats-on/misplaced-women/" target="_blank">most recent iteration</a> took place last month, not in a liminal site of transit, but in a neighborhood in the throes of transformation. Invited by artist <a href="http://elenamarcevska.com/" target="_blank">Elena Marchevska</a>, Ostojić hosted a two-day workshop at the current home of <a href="http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/" target="_blank">Live Art Development Agency</a> (LADA), in the East London neighborhood of Hackney Wick. Marchevska was undertaking a residency with LADA&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/projects/restock-rethink-reflect" target="_blank"><em>Restock, Rethink, Reflect</em></a> (RRR) project, an ongoing initiative to support artists engaging with issues of identity politics and cultural diversity. Over the last decade residency themes have included race, disability, and feminism; RRR&rsquo;s fourth iteration, which runs through 2018, is specifically focused on questions of privilege.</p> <p>As an academic researcher and artist, Marchevska focuses on questions of displacement, considering feminist and artistic interventions as strategies of &ldquo;hospitality.&rdquo; She had invited Ostojić and fifteen participants of the Misplaced Women Workshop to the once &ldquo;edgy&rdquo; Hackney Wick for two days to take on the surrounding neighborhood as a laboratory in which to research and perform. Until the 2012 Olympic Games in London, Hackney Wick was a former industrial neighborhood of food packers and factories, increasingly populated by affordable art studios, venues, and fabrication labs. Preparation for the 2012 Games saw the construction of massive stadiums and parks in the area, followed by the sudden explosion of condo complexes, the enormous Stratford Westfield shopping mall, and awkward landscaping attempts to turn the Olympic site into &ldquo;useable&rdquo; parks. Along with physical changes came increased rents and the inevitable loss of arts spaces, including the important venue <a href="http://www.performancespace.org/" target="_blank">]performance s p a c e [</a>, which moved to Folkestone following complaints from residents of newly built condominium complexes.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170110122327-Photo_14-12-2016_12_47_22.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Dagmara Bilon. Photo: Jasmine Lee</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>As workshop participants unpacked and repacked their bags throughout this transformed, and transform<em>ing</em>, neighborhood, their actions engaged and pointed to the all too common predicament of <a href="http://www.citymetric.com/horizons/olympic-legacy-killing-londons-creative-culture-2369" target="_blank">Olympic legacy neighborhoods</a> and gentrification in general. They enacted Ostojić&rsquo;s basic score in posh shopping malls full of fake snow and foliage for the holiday season; they performed in children&rsquo;s playgrounds surrounded by unfinished development projects and the sounds of construction&mdash;and, notably, no actual children, despite the oddly temperate December weather.</p> <p>These generic pseudo-public spaces and the vestiges of old Hackney Wick became the backdrops and contexts for reiterations of Ostojić&rsquo;s performance encompassing both personal and more pointedly geo-political critiques. Among the fifteen participants selected by Ostojić and Marchevska from an open call were practicing artists, architects, journalists, activists, and volunteers concerned with displacement.</p> <p>In one performance, UK-based, Polish-born artist <a href="https://dagmarabilon.com/" target="_blank">Dagmara Bilon</a>, whose practice draws on her own experiences of migration, motherhood, and art-making, unpacked a red vintage suitcase and distributed the artifacts of her own past performances&mdash;costumes, personal objects, and large papier-m&acirc;ch&eacute; &ldquo;pussy&rdquo;&mdash;to participants and audience members to carry. She then stepped into two leg holes cut into the suitcase, zipped herself inside and, blinded and in high-healed shoes, tentatively crossed the bridge to the entrance of the Westfield shopping center. A procession of objects and onlookers followed in her wake. The piece was met with varied responses of delight and bemusement by shoppers (and suspicion by a golf-cart-driving security guard).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170110122125-IMG_0025.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Nick Harris. Photo: Danyel Ferrari</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Nick Harris&rsquo; performance, a mimed unpacking, recreated the work he does with children as a clown in refugee camps in Europe, including the former &ldquo;Jungle&rdquo; in Calais. His performance, which is initiated by a loud call of &ldquo;<em>Dayira!</em>&rdquo; or &ldquo;circle&rdquo; in Arabic, used to create an impromptu space in the camps, drew the attention of some workers in a food shipping business opposite the former home of ]performance s p a c e [, who came from behind a refrigerator curtain to watch.</p> <p><a href="http://www.teresaalbor.moonfruit.com/" target="_blank">Teresa Albor</a>, an American artist and journalist based in London, carried with her a selection of personal effects from&nbsp;<em>The Things We Leave Behind</em>, a collaborative project&nbsp;with photographer Lais Pontes. The project creates photographic archives of lost or abandoned objects collected through their work with <a href="https://www.facebook.com/dirtygirlslesvos/" target="_blank">The Dirty Girls of Lesvos Island</a>, an organization which collects, washes, and redistributes discarded clothing from asylum seekers arriving on the beaches of Lesbos, Greece. These items, including now-useless money from people&rsquo;s departure countries, family photographs, and once valued religious objects, lost or left in transit, were unpacked and carefully repacked under the watchful eyes of security guards and holiday shoppers in a temporary Christmas village in the mall, and again in the old Hackney Wick packing yards.</p> <p>These varied interpretations of and engagements with the notion of &ldquo;dis/misplacement&rdquo; arise from both Ostojić&rsquo;s commitment to <em>Misplaced Women?</em>&nbsp;as a locus for discussion and experience, as well as from Elena Marchevska&rsquo;s investment in the feminist politics of the notion of &ldquo;hospitality.&rdquo; In a truly collaborative turn, both artists left the determinations of each performance to its participants. The workshop was, thus, a kind of nesting doll of various iterations of sharing space and stories; each participant&rsquo;s work was forged within Ostojić&rsquo;s archive, within Marchevska&rsquo;s residency, harkening as much to histories of activist consciousness-raising circles as to an arts workshop. LADA, which is itself currently threatened with relocation from Hackney Wick, also acts more as a hosting institution than a traditional gallery or performance venue, helping to support and foster new works and building archives of underrepresented projects and artists who work in live arts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170110122106-IMG_0024.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Teresa Albor. Photo: Danyel Ferrari</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Large-scale geopolitical displacements have been the subject for many artworks in the past year, some of them extraordinarily visible and well funded. High-profile artworks, like Ai Weiwei&rsquo;s life jacket installations in Berlin and Vienna, often attempt to represent the issue though monumental scale. But the <em>Misplaced Women?</em> project and its participants engage with mis- and displacement on an intimate level. Their performances draw from individual migration stories, as well as embodied experiences such as ageing, motherhood, and illness. The performers&rsquo; unpackings thus resonate on a personal scale as much as they reflect the local site of a gentrifying neighborhood and open onto urgent, broader themes of geopolitical mass displacements.&nbsp;Collectively, these projects work to connect separately understood questions of borders and their crossings. Through a seemingly small, quotidian gesture&mdash;the opening up of a tiny, personal space in public&mdash;<em>Misplaced Women?</em> grapples with how, in turn, borders redrawn by economic and geopolitical forces themselves traverse our bodies and spaces.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170110144405-misplaced_women.png" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Tanja&nbsp;Ostojić. Photo: Danyel Ferarri</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><em>As part of her ongoing research residency at LADA, Elena Marchevska is </em><a href="http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/opportunities/invitation-for-contributions-to-elena-marchevskas-study-room-guide-on-displ-1/" target="_blank"><em>inviting artist contributions</em></a><em> on the subject of displacement through January 20, 2017.</em></p> <p><em>Tanja Ostojić accepts submissions to her <a href="https://misplacedwomen.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">Misplaced Women? website</a>,&nbsp;an ongoing archive of personal experiences with recreations of the project.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/200738-danyel-ferrari?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Danyel Ferrari</a></p> <div id="m_-6646011613517832592AppleMailSignature"><em>Danyel M. Ferrari is an artist and independent researcher currently based in Istanbul, Turkey.</em></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Shannon Marie Mulvey.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo: Hilary Williams)</span></p> Tue, 10 Jan 2017 17:36:48 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Round 1 of the ArtSlant Prize IX Now Accepting Submissions <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">Above: Round 1 Entry by&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/995875" target="_blank">Sid Daniels</a>, <em>Grand Hotel,&nbsp;</em>2016.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize supports emerging artists working in all media.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">We offer cash prizes and an exhibition to winners, with opportunities to sell and promote your work to our international network throughout the process.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Each round of our prize is judged by a panel of three independent art professionals. In the past, these have included gallery owners and curators from some of the top galleries in the world, as well as renowned critics and artists.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: large; line-height: 24px;"><strong>To Apply:</strong>&nbsp;click&nbsp;<strong>contest entry</strong>&nbsp;from your ArtSlant Profile<strong>&nbsp;</strong>or enter from your&nbsp;<strong>Contest&nbsp;</strong>tab on your account page.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: large; line-height: 24px;"><strong>Submissions close</strong>&nbsp;on&nbsp;<strong>January 25th at Midnight ET.</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td allign="center" style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 200px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; text-align: center;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: ; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: ; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: ; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: ; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">Honorable Mention &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: ; font-size: small;"><span style="color: #00cfa6;">see below for more details</span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>HOW IT WORKS:</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Step 1: Enter Showcase&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Click <strong>enter Showcase</strong>&nbsp;to the right of your ArtSlant profile. Don&#39;t have one? <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/users/signin">Create your free profile today! </a></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Just $3 enters one of your works into our site-wide competition.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: ;"><strong>Step 2: Win Showcase</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">If your work is selected by our editors, you become a Showcase Winner and enter Premium Placement ($25). This advances you in the ArtSlant Prize competition to the Juried Round where your work receives a ton of exposure and is reviewed by our panel of guest jurors.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 30px;">Premium Placement promotes your work around the ArtSlant website including on the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/main" target="_blank">homepage</a>,&nbsp;the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/artshow" target="_blank">artshow</a>, and on our social media accounts.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 21px;">Think of it like a very affordable form of advertising.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: ;"><strong><span style="line-height: 30px;">Step 3: Win Juried Round</span></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">A rotating panel of leading gallerists and art professionals reviews the Showcase Winners and select&nbsp;one artist to advance from each of the following categories: painting, photography, mixed-media, abstract, sculpture, drawing, new-media, installation, and student. Juried winners have the option to sell their work through ArtSlant on <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true">Amazon.com</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: ;"><strong><span style="line-height: 21px;">Step 4: Win the ArtSlant Prize</span></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Four Juried Winners are selected for the ArtSlant Prize at the end of the year. Winners receive cash prizes and are exhibited at the ArtSlant Prize exhibition. Past exhibitions took place at Aqua Art Miami during Art Basel Miami Beach.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span>Honorable Mention&nbsp;</span><span>&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Just click <strong>enter Showcase</strong> from your ArtSlant Profile&nbsp;to participate in the international ArtSlant Prize.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Don&#39;t have an ArtSlant Profile?&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/users/signin">Create one for free today.</a></span></p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3"> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Past winners include:</span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">To be announced...</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2015+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2015 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2014 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2013 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2012 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce">Veronica Bruce</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer">Susan Meyer</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2011 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2010 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2009 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 09 Jan 2017 19:07:09 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Doxology: Dell M. Hamilton’s BLUES\BLANK\BLACK <p><em>This piece is an Editors&rsquo; Pick from reviews published by members of the ArtSlant community.&nbsp;</em><em>Click&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/46719" target="_blank">here</a>&nbsp;t</em><em>o learn about writing community exhibition reviews on ArtSlant.</em></p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">&ldquo;&hellip;<em>right now being born a girl is to be born threatened</em>&hellip;&rdquo; &mdash;Ntozake Shange</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">With the Christmas holiday rapidly approaching, a limited audience gathered at the Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African and African American Art at Harvard University for a riveting performance of a work challenging issues of race, gender, violence and indefensible doings by segments of the law enforcement community.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">There, Dell M. Hamilton built upon the current exhibition, Carrie May Weems&rsquo; <em>I once knew a girl&hellip;</em>, with her one woman, compelling work, <em>Blues\Blank\Black</em>, a complex, superbly performed piece of truth-telling. With song and fairytale, with spoken text and gesture and invocation, Hamilton led the assembled through the galley as a stunned chorus from a painful Greek tragedy, like the confused citizens of Thebes&hellip;or somewhere.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This presentation begins with the sound of heels approaching on the marble gallery floor followed Ms. Hamilton&rsquo;s entry. &ldquo;Hello,&rdquo; she says. She begins taking things from a shoulder bag&hellip;things, a blond wig, which she puts on&hellip;a black doll&rsquo;s head, which she puts a white face paint on, and sheets of white paper, each with a name written on it&hellip;Rekia Boyd&hellip;Delores Epps&hellip;Alesia Thomas&hellip;and hands them randomly to the spectators. Names she&rsquo;ll repeat, souls we should remember. &ldquo;I once knew a girl,&rdquo; she says somewhat sadly, &ldquo;if they erase you, they erase me,&rdquo; then breaks into song in her blue satin-esque dress, the artist as hipster. There&rsquo;s a lot going on in this opening salvo, activity one need pay heed, and, &ldquo;stay woke,&rdquo; as they say.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112121159-Cooper_BlueBlankBlack__MelissaBlackall__-13.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Dell M. Hamilton,&nbsp;<em style="font-size: 14px;">Blues\Blank\Black</em>, 2016.&nbsp;<span style="text-align: justify;">Photo: Melissa Blackall</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">She was to later share, &ldquo;The doll is complicated&hellip;I&rsquo;m interested in folklore/fairytales, narrative and literature, but also in how the genres shape gender&mdash;specifically girlhood and womanhood.