Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Ghosts, Devils, and Advertising <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">&ldquo;City of Lights, City of Fonts&rdquo;</a>&nbsp;is a&nbsp;blog and visual diary created by ArtSlant&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1517302926405000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG2iJiiFloEnyaBex_3a9Pp4gWxdQ" href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" target="_blank">Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence</a>, Ali Fitzgerald.&nbsp;Fitzgerald will explore France&rsquo;s evolving visual relationship to propaganda, looking deeply at aesthetics of nationalism and politicized otherness.&nbsp;With sketches, writing, and graphic vignettes, she will document fonts, signage, and France&#39;s history of drawing as activism.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In his book, <em>A Little Guide&nbsp;to the 15th Arrondissement for the Use of Phantoms</em>, Roger Caillois examines the sleepy district in Paris where he grew up, the same district where I&rsquo;m staying now.</p> <p>I bought the book imagining a witchy, postmodern guide to my new home, but actually, Caillois&rsquo; &ldquo;phantom beings&rdquo; are symbols. They are stand-ins for immigrants and asylum-seekers, <em>&eacute;trangers</em> who were driven from their homes in the 15th Arrondissement as the Seine&rsquo;s waterfront was being developed.&nbsp;The book itself is a bizarrely fascinating take on psychic architecture and the impact of space on our memory. He&rsquo;s especially fond of narrow buildings, which are seemingly incapable of housing anything truly fleshy.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220083812-Artslant_4_1.jpeg" /></p> <p>Caillois describes a childhood in Paris in the 20s and 30s which was covered in gigantic, painted advertisements and posters.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220083840-Artslant_4_2.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220083858-Artslant_4_3.jpeg" /></p> <p>With the prominence and ease of poster-making in the 20th century, France&rsquo;s former glories could suddenly be used not only to recruit people for war efforts, but also to sell products.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220092000-Artslant_4_4.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220092040-Artslant_4_5.jpeg" /></p> <p>The link between national icons, patriotism, propaganda, and advertising is a relatively strong one. But it brings up a foggier question: is advertising always a form of propaganda?</p> <p>Even if there were a metric to measure (dis)honesty in advertising, visuals are slippery and not beholden to the same rules as written text. It&rsquo;s pretty clear that advertising and political propaganda frequently exchange the same visual strategies: seductive women, burly men, and awakened national sentiment.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220092121-Artslant_4_6.jpeg" /></p> <p>In <em>How Propaganda Works</em>, Jason Stanley argues that advertising is especially propagandistic when it aims to sell us products that are harmful or irrelevant. This is depressingly clear in the omnipresent promise of beautiful women in ads, or the bizarre appropriation of a Martin Luther King speech in a Dodge Ram commercial.</p> <p>Both advertising and propaganda seek to simplify: to make things black and white, good versus evil. In advertising, the perfect life awaits you at the bottom of a bottle of Pernot. In political propaganda, viewers are threatened with the loss of the old world order to something or someone &ldquo;evil.&rdquo;</p> <p>Next time, I&rsquo;ll go into this (over)simplification a bit more. In the meantime, please enjoy this belated Valentine-slash-World-War-I-propaganda-poster of the Kaiser kissing the devil.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220092153-Artslant_4_7.jpeg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald">Ali Fitzgerald</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 20 Feb 2018 08:14:03 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Jesse Farber Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/main/show_new_email/84518?obj_type=User&amp;re_id=85197683&amp;template_id=48823" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/501157-jesse-farber" target="_blank">Jesse Farber</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>There is a way in which I think we are very alienated from ourselves, in trying to understand ourselves as material beings existing in the world. We learn more and more about the nature of matter and our physical systems, but it&rsquo;s still so difficult to feel in any visceral sense that this is actually happening inside us and around us&mdash;that it&rsquo;s in fact who we are, on a fundamental level. Instead, a muddle of textbook diagrams, conceptual frameworks, x-rays, family trees, religious hierarchies, and endless other schemata shapes our fragmented material identities. My work examines this confused sense, deep within us, of what we think we are made of, and therefore, who and what we are.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I believe artworks should change how we perceive and understand the world. Artists have the power to help us learn, grow, and expand our awareness in an infinite variety of ways. It is the artist&rsquo;s responsibility to contribute to this. In an age of cultural saturation, with aesthetic pleasure readily available, artists should demand more of themselves than making nice things to look at. Fortunately, however, even the simplest work can evoke a profound experience, if we are willing to let it teach us.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180219101031-img935-c-col-pu.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>O\s&frasl;&ordm;&frasl;&ordm;</em>, 2018, Digital print, 130 x 130 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I always feel this way about whatever I&rsquo;ve just finished making!</p> <p>I completed this large print work called&nbsp;<em>O\s&frasl;&ordm;&frasl;&ordm;</em>&nbsp;just a few days ago, so it grabs the title for now. Really, I&rsquo;m very happy about this whole series. For me, the objects and situations in these prints are these kind of ontological puzzles, modeling our fragmented sense of our material self. They have recognizable real-world qualities, and are photographically rendered, but they are not truly identifiable.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;ve learned a lot of coding over the last several years, and recently started developing my collage prints into animated algorithmic environments. That work I will definitely make, but I could also imagine a future point at which it would be somehow possible to actually render these elements as living lifeforms, not merely as algorithmic simulations in a virtual environment. This thought repulses me, but, then again, as a fan of horror sci-fi films, I can&rsquo;t help being intrigued by it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180219101001-20171030195146-img626-b-final.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>1gY&#39;lli</em>, 2017, C-print, 130 x 130 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Joerg Simon (Frankfurt, DE)&mdash;Joerg combines the best of alienated paranoiac collage with a humanistic, personal approach. We have also collaborated on collages, and an album of soundworks. <a href="https://www.ausstellungsraum-becker.de/ausstellungen/sketch-show/" target="_blank">This link</a> is to a recent exhibition of his. You can also hear the album we did together <a href="https://www.jessefarber.com/artist/audio" target="_blank">here</a> (where a free audio player is embedded.)</p> <p><a href="https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100008180257011" target="_blank">Malcolm Smith</a> (Alabama, USA)&mdash;Mind-blowing techno-mysticism. We haven&rsquo;t collaborated yet, but I hope we get to someday.</p> <p><a href="https://www.instagram.com/not_just_ice_/" target="_blank">Jasmine Justice</a> (Berlin, DE)&mdash;Painting which crystallizes the information atmosphere. Another great collaboration partner! Also check out her upcoming April show at <a href="http://www.65grand.com" target="_blank">65Grand</a> in Chicago.