&rdquo; Continuing, &ldquo;So since the exhibition was titled, <em>I once knew a girl</em>, it just reminded me of how many conversations young girls have with their dolls&hellip;convos that are obviously make-believe but profound and intimate for a young child. The ability to imagine and re-imagine gets lost as you get older and I always want to get back to that wondrous place.&rdquo; &hellip;place as ancient as the scriptures and as fresh as Picasso.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">22-year-old Rekia Boyd, an African-American woman, was shot and killed by an off-duty Chicago police detective who&rsquo;d fired multiple shots from a car over his shoulder hitting her in the back of the head. The detective claimed someone with Ms. Boyd held a gun, but it proved to be a cellphone. Charged with involuntary manslaughter, the detective was cleared. &ldquo;Rekia Boyd,&rdquo; Hamilton calls out as she moves through the gallery. &ldquo;Rekia, Rekia, Rekia.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Responses to the klling of women of color appear muted compare to those of males. As Ms. Hamilton points out, &ldquo;Media coverage has been significantly bent toward the omission of women.&rdquo; She continues her mobile performance, &ldquo;If they erase you&hellip; they erase me,&rdquo; while giving rise to the human element of that icy fact.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">At points she launches into song... &ldquo;Why Was I Born,&rdquo; The Cranberries&rsquo; &ldquo;Linger,&rdquo; and the haunting &ldquo;Down by The Water&rdquo; by The Drums, which she loads up with frequency for the wrenching rendezvous she&rsquo;s chosen. &ldquo;I try to pick songs that suit my voice, but that also either have questions in them,&rdquo; Hamilton says, &ldquo;exploit the architecture (in this case the gallery) or sound of a site or that somehow convey a kind of &lsquo;hurt so good&rsquo; feeling.&rdquo; There is more white paper, more names.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112121507-Cooper_BlueBlankBlack_MelissaBlackall_-39.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Dell M. Hamilton,&nbsp;<em style="font-size: 14px;">Blues\Blank\Black</em>, 2016.<span style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;Photo: Melissa Blackall</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Eleanor Bumpurs, an African-American woman, was killed by New York City police who shot her twice with a 12-gauge shot gun. They&rsquo;d been sent to enforce a city ordered eviction. from her apartment. When Ms. Bumpurs refused to open the door, police broke in. &ldquo;Eleanor Bumpurs, Eleanor Bumpurs, Eleanor Bumpurs,&rdquo; intones Hamilton.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Gracefully woven into her dynamic performance, are Ms. Hamilton&rsquo;s risky, fluid and supple costume change maneuvers...slipping into a sophisticated white gown as the traveling house looks on, with the other toward the conclusion when she briefly slips from view to apply a white face and flowing, robe-esque garment and reshapes into Spanish and sings Marc Anthony&rsquo;s, &ldquo;Contra La Corriente.&rdquo; There is more white paper here, more names</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">54-year-old Delores Epps and her 13-year-old daughter were killed in Memphis, Tennessee, when a police officer responding to a call slammed into her car. Hed not activated his lights or siren.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">And there are others Ms. Hamilton reminds us of and calls to the ball. Alesia Thomas, Tarika Wilson, Sandra Bland, Deborah Danner, of whom she speaks, &ldquo;she was not lost because no one was looking for her.&rdquo; And there are others. Too many others not on the performance&rsquo;s roll.</p> <p>&ldquo;My art needs to move around,&rdquo; says Hamilton. &ldquo;Last year I felt un-moored. I&rsquo;d been to a vigil for Bland and Eric Garner. I re-read (Morrison&rsquo;s) <em>Bluest Eye</em>. Without Morrison and Carrie [Mae Weems] I wouldn&rsquo;t exist. Of course, I use, <em>Beloved</em>.&rdquo; Continuing, &ldquo;The takeaway is, look up the names...I&rsquo;ll do this &rsquo;till there are no more.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112121438-Cooper_BlueBlankBlack__MelissaBlackall__-61.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Dell M. Hamilton,&nbsp;<em style="font-size: 14px;">Blues\Blank\Black</em>, 2016<span style="text-align: justify;">. Photo: Melissa Blackall</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dell M. Hamilton performed&nbsp;</em>Blues\Blank\Black <em>on December 22, 2016, at the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/venues/show/49677-the-ethelbert-cooper-gallery-of-african-and-african-american-art" target="_blank">The Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African and African American Art</a>&nbsp;at Harvard University. The performance took place during Carrie Mae Weems exhibition</em> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/432330-i-once-knew-a-girl" target="_blank">I once knew a girl...</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/413623-jeffrey-mcnary?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Jeffrey Mcnary</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images:&nbsp;<span style="text-align: center;">Dell M. Hamilton,&nbsp;</span><em style="text-align: center; font-size: 14px;">Blues\Blank\Black</em><span style="text-align: center;">, 2016, Performance at the&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: justify;">Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African and African American Art at Harvard University, December 22, 2016. Photos: Melissa Blackall</span>)</span></p> Thu, 12 Jan 2017 13:17:45 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Danielle Williamson | Jenyu Wang | Anna Fafaliou <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/370680-danielle-williamson?utm_source=DanielleWilliamson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Danielle Williamson &ndash; Tel Aviv-Yafo</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/781304?utm_source= DanielleWilliamson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/781304/u3azr9/20140217201722-gaar_header.png" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/781305?utm_source= DanielleWilliamson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/781305/y8wnrh/20140217202041-IMG_5151.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/778358?utm_source= DanielleWilliamson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/778358/y8wnrh/20140209214914-Selection_004.png" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/781306?utm_source= DanielleWilliamson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/781306/y8wnrh/20140217202425-Selection_008.png" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/211043-jenyu-wang?utm_source=JenyuWang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Jenyu Wang &ndash; New York</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840842?utm_source=JenyuWang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840842/u3azr9/20140814084323-1_Curtains_still_copy.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/827030?utm_source=JenyuWang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/827030/mf2ji7/20140627030141-Diving_5.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/827033?utm_source=JenyuWang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/827033/mf2ji7/20140627030726-Durer_2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/827016?utm_source=JenyuWang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/827016/mf2ji7/20140627023640-Kiss_object_2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/450374-anna-fafaliou?utm_source=AnnaFafaliou&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Anna Fafaliou &ndash; London</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/984170?utm_source=AnnaFafaliou&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/984170/u3azr9/20160425165417-FINAL_PERSON2-3.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; width: 100%;" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/984189?utm_source= AnnaFafaliou&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/984189/y8wnrh/20160425174232-Not_Formed_Yet_shape_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/984188?utm_source= AnnaFafaliou&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/984188/y8wnrh/20160425174156-FINAL.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/984165?utm_source=AnnaFafaliou&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/984165/y8wnrh/20160425163707-illusions_diptyque.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20160210150305-prize-radar-logo-2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/sf/foundation"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 06 Jan 2017 18:48:29 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Alison Hunt Ballard | Michael Wynne | Narda Alvarado <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/194671-alison-hunt-ballard?utm_source=AlisonHuntBallard&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Alison Hunt Ballard &ndash; Palm Springs, CA</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/913865?utm_source= AlisonHuntBallard&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/913865/u3azr9/20150519173309-Housework_Full_Alison_Hunt_Ballard.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/913879?utm_source= AlisonHuntBallard&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/913879/u3azr9/20150519175218-Hunters_Alison_Hunt_Ballard4.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/913863?utm_source= AlisonHuntBallard&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/913863/u3azr9/20150519173257-Quell_Detail1_Alison_Hunt_Ballard.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/913881?utm_source= AlisonHuntBallard&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/913881/u3azr9/20150519175543-Slake_Alison_Hunt_Ballard1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/470653-michael-wynne?utm_source=MichaelWynne&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Michael Wynne &ndash; London</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1014179?utm_source=MichaelWynne&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1014179/u3azr9/20161029183933-IMG_0053.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1014186?utm_source=MichaelWynne&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1014186/u3azr9/20161029184046-IMG_1147.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1014181?utm_source=MichaelWynne&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1014181/mf2ji7/20161029183942-IMG_0056.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1014185?utm_source=MichaelWynne&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1014185/u3azr9/20161029184021-IMG_1139.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/10608-narda-alvarado?utm_source=NardaAlvarado&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Narda Alvarado &ndash; Bolivia</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/872326?utm_source=NardaAlvarado&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/872326/u3azr9/20141217212257-8_TIME_narda.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; width: 100%;" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/899664?utm_source= NardaAlvarado&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/899664/u3azr9/20150402213138-4_DREAMS_COVER_low.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/899668?utm_source= NardaAlvarado&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/899668/u3azr9/20150329231014-2_caja_3D_AZUL_LOW.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/899637?utm_source=NardaAlvarado&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/899637/u3azr9/20150329225733-publicacion_libro.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20160210150305-prize-radar-logo-2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 02 Jan 2017 11:25:45 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In 2016, Women Artists Led the Way in New Media <p>A couple weeks ago I asked Christian Petersen, who writes the fortnightly &ldquo;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS">Wednesday Web Artist of the Week</a>&rdquo; column, to pick his favorite artist interviews of 2016. For his edification, I emailed over a list of the year&rsquo;s best-read pieces, which, I keenly observed, comprised all women artists. Oh, &ldquo;it&rsquo;s gonna be ALLL ladies for sure,&rdquo; he shot back.</p> <p>I asked if he had any reflections on what he learned interviewing 25 new media artists and curators this year. &ldquo;What I&rsquo;ve really taken away from the column is that the world of new media art is home to a myriad of powerful and exciting feminist voices. They will all inevitably be huge inspirations to the next generation of artists who will continue to define new media art as a unique and vital outlet for expressions of universal equality and freedom of thought.&rdquo;</p> <p>These artists are not only working in overtly feminist registers, of course. As the column evolved to feature increasingly in-depth interviews, we learned about artists&rsquo; earliest memories of discovering and making digital art, and followed debates about how new media practitioners can get paid. Artists discussed their technological innovations, their use of platforms like Instagram, peer-to-peer games, and Vine, and how their work addresses social and political issues extending far beyond the reaches the digital realm.</p> <p>Here, Christian describes his top ten from 2016:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/45520-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-leah-schrager" target="_blank">Leah Schrager</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20160323074402-cocol23.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m just shocked by how much I&rsquo;ve been told that I may not be sexy and an artist at the same time&hellip;I see people performing on the internet in and out of the art context as true frontrunners in female art and feminism.&rdquo; &mdash;Leah Schrager</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Leah Schrager&rsquo;s meditation on her performance of celebrity as an arts practice was our most-read WWAOTW column in 2016. Writes Christian: &ldquo;Schrager&rsquo;s deceptively complex brand of feminism, expressed through the unashamed sexuality of her beautifully abstracted self portraits, makes her voice unique among new media artists.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="these%20women%20are%20my%20heroes.%20They%20are%20free%20and%20face%20different%20worlds." target="_blank">Olga Fedorova</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/46779/p66fzh/20161102102455-Island.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;These women are my heroes. They are free and face different worlds.&rdquo; &mdash;Olga Fedorova</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Our recent profile on Olga Fedorova took off&mdash;and we&rsquo;re not surprised. Her impeccable 3D digital art features a cast of strong, seductive women facing off against adversaries like alligators and ticking time bombs. &ldquo;Olga is a true rising star of the new media art world and an exciting talent to watch in 2017. Her surreal tableaux are enigmatic wonders,&rdquo; says Christian.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46589-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-elizabeth-mputu">Elizabeth Mputu</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/46589/p66fzh/20161005150102-first_pic.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;We want an art world that&rsquo;s fat loving, and gay, and not ableist, and genuinely safe for trans people, that doesn&rsquo;t leave its artist feeling exploited. One that respects sex workers, that helps to care for and not just glamorize varying illnesses, that looks beyond celebrity and who can be an artist and de-establishes this&nbsp;hierarchy&nbsp;that has continued to build over time because of the institutional support coming in.&rdquo; &mdash;Elizabeth Mputu</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Following the release of her NewHive&nbsp;commission, <em>Broken Windows</em>, Elizabeth Mputu spoke candidly about &ldquo;the beauty of being blunt,&rdquo; and how her practice incorporates learning well-being from her ancestors. Christian says: &ldquo;Mputu&rsquo;s contrasting explorations and confrontational and spiritual ideas through a militant contemporary lens make her a truly vital artist.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/45239-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-morehshin-allahyari" target="_blank">Morehshin Allahyari</a> &nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src=" http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20160224100015-Lamassu.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;As an artist born and raised in a country like Iran, I never had the privilege of thinking about art as only a decorative and visually pleasing medium. I saw my art practice as a way to address, criticize, and raise awareness about the political and cultural issues around me.&rdquo; &mdash;Morehshin Allahyari</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Allahyari&rsquo;s open-source 3D modeling project, which allows anyone with a 3D printer to recreate artifacts destroyed by ISIS, was one of the most widely acclaimed new media projects in 2016&mdash;and with good reason. &ldquo;Allahyari&rsquo;s unique approach to exploring the complexities and difficulties of her home country, Iran, give her work a rightly celebrated edge of social and political activism,&rdquo; reflects Christian.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/44850-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-v5mt" target="_blank">V5MT</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20160112110035-v5mt_New_Cult_Object_004_dis.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;There&#39;s still plenty of rough, poorly executed stuff, pretty much all the same, copying same ideas all over again&hellip; I&rsquo;m tired of seeing this &lsquo;aesthetic,&rsquo; and I&rsquo;m currently searching for inspiration somewhere else.&rdquo; &mdash;V5MT</em></p> </blockquote> <p>WWAOTW kicked off 2016 with this short-but-sweet profile of gif master V5MT. &ldquo;No one makes better gifs than V5MT,&rdquo; Christian considers. &ldquo;Her constantly evolving work transforms impressive technical complexity into universally accessible brilliance.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/45985-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-pussykrew" target="_blank">Pussykrew</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20160601145443-tumblr_o7gv66hPLf1tpmi7uo1_1280.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;The internet and digital tools can be seen as a utopian environment that gives you freedom from social constructs such as gender. Technology can be used as a vehicle for the dissolution of sex and gender as well as a means to link the body with machines.&rdquo; &mdash;Pussykrew</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Digital art duo Pussykrew make slick and stunning imagery. But we especially loved this interview for their considered insight into what they still see as the inherent privilege (and possibilities) of technology today. &ldquo;Pussykrew&rsquo;s hyper-modernist creations are unsurpassed as a beacon of futuristic thinking in contemporary new media art,&rdquo; pronounces Christian.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/44995-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-carla-gannis" target="_blank">Carla Gannis</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/44995/p66fzh/20160127122819-CarlaG_MagicCarpetRide.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re projecting ourselves, our faces, across networks at a time when climate change could, in a near future, eradicate our &ldquo;collective human face&rdquo; from the planet; when artificial intelligence and machine development threatens to replace us as the most intelligent life forms on Earth.&rdquo; &mdash;Carla Gannis</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Carla Gannis garnered heaps of attention for her <em>Garden of Emoji Delights</em> in 2014. This year we loved her expanded view of the selfie as expressing &ldquo;a lot more about us than ubiquitous cultural narcissism.&rdquo; &ldquo;Gannis was at the vanguard of the modern new media movement,&rdquo; Christian says, &ldquo;and is still constantly pursuing innovation in her explorations of digital life.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/45065-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-faith-holland" target="_blank">Faith Holland</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20160209141459-ookie-sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;Women are taught that their bodies are part of their value as humans and readily use their bodies as tools for their work and others. Men don&#39;t have this training, so to draw men out to use their bodies for my work, even men who work on sexuality like I do, can be a challenge.&rdquo; &mdash;Faith Holland</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Faith Holland is one of the women at the helm of new media art&rsquo;s feminist turn. Her <em>Ookie Canvases</em> consist of digitally manipulated images of ejaculate provided by male artists. In February, she curated a selection of these, and other&mdash;shall we say &ldquo;explosive&rdquo;?&mdash;works for ArtSlant. Christian&rsquo;s take: &ldquo;Holland work has a tangible human and emotional quality that is missing from a lot of new media art. She also often expresses an always appreciated sense of humor.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/46481-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-xaviera-l%C3%B3pez" target="_blank">Xaviera L&oacute;pez</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/46481/p66fzh/20160907173959-xl.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;I think it&rsquo;s very interesting to share something personal and get to see how others view it. This is another advantage of the internet: people feel free to speak their minds.&rdquo; &mdash;Xaviera L&oacute;pez</em></p> </blockquote> <p>This conversation with Chilean animator Xaviera L&oacute;pez, an early adopter of Vine, was a surprise hit. As an artist living far from the global centers of the art world, she shares a reassuring perspective on how the internet is a space for true creative connections. &ldquo;Lopez&rsquo;s videos and gifs could be considered the ultimate selfies,&rdquo; writes Christian. &ldquo;Her amazingly creative explorations of her own fluctuating emotional states are deeply fascinating.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/46675-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-julia-greenway" target="_blank">Julia Greenway</a></strong></span></p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/46675/p66fzh/20161019084933-Yang_03.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em>&ldquo;When it comes to tech-based mediums, there is still a lot of education and awareness building that needs to happen.&rdquo; &mdash;Julia Greenway</em></p> </blockquote> <p>In October we featured not an artist, but a gallerist and curator dedicated to expanding the spaces and visibility of new media and digital art. Julia Greenway, of Seattle&rsquo;s Interstitial Gallery, spoke about the unique challenges of running a physical gallery for new media. &ldquo;Julia Greenway runs a gallery that is helping define the meaning of new media art in a physical space through her hugely ambitious and progressive curation,&rdquo; Christian concludes.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Wednesday Web Artist of the Week is a bi-monthly column by online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen. Every other Wednesday he interviews some of the world&rsquo;s most innovative and exciting new media art practitioners.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrea Alessi</a></p> <p><em>Andrea Alessi is Managing Editor of ArtSlant.</em></p> Thu, 29 Dec 2016 00:17:26 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Who Are the Modern “Creatives”? Social Currency and the Self-Made Artist <p>As I walked up to Andr&uuml; Sisson&rsquo;s studio on the morning of the press preview for his self-produced debut solo show, <em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em>, I saw what the past few months of collaborating with musician and friend, Rocco DeLuca, must have been like.</p> <p>Sisson sat on the floor of a matte black van parked in front of his studio. Its open shell provided the only source of shade on a cloudless late September day, the sun spitting out the last of summer&rsquo;s relentless 90-degree heat. DeLuca stood nearby on the sidewalk, passing a spliff back and forth a couple of times, laughing and chatting, before anyone noticed my intrusion.</p> <p>The two started their creative process much like this: talking ideas and hanging out in their East Los Angeles neighborhood just a stone&rsquo;s throw from Downtown.</p> <p>DeLuca rolled spliffs throughout our interview. &ldquo;Hey can you roll me one?&rdquo; asked Sisson, as we sat for a short chat, surrounded on all sides by nine large paintings in his shared studio&rsquo;s gallery space. Sisson began developing the original concept for <em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em> about a year ago, months before asking DeLuca to contribute a tenth and final piece.</p> <p>&ldquo;Our imaginations would take off on the block watching people walk by,&rdquo; said DeLuca, sitting cross-legged on the cement floor. &ldquo;We talked about visuals with audio and how important they are because they can lift one another&hellip; and then Andr&uuml; asked me, &lsquo;Would you score my pieces?&rsquo; And I thought, <em>that&rsquo;s the most beautiful thing any man&rsquo;s ever said to me</em>. You really want this, sailor? Well, you got me.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161219102034-Ivory_Gold_Slaves_empty_by_Jerrick_Romero.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;"><em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em>&nbsp;installation view. Photo: Jerrick Romero</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The last &ldquo;painting&rdquo; completes the show with ten works, except it isn&rsquo;t shadowy figures painted on reused brown paper grocery bags, like the others. <em>The Tenth Painting (Mississippi Delta)</em> hovers invisible like a ghost just behind your shoulder, marching in gentle chronology from one physical piece to the next: <em>Free Lunch pt. 2</em>, then <em>Grits</em>, <em>Bag Lady</em>, <em>Maggots</em>, <em>Orisha</em>, <em>Mississippi Delta</em>, and so on.</p> <p>Seductive and moody, it&rsquo;s not surprising to learn the soundscape was created as modern blues. DeLuca&rsquo;s spontaneous sounds match Sisson&rsquo;s haphazard brushstrokes.</p> <p>&ldquo;Africa lives the mother of all rhythm, all beauty,&rdquo; said DeLuca, who connected those rhythms to the Mississippi Delta, home of the Delta blues, the first American blues movement beginning in the early 20th century. American blues soonafter became one of countless examples of the whitewashing and appropriating of Black culture in America.</p> <p>Today, the Delta is still reckoning with slavery, segregation, and subsequent <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/01/how-white-flight-ruined-the-mississippi-delta/384227/" target="_blank">white flight</a>; it&rsquo;s where poverty and economic mobility are worse than anywhere else in the developed world. <a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/poverty-stricken-past-present-mississippi-delta/" target="_blank">According to a recent PBS piece</a>, Mississippi ranks 50th out of 50 states by poverty rate. The Delta blues transcend location and circumstance, otherwise inescapable by its residents who remain majority Black since the early 19th century.</p> <p>Black Americans are tied to the South, their distinct histories tangled up along with colonization; <em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em> deals with the mythology of conquerors, the idea of a singular narrative present in most history texts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161219101649-AS_notebook_by_Lauren_McQuade.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Photo: Lauren McQuade</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;This morning was the first time that I heard the actual album,&rdquo; said Sisson, who entrusted DeLuca with this task about five months prior. DeLuca makes his living as a musician, performing on the road and working with collaborator, <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2016/05/daniel-lanois-interview-moogfest-bob-dylan-us-brian-eno/484421/" target="_blank">Daniel Lanois</a>&mdash;the two released <a href="http://www.npr.org/2016/09/01/491517830/first-listen-daniel-lanois-goodbye-to-language" target="_blank"><em>Goodbye to Language</em></a>, an experimental record featuring two steel guitars performing spontaneously to each other, that same week. Lanois can also be heard on <em>The Tenth Painting</em>, which acts as an extended session.</p> <p>Their work combined, &ldquo;it&rsquo;s a motion picture,&rdquo; Sisson said to DeLuca, &ldquo;We just directed a film right now.&rdquo;</p> <table align="right" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Why do I have to go through a gallery? Why do I have to deal with curators? What&rsquo;s the natural projection for an industry like art?&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>There is, of course, no single medium, genre, or mode of art-making. For the self-made artist, like Sisson, creation is a spectrum of different practices, influences, mediums, and, in his case, collaboration that relies on his identity as the crux. <em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em> is an untainted portrait of the artist as a young man, on the artist&rsquo;s own terms.</p> <p>This sort of expansive vision&mdash;an openness to different mediums and abandonment of clear taxonomies&mdash;is emblematic of a new type of professional artist, the young &ldquo;creatives&rdquo; today who are bypassing traditional gatekeepers of the art world and writing a new playbook (even if they are keeping the old one in mind).</p> <p>An opening reception for <em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em> was planned for the following night. Sisson&rsquo;s multi-room studio is shared with various other artists and includes an exhibition space at the heart. Sisson had haggled with his landlord and agreed to trade two drawings in exchange for the use of the space for ten days: ten paintings, ten days, none for sale.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&#39;s an offering, essentially,&rdquo; said Sisson&mdash;an offering with no middle person between artist and audience. Sisson has full control.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161219101533-AS_at_Ivory_Gold_Slaves2_by_Jerrick_Romero.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Andr&uuml; Sisson at&nbsp;<em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em>&nbsp;opening. Photo: Jerrick Romero</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Not for lack of trying. While working on this project, the self-taught painter became frustrated with the rigidity of gallerists and curators who took meetings at his impressive studio space only to suggest conventional first steps for an emerging artist (such as group shows). He started asking himself questions, like:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;"><em>Why do I have to go through a gallery? Why do I have to deal with curators? Why do I have to subscribe to a system that everyone else is subscribing to and, it works perfectly fine, but how long can it work in this sense, and what&rsquo;s next? What&rsquo;s the natural projection for an industry like art?</em></p> <p>Social media helps bypass traditional avenues to prominence by allowing the creation and curation of one&rsquo;s own narrative, even persona, giving space for users to build a dedicated audience of digital followers that mobilize IRL&mdash;search <a href="https://www.instagram.com/andrusisson/">@andrusisson</a> on Instagram and you will find no separation between the person, the artist, the internet being, and no trace of a part-time job to make ends meet.</p> <p>Particular platforms like Vine (<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/01/arts/vine-jay-versace-black-culture.html?_r=0">RIP</a>) and <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/04/the-truth-about-black-twitter/390120/">Black Twitter</a> have been important spaces for Blackness to exist in a country where the core system is based on white supremacy. Both social media outlets are credited for bypassing traditional media with white gatekeepers but, like the Delta blues, Vine and Black Twitter are rightly noted for sparking mainstream culture that soon becomes perverted, appropriated, and often monetized by white people.</p> <p>Social currency can lead to monetary compensation for a select few, as mostly white socialites, bloggers, and celebrities&mdash;but also self-made models and trendsetters&mdash;sell individual posts for cash. As new media artist Leah Schrager recently detailed in an <a href="http://rhizome.org/editorial/2016/sep/08/self-made-supermodels/" target="_blank">account of her work as an Instagram model</a>, compensation is based on your following (more followers, more pay), essentially blurring <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/30/business/media/instagram-ads-marketing-kardashian.html" target="_blank">#ad</a> content with one&rsquo;s personal &ldquo;brand.&rdquo; While blurring lines between work and life is indeed attributed to this generation&rsquo;s rise and prosperity, selling out is not homogenous among artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161219101236-AS_show_prep_hair_by_Jerrick_Romero.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Andr&uuml; Sisson preparing for&nbsp;<em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em>. Photo: Jerrick Romero</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>While planning his show, Sisson had to move out of his apartment and for a month had no place to live. He used all the money from selling other works and his part-time job that would have gone to rent to pay for frames and other logistical expenses.</p> <p>&ldquo;I was telling Rocco that in my mind that&rsquo;s what a true artist does, you know what I mean, like, how much do you really believe in something? Are you willing to sleep on your friend&rsquo;s couch or in your car to put a project out? That&rsquo;s my stance, and, yes, I will and, yes, I&rsquo;m doing so and it feels good. It&rsquo;s scary,&rdquo; he laughed, &ldquo;But it feels good.&rdquo;</p> <table align="left" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;How much do you really believe in something? Are you willing to sleep on your friend&rsquo;s couch or in your car to put a project out?&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>I asked Sisson if he had a backup plan. He shifted his cap to reveal a half-shaved dome similar to one of Jean-Michel Basquiat&rsquo;s earlier hairstyles.</p> <p>&ldquo;A backup plan for what?&rdquo; he answered, in earnest.</p> <p>&ldquo;Exactly!&rdquo; said DeLuca, not skipping a beat.</p> <p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s that saying: the only thing that Plan B does is get in the way of Plan A, and I just have Plan A&rsquo;s, and sometimes it works to my benefit and other times it doesn&rsquo;t but I know that everything will work out,&rdquo; said Sisson. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m not going to starve and I have the support of friends and family to the point where I can crash for a couple of weeks and have shelter, so that&rsquo;s my Plan A I guess.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Man, that&rsquo;s a good plan,&rdquo; said DeLuca.</p> <p>&ldquo;Right?&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Any other plans are just networks of escapes, isn&rsquo;t it?&rdquo; said DeLuca.