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>l)(y&bull;k</em></span><span style="font-size:12px;">, 2017, C-print, 130 x 130 cm)</span></p> Tue, 20 Feb 2018 01:10:32 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Portrait: Katie Stout Defies Genre with Her Touchable, Usable, Body Positive Artworks <p><em>This photo portrait was originally published as a longer interview feature on </em><a href="https://www.freundevonfreunden.com/by-subverting-the-expected-brooklyn-artist-katie-stout-takes-a-welcome-humanistic-approach-to-her-art"><em>Freunde von Freunden</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p>In a vast warehouse in the Bed-Stuy neighborhood of Brooklyn, Katie Stout crafts couches out of various textiles and her signature Girl Lamps out of clay, celebrating womanhood with colors and textures in the form of functional pieces.&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Stout&rsquo;s creative process is bold, experimental, and constantly evolving&mdash;during our studio visit she was feverishly finding a way to support a desk she was assembling out of papier-mâché and wire for an upcoming show. Katie&rsquo;s work can be intimidating because of its sheer boldness, but when you strip it down, it&rsquo;s a reflection of the woman behind the work: engaging, approachable, confident, and fun.</p> <p>Freunde von Freunden met the artist in Brooklyn to chat about her genre-defying artwork and furniture.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215144802-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4616.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;I think you can spill milk on something and still treat it like a piece of art.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What type of work do you create?</strong></p> <p>I make art that functions as furniture but sometimes it doesn&rsquo;t. I&#39;m not totally committed to any material; I use scraps around my studio, a lot of clay, and I love papier-mâché. I tend to take any opportunity to work with a new material. I like using everything and learning about different processes and then doing things the wrong way. Love easy low-brow materials like crayons, trash, things like clay that can be mushed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215144833-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4351.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How did your childhood influence your creativity?</strong></p> <p>I grew up in a household where creativity was celebrated. I had a whole zone to myself where I could make a mess and there was never a shortage of art supplies. My mom also went to RISD and her mother had been a photographer. When I wanted to be a cheerleader in fourth grade, my dad said, &ldquo;No, you&#39;re going to be cheered for.&rdquo; Might be the coolest thing he&rsquo;s ever said.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215144943-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4438.jpg" /></td> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215145559-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4354.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Your furniture is designed to not only be art, but also to be used as actual furniture in a household. Do you find people treat it as both after purchasing a piece, or do they covet it more like a piece of art not to be touched?</strong></p> <p>I think people are sometimes confused about how they&rsquo;re supposed to use it. It&rsquo;s a space that people feel uncomfortable in, which I love. But I think you can spill milk on something and still treat it like a piece of art. I guess art is defined by the viewer. In general I think people revere prescribed art too much and lesser known art too little. Someone spending $450 million on a painting is gross. Especially if it&rsquo;s da Vinci. I couldn&rsquo;t get out of the da Vinci show at the Met fast enough because the hype eclipsed the merits of the work.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>I want to take a more humanistic approach to art and art making, one where it can be touched and used and provides a different and more welcoming approach to how it&rsquo;s viewed and how it functions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215145306-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4372.jpg" /></td> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150855-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4356.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">(left) Shady Lady lamps in progress</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>You explore themes around sexuality in your work. Is this a particular statement?</strong></p> <p>I was interested in exploring the objectification of women by of extreme objectification. There&rsquo;s a frenzy of conversation about sexual abuse in the media with #MeToo, Hollywood, U.S. gymnastics, Donald Trump. Women have inarguably been treated as objects to be used. By parodying the art objects of women, the ladies I create own their bodies. I imagine them holding the lampshade up as a choice they&rsquo;ve made. They defy traditional categories of what women are supposed to be by being domestic and choosing to be sexually open. Don&rsquo;t call it naughty.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215145329-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4443.jpg" /></td> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150048-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4455.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is your favorite piece you&rsquo;ve ever created?</strong></p> <p>My favorite piece has been Wench Bench due partially to the unexpected and automatic nature of its actualization. I had a chainsaw artist in Duluth carve nude female forms out of pine stumps. (You know chainsaw art&mdash;like those carved bears in upstate New York?) The nude ladies were various apathetic positions lying on the floor&mdash;in fetal position after having given up&mdash;and I had them carved out of stumps into little stools. But the carvings came back much smaller than I expected and were too low to sit on. So I puzzle pieced them all together into a bench, which I called Wench Bench, which made for a far more dynamic piece than my original idea.</p> <p><strong>What is the best thing you&rsquo;ve done for your career?</strong></p> <p>The best thing I&rsquo;ve done is pursue it full-time and not really listen to people who thought I was insane.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150346-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4497.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150330-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4433.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Read the full interview and find more images of Katie Stout and her BK studio on </em></strong><a href="https://www.freundevonfreunden.com/by-subverting-the-expected-brooklyn-artist-katie-stout-takes-a-welcome-humanistic-approach-to-her-art"><strong><em>Freunde von Freunden</em></strong></a><strong><em>.</em></strong></p> <p>Adapted from text and photography by <a href="https://www.freundevonfreunden.com/tag/Erin-Little/">Erin Little</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 15 Feb 2018 07:12:08 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The ArtSlant Prize X: Apply Today + Juror Announcement! <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20180213174127-ArtSlant_Prize_X_2018-01.png" style="width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><b style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><i>Round 1 of the ArtSlant Prize X closes February 26th.</i></b></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><b style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><i>Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes and an exhibition in New York during Armory Week!</i></b></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><i style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><strong>To apply</strong>, sign in to <a href="https://www.artslant.com" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;"><strong>artslant.com</strong></a>, click the menu navicon <img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170906130218-Screen_Shot_2017-09-06_at_9.01.04_AM.png" style="width: 25px;" />&nbsp;at the top and select&nbsp;<strong>ArtSlant Prize</strong>.</i></p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><i>The&nbsp;</i><em><strong>ArtSlant Prize IX Exhibition</strong></em><i>&nbsp;will take place during Armory Week in New York at&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a></strong>, March 6&ndash;12, 2018, booth 2231.&nbsp;</i></font><i style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;">Purchase tickets for the fair&nbsp;<strong><a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/o/springbreak-art-show-12813445625" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">here</a></strong>.</i></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size:18px;"><strong><em>ROUND 1 JURORS:</em></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215134930-Screen_Shot_2018-02-15_at_14.41.57.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; line-height: 30px;"><font face="georgia" size="4"><strong>Roberto Acosta Oyarzo</strong> is <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/500475-roberto-acosta-oyarzo" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>printmaker</strong></a>, film maker and curator based in Valpara&iacute;so, Chile.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center; line-height: 30px;"><font face="georgia" size="4"><strong>Tiana Webb Evans</strong> is a <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/500995-tiana-webb-evans" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>cultural producer</strong></a>, a marketing and communications professional, and an advocate for diversity in the arts. </font></p> <p style="text-align: center; line-height: 30px;"><font face="georgia" size="4"><strong>Margaret Clinton</strong> is the owner and director of <a href="http://koenigandclinton.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;"><strong>Koenig &amp; Clinton</strong></a>, a gallery based in Brooklyn, NY.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica;">ARTSLANT PRIZE X</span></strong></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">Honorable Mention</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170320214133-artslant-springbreak.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 385px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:10px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/47340-announcing-the-artslant-prize-2016-winners-and-exhibition-at-springbreak-art-show" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Exhibition</a> at <a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" target="_blank">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a>, March 2017.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="text-align: justify; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. The prize recognizes artists who critically engage with their medium and culture at large. Up for grabs are exhibition opportunities and cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners.&nbsp;Learn more&nbsp;<strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/8456" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">here</a></strong>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">Art page</a></strong><span style="line-height: 21px;">. &nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners</a></strong>&nbsp;have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors, and personalities.</span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2017+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize IX:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/74231-david-rios-ferreira" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">David Rios Ferreira,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472559-sabato-visconti" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Sabato Visconti,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233356-katya-grokhovsky" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Katya Grokhovsky,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/478928-daapo-reo" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Da&agrave;P&ograve; Reo</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize VIII:</a>&nbsp;</strong></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize VII:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize VI:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize V:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize IV:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Veronica Bruce</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Susan Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize III:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize II:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize I:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:51:29 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Process Park Artist Residency: Final Days to Apply!! Deadline: Feb 18 <table> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">We are proud to announce a new experimental residency created by ArtSlant in collaboration with Chashama.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Process Park</span></strong>&nbsp;is a funded four-week residency for 3-4 artists at&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.chashama.org/chanorth" style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;" target="_blank">chaNorth Artist Residency</a>&nbsp;<span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">in Pine Plains, NY, the goal of which is to learn to live and work better through a process-oriented approach to art making and existing. The residency will conclude with an exhibition/symposium in New York that will be conceived and planned as a group during the residency.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">The Spring 2018 residency&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">runs April 1&ndash;April 29</span>. Application <span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">deadline: February 18, 2018.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214173900-PP.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Process Park, Main House at chaNorth</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park is designed to foster an engaged community through developing engaged individuals.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Artists and cultural producers need space and time to interrogate and refine the ways they work and create while retaining a sense of amateurism. To this end, Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">encourages research and play</span>. Through knowledge-sharing, making, and experimentation, this residency aims to generate deeper connections between people and the visual and material culture they consume.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">focuses on reinserting ourselves into the act of production</span>, to interrupt the paradigm of contemporary alienation. Residents will be encouraged to develop a stronger&nbsp;relationship to</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">&nbsp;the food we eat, the images we ingest, and the omnipresent algorithms that fundamentally shape our lives</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">. Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">pushes back on throw-away consumption</span>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">We ask participants to bring knowledge to share and a willingness to learn from the residency&rsquo;s facilitators, visitors, and co-residents.&nbsp;The emphasis will be on learning through doing. The goal is not only to share knowledge useful in art making but to share knowledge which will be useful in the practice of everyday life. Intensives take the form of teaching or&nbsp;learning the basics of a given skill in a day. Residents will practice those skills throughout the duration of the residency to incorporate that new knowledge into their lives.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">If we create what supports and sustains us and our practices, our investment in the world is made richer, deeper.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">includes Room &amp; Board for four weeks, educational intensives, and an exhibition/symposium in NYC.