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">⁂</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161219101107-GL_studio_by_Lauren_McQuade.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Gianni Lee in his studio. Photo: Lauren McQuade</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The next night, an hour into the opening party for <em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em>, it&rsquo;s packed full with a crowd any PR rep would envy&mdash;a testament to Sisson&rsquo;s likable personality and shrewd use of social currency. The crowd is not bad either for an ever-expanding Arts District-<a href="http://la.curbed.com/maps/arts-district-los-angeles-development-map">adjacent</a> neighborhood still roaring with semi-trucks and their haul, the last semblance of industry near this side of the LA River bordering Boyle Heights.</p> <p>Gianni Lee&rsquo;s antennae-like hairstyle stands out among the crowd. We first spoke a few days before inside his shared live/work loft in Downtown&rsquo;s Historic Core.</p> <table align="right" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;I feel like if I&rsquo;m not bringing any social change through my art, I&rsquo;m not serving my community the right way.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>His living area is lined with finished and half-finished canvases layered two-three deep, filed between computer screens and samples from the clothing line Babylon Cartel, of which Lee is co-owner and creative director. Jack-of-all-trades seems a fitting title, but the working DJ, producer, and designer (<a href="http://photogenicsmedia.com/influencer/gianni-lee/">now model</a>) prefers simply &ldquo;creator.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Don&rsquo;t get thrown off if I record you,&rdquo; said Lee, who got distracted when uploading part of our conversation to his Instagram story.</p> <p>Lee first started painting graffiti at this year&rsquo;s SXSW<strong>.</strong> He figured others would simply assume he was another pawn in the &ldquo;creative&rdquo; environment of the massive music festival. At the time, he made an announcement to his Twitter following, &ldquo;A couple of my friends stopped by, saw me painting and just thought it was cool, and I guess that started the wave.&rdquo;</p> <p>Balancing between creative worlds, with industries like fashion and music, leaves room for expression to be carried outside of these systems: &ldquo;I&rsquo;m in the music industry, I see how the music industry works to a certain extent&mdash;certain things I like, certain things I don&rsquo;t like. I can&rsquo;t comment on everything about it, so why not put it in a painting?&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161219100824-GL_studio2_by_Lauren_McQuade.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Gianni Lee in his studio. Photo: Lauren McQuade</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The neon, humanoid figures present in Lee&rsquo;s paintings seem to be trapped in the Matrix: pipes, or metal arms, fixed to their foreheads; wires stuck in their wrists like splinters.</p> <p>&ldquo;That&rsquo;s what it&rsquo;s all about for me,&rdquo; Lee said, &ldquo;What can I do to get my opinion across on how I view the world without just bitching and complaining on Twitter? &hellip; Art is the perfect way because if somebody really wants to know, I can be like: look at my paintings and let&rsquo;s have a conversation.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;I feel like if I&rsquo;m not bringing any social change through my art, I&rsquo;m not serving my community the right way,&rdquo; said Lee, who grew up in West Philadelphia, PA.</p> <p>Conversations regarding Black bodies in America are conversations that still need to be had; the year is not yet over, but 2016 leads in police killings of unarmed people, with <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/ng-interactive/2015/jun/01/the-counted-police-killings-us-database" target="_blank">1026</a>&nbsp;so far. These killings disproportionately affect people of color.</p> <p>&ldquo;I really take being a Black person to heart and I feel like because of how I was raised and what I&rsquo;ve been through and the hardships that I had growing up in the inner city, like, in the hood, I felt like I had to be a voice to generations underneath me; it&rsquo;s a sad feeling to be in a place where you really don&rsquo;t want to be and you have so much riding against you to get out, and [when] you finally make it out, I feel like you have to be that beacon of hope for other people.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161219102543-GL_detail2_by_Lauren_McQuade.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Photo: Lauren McQuade</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>His tone was no longer lofty, but implied the urgency of life and death.</p> <p>&ldquo;I really feel strongly about this shit, man. I could have not made it out. I could have sold drugs or could have got shot or could have just gave up and got married and could have been just living a blue collar life in Philly working at the airport with two kids, making enough to survive, probably would have bought a house somewhere in West Philly or Northeast.&rdquo;</p> <p>How often does he think about these alternative realities, which started sounding very specific, I wondered out loud.</p> <table align="left" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;People will change their perceptions of you because you have a blue check. Twitter figured it out: they&rsquo;ve created a hierarchical system.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&ldquo;All the time, man, like, all the time,&rdquo; said Lee. &ldquo;I just don&rsquo;t want to live my life that way; I really want to be an artist and take this shit all the way.&rdquo;</p> <p>As far as role models are concerned, there are not many&mdash;Lee mentions Basquiat, who walked runway; Keith Haring, who sold handmade T-shirts; and Andy Warhol, who appeared in ad campaigns. But none of those precedents had to deal with the internet.</p> <p>Lee describes the creative flexing he sees online as &ldquo;a cesspool of fuckery.&rdquo; He elaborated, &ldquo;Today&rsquo;s culture in general, there&rsquo;s a lot of mental slavery and people just blindly following leaders. I call these leaders false prophets and people just blindly follow them, and I&rsquo;m just like why? Why don&rsquo;t you create a narrative for yourself?&rdquo;</p> <p>As far as his own narrative is concerned, Lee is slowly building his network, posting a seamless weaving of business ventures among more personal projects on social media. But still, there are challenges.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161219102418-GL_studio3_by_Lauren_McQuade.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Gianni Lee in his studio. Photo: Lauren McQuade</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ll find&nbsp;people that really want to embrace me or really want to support what I do but I don&rsquo;t have a big enough following,&rdquo; said Lee. &ldquo;There are&nbsp;people out there that do way less than me but have, like, 150k on Instagram, so they&rsquo;ll overlook the guy who really has the talent.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m really losing out on key connections&nbsp;because of my following,&rdquo; he went on. &ldquo;Sometimes I&rsquo;ll hit a stalemate and that shit can really fuck with you&nbsp;because I know that my work is bigger than my Instagram following, like, I don&rsquo;t even have 10k yet, but to other&nbsp;people it just means so much.&rdquo;</p> <p>Lee recently got <a href="https://twitter.com/giannilee?lang=en">verified on Twitter</a>, and since then, has experienced a new notoriety: &ldquo;&hellip;it&rsquo;s good looking at it. It puts you in a different, I guess, category but the fact that&nbsp;people will then change their perceptions of you&nbsp;because you have a blue check next to you; it&rsquo;s genius from Twitter&nbsp;because Twitter figured it out: they&rsquo;ve created a hierarchical system.&rdquo;</p> <p>It dawns on me that he&rsquo;s right&mdash;we really have given social media platforms all of the power that comes with social currency. Twitter even has an exclusive TweetDeck, or tab, that only shows communications between those who have also been verified.</p> <p>But is it even still possible to claim victory over the algorithms?</p> <p>&ldquo;I look at it like I&rsquo;m&nbsp;definitely going to figure out the system and work my way through it and around it, but I&rsquo;m&nbsp;definitely not going to hold everything to that standard.&rdquo; Lee continued, &ldquo;I feel like pieces will fall into place and if those&nbsp;people want to embrace me, they will when the time is right. I just continue to work at the highest level that I can.&rdquo;</p> <p>Back inside the gallery, admiring Sisson&rsquo;s independent venture and successful debut solo, Lee looks around one last time and says, &ldquo;Yeah. I want to do something like this next.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161219100010-GL_at_Ivory_Gold_Slaves_by_Jerrick_Romero.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Gianni Lee at&nbsp;<em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em>. Photo: Jerrick Romero</span><br /> &nbsp;</p> <p><em><a href="https://www.tappancollective.com/collections/andru-sisson" target="_blank">Andr&uuml; Sisson</a> is a painter living and working in Los Angeles and New York. Sisson began exploring creative expression as a child growing up in rural Arizona, where he was surrounded by a family of painters. His work has been included in the Silverlake Conservatory of Music Benefit Gala alongside Damien Hirst, Dennis Hopper and Richard Prince. He is collected internationally, from Los Angeles to London.</em></p> <p><em>Gianni Lee is a multidisciplinary artist, designer, and music producer from Philadelphia, PA, who lives and works in Downtown Los Angeles. Lee is the first ever DJ Champion for Vfiles and Def Jam Records, earning his title in 2014. </em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/431064-lauren-mcquade?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Lauren McQuade</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.laurenmcquade.com/" target="_blank"><em>Lauren McQuade</em></a><em> is an LA-based writer, photojournalist and editor with interest in social issues and the representation of culture in the city of Los Angeles.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Andr&uuml; Sisson preparing for&nbsp;<em>Ivory Gold Slaves</em>. Photo: Jerrick Romero)</span></p> Mon, 09 Jan 2017 17:00:15 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Yoshi Sodeoka <p><a href="http://www.sodeoka.com" target="_blank">Yoshi Sodeoka</a> is a Japanese artist who moved to New York to attend Pratt Institute in the late 80s and has made it his home ever since. The work he started there, using the first wave of accessible digital tools, could be seen as a direct precursor to what became the modern new media art movement. He was a very early proponent of using the internet as a blank canvas for a new kind of creativity, exploring those possibilities with his groundbreaking work at <a href="http://deadword.com/" target="_blank">Word.com</a>, one of the first web magazines.</p> <p>Today Sodeoka is best known for his mind-melting video experiments, often enhanced with his own textured musical compositions. His explosive visual style has led to multiple bands (including Tame Impala and Psychic TV) commissioning him to provide visuals for their sounds. Sodeoka&rsquo;s work feels at once technologically complex and organically grounded. His fevered psychedelic visions are imbued with humanity and warmth, giving them an accessible appeal that is sadly absent from much contemporary digital art. Besides his own artistic endeavors, Sodeoka also is a tireless and innovative promoter of modern video art through his collective <a href="http://www.undervolt.co/" target="_blank">Undervolt &amp; Co</a>.</p> <p>I spoke to Sodeoka about the origins of his interest in digital art and his journey to becoming a highly respected member of the contemporary new media art scene.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161214105353-6_1000.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">&ldquo;Prototype #47: 3:20AM,&rdquo; Monkey Town LA, 360&deg; Video Installation</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: You had an art tutor as a kid. What did they teach you about art?</strong> <strong>What were your favorite things to create as a child?</strong></p> <p><strong>Yoshi Sodeoka:</strong> I learned oil painting and sculpture-making as a child. And I remember having my first solo show with my paintings at a local art gallery when I was ten, lol. The tutor obviously taught me basic ideas of colors and compositions, etc.&mdash;the usual stuff. But I think he showed me how to live as an artist more than anything, both good and bad. He was a full-time painter/sculptor and had a small art studio near where my family lived. And the place was filled with many interesting art stuff. And he used to listen to strange music, especially for an elementary school kid&rsquo;s ears. To be surrounded by that environment for eight years as a child had a significant influence in my later life.</p> <p><strong>CP: Your parents were clearly supportive of your creativity. How do they feel about the art you make now?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> Yes, they were just wonderful and supportive and still are. But I think they are pretty much confused by what I do now. Not that they aren&rsquo;t happy about it. It&rsquo;s just that I think what I do now is beyond their level of comprehension. The thing is, I even have hard time explaining what I do to people. So, I can&rsquo;t blame them. But when I make an artwork for the <em>New York Times</em>, etc., they understand it and it makes them happy.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/98088203?color=ffffff" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/98088203" target="_blank">&ldquo;Rainfall&rdquo;&mdash;My Panda Shall Fly</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/sodeoka" target="_blank">Yoshi Sodeoka</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What was your first experience of art made by a computer, and why&nbsp;</strong><strong>did you first start using a computer to make art</strong><strong>?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I remember using Aldus Freehand very early on. But I quickly realized I didn&#39;t like making art with vector-based programs. Adding a bunch of squares and circles, dragging handles with a mouse to make an artwork just felt unnatural especially for someone with a traditional painting background. Then I discovered Photoshop and I felt better.</p> <p>I went to Pratt Institute and they had a bunch of Mac IIcx&rsquo;s. Everything about Mac at the time was fascinating. They had a class to teach Macromedia Director with it and I got totally hooked making interactive art with Lingo. So I ditched paintings and never looked back. &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you become interested in video art?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I started to move toward making moving images because the painting simply stopped being enough. I also always had a passion for sound making. So video totally made sense to me. I felt like I could communicate my ideas better with videos.</p> <p>Also, there&rsquo;s another factor to this: there was a period when I made a lot of web art and interactive things, but I stopped doing that a while ago. What&rsquo;s disappointing is any artworks that rely on browsers or computer hardware usually won&rsquo;t work in 10 years. I know people are making efforts to preserve old websites and CD-ROMs and things, and I think that&rsquo;s great. But to me, it&rsquo;s personal. It&rsquo;s about looking back at things I made on my own.</p> <p>The art I make serves as a diary. I want to be able to look at what I made 10 years ago without worrying about the tech. I just can&rsquo;t rely on other people to do that for me. Videos are a lot easier to preserve since it&rsquo;s just of bunch of images sequenced together. Video compression and resolutions might change later on, but I can always easily convert it to a newer format by myself.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-kPw0CgEqAo?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">&ldquo;Prototype #47: 3:20AM,&rdquo; Monkey Town LA, 360&deg; Video Installation (Bird&#39;s Eye View demo)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why did you leave Japan and come to America?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I came to New York to study at Pratt Institute. Right after high school in Japan, I met an American art teacher who was originally from Philadelphia. He lived in Tokyo back then. He was a RISD alumni and was a founding member of Talking Heads. I also played in bands a lot, so he and I bonded well. I was a confused musician wannabe teenager with no real direction in life. It was his time to get back to New York to focus on art. He then suggested I should study more art in the US. Having a support from someone like him in a new land was a huge plus. And my parents were also into this idea since they didn&rsquo;t like the other idea of me trying to make a living playing music. I grew up in big cities like Tokyo and Yokohama. So New York wasn&rsquo;t that much different to me except for stinky sidewalks and dirty subway stations. Not to mention louder and taller people. But I instantly felt like I could fit in. I guess I still like it here because I still live here.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you start to realize that there was a new media community that you could be part of?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I&rsquo;m not sure. I&rsquo;ve been doing this type of thing for so long. I&rsquo;ve seen more than a few different new media art communities passing by; people come and go. I always feel like an outsider looking inside. I stay low-key most of the time, but I&rsquo;m always around somewhere making stuff.</p> <p><strong>CP: </strong><strong>A lot of your work could be described as &ldquo;psychedelic.&rdquo; Are you interested in psychedelia generally or did you arrive at that aesthetic independently?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I should say that none of those &ldquo;psychedelic&rdquo; aesthetics are actually intentional. No matter what I do, it&rsquo;s just how it comes out. I do like a lot of psychedelic art, but that&rsquo;s definitely not the only thing I&rsquo;m into. And I&rsquo;m definitely NOT a drug user&hellip;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/30080859" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/30080859" target="_blank">Violet Dark Spring of the Numinous Orb (2011)</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/sodeoka" target="_blank">Yoshi Sodeoka</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: There is also a cosmic/new age element to some of you work. Are you a spiritual person?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I would not know. Sometimes I read things about spirituality and I find some things in common. But then sometimes I don&rsquo;t. I have to say I don&rsquo;t trust someone who says he/she is a spiritual person. The idea of labeling something like that is kind of shady.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/37427970?color=ffffff" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/37427970" target="_blank">Sibyl: A Wind God&rsquo;s Passage to the Funeral Games (2012)</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/sodeoka" target="_blank">Yoshi Sodeoka</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work is sometimes very mellow and sometimes confrontational&mdash;does that represent two sides of your personality?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> Maybe. I&rsquo;m never a confrontational person in nature. But I am probably hiding my angry emotions inside ; ). Art is just my good outlet. It&rsquo;s a good thing that I have that. Otherwise, I would be going totally nuts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="369" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/168243315?color=ffffff&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/168243315" target="_blank">See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil&mdash;Yoshi Sodeoka</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/undervolt" target="_blank">Undervolt &amp; Co</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/25047704" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/25047704" target="_blank">Passage Pt3. Radioactive Mountain (2011)</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/sodeoka" target="_blank">Yoshi Sodeoka</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How does music influence the work you make and how does art influence the music you make?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I always think of music and art all mashed up and together and don&#39;t separate those two. But attitude wise, I&rsquo;ve learned everything from music, especially hardcore punk. DIY ethos and the idea of anti-establishment are something I am always conscious about. Being in the scene at an earlier age taught me a lot about that way of life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/135510971?color=ffffff" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/135510971" target="_blank">Drag&mdash;MYMK</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/sodeoka" target="_blank">Yoshi Sodeoka</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: There are a lot of vintage aesthetics in your work, but it is not retro. How do you get that balance right?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> That&rsquo;s great. I appreciate your observation. I just like the look of wear and tear. Something about that shiny perfect look makes me feel uncomfortable. A decayed look gives it a more human-made feel. But I don&rsquo;t have that so-called &ldquo;retro-fetish.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161214104833-8_0-17-52-06.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Distortion IV</em>, 2013</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161214104904-E-copy.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Distortion II</em>, 2011</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You were part of an early webzine called <a href="http://deadword.com/" target="_blank">Word.com</a> in the 90s. What was that experience like? What did you do for it?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> We did a lot of different things with Word.com. Unfortunately that domain name was bought by Merriam Webster for obvious reasons after we got shut down in 2001. But we had that domain name before them. It was registered in 1994 or so, we fully intended to make a webzine called Word.</p> <p>The best I can do to describe what it was is to invite you to look at the <a href="http://deadword.com/" target="_blank">archive</a>. My title was art director. So I was in charge of all the visual aspects of Word.com. Basically it was a mash up of writings, art, music, and games that happened in a chaotic dotcom era. A <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/haydnshaughnessy/2011/11/10/ten-websites-that-changed-the-world/#a44112b36a08" target="_blank"><em>Forbes</em> article</a> described it as &ldquo;the first truly multi-media web originated ezine, in an age when websites were repurposed print.&rdquo; That pretty much says it all. The <a href="https://twitter.com/jim_boulton/status/589065649659498499/photo/1" target="_blank"><em>New York Times</em> even used Word&rsquo;s screenshots to explain what a web browser was in 1995.</a> Yes it&#39;s that old. I think it stood out because there was no one else making a website like that at the time. Almost every website was with default gray page with flush left text. We pushed the boundaries of HTML to explore the real potentials of web design by using a lot of hacked codes. We used to get many complaints because we crashed a lot of people&rsquo;s Netscape.</p> <p>Luckily, Word has been acquired by a couple of art museums worldwide as a permanent collection piece.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161214104630-w2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Word.com screenshot</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161214104534-CCzIFhVWIAAItHd.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>NYTimes</em> article on August 19, 1995.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your relationship with GIFs?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I think it&rsquo;s just one of the mediums that happens to be good and works. There&#39;s nothing complicated about it technologically. I don&rsquo;t have philosophical and artsy things to say about it. I use it when it fits well with my idea. But I leave it out when it doesn&rsquo;t.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161214104406-MrVomit_V_2.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="http://payload.cargocollective.com/1/0/19991/2236052/Amoeba.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="http://payload.cargocollective.com/1/0/19991/2236052/blob3.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: There is a strong science fiction feeling to your work. Are there certain things in that genre that have inspired you?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I think I&rsquo;ve gotten into sci-fi more from music rather than movies or books. I was into space rock, prog-rock and avant-garde jazz. Looking at the artwork of bands like Hawkwind, Yes, Pink Floyd, Sun Ra,&nbsp;just to name a few, had an impact on me.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="525" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/7628740?color=ffffff" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/7628740" target="_blank">Psychedelic Death Vomit (Slight Return) 3d (2010)</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/sodeoka" target="_blank">Yoshi Sodeoka</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: </strong><strong>It&rsquo;s notoriously hard to make money as a digital artist. Is that your experience? What are your thoughts on that?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I think we aren&rsquo;t just talking about &ldquo;digital artists&rdquo;&mdash;it&rsquo;s about &ldquo;artists&rdquo; in general. It&rsquo;s definitely not easy. I haven&rsquo;t had a regular day job in a while. Office jobs make me crazy. I don&rsquo;t teach in school, and I&#39;m terrified of public speaking. Basically I have no stable side income. Fortunately, I have just about enough of a stream of commissions to get me by, mostly from bands to make music videos and album art, illustrations for newspaper/magazines, and sometimes branding projects for fashion industries and electronic brands. Maintaining my portfolio website always helped.</p> <p>I just happened to make a type of art that can be applied to many different formats. If my passion was to build gigantic sculptures like Richard Serra does, I know I would have been screwed.</p> <p>I&rsquo;ve done plenty of gallery shows in the past. But I&rsquo;m not sure if I fit in. I realized that there&rsquo;s this idea in the art scene that you aren&rsquo;t a fine artist if you aren&rsquo;t working with galleries and selling your work in fairs and auctions. I don&rsquo;t agree with it. I know doing gallery stuff isn&rsquo;t the only way to be a good artist. I realized a long time ago that I will never be a big rich gallery artist like Damien Hirst or Jeff Koons. I&rsquo;m not into the pretentiousness of the art world anyway. It&rsquo;s over-intellectualized and I feel that a lot of gallery artist types are making art just to impress curators and competitors and living inside their own art world bubble. So, instead of trying to engage with that scene, I wanted to focus on finding a different path. That&rsquo;s not to say I would not work with galleries at all in the future. I&rsquo;ve met some gallery owners with good intentions. But I still only see gallery activities as one of many outlets. I am just not fond of the whole system.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161214104050-addicted_1117.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>New York Times</em>, Sunday Review, &ldquo;Addicted To Distraction,&rdquo; 2015</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In any case, I still had to find another way to make a living and still fulfill my artistic desires. My answer is to take a wide range of commission opportunities from outside of the art world that are presented to me. People usually come to me understanding what I do. And they grant me creative freedom. So I am still able to work on projects without compromising my artistic integrity. Good music people are always open-minded and creative. And I&rsquo;ve worked with very creative newspaper/magazine art directors. They let me do whatever I want, and I feel lucky. But I take it as a reward for being in the industry for so long, not giving up, and taking no break all this time.</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t make a lot, but I&rsquo;ve been able to break even so far. One of the keys to attract interesting commissions is to be open-minded. It&rsquo;s important to blend in with what&#39;s going on in the real world, and understand and be curious about what other creative people in different fields are doing. It&rsquo;s always a terrible idea to look down on people by thinking &ldquo;I&rsquo;m better than you because I make fine art.&rdquo; You know that type ; )</p> <p>There still are demands for good art in this economy outside of the art world. So why not take those? If I didn&rsquo;t have that sort of mindset, I would be limiting myself to a lot of interesting opportunities that are out there.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/44567902?color=ffffff&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/44567902" target="_blank">&ldquo;Youth In Trouble&rdquo;&mdash;The Presets (2012)</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/sodeoka" target="_blank">Yoshi Sodeoka</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What are your favorite tools for making digital art and why?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I&rsquo;ve used After Effects since version 1. I know a lot about it, and I think it&rsquo;s still one of best tools around to make moving images. But I&rsquo;ve gotten a little tired of the slow rendering time lately. You can make pretty cool VR things inside After Effects now. I&rsquo;ve tried making a few things and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/sodeoka/videos/vb.1202596330/10209078509898886/?type=2&amp;theater" target="_blank">posted</a> them on Facebook. There are a lot of potentials in that. But I&rsquo;m not into the idea of making VRs for VR sake. I have to see if I have the right idea and reason to make artistic VR content. Plus, the stuff that I usually want to make is too complicated and it takes too much time to render. It makes it less spontaneous. So, I decided to wait till the technology is matured. I&rsquo;ve gotten one of those Google Cardboard goggles but I find it awkward. I&rsquo;m already addicted to my iPhone&mdash;I don&rsquo;t like the idea of attaching it to my big freaking head.</p> <p>So lately, I&rsquo;ve been taking a break from rendering hell, going back to basics. I&rsquo;ve been experimenting a lot with real time video processing using Syphon with Modul8. I can create endless visual variations of digital video feedback with that combo. My latest project called <a href="http://ysrt50.skyapnea.com/" target="_blank">YSRT50</a> with electronic music producers Rain Text was entirely made with that technique. I&rsquo;ve always liked working in video feedback. The video I made for <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnKUD_OztRE" target="_blank">Tame Impala&rsquo;s &ldquo;Elephant&rdquo;</a> was mostly using analog video feedback with cheap gear. And the process was totally spontaneous and quick. And I think it turned out well for the music. I&#39;m still proud of what I could achieve with that limited setup. A lot of time, you don&rsquo;t need complicated 3D software or trendy new tech stuff to make something interesting.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/185832515?color=ffffff&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/185832515" target="_blank">1.4&mdash;YSRT50</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/sodeoka" target="_blank">Yoshi Sodeoka</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/53343768?color=ffffff&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/53343768" target="_blank">Elephant&mdash;Tame Impala (Official Video 2012)</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/sodeoka" target="_blank">Yoshi Sodeoka</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you tell us a little about your video art collective Undervolt &amp; Co?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I originally started <a href="http://www.undervolt.co/" target="_blank">Undervolt &amp; Co</a>&nbsp;a few years ago wanting to start a label to distribute video art in the same way music is distributed. I always liked the idea of self-publishing and I&rsquo;ve done a few before. The first DVD that I published was back in 2001 called &ldquo;<a href="http://sodeoka.com/404031" target="_blank">404031</a>&rdquo;. It has a 31-minute noise video. At the time, DVD burners used to cost a fortune and there were no small DVD replication services. So, I had to send it out to a big major replicator, which also produced Harry Potter DVDs, to have it made. They were totally confused by what I wanted to publish. That was funny. Anyway, I thought I knew a thing or two about publishing video art. And I hadn&rsquo;t seen a good place where modern experimental video artists are represented in a respectable manner. So I wanted to make a label with great video artist friends I&rsquo;ve met over the years.</p> <p>Undervolt has been evolving and shifted focus gradually. We&rsquo;ve become more like a collective rather than a label. We&rsquo;ve had good opportunities of being invited as a collective to great festivals like Moogfest, Mutek IMG, Pittsburgh VIA, and the Museum of Moving Image in the past couple of years. So it&#39;s been rewarding so far. Also, I guess this is just my small way of contributing to the video art community.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/130324202?color=ffffff&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/130324202" target="_blank">Exponential Functions 154: Yoshi Sodeoka</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/undervolt" target="_blank">Undervolt &amp; Co</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What projects do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>YS:</strong> I&rsquo;ve been given an opportunity to work on my own art book. I&rsquo;m not sure if it will be a monograph book of my past work or if everything will be made new just for that. I&rsquo;m still contemplating ideas.</p> <p>Also, I started to think about what the new edition of Undervolt &amp; Co for 2017 will be.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<em>Noise</em>, 2010. All images and videos: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 14 Dec 2016 15:54:54 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list 2016’s Best Artist Interviews <p>There&rsquo;s been <a href="http://www.artspace.com/magazine/interviews_features/qa/adam-curtis-hypernormalisation-interview-54468" target="_blank">a lot</a> of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/46686" target="_blank">hand-wringing</a> of late about whether artists and the creative class can do more to combat the growing threats to democracy, the environment, and even our physical bodies. The work is never over, but I found a welcome moment of encouragement while reviewing <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/articles/list?listtype=interviews" target="_blank">the artist interviews ArtSlant published in 2016</a>. Clicking through the archive I was motivated by the diverse cross-section of artists grappling with some of the most pressing issues of our time.