</span>&nbsp;Residents are encouraged to continue their own practices during the residency but are expected to participate in courses and scheduled group meals and events.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214174104-298116_252439538127025_881163471_n.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Communal dining at chaNorth, Summer 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Application Requirements:</span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong>Who:</strong>&nbsp;All artists, cultural producers, writers, musicians, programmers, and researchers,&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">21+</span></strong>, looking to enrich their relationship with a mode of production are welcome to apply.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Course Proposal</span>:</strong>&nbsp;Residents will lead an intensive, one-day course, sharing a skill of their choice with other residents. This skill can be part of your practice or not. You don&rsquo;t need to be an expert but should feel comfortable enough that you can assist people in exploring a given area of knowledge. Your course proposal should be a brief description of the skill you want to teach, and how (max 250 words) and be entered into the field &ldquo;Statement of Intent&rdquo; on the application page.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Current intensives available by residency facilitators for Spring 2018 include planting, pickling, fermentation, basic HTML, felting, podcasting, clay-refinement, digital publishing, kiln and oven construction, and baking.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Further intensives will be proposed and offered by residents.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Statement of Intent</span>:</strong>&nbsp;Following your course proposal, your statement of intent should introduce your practice and provide a connection between your practice and what you hope Process Park will allow you to achieve within its unique parameters. Discuss what you will gain from this experience and what you can bring to the group&rsquo;s dynamic. How would a process-based approach inform your practice going forward? How do you envision using your time at Process Park?&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">(max 500 words)</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Please also include c</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">ontact information for&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">two references</span></strong>&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">and your<strong>&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">CV</span></strong>.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">You must apply using your&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">ArtSlant Profile.</span></strong>&nbsp;Sign up&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/intros/plans" target="_blank">here</a>&nbsp;if you don&#39;t have one already. Use your profile to include supporting images or texts for your application. An application fee of $25 will be required to submit your application. The fee goes to the operating costs of the residency.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Questions? See the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/articles/show/48841-faq-process-park" target="_blank">FAQ</a>. Still have questions? Email us at&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:residency@artslant.com" style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">residency@artslant.com</a>.&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204002549-Process-park-logo-sq.jpg" style="height: 249px; width: 250px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Apply&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/foundation/index/10">here</a></span></strong><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">.</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.chashama.org/"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204003616-chashama-logo-2017.png" style="width: 280px; height: 60px;" /></a></td> <td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204003642-ArtSlant-Logo-2014-01.jpg" style="width: 245px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:48:22 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Lorna Mills Cracks The Great Code <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&rsquo;re interested in what&rsquo;s happening with art on the web. Every other Wednesday online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If you have even a passing interest in net art then you are likely familiar with the work of <a href="http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/LornaMillsImageDump/">Lorna Mills</a>. The Toronto-based artist and curator has been hugely successful in promoting the medium to a wider audience, both through her own work and as a conduit for other artists. In her own practice, Mills works mainly in the GIF format, creating digital collages with manipulated elements of found GIFs. Her work brazenly straddles the line between &ldquo;high art&rdquo; and low (digital) culture with punkish irreverence and wicked humor.</p> <p>As a curator Mills is best known for uniting 115 digital artists in an ambitious remake of the John Berger documentary <em>Ways of Seeing</em>, which was shown as part of <em>Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art</em> at the Whitney in 2017. <em>Ways of Something</em>, as Mills retitled it, not only stands as an unassailable document of the state of the digital art nation at its time of release, but also successfully proves that the truths of Berger&rsquo;s insights are as relevant today as they ever were.</p> <p>Mills famously beamed her&nbsp;<em>Mountain Light/Time</em>&nbsp;GIF on giant screens around New York&rsquo;s Times Square in 2016, cementing her reputation as one of the most significant contemporary new media artists. The artist&nbsp;has a longstanding relationship with New York&rsquo;s Transfer gallery, where she&rsquo;s just opened her latest solo show, <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/463002-the-great-code" target="_blank">The Great Code</a></em>. The exhibition, which Mills says she&rsquo;s been working on for the last 15 years and includes the covers of some 3,075 books the artist has read, plays with the definition of &ldquo;code&rdquo; and suggests that &ldquo;the order of knowledge has been collapsed and compressed.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152216-Vancouver_5_4.gif" /></p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What were you like as a kid?</strong></p> <p><strong>Lorna Mills:</strong> I was a precocious reader, manic, rude, and very irritating (some adults were charmed by this, but not the adults in my family). I am still a reader, less rude perhaps, but still irritating.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first use a computer creatively?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> 1993&ndash;94, delivery was on floppy disks and CD-roms.</p> <p><strong>CP: What did you make?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> A CD interactive environment/portrait of a musician friend titled <em>The Man They Couldn&rsquo;t Deconstruct Because He Knew Too Much</em>.&nbsp;When he saw it he said, &ldquo;This is more about you than it is about me,&rdquo; ...well, yeah.&nbsp; A few other hard to describe things, all done in Director, so the images were very rich, but I suspect that all the early stuff is unplayable now. I never set max speeds on the animations so on my current system, everything whips by super fast in those early pieces.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152139-Prison_7.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: </strong><strong>When did you first become aware of the GIF format?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Mid-90s, but they were all graphics and I didn&rsquo;t like drawing tools.&nbsp;At that point I had been programming children&rsquo;s educational games in Director and later in Flash, working with illustrators and basically making things come alive in an interactive setting. It was something I really enjoyed professionally because I had good timing (and a real respect for other people&rsquo;s drawing skills.)