</p> <p>In 2016, artists taught us about self-defense when faced with police brutality and how to evade Big Data collecting our DNA (really). We spoke with artists amplifying the voices of incarcerated populations and memorializing a planet facing mass extinctions. Artists shared strategies about navigating post-colonial legacies and wrestling with conundrums of visibility and identity. And women artists spanning multiple generations spoke of their radical feminist practices both on- and off-line.</p> <p>It seems with every news cycle&mdash;and every new cabinet appointment&mdash;we have more to feel discouraged about as the final days of 2016 tick over to 2017. But let&rsquo;s take this moment to celebrate the many ways artists continue to rise to some of the most urgent challenges of our time. Thanks to all the artists who so generously shared their words with us in 2016. From the archive, these are some of our favorites:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/45610-the-ecology-of-maya-lin-a-memorial-for-the-planet" target="_blank">The Ecology of Maya Lin: A Memorial for the Planet</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/980409/p66fzh/20160404182816-A_Fold_in_the_Field_01.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Maya Lin,</span><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px;">A Fold in the Field</em><span style="font-size: 12px;">, 2013. Photo: David Hartley Mitchell. Courtesy of Gibbs Farm</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-size:20px;"><em>&ldquo;I think I have always felt that if we can accurately look at what we are doing, or what we have done, we will be able to learn from our past in order to shape a different future.&rdquo;&nbsp;&mdash;Maya Lin</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p>In our most-read interview of 2016, Philip Barash caught up with <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/92-maya-lin" target="_blank">Maya Lin</a> for a &ldquo;psychological pause&rdquo; as she looked back at her career and considered how her art, architecture, and memorials speak together in one voice. Lin&rsquo;s memorials have addressed some of the most vital issues of our time: war, civil rights, women&rsquo;s rights, and the culture and history of Native Americans. Her latest project, <em>What is Missing?</em>, is a global memorial to the species and natural environments driven to extinction by humans.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/46566-genevieve-gaignard-youre-not-that-but-youre-not-emnotem-that" target="_blank">Genevieve Gaignard: &ldquo;You&rsquo;re Not That, But You&rsquo;re Not <em>Not</em> That&rdquo;</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1009307/u3azr9/20160929154852-Drive-By_Side-Eye_worksv2_copy.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="text-align: center; font-size: 12px;">Genevieve Gaignard,&nbsp;</span><em style="text-align: center; font-size: 12px;">Drive-by, Side-eye</em><span style="text-align: center; font-size: 12px;">, 2016, Chromogenic Print 28 x 42 inches. Courtesy the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-size:20px;"><em>&ldquo;They&rsquo;re me behind a fa&ccedil;ade... they&rsquo;re extremes. But it&rsquo;s a comment on who I have to be to fit into certain situations.&rdquo; &mdash;Genevieve Gaignard</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p>On the eve of her solo show, <em>Smell the Roses</em>, at the California African American Museum in October, photographer <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/387984-genevieve-gaignard" target="_blank">Genevieve Gaignard</a> spoke to Alex Anderson about identity, passing, and the archetypical characters she performs in her work. We loved the candid insight that Gaignard, a biracial woman of color with fair skin, brought to the slippery subject of finding truth in the abstract aporia of identity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/45231-bringing-self-defense-performance-art-into-the-community-an-interview-with-shaun-leonardo" target="_blank">Bringing Self-Defense Performance Art into the Community: An Interview with Shaun Leonardo</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/45231-bringing-self-defense-performance-art-into-the-community-an-interview-with-shaun-leonardo" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/45231/p66fzh/20160223193340-Screen_Shot_2016-02-23_at_2.29.34_PM.png" style="text-align: center;" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Still from <em>I Can&#39;t Breathe </em>performance at EPIC North High School. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-size:20px;"><em>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s not about survival. People have to prioritize joy. What does that mean for young people of color? To prioritize joy means having an active role in creating a space where you can almost always see the light at the end of the tunnel.&rdquo; &mdash;Shaun Leonardo</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p>In February, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45402-shaun-leonardo" target="_blank">Shaun Leonardo</a> brought his <em>I Can&rsquo;t Breathe</em>&nbsp;self-defense performance and workshop into NYC schools and community centers, turning a project initially enacted in art spaces into a potentially life-saving gesture. Editor Joel Kuennen chatted with Leonardo about presenting the work in these different contexts, the legacy of police violence in New York City, and believing in the struggle.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/45840-louise-fishman-subverting-the-patriarchy-with-2-inch-paintings" target="_blank">Louise Fishman: Subverting the Patriarchy with 2-inch Paintings</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/45840-louise-fishman-subverting-the-patriarchy-with-2-inch-paintings" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/986833/p66fzh/20160510135019-angry_hillary.jpg" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Angry Hillary</em>, 2008, Acrylic on paper, 26 x 40 in. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em><span style="font-size:20px;">&ldquo;Nothing fundamental has changed. Misogyny is still blossoming in every aspect of modern life.&rdquo; &mdash;Louise Fishman</span></em></p> </blockquote> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/53011-louise-fishman" target="_blank">Louise Fishman</a>&rsquo;s painting&nbsp;<em>Angry Hillary</em>&nbsp;predates the candidate&rsquo;s recent political heartbreak by two election cycles. But for Fishman, who spoke to Olivia Murphy during her solo at ICA Philadelphia this spring, the struggles and sexism powerful women face is hardly surprising. And she&rsquo;s long stopped playing by men&rsquo;s rules: active in the lesbian and queer movements in the 60s, Fishman consciously tried to discard whatever she felt came from the male tradition&mdash;including painting on large canvasses.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46776-heather-dewey-hagborg-questions-dna-as-big-data" target="_blank">Heather Dewey-Hagborg Questions DNA as Big Data</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46776-heather-dewey-hagborg-questions-dna-as-big-data" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/46776/p66fzh/20161101191750-16039-131-jouph-luthy.jpg" style="text-align: center;" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Heather Dewey-Hagborg, <em>Radical Love: Chelsea Manning</em>, 2015. Image by @Luthy</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-size:20px;"><em>&ldquo;Do we as a culture decide it&rsquo;s ok to throw genetic privacy out the window? Or do we shape our norms differently and work to protect people&rsquo;s privacy...? I think the only way we can make these decisions is to have more cultural production around these topics.&rdquo; &mdash;Heather Dewey-Hagborg</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p>In this fascinating interview we learned artful strategies for protecting genetic privacy at a time when our DNA is increasingly used against our knowledge. On the occasion of her ThoughtWorks residency in Manhattan, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/151006-heather-dewey-hagborg" target="_blank">Heather Dewey-Hagborg</a>&nbsp;explained to Editor Joel Kuennen about our faulty reliance on DNA as evidentiary truth, not to mention the inherent racial biases that come to the fore in its application.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/45704-angela-washko-talking-feminism-in-the-spaces-most-hostile-to-it" target="_blank">Angela Washko: Talking Feminism in the Spaces Most Hostile to It</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/45704-angela-washko-talking-feminism-in-the-spaces-most-hostile-to-it" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/article/image/45704/p66fzh/20160420165310-20160420140448-69224e2fd61fb0ff94806c645135bafe.jpg" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Angela Washko, <em>The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness in World of Warcraft</em>, Screenshot from performances in-game</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-size:20px;"><em>&ldquo;Our online lives are our real lives&hellip; I think more and more women realize how much their experiences online differ from men&rsquo;s experiences&hellip; and the ways those online experiences impact their lives, it feels important and pervasive, so they want to make work about it.&rdquo; &mdash;Angela Washko</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/210039-angela-washko" target="_blank">Angela Washko</a> opens up discursive spaces in virtual places: like World of Warcraft, and in her notorious interview with pick-up artist Roosh V. In his <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Wednesday Web Artist of the Week column</a>, interviewer Christian Petersen has spoken with a lot of artists about feminism in the digital age, but this conversation with Washko&mdash;who uses the internet as a social medium more than an aesthetic tool&mdash;was one of our absolute favorites on the subject.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/articles/show/46220-radioactive-an-interview-with-maria-gaspar" target="_blank">RADIOACTIVE: An Interview with Maria Gaspar</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/articles/show/46220-radioactive-an-interview-with-maria-gaspar" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/998435/p66fzh/20160712152420-Gaspar-Maria-6-WretchedParamount.jpg" /></a></p> <p align="center"><span style="font-size:12px;">Maria Gaspar, <em>Wretched and Paramount #1 (Extreme Landscapes Series; Google study of Cook County Jail in Chicago)</em>, 2014, Inkjet Print</span></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><em><span style="font-size:20px;">&ldquo;The role of artists and creative folks is always an interesting one because I often think about how artists can point to, put light on, proposition, incite, intervene, subvert, reveal in forms that can range from a space of both poesis and praxis.&rdquo;&nbsp;&mdash;Maria Gaspar</span></em></p> </blockquote> <p>When the Rauschenberg Foundation named <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/44539-maria-gaspar" target="_blank">Maria Gaspar</a> one of its 2016 Artist as Activist Fellows in Racial Justice + Mass Incarceration this summer, we wanted to know more. The Chicago-based artist spoke with Tempestt Hazel about her undertaking <em>RADIOACTIVE: </em><em>Stories from Beyond the Wall</em>, a collaborative audiovisual project working with those most impacted by Chicago&#39;s Cook County Jail&mdash;both in and outside its walls.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/45765-beyond-beauty-beatriz-santiago-mu%C3%B1oz-on-how-to-truly-perceive-a-place" target="_blank">Beyond Beauty: Beatriz Santiago Mu&ntilde;oz on How to Truly Perceive a Place</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/984762/u3azr9/20160427155551-Other_uses2.jpg" /></p> <p align="center"><span style="font-size:12px;">Beatriz Santiago Mu&ntilde;oz, <em>Otros Usos</em>, 2014, 16mm, Color, Silent</span></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-size:20px;"><em>&ldquo;None of this is beautiful. But you can&rsquo;t point the camera at this and see toxic; you see beauty. That is a problem that is inherent in the place.&rdquo;&nbsp;&mdash;Beatriz Santiago Mu&ntilde;oz</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p>Leading up to her New Museum solo in April, Puerto Rican artist and filmmaker <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/267441-beatriz-santiago-mu%C3%B1oz" target="_blank">Beatriz Santiago Mu&ntilde;oz</a> met with Ionit Behar in Chicago. In this far-reaching conversation, they dig into the complexity of representing a place like Santiago Mu&ntilde;oz&rsquo;s native Puerto Rico&mdash;where ostensibly beautiful landscapes are embodied with social, political, and ecological traumas and histories.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46524-in-blockchain-tribute-simon-denny-imagines-future-crypto-economies" target="_blank">In Blockchain Tribute, Simon Denny Imagines Future Crypto-economies</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008099/u3azr9/20160920140523-SD_16_010L1__1_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Simon Denny,<em> Blockchain Future State Founder Whiteboard Globe Drawing: Blythe Masters Digital Asset</em>, 2016, PE globe with plexiglas components and metal holder on Bullstage platform, stage feet; UV print on alucore, plexiglas. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel Gallery, New York</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-size:20px;"><em>&ldquo;What does this feel like to be around all these derivatives of a liberal tech future?&rdquo; &mdash;Simon Denny</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p>Despite becoming more pervasive as a digital authentication tool, blockchain technology can be hard for the layperson to understand. Enter <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23755-simon-denny" target="_blank">Simon Denny</a>, whose <em>Blockchain Future States</em> at Petzel Gallery in September took an imaginative and didactic approach (tech startup-themed board games?) to envisioning the technology&rsquo;s implications. Profiling four companies using blockchain and Bitcoin, he told Olivia Murphy about his tech culture-inspired &ldquo;fan art.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/45607-brenda-goodman-talks-50-years-of-fearless-introspective-painting" target="_blank">Brenda Goodman Talks 50 Years of Fearless, Introspective Painting</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/45607-brenda-goodman-talks-50-years-of-fearless-introspective-painting" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/980334/p66fzh/20160404140637-Almost_a_Bride.jpg" /></a></p> <p align="center"><span style="font-size:12px;">Brenda Goodman, <em>Almost a Bride</em>, 2015, Oil on wood, 80 x 72 in. Courtesy of the artist and Life on Mars Gallery</span></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-size:20px;"><em>&ldquo;...I won&rsquo;t stop painting what is in my heart, and I will never retire! Anyway, have you ever heard a painter say they have retired? No. They just paint till they can&rsquo;t anymore.&rdquo;&nbsp;&mdash;Brenda Goodman</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p>&ldquo;I need to do this to survive, and so far I have!&rdquo; <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/390360-brenda-goodman" target="_blank">Brenda Goodman</a> told Bradley Rubenstein during one of many lunches they shared last year. The 72-year-old painter&rsquo;s deeply personal and often enigmatic work has seen a well-deserved resurgence in recent years, but setbacks along the way never stopped this intrepid painter. We simply loved this revealing and emotional interview.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrea Alessi</a></p> <p><em>Andrea Alessi is Managing Editor of ArtSlant.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 14 Dec 2016 23:15:29 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Natalia Zuluaga Kicks Off ArtCenter/South Florida’s Latest Chapter with “An Image” <p>When <a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/" target="_blank"><strong>ArtCenter/South Florida</strong></a> opened on Lincoln Road in 1984, in the heart of South Beach, the street was &ldquo;nearly abandoned and severely dilapidated.&rdquo; Today the center, which hosts exhibitions, classes, and a studio residency program, is credited with kickstarting the revitalization of the mall and its surrounding area. Following the appointment of Natalia Zuluaga as Artistic Director this August, ArtCenter itself is getting something of a revitalization. Dynamic changes are underway as the promising Bard Center for Curatorial Studies graduate begins her tenure with an ambitious exhibition that rethinks the space&#39;s programming structure&mdash;and the very shape of what an exhibition can be.</p> <p>Part of an emerging generation of local creatives that have been actively distinguishing Miami&rsquo;s cultural identity through art&mdash;challenging stereotypes about the city and bringing it visibility outside of the annual art fair invasion&mdash;Zuluaga will oversee programming, education initiatives, and artist residencies. In addition, she works on a variety of collaborative curatorial and publishing projects such as <a href="http://namepublications.org/" target="_blank"><strong>[NAME] Publications</strong></a> and PDP/PLP, a transdisciplinary &ldquo;think tank&rdquo; co-run by <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/334661-alan-gutierrezhttps://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/334661-alan-gutierrez" target="_blank"><strong>Alan Gutierrez</strong>,</a> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/228798-patricia-margarita-hernandez" target="_blank"><strong>Patricia Margarita Hernandez</strong></a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/223455-domingo-castillo" target="_blank"><strong>Domingo Castillo</strong></a>. &nbsp;</p> <p>For her debut ArtCenter exhibition, she worked with Castillo, an artist and co-founding <a href="http://noguchibreton.net/" target="_blank"><strong>Noguchi Breton</strong></a> gallerist, to co-curate <a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/fall2016/animage/" target="_blank"><strong><em>An Image</em></strong></a>, which runs through December 18. Together, they organized an exhibition that deconstructs, subverts, and reasserts notions of <em>the image</em>: what it is, what it could be, and how it functions in culture. The exhibition title is borrowed from Harun Farocki&rsquo;s film, included in the show, and the installation presents a smart selection of video art, objects, performance, and talks.