</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first recognize its creative possibilities?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> The creative possibilities for my own work didn&rsquo;t crystalize until I saw what <a href="http://www.sallymckay.ca/" target="_blank">Sally McKay</a> was doing with GIFs using photographic sources, so early to mid-2000s.&nbsp;At that point there was a lot more activity online from people posting video-sourced GIFs, so I was making GIFs from my own video footage and looking at existing animations made by people who didn&rsquo;t position themselves as artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154641-river3.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When does a GIF become a piece of art? Does the maker have to</strong> <strong>identify as an artist?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I don&rsquo;t know the answer to that question, generally art comes from people who do declare themselves artists, but there are always exceptions. It&rsquo;s not something I worry about.</p> <p><strong>CP: How has your relationship with the internet evolved since you first used it?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I was attracted to aggregate sites from the beginning&mdash;I was never a good surfer. I also participated in the heydays of blogging;&nbsp;the audiences were small and the conversations were exciting. Later on, social media was comfortable for me because I had already defined an online persona that I was comfortable with.&nbsp;</p> <p>On Facebook and Twitter, I have the endearing belief that total strangers are delighted to hear from me. This is probably a major error on my part.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>I prefer my important conversations IRL now.&nbsp;The potential for ridiculous misunderstandings on social media is too high and I don&rsquo;t want to spend my time defining all my terms to strangers or defending misreadings of what I am trying to say.&nbsp;So now I only post images of my giant dog and my animated GIFs. I spend a lot more time reading other people&rsquo;s posts. I&rsquo;m a major lurker and liker.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153454-1360_9_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first realize there was a scene building around &ldquo;Internet Art&rdquo;?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Aside from Sally&rsquo;s work, I was attracted to the artists in the surf clubs, so mid-2000s. (I was a major fan of Guthrie Lonergan and Chris Ashley.)</p> <p><strong>CP: </strong><strong>What were the surf clubs and what attracted you the them?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> You don&rsquo;t know about <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surfing_club">surf clubs</a>???? Google!&nbsp;Nasty nets and <a href="http://www.loshadka.org/">Loshadka</a> were a couple of the places where all the net art kids were playing together.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153526-SPAMM_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about your process when making a GIF?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> My process is very congenial.&nbsp;(It&rsquo;s a nice way to live. I&rsquo;m very lucky.) I spend every day looking and downloading animated GIFs while watching Netflix or BBC and then spend countless hours cutting them up frame by frame, again while watching Netflix or BBC.&nbsp;(I&rsquo;m very good at mindless tedious tasks.)</p> <p>Once I have all the raw materials on hand, the collage work&mdash;the combination and placement of GIFs onto a picture plane&mdash;comes very quickly and instinctively, and that is when I get to surprise myself. (I admire conceptual artists mostly because I will never be one myself.)</p> <p><strong>CP: How obsessive are you?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I&rsquo;m focused and driven, but I don&rsquo;t mind the term obsessive applied to me.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154042-Histokay_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Humor is often a big part your work.</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I have a well-honed sense of the ridiculous, I can&rsquo;t ignore it.&nbsp;I&rsquo;d rather feel alive in my work with all its profanity. I don&rsquo;t aspire to be relentlessly transcendent, lofty, minimal, or sacred.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Are you funny IRL?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Hell yeah. (Sometimes funnier than I mean to be.)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154241-Prison_6.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about your art school experience and what influence</strong> <strong>it&rsquo;s had on your ongoing practice?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I went to small independent art schools that no longer exist and I was trained as a painter.&nbsp;That early training manifests itself in the formal undercurrents of my work. I learned that visual art should be interesting to look at.&nbsp;It&rsquo;s such a simple requirement, yet many artists fail.</p> <p><strong>CP: What does &ldquo;post internet&rdquo; mean to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> It&rsquo;s not something I worry about. (Why do people keep on asking me that?)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153939-Boom.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: I read that you have an interest in Nazi art&mdash;what draws you to that subject?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> WTF???????&nbsp;LOL,&nbsp;art in the service of a totalitarian state is not generally great art. I&rsquo;m only interested in Leni Riefenstahl who is problematic because she was a force of nature, a genius and a Nazi, though she claims she wasn&rsquo;t.&nbsp;And if she wasn&rsquo;t, she&rsquo;d have to be the most mind-numbingly ambitious artist in the history of the universe to align herself with the Nazis so she could make her films.&nbsp;</p> <p>Leni&rsquo;s two most famous films are <em>Triumph of the Will</em> about the 1934 Nazi Party Congress in Nuremburg, and <em>Olympia</em>, a documentary on the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. b/t/w in later life she claimed that <em>Triumph</em> was about &ldquo;jobs and peace.&rdquo;&nbsp;These films are acknowledged as masterpieces and in the 30s she was recognized as a brilliant but contentious artist worldwide (also much admired by many American film makers, especially Walt Disney, who also knew a thing or two about the enthralling grip of Mythologies.) (Uncle Walt was a fascist too.)</p> <p>She believed that art was something pure and beautiful. Of course, after WWII she was demoted from artist to propagandist by people who also think that art is something pure and beautiful.</p> <p>I have no use for purity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152342-DSC_2914-1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy of Transfer Gallery</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How did your association with Transfer Gallery begin?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I met Kelani Nicole at <a href="http://gli.tc/h/">gli.tc/h</a> festival in Chicago in 2012. She told me that she had just moved to NYC and was going to open a gallery and would I like a show? I said yes.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about the importance of Transfer Gallery on the wider digital art scene?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Kelani expanded the gallery scene for digital art and has tirelessly promoted emergent practices that very few other galleries were interested in or even aware of five years ago.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152511-Detail_4.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What was the genesis of the idea for your new show <em>The Great Code</em>?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> <em>The Great Code</em> is a title I stole from the writer Northrop Frye. (The title of my previous show <em>At Play in the Fields of the Lord</em> was stolen from the writer Peter Matthiessen.)