</p> <p>I spoke recently with Zuluaga and Castillo about their conceptual framework and the intricacies of their robust exhibition, which is a must-see during Miami Art Week next month.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180139-ArtCenter_An_Image_Exterior_View.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Exterior view of <em>An Image</em>,&nbsp;ArtCenter South/Florida. Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Audrey Phillips: Natalia, what led to your move to ArtCenter/South Florida and what shape do you see things taking with future exhibitions? &nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Natalia Zuluaga: </strong>My move to ArtCenter was really the result of a confluence of things, and luckily so. I think the institution is going through an interesting transition period and was a great place from which to explore my own interests in &ldquo;institutional forms&rdquo; and programming. So the invitation to come in and re-imagine the way ArtCenter&rsquo;s many pieces fit together (exhibitions, residencies, pedagogy) was particularly exciting for me.</p> <p><em>An Image</em> reflects a way of programming that allowed us to think through ideas over longer periods of time. So, instead of thinking about an exhibition schedule that included 10 exhibitions a year, I figured we could shorten that down to 3-4, and instead unpack the ideas over longer periods of time and through a variety of engagements. This is where the thinking behind an exhibition in the shape of objects, lectures, screenings, and using the exhibition space as the site where most of these things happen came into fruition. So future programs at ArtCenter may not be exhibitions at all, and instead focus on the necessary outputs for the content we want to engage with and breaking with the demands we place on ourselves to produce (or overproduce!) in one particular way.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121181003-ArtCenter_An_Image_Barbara_Kasten__2_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Barbara Kasten,&nbsp;Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: The exhibition seems so thoughtful, even the design of the </strong><a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/fall2016/animage/" target="_blank"><strong>web page</strong></a><strong>&mdash;which is beautiful. I imagine it was also approached as an image in and of itself. Could you talk about the process of selecting works and how they operate in relation to one another?</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>Domingo and I really did want to think about all of the components in the exhibition as images, or as contributing factors to the construction of an image. We wanted to move beyond the representational force of an image which had dominated so much of &ldquo;image&rdquo; discourse/politics and think about the way an image is both imbricated and a catalyst for a number of social/political processes. So yes, the website, and especially the installation was important for this because we knew that the exhibition space as an image would travel further than the amount of people who could possibly access it in person.</p> <p>As a project we like to think that it works on two registers: that the exhibition space itself works as the place where the construction of an image is set to play, and that the public programs were a way of thinking through effects and gamuts of temporalities. In the space you have works by Harun Farocki, Enrique Castro-Cid, Barbara Kasten, and Suzan Pitt as immediate examples bolstered by the exhibition design and by the lighting, which Alan Gutierrez so carefully designed. Each one of these pieces does something slightly different: Farocki gives you the careful construction of desire in an image; Pitt&mdash;the presence of the hand in her very rich imagery; Castro-Cid in the relation between reality, computer-aided design, and painting. &nbsp;</p> <p>I think together the pieces are more than individual images&mdash;and this is important because we weren&rsquo;t interested in <em>importing </em>images; we wanted to create one too.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180257-ArtCenter_An_Image_Alan_Gutierrez.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Alan Gutierrez, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Domingo Castillo:</strong> We looked at <a href="http://arquitectonica.com/blog/portfolio/residential/the-pink-house/" target="_blank">ARQUITECTONICA&rsquo;s Pink House</a> as a case study of a project that literally reprogramed the visual identity of Miami for the 80s and made ARQUITECTONICA an instant global architecture firm. The house, which perfectly exemplifies the &ldquo;post-modern&rdquo; in architecture, won multiple awards before it was even built. The proposal of which was first designed by Laurinda Spear and Rem Koolhaas, showed a return to the hand-painted and romanticized rendering which clearly highlighted their admiration of the Bauhaus thinking but begins to do something else.</p> <p>When the house is finally constructed it&rsquo;s redesigned by the newly established firm. It begins getting highlighted for its five Shades of Pink and it continues to get awards through all the photography-based architectural magazines. Luxury brands use the house as a stage for their advertisements, becoming the actual post-modern moment. The functionality of the house as a house comes second to it functioning as a stage where images are created. Due to the sheer amount of images that are generated through the house and its positioned branding of the image, the City of Miami starts to pivot towards the lifestyle, colors, and aesthetics laid out by the house and the images of its use. That to this day continues informing a &ldquo;luxurious&rdquo; understanding of the city, as per <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKbR7u8J5PU" target="_blank">Pitbull and Chris Brown&rsquo;s &ldquo;Fun&rdquo; music video.</a></p> <p>This is the grounding logic we wanted to work through with the exhibition as a whole. Instead of bringing in archival material, the logic is re-performed and our study of the house gets incorporated into the exhibition design and promotional apparatus of the exhibition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180722-ArtCenter_An_Image_Enrique_Castro_Cid.jpg" style="width: 467px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Enrique Castro-Cid,&nbsp;Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: You mention that the exhibition is &ldquo;an inherent political project&rdquo; that looks at &ldquo;image in relation to power structures and pseudo-agency&rdquo; referencing a &ldquo;history of anxiety,&rdquo; then tie these themes to the image of Miami as &ldquo;colonial fantasies of Latin America&rdquo; in your press release. Further to that, you assert that &ldquo;images are coded by different cosmologies in order to reconfigure the politics of visibility and presence.&rdquo; I&rsquo;m curious to know how or where these different cosmologies exist and am also interested in your thoughts related to these aspects of your statement.</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>Alan Poma&rsquo;s <em>La Victoria Sobre el Sol </em>[Victory Over the Sun], which is the multi-media opera we are presenting at the conclusion of the exhibition that re-appropriates the Russian futurist play by the same name, is a good example of what we mean by the way in which different cosmologies code images. The play translates the opera both visually and linguistically to incorporate both Andean visions of the last moments of the solar system -- a story that has its origins in pre-columbian cultures. This incorporation is not in effect to translate the story, but to reclaim and decolonize the notion of futurity as a narrative that is strictly european in origin and in doing so re-situates the way in which that narrative has a <em>presence</em>, and is made <em>visible</em>; and that is inherently a political act.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s great that you picked up on the &ldquo;colonial fantasies.&rdquo; This was a slight jab at the idea that Miami is the &ldquo;gateway to the Americas&rdquo; or the &ldquo;capital of Latin America.&rdquo; This is language that has been disseminated by economic and tourist development boards in an effort to really sell Miami as that; but for us that idea pointed to a kind of colonial fantasy that doesn&rsquo;t play out through the dispossession of land or the acquisition of it for a nation state, but through a more pervasive form of economic colonialism. One key example that Domingo and I are always talking about is <a href="http://www.verizonenterprise.com/infrastructure/data-centers/north-america/nap/nap-americas.xml" target="_blank">NAP of The Americas</a>. This data site located just north of downtown Miami is where a large amount of internet traffic from the Americas is funneled through. So if you send an email, say, from Brazil to Chile, there&rsquo;s a chance it has to travel up here before reaching its destination. This subtle crossing of territories says more about Miami as a gateway and capital and the power structures that support and propel this vision forward than palm trees and sunsets do.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180826-ArtCenter_An_Image_Installation_shot.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: What makes Miami unique in relation to other &ldquo;art worlds&rdquo;?</strong></p> <p><strong>DC:</strong> Miami is just another node within the larger network of Contemporary Art. A place of constant contestation, natural disasters, racial inequality, financial inequality, constant land (re)development, and the ecological harmony of the Everglades are a few things of many that constantly rub up against each other and have to be constantly negotiated. The politics of the image become almost obvious if we start thinking about the way that art has always been instrumentalized within the creation and development of this city&rsquo;s imagery. When used with this kind of awareness and agency images and art can be used as a great vehicle where one can act and possibly change the course or at least the conversation towards more radicalized and empowered futures.</p> <p><strong>AP: What are your top Miami picks for Art Basel week?</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>To see:&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/events/show/427723-an-image" target="_blank"><em>AN IMAGE</em></a> :) and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433501-sometimes-random" target="_blank">Lynne Golob Gelfman</a> at Noguchi Breton.</p> <p>To eat: <a href="http://www.chefcreole.com/" target="_blank">Chef Creole</a> (200 NW 54th Street in Little Haiti), <a href="http://www.lapalapahondurena.com/" target="_blank">La Palapa</a> (2699 Biscayne Boulevard in Edgewater), and <a href="http://www.lacamaronera.com/" target="_blank">La Camaronera</a> (1952 W Flagler Street in Little Havana).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;Audrey L. Phillips</p> <p><em>Audrey Phillips is a Toronto-based writer. She is a regular contributor to AQNB.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image to top: Installation view of <em>An Image</em> at ArtCenter/South Florida. Harun Farocki and Alan Gutierrez. Photos: Zack Balber. All images courtesy of ArtCenter/South Florida)</span></p> Tue, 29 Nov 2016 19:23:06 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Artist Positioning Himself as Richter’s Crown Prince <p>Next year Eberhard Havekost turns fifty: time to balance the books. The press release for his current solo at KINDL positions Havekost &ldquo;among the most important German artists of his generation.&rdquo; The artist himself probably doesn&rsquo;t agree with an accolade this generic, especially when it&rsquo;s accompanying the kind of self-confident display of painterly power that is <em>Inhalt</em>. The show takes up two full floors and doesn&rsquo;t leave much wall space unused. The works on show are so diverse, they could have been created by three or four different artists.</p> <p>Most recognizable as Havekost&rsquo;s are the flat figurative paintings of everyday objects and scenes. They&rsquo;re based on photographs, either Havekost&rsquo;s own or found footage, which have been digitally enhanced and transferred to canvas with a minimum of depth or visible brushstroke. A lipsticked mouth blowing out smoke, a close-up of a sugar cube, a bent, tanned leg framing the ocean behind. It&rsquo;s imagery with a pop-art charm, somewhere between social and photo realism. And it is what it is. Only occasionally does Havekost allow himself an ironic wink, like in the <em>Transformers</em>-titled depiction of a car wreck.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222950-KINDL_Havekost_01_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 413px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, <em>Baum, B15</em>, 2015, Oil on canvas, 270 x 160 cm.<br /> Courtesy of Galerie Gebr. Lehmann and Anton Kern Gallery. Photo: Werner Lieberknecht</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Havekost&rsquo;s most vacant paintings are of dead screens, of TVs, computers, or mobile phones. The vast pools of grey nothingness hold promises of light and pigment but they turn out to be the dull opposite of everything painterly. In their off mode it&rsquo;s almost impossible to imagine we spend hours every day looking at them, our windows to the world. With sardonic delight Havekost exposes the soul of the virtual world in <em>Baum</em>: the colorful electronic bits inside a cracked iPhone are more real than the numb screen.</p> <p>With a series of iridescent works Havekost bounces to the other side of the spectrum. One triptych is even called <em>Light</em>. It&rsquo;s a depiction of basic physics but the result is both kitschy and hysterical. Havekost offsets these luminary explosions with measured color schemes, rhythmic compositions of six shades of secondary colors with titles such as <em>Copy + Property</em> or <em>Sch&ouml;ner Wohnen</em>. Here, the natural force of light and reflection has been categorized and domesticated.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222918-KINDL_Havekost_M1_02_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 518px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, Installation view of <em>Inhalt</em> at KINDL&rsquo;s Power House (first floor, M1). Photo: Jens Ziehe, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Up to this point the works in <em>Inhalt </em>can somehow be linked together, however diverse they may be. But Havekost rudely breaks this logic by adding half a dozen semi-abstract expressionist paintings, scattered across the walls, often right next to the flattest images in the presentation. The palette is geared towards contrast, the paint seems to have been forcefully smeared onto the canvas, attacked with sharp objects. To see <em>Zimmerpflanze</em> (House plants), a violent clash of sweeping greens, blacks, and yellows, right next to the perfectly realistic flowers in <em>Poison</em>, is nothing short of shocking.</p> <p><em>Inhalt</em> is Havekost flexing his painterly muscles. He obviously feels the need to showcase the full range of his skills. And he is explicitly competing with Gerhard Richter, the greatest German painter alive today, the best of not just his own but of all generations. The color schemes, the abstract work, the photorealistic images&mdash;they echo Richter&rsquo;s multi-faceted oeuvre. The standoff between the now 84-year-old Nestor and his would-be crown prince doesn&rsquo;t end favorably for Havekost, though. As Frieze critic Kristy Bell noticed in her review of his 2006 show at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg: &ldquo;Richter described the process of painting from photographs as being about making the banal &lsquo;more than just banal,&rsquo; but the problem with Havekost&rsquo;s paintings is that the banal just becomes more banal.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222822-KINDL_Havekost_02_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 391px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, <em>Gef&uuml;hl, B15</em>, 2015, Oil on canvas, 80 x 45 cm.<br /> Courtesy of Galerie Gebr. Lehmann and Anton Kern Gallery. Photo: Werner Lieberknecht</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>What holds true for Havekost&rsquo;s photographically inspired paintings, applies to his entire body of work. Richter&rsquo;s works are about history and painting, memory and painting, identity and painting, a lot of different subjects combined with painting. Havekost&rsquo;s are only about painting. His subject matter is of secondary concern; the images are first and foremost shapes and colors. His large-scale reproduction of an illustration from a history book he received as a child might inspire mild bewilderment but his decision to paint it seems random. In that light the show&rsquo;s title, <em>Inhalt</em> (Content), feels deeply ironic. To be counted amongst the truly greatest painters of his age, however, Havekost needs to go beyond his noncommittal game of half-hearted references.</p> <p><em>Eberhard Havekost&rsquo;s </em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433413-inhalt" target="_blank">Inhalt</a><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433413-inhalt" target="_blank"> </a>is on display at KINDL &ndash; Zentrum f&uuml;r zeitgen&ouml;ssische Kunst, Berlin, until February 19. 