</p> <p>I wanted to play with the many definitions of code by showing a print installation that consists of about 3,075 small glazed images of book covers.&nbsp;I&rsquo;ve been working on this project for about 15 years and plan to continue it as long as I live.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154952-Detail_2.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Right after 9-11, a now expired section of the Patriot Act required libraries to hand over records&mdash;without a warrant&mdash;if requested by law enforcement (they also weren&rsquo;t allowed to inform library patrons that their records had been reviewed). Of course the American Library Association fought it in court, because unlike most legislators, librarians have spines. (Apparently many libraries had signage that read, &ldquo;The FBI has not been here. (Look very closely for the removal of this sign.)&rdquo;) So it was in this climate that I decided to do a big beautiful data-dump of every book I can remember reading in my life, highbrow, lowbrow, and everything in between (I read fast and retain very little).</p> <p>It&rsquo;s a giant, brightly lit, shiny pile of prints on a seven by seven foot table. Openness about my reading habits was not a motivation&mdash;the volume of prints prevents a viewer from really seeing much more than what is sitting on top&mdash;and since I install the work, I get to choose what you actually can see. I&rsquo;m a deceptive creature.</p> <p>I also included an installation of six animated GIF collages with even more mixed messaging.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/105731173?byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/105731173" target="_blank">Ways of Something - Episode 1</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What did you learn from curating/overseeing the <em><a href="https://vimeo.com/105731173" target="_blank">Ways of Something</a> </em>project? What was the best thing about it being shown at the Whitney?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I learned the limitations of an artist-curated project.&nbsp;When artists curate, they bring their own set of blindness and insight to a project.&nbsp;I may tackle something like that again if I come up with an engaging idea and a different format, but I don&rsquo;t plan to apply that particular formula again.&nbsp;</p> <p>The best thing about showing at the Whitney was bringing over 115 people to show with me. I also enjoyed sending out the announcement with a two-word cover letter: FUCK YEAH.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153723-timessquare.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you describe you emotions when you saw your work being shown on giant screens in Times Square?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:&nbsp;</strong>It was disconcerting because I&rsquo;ve never shown at that scale without knowing what it would look like beforehand. It was bewildering so I didn&rsquo;t feel like celebrating, and being Canadian, I thought that I should apologize: &ldquo;Sorry, just a big &rsquo;ole yellow GIF.&rdquo; A few nights later, I saw it a second time and realized that it was really good.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153824-Mt_Light_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: The internet and digital art have become a popular medium for the expression of feminist ideas&mdash;why do you think that is?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong>&nbsp;The internet is where misogyny thrives, so the battle has to take place there.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154507-CRT_20.gif" /></p> <p><strong>CP: What else do you have coming up this year?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> In mid-March I will be showing a multi-projection and multi-monitor GIF installation full of gratuitous internet filth at at Festspielhaus Hellerau in Dresden for the <em><a href="http://www.digitalfeminism.net/2018/">dgtl fmnsm</a></em> festival. On March 24, Transfer will be launching my catalog with an essay by Seth Watter as well as celebrating the 5th anniversary of the gallery. Then the next day, the 25th, at 3pm, all four episodes of <em>Ways of Something</em> will be screened at the Museum of the Moving Image in New York.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Courtesy of the artist and Transfer Gallery)</span></p> Wed, 14 Feb 2018 09:03:38 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list What Makes Up the Parisian Mystique? Part Two <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">&ldquo;City of Lights, City of Fonts&rdquo;</a>&nbsp;is a&nbsp;blog and visual diary created by ArtSlant&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1517302926405000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG2iJiiFloEnyaBex_3a9Pp4gWxdQ" href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" target="_blank">Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence</a>, Ali Fitzgerald.&nbsp;Fitzgerald will explore France&rsquo;s evolving visual relationship to propaganda, looking deeply at aesthetics of nationalism and politicized otherness.&nbsp;With sketches, writing, and graphic vignettes, she will document fonts, signage, and France&#39;s history of drawing as activism.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last week <a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/49102-what-makes-up-the-parisian-mystique-part-one" target="_blank">I asked</a> what decorative beauty inspires in us. This week, I felt the overwhelming power of ornamentation as I walked around the Notre Dame Cathedral.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155104-Artslant_3_1.jpeg" /></p> <p>The mouths of its infamous gargoyles were swollen with icicles because of a recent snowstorm. I wondered: besides being grotesquely cute, what is the purpose of gargoyles?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213161235-Artslant_3_2.jpg" /></p> <p>Architecture and built structures have often been used as propaganda to alter the attitudes and ideals of citizens. Giant towers and buttresses are church- or state-sponsored shows of power through built beauty. Some structures inspire awe, some reverence, others fear. Sometimes, like with soviet statues, their sheer grandiosity is meant to compel an emotional response.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155143-Artslant_3_3.jpeg" /></p> <p>On Sunday I traversed the Place de R&eacute;publique, a square centered around a triumphant monument of Marianne. She loomed over teenagers as they smoked and shuffled and exchanged tentative first kisses.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213160339-Artslant_3_4.jpeg" /></p> <p>Marianne is an overt appeal to patriotism carved in stone, but there are also less tangible threads of manipulative artistry around Paris. How do the light and air and presentation of things affect us?</p> <p>On my street alone I marvel at orderly rows of curated shrimp, bright macarons, and well-manicured trees.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155233-Artslant_3_5.jpeg" /></p> <p>This ambient beauty is a part of the Parisian mystique, a fantasy used to entice, convince, and laud quintessential &ldquo;Frenchness.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Sometimes this feeds into traditional notions of European beauty co-opted by political parties to stir patriotism alongside artistic appreciation.</p> <p>For instance, the National Front often employs a blue rose, its delicate beauty obscuring darker exclusionary aims. The Bloc Identitaire, an anti-Islam group in France, employs traditional French symbols like medieval shields to underline a preferred ancestry.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155257-Artslant_3_6.jpeg" /></p> <p>Marveling at and questioning the links between French beauty and identity is a great way to spend a February snow week in my humble opinion.