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Eberhard Havekost, Installation view of <em>Inhalt</em> at KINDL&rsquo;s Power House (second floor, M2). Photo: Jens Ziehe, 2016)</span></p> Sat, 26 Nov 2016 18:13:28 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Relentlessly Dissecting Beauty, Marilyn Minter Gets at the Guts of Glamour <p><em>October saw the launch of&nbsp;A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The series&rsquo; first two exhibitions honor two unique feminisms. Today, we&rsquo;re taking a look at them both: Beverly Buchanan&rsquo;s&nbsp;</em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46824-beverly-buchanan">Ruins and Rituals&nbsp;</a><em>and Marilyn Minter&rsquo;s&nbsp;</em>Pretty/Dirty<em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A woman just beginning to show the signs of a life well-worn, with deeply impressed laugh lines and a made-up face sagging ever so slightly, stares almost seductively, or maybe placidly at you from her bed. A cigarette burns in her liver-spotted hand, the strap of her nightgown barely hangs on to one shoulder. The photograph is titled <em>Coral Ridge Towers (Mom Smoking) </em>(1969/1995), and as titled, along with the eight other photos in the series, it depicts the artist&rsquo;s mother in her Florida home. But there is a reason it took Marilyn Minter over twenty years to print and show this series.</p> <p>On a walk-through of her recently opened retrospective at Brooklyn Museum, Minter stops at the Coral Ridge Tower series, which begins the show, to recall how she didn&rsquo;t feel there was anything special about these photos when she took them&mdash;she was simply snapping photos of her mother in her apartment, doing the things she usually did. But upon showing them to some classmates, she realized that what she&rsquo;d captured was something entirely different. She saw what they saw: a woman defeated by the patriarchal standards of femininity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130743-Coral_Ridge_Towers__Mom_Smoking_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 543px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Coral Ridge Towers (Mom Smoking)</em>, 1969/1995, Gelatin silver print. Collection of Beth Rudin DeWoody</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Pretty/Dirty</em>, Minter&rsquo;s first major retrospective, explores this idea of abject beauty that we see running throughout her entire oeuvre&mdash;from her first student photographs, to her current paintings and videos. As a show, it is concise and clear cut, taking a few choice samples from each era of the artist&rsquo;s history in order to create a trajectory to understanding more fully how she arrived at her current work: the glossy, high production value, artificial colored, painted lips and lacquered nails&mdash;all resulting in what looks almost like Maybelline advertisements on acid.</p> <p>But the early works play an important role in understanding this largely misunderstood artist, because we see that there is a desire throughout to give agency to the unspoken, the overlooked, the scoffed, the embarrassing. Through the photographs, paintings, and videos she dissects this idea of beauty, a beauty that has been forced down the throats of women like her mother, a beauty that she herself would not be consumed by, rather she would turn in on itself, revealing the guts of glamour.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130636-Big_Girls.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 508px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Big Girls</em>, 1986, Enamel on canvas, 2 panels. Collection of Bill Contente, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The first real hint of this after the early photographs is <em>Little Girls #1 </em>(1986) and <em>Big Girls </em>(1986), both of which depict a deconstruction of women&rsquo;s bodies via the media they are most widely represented in: magazines. Each painting is constructed from source images ripped apart and put back together, representing the scrutiny women&rsquo;s bodies are put through on a daily basis. This is the beginning of Minter&rsquo;s interest in reclaiming oppressive images from the media for her own feminist agenda.</p> <p>Included as well are her photorealist paintings of floors and sinks, mostly taken from her home and in her studio. Here, in a collision of the domestic realm with the workspace, we see that she trained her photorealist eye on the mundane, turning the ordinary into something beautiful, something to look at or even objectify. It&rsquo;s not until later in her career that she brings this technique back, focusing instead on the absurdity of realism&mdash;the freckles the fashion industry takes such pains to erase (<em>Blue Poles,</em> 2007), the stubble still visible in freshly shaved underarms (<em>Armpit</em>, 2006), the unsightly marks binding clothes leave on bodies (<em>Sock</em>, 2005). Even the close-up shots in <em>Plush </em>(2016) are beautiful, taking a kind of professional care to make each individual bush look like a star&mdash;a head shot for your vulva.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130547-Armpit.jpg" style="width: 467px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Armpit</em>, 2006, C-print. Courtesy of the artist, Salon 94, New York, and Regen Projects, Los Angeles</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This sort of sexual glorification is also visible in her first hardcore porn paintings, like <em>Porn Grid </em>(1989). To a contemporary audience the paintings might seem quaint, portrayed in bright colors, with an almost cartoonish halftone dot matrix, which was actually a laborious hand-painted effect. In fact, the depictions may not even register as &ldquo;hardcore porn&rdquo; anymore, as we see things almost as graphic on HBO these days. But it&rsquo;s important to note that these paintings were coming out of a time wrought with identity politics, and just by daring to go tackle the issue of porn had established Minter as something of a feminist-outcast, a traitor to the rhetoric of the time, shunned as a perceived accomplice of oppression.</p> <p>Looking back we can see that she was taking a feminist stance that was way ahead of her time with these paintings. Minter, as a heterosexual woman, was reclaiming the oppressive images from porn in hopes to turn them on their head with a female sex-positive message. Porn has been a reality of our culture for longer than most like to admit, so by co-opting these images of consensual sex, she was giving women agency over their sexuality, agency to enjoy and indulge in their sexuality. Plus, she noted, &ldquo;no one has PC fantasies, anyways,&rdquo; so we might as well get it all out there in the open. She was also searching for subject matter that would indeed shock and alarm for the very fact that a woman was dealing with it, noting that &ldquo;if Mike Kelley could mine 13-year-old girl culture of mall culture, unicorns, crushes&hellip;&rdquo; the equivalent would be her mining hardcore porn.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130449-Orange_Crush.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 420px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Orange Crush</em>, 2009, Enamel on metal, 108 x 180 in. Private collection</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Her practice and eye have certainly grown and evolved along with the available technology, now incorporating higher production photo shoots, from which she constructs Photoshopped images, called &ldquo;cobbles,&rdquo; to create the perfect source image, from which she then makes her signature photorealistic enamel on metal paintings. She has moved away from the explicitly sexual, and back into a world of opulent sensuality. In the video <em>Meltdown</em> (2011), a silver-heeled and bejeweled foot dripping in metallic silver, kicks through an invisible plane of glass in slow motion. And paintings like <em>Drizzle (Wangechi Mutu)</em> (2010) and <em>Orange Crush</em> (2009) display similar dripping, metallic, almost ravenous mouths pouring over with glimmering substances.</p> <p>There&rsquo;s something insatiable about these paintings and videos. They contain a force that draws you in and pushes you away at the very same time, imploring you to consume them, much like their subjects slurp and taste and lick. Minter is creating seductive, yet off-putting steamy, frosty, wet, crystalized, shiny gem-filled fantasy worlds. You look in and look in, until you pull back, for fear of being consumed. This is the power of subverting the patriarchal gaze, the confinement and rule of imposed femininity&mdash;that the beauty and lust can linger along with the abject and repellent.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452624-olivia-b-murphy?tab=REVIEWS">Olivia B. Murphy</a></p> <p><em>Olivia Murphy is a writer and editor based in New York, covering arts and culture. Her work has appeared in various publications both in print and online, including&nbsp;</em>L&#39;Officiel Magazine<em>,&nbsp;</em>Freunde Von Freunden<em>,&nbsp;</em>Whitehot<em>,&nbsp;</em>Riot of Perfume<em>,&nbsp;</em>doingbird<em>, and&nbsp;</em>Whitewall Magazine<em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Marilyn Minter, <em>Blue Poles</em>, 2007, Enamel on metal. Private collection, Switzerland)</span></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2016 13:21:50 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Beverly Buchanan and the Architecture of Blackness <p><em>October saw the launch of&nbsp;A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The series&rsquo; first two exhibitions honor two unique feminisms. Today, we&rsquo;re taking a look at them both:&nbsp;Beverly Buchanan&rsquo;s </em>Ruins and Rituals<em> and Marilyn Minter&rsquo;s </em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46826-relentlessly-dissecting-beauty-marilyn-minter-gets-at-the-guts-of-glamour">Pretty/Dirty</a><em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>How might we understand a spatial and architectural discourse that marks a black subjectivity? This is the question that lingers in my thoughts as I reflect on <em>Ruins and Rituals</em>, a retrospective exhibition presenting the work of the late Beverly Buchanan, now on view at the Brooklyn Museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Sackler Family Curator Catherine Morris considers Buchanan a game changer, which is not untrue; I would consider Buchanan a witness.</p> <p>Beverly Buchanan was a black Southern woman. As a black Southern woman myself, many of those in my personal circles ascribe to this positionality a type of unspoken power. However, as <a href="http://4columns.org/d-souza-aruna/beverly-buchanan">critics</a> have already rightfully articulated, within the parameters of the mainstream (read: New York City) art world during the 1970s, 80s, and early 90s&mdash;the periods during which Buchanan was most active&mdash;to be Southern and black and woman often resulted in an overlooking. Buchanan worked anyway, creating a repository of site-specific earthworks, sculptures, self-portraits, and other assemblage objects that move across the schools of conceptual and land art, while responding to the idiosyncrasies of the geographies in which she lived. So, as the artist traversed multiple landscapes, so too did her ever evolving canon traverse the political histories of the land, which often revolved explicitly around blackness(es).</p> <p>Organized by guest curators Jennifer Burris and Park McArthur, <em>Ruins and Rituals </em>points a critical, unprecedented eye towards Buchanan&rsquo;s multi-disciplined oeuvre. (Full disclosure: I am now employed at the organization where McArthur was once an artist-in-residence.) The exhibition is divided among three galleries, resisting a chronological viewing experience while still offering an obvious thread of conceptual connectivity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110165731-Untitled__Slab-Works_1_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 560px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Untitled (Slab Works 1)</em>, circa 1978&ndash;80, Black-and-white photograph of cast concrete sculptures with acrylic paint in artist studio. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Upon entering the Sackler Center, one is drawn towards Buchanan&rsquo;s <em>Frustuala</em> series: small, concrete blocks and columns the artist utilized as markers of presence, or, in some cases, the withering away of that which once was. When she began the series in the late 70s, Buchanan was employed in the public health field in New York and New Jersey. She used the stones to respond to the urban decay she was encountering, acutely aware that the materials she used to compose the works were also subject to weathering and aging. In a document on view in the archival section of the exhibition, Buchanan writes that she was &ldquo;...interested in urban walls when they [were] in various stages of decay; walls as part of a landscape.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Buchanan&rsquo;s topographical engagement embodies critic (and close friend of the artist) Lucy Lippard&rsquo;s meditations on place&mdash;that is, a location in which space meets memory. <em>Marsh Ruins</em> (1981), for example, marks the memory of a group of Igbo slaves who drowned themselves off the coast of St. Simons Island, Georgia, as a way of resisting enslavement. Buchanan built these ruins in the marshes of Glynn, in Brunswick, Georgia, and in the show we encounter them via a video created by Burris, McArthur, and Jason Hirata. <em>Marsh Ruins</em> is a material reckoning with the earth in which its stone are planted, certainly, but also a physical (perhaps even spiritual) negotiation through unseen remnants of time.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170452-Shack_Stories__Part_I_.jpg" style="width: 531px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, with poet Alice Lovelace, <em>Shack Stories (Part I)</em>, 1990, Unpublished handmade book of ink and crayon drawings with watercolor and collaged typewritten text. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The same might be said of Buchanan&rsquo;s small shack sculptures. It is in these works that we see the artist most vividly address a Southern, black, architectural vernacular. That is to say, the shack, in Buchanan&rsquo;s hands, is not merely a signifier of social status, but rather a framework&mdash;literally and figuratively&mdash;through which we might understand the nuances of black Southern life. The form represents an important site of social and familial interactions such as weddings, births, and religious gatherings. The centering of the shack as structure<em>&nbsp;but also&nbsp;</em>cultural idiom places blackness within the frame of reference for spatial inclusion, as architect Mario Gooden describes in his book&nbsp;<em><a href="https://www.arch.columbia.edu/books/catalog/3-dark-space-architecture-representation-black-identity">Dark Space: Architecture, Representation, Black Identity</a></em>. Through these loaded forms, Buchanan speaks to the particularities of a black Southern subjectivity, past and present.&nbsp;<em>Low Country House</em>&nbsp;(date unknown), a small, unpainted wood shack, is an eloquent illustration of Buchanan&rsquo;s deftness for the subtle processes of commemoration.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170038-Low_Country_House.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Low Country House</em>, date unknown, Wood. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan, courtesy of Jane Bridges. Photo: Adam Reich, courtesy of Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In the 90s, Buchanan also began to make assemblage pieces, often dedicated to or named after close friends, once again embodying experience and memory within material form. In the final gallery we see the bulk of this later work alongside a trove of photos, letters, and other textual ephemera produced by Buchanan throughout her life. In this room, though full of works ostensibly different in form, we still encounter Buchanan&rsquo;s entanglement with space, object, and memory. Here, the artist turns inward, tracing a personal relationship to the people she loved and the spaces she called home. In one black and white photograph, <em>Hunger and Hardship Creek</em> (1977/1994), Buchanan grips a sign pole with her right arm while staring intently at the camera. In an untitled, undated photocopied business card, she has drawn an image of herself as working artist/good cook/drama queen/safe driver. She is naming herself.</p> <p>McArthur and Burris have gifted us with a well-deserved exhibition that offers a full picture of the prolific artist. The curatorial narrative surrounding the exhibition is concise and direct, some may argue approaching the didactic. But, for me, the texts and exhibition materials feel extremely important as a narrative tool, especially when Buchanan is unfamiliar to many who will first encounter her story through this exhibition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170211-Untitled__The_Doctor_will__if_you_re_lucky__see_you__now_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Untitled (&ldquo;The doctor will, if you&rsquo;re lucky, see you, now.&rdquo;)</em>, July 1993, Unpublished writing in notebook. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In <em>Dark Space</em> Gooden goes on to remark that &ldquo;...the black female body occupies a space within the matrix of subjectivities and bodies, and as such, its spatial praxes, whether visible or invisible, yield its potential agency to reference its own self.&rdquo; Gooden makes this statement with specific regard to the ways blackness has (or has not) tended to operate within spatial and architectural theories and dialogues. Buchanan then, it can be argued, transgresses the boundaries of seen and unseen in order to map a non-linear grid, a dark <em>place</em>, to borrow again from Lippard, where blackness is represented through memory, structure, or through her own image, her body.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/417193-jessica-lynne?tab=REVIEWS">Jessica Lynne</a>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Jessica Lynne is co-editor of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.arts.black/">ARTS.BLACK</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Beverly Buchanan,&nbsp;<em>Untitled (Double Portrait of Artist with Frustula Sculpture) (detail)</em>, n.d. Black-and-white Photograph With Original Paint Marks, 8&frac12; x 11 in. Private Collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan)</span></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2016 13:22:37 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list