</p> <p>Next time I&rsquo;ll write a little about advertising as propaganda and look at Roger Caillois&rsquo; visions of a mid-century Paris covered with posters. Here&rsquo;s a busty preview:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155327-Artslant_3_7.jpeg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald">Ali Fitzgerald</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 13 Feb 2018 08:13:02 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Announcing the ArtSlant Prize IX Winners <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%; float: center;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="line-height: 30px; width: 100%; float: center;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p>We are very excited to announce the ArtSlant Prize IX Winners. Thank you all the <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456">jurors</a> from the ArtSlant Prize IX showcase and congratulations to all our <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=juried%5E2017+Winners">juried winners</a>! It is from this pool of juried winners that ArtSlant&rsquo;s Editorial Board selected the ArtSlant Prize Winners. The ArtSlant Prize IX Exhibition will take place during Armory Week in New York at <a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a>, March 6&ndash;12, 2018, booth 2231. Purchase tickets for the fair&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/o/springbreak-art-show-12813445625">here</a>.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p>SPRING/BREAK Art Show is an internationally recognized exhibition platform transforming underused, atypical, and historic New York City exhibition spaces to activate and challenge the traditional cultural landscape of the art market. The seventh annual fair will be held&nbsp;from March 6&ndash;12, 2018, at 4 Times Square.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4">&nbsp;</font></em></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center;"> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; background-color: #00cfa6; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none;">ArtSlant Prize IX Winners:</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/74231-david-rios-ferreira"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1001144/u3azr9/20160731001832-Untitled2016_02sized.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">FIRST PLACE: $3,000</span>&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/74231-david-rios-ferreira" style="color: #000000;">David Rios Ferreira</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472559-sabato-visconti"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1080434/u3azr9/20171216224650-dacalog_04_13_med.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">SECOND PLACE: $1,000</span>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472559-sabato-visconti" style="color: #000000;">Sabato Visconti</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233356-katya-grokhovsky"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1079249/u3azr9/20171206044830-1.KatyaGrokhovskyBadWoman.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">THIRD PLACE: $1,000</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233356-katya-grokhovsky" style="color: #000000;">Katya Grokhovsky</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/478928-daapo-reo"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1067597/u3azr9/20171010035810-daaPo_reo_01.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">HONORABLE MENTION:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/478928-daapo-reo" style="color: #000000;">Da&agrave;p&ograve; Reo</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p>The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. The prize recognizes artists who critically engage with their medium and culture at large. Up for grabs are exhibition opportunities and cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners.&nbsp;Learn more <a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/8456">here</a>.</p> <p>Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase">Art page</a>. &nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners</a> have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 12 Feb 2018 13:44:37 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list What Makes Up the Parisian Mystique? Part One <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">&ldquo;City of Lights, City of Fonts&rdquo;</a> is a&nbsp;blog and visual diary created by ArtSlant&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1517302926405000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG2iJiiFloEnyaBex_3a9Pp4gWxdQ" href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" target="_blank">Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence</a>, Ali Fitzgerald.&nbsp;Fitzgerald will explore France&rsquo;s evolving visual relationship to propaganda, looking deeply at aesthetics of nationalism and politicized otherness.&nbsp;With sketches, writing, and graphic vignettes, she will document fonts, signage, and France&#39;s history of drawing as activism.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>My gossamer vision of Paris, flimsy and informed by movies, comprises the following things:</p> <p>Douchebag Woody Allen characters who love the rain</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094347-Artslant_2_1.jpeg" /></p> <p>Floral perfumes</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094413-Artslant_2_2.jpeg" /></p> <p>Getrude Stein and her band of modernist cool kids</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094442-Artslant_2_3.jpeg" /></p> <p>Stylized, angry cats</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094614-Artslant_2_4.jpeg" /></p> <p>And Art Nouveau. As I was walking around the city (in the rain) I noted the lilting, romantic flourishes of Art Nouveau all around me. Some signs were from the late 19th century, while others were made to look like they were. Why does this period of ornate line define our aesthetic vision of Paris?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094711-Artslant_2_5.jpeg" /></p> <p>Bombed out Berlin (where I live) has almost no remnants of Art Nouveau left. It&rsquo;s too butch for that. If the two cities were typefaces, they would look something like this:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094743-Artslant_2_6.jpeg" /></p> <p>Art Nouveau took hold during La Belle &Eacute;poque, where prosperity and peace allowed for artistic experimentation and projected wealth. Pre-war Paris is often portrayed as a creative wonderland full of optimism, dotted with posters by Alphonse Mucha and Toulouse-Lautrec. These posters featured a lot of natural, organic forms: like naked women surrounded by flowers.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094850-Artslant_2_7.jpeg" /></p> <p>This vision of Paris has endured and become its own golden brand, imbuing the city with anachronistic romance. Is that a kind of propaganda? What does this investment in decorative beauty inspire in us? I&rsquo;ll take a look at these and other questions in the second part of this blog post.</p> <p>In the meantime, here&rsquo;s a picture of some earlier, <a href="https://dangerousminds.net/comments/the_pornographic_propaganda_that_was_used_against_marie_antoinette" target="_blank">pornographic propaganda</a> which effectively smeared the original queen of opulence, Marie Antoinette.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207095000-Artslant_2_8.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Image <a href="http://dangerousminds.net/comments/the_pornographic_propaganda_that_was_used_against_marie_antoinette" target="_blank">via</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald">Ali Fitzgerald</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 07 Feb 2018 01:59:13 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list What’s Lost in the Art World’s Fixation on Price? <p><em>Red is good &ndash; brown is bad &ndash; and nothing with fish</em>. So goes our education in the alchemy of divining an artwork&rsquo;s appeal, as delivered by one of the collectors featured in Nathaniel Kahn&rsquo;s new documentary <em>The Price of Everything</em>. Through candid interviews with artists and industry specialists the film takes us on a pacey journey through the high end of the commercial art world. What does our current relationship with art, creativity, and the commercial structures we have built around them really say about our appreciation of value?</p> <p>With record sales happening left, right, and center, a huge part of popular discourse about art focuses on its price tag. And at the heart of the film are the complex dynamics&mdash;sometimes harmonious, sometimes uneasy&mdash;between commerce and creativity. &ldquo;Art and money have always gone hand in hand,&rdquo; says auctioneer and collector Simon de Pury. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s very important for good art to be expensive. You only protect things that are valuable. If something has no financial value, people don&rsquo;t care.&rdquo; Meanwhile artist Larry Poons asserts that &ldquo;art and money have no intrinsic hook up,&rdquo; and Gerhard Richter asks if it really adds up for a painted canvas to cost more than a house. The film&rsquo;s title evokes Oscar Wilde&rsquo;s definition of a cynic, who &ldquo;knows the price of everything and the value of nothing.&rdquo; Even the most na&iuml;ve art lover knows the &ldquo;value&rdquo; of an artwork has very little to do with any intrinsic material worth. But is our fascination with price in the world of contemporary art causing us to lose sight of true value? And what are the costs of the excesses of a soaring art market?</p> <p>Today the contemporary art sector dominates all other categories of fine art in a market fuelled not only by passionate collectors but by speculation and buying for investment purposes. As the supply of Old Masters and Modern artworks diminished, a young, wealthy set of collectors turned to collecting living artists. The Robert C. Scull auction in 1973 is considered the start of the bullish contemporary art market. The film includes archival footage (including a tense exchange between Scull and Robert Rauschenberg about the profit enjoyed by the former on the sale of a work by the latter), linking early speculative investment in art and the relationship of the secondary market to living artists. Edward Dolman, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Phillips, remembers strong initial resistance from auction houses to the new, unproven, seemingly risky sale category that now accounts for more than half the value of the entire art market<a href="#_ftn1" name="_ftnref1" title="">[1]</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180206171717-the-price-of-everything---still-3_38479095784_o.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Collector Stefan Edlis appears in&nbsp;<em>The Price of Everything</em>&nbsp;by Nathaniel Kahn, an official selection of the U.S. Documentary Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by US Four Productions</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In the ensuing years the top end of contemporary art has become synonymous with luxury. <em>The Price of Everything </em>takes us inside multi-million-dollar auction sales, as well as the vast studio of Jeff Koons, where an army of assistants manages the physical production of artworks while the artist discusses $25-35 million commissions, and we&rsquo;re introduced to an exclusive collaboration with Louis Vuitton handbags. The question of &ldquo;value&rdquo; in these vignettes seems to square firmly with the notion of art as commodity, or even as brand. But this high-level system of production strikes a strong contrast with other artists in the documentary, whose style and working processes are less fitting with the lavishness of the current market.</p> <p>Despite the fact that collectors are clamoring for work by living artists, the market can be surprisingly disconnected from the creators themselves. The film follows MacArthur Foundation Grant Award-winning artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby as she watches one of her works get &ldquo;flipped&rdquo; and sold for a huge profit at auction&mdash;none of the resale value is transferred to her, and there is a risk that the new leap in price may set a difficult precedent for her to follow. Akunyili Crosby&rsquo;s artistic process is labor-intensive and time-consuming and, despite demand, her output is limited to around 12 works a year. Her response to the sale is surprise, disappointment, acceptance. Could the heat of the art market be at the expense of artists themselves?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180206171644-the-price-of-everything---still-1_37990467434_o.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Artist Larry Poons appears in&nbsp;<em>The Price of Everything</em>&nbsp;by Nathaniel Kahn, an official selection of the U.S. Documentary Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by Bob Richman</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Another unexpected casualty of the market&rsquo;s influence may be the evolution of an artist&rsquo;s oeuvre over time. Under growing expectations to produce more&mdash;and more similar&mdash;work, it may be harder than ever for emerging artists to aim towards traditional career development, forming a full range of early, developing, and mature styles. This is by no means a new calculation, however. Larry Poons, an 80-year-old American abstract painter who came to prominence in the 1960s but did not follow an expected career trajectory, emerges as the film&rsquo;s hero of non-conformity. He challenged critical and commercial expectations, refusing to continue producing work in his early op art style. The implication is that Poons did so at the expense of the greater success conferred upon his peers. The flipside, however, is that he has achieved longevity: in his rural, snowy farmhouse studio he prepares large-scale abstract works for an upcoming show. Other artists react differently. George Condo works quickly, almost despite the market, virtually producing a finished artwork before our eyes and happily recreating a character form he has used in previous works. He says that although there is no need to sell everything, it is important not to ignore a creative impulse.</p> <p>The commodification of art is not a new phenomenon. In a Q&amp;A, director Nathaniel Kahn made the point that, viewing the art world as a microcosm of the wider world, what we spend money on reveals our values as a society. In this respect, on some level the surging interest in contemporary art could be seen as positive: by focusing appreciation on the work of living artists, collectors are supporting and embracing a diversity of voices for the benefit of future generations.</p> <p>But in a world where appreciation is as market-based, and the values are so noteworthy&mdash;as the film&rsquo;s closing shot of Leonardo da Vinci&rsquo;s <em>Salvator Mundi</em> selling for $450 million reminds us&mdash;we must be mindful of the effects of a top-heavy market on the lower and mid levels of the industry and on the creative processes and livelihoods of artists in particular. As art writers, readers, art lovers and appreciators, we can also aim to push a discourse which consciously focuses on the creative, cultural, intellectual, and emotional values of contemporary art, not solely the financial spectacle.</p> <p><a href="http://thepriceofeverything.com/" target="_blank"><em>The Price of Everything</em></a><em> premiered at the </em><em>2018 Sundance Film Festival, January 18-28, Park City, Utah. It </em><em>will open in theaters in at least a dozen U.S. markets before debuting on HBO.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/414240-antonia-ward?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Antonia Ward</a></p> <p><em>Antonia Ward is a Los Angeles-based writer, and regional liaison for global art membership organization The Cultivist.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div> <hr align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div id="ftn1"> <p><span style="font-size:14px;"><a href="#_ftnref1" name="_ftn1" title="">[1]</a> The Art Basel and UBS report &ldquo;<a href="https://d33ipftjqrd91.cloudfront.net/asset/cms/Art_Basel_and_UBS_The_Art_Market_2017.pdf" target="_blank">The Art Market 2017</a>&rdquo; found that in 2016 post war and contemporary art accounted for as much as 52% of total sales by value.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Jeff Koons appears in&nbsp;<em>The Price of Everything</em>&nbsp;by Nathaniel Kahn, an official selection of the U.S. Documentary Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by US Four Productions)</span></p> </div> </div> Tue, 06 Feb 2018 14:11:56 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list