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Threewalls

Venue  |  Exhibitions  |  Reviews
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An Overdue Retrospective

by Alicia Chester
At first look, Fearful Symmetries exhibits surprising choices for Faith Wilding’s first retrospective. Best known as a performance and installation artist and writer involved with feminist art collectives, Wilding has firmly secured her place in the canon of the feminist art movement. Having studied with Judy Chicago in the Feminist Art Program – first at California State University, Fresno, and then at CalArts – she subsequently participated in Womanhouse (1971–1972), in which she performed her provocative and significant work Waiting (1972). Since that time Wilding’s work has spanned performance, writing, installation, mixed media, and BioArt; she has collaborated with the Critical... [more]
Posted by Alicia Chester on 1/17/14
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The Repercussions of the Digital Present

by Monica Westin
Laura Mackin’s practice gently translates the amateur, everyday practices of archiving, and the professional acts of the artist who would frame and present these encounters through explicitly aesthetic approaches. Her “120 Years” exhibition at threewalls captures, frames, and critiques our current flood of armchair curating of found images (Tumblr is the obvious example par excellence) and the compulsive digital archiving of our private lives for public consumption. The work in Mackin’s show consists of found photographs/postcards and home movie footage reconfigured to form endless varied repetitions of images... [more]
Posted by Monica Westin on 1/24/12
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When the Wall Fell

by Steve Ruiz
Threewalls is no stranger to openness, social discourse, and politicial proposals. The exhibition space and organization behind it is founded on the first principle (there is no fourth wall), practices the second (as a non-profit organization with a democratic curatorial position), and ends up with the third, showing exhibitions such as "Voices from the Center," a narrative history of life under socialist government. However, as threewalls and other galleries and museums take the self-reflexive step of using discourse as discourse, and dive into the mirrored spiral of encouraging political discou... [more]
Posted by Steve Ruiz on 11/28/11
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Orphaned by the Symbol

by Joel Kuennen
“Yeah USSA! Go Bears, Go!” Said artist, Zachary Cahill during his Artist’s Talk at threewalls last Thursday, the night that also coincidentally coincided with the beginning of Occupy Chicago. Both this exhibition and the gathering inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement find their origins as orphans. Ending its month-long run at threewalls this weekend, Zachary Cahill’s "USSA 2012: The Orphanage Project" is a working-through by an artist orphaned by the symbol. The anxiety produced by this disenchantment and inability to find authentic connection with the abstract societal bond that the symbol... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 10/10/11
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Production Values

by Steve Ruiz
Minimal and post-minimal painting has had something of a resurgence in the last few years. Many of Chicago’s artists are participating in it from various angles, enough that an exhibition was inevitable. I had been anticipating threewalls’ “Either/Or/Both” as a look at the those artists working between hand-made and automatic production. The exhibition provided a solid variety of these works demonstrating the spaces between geometry and intuition, pattern and expression, and planning and execution. The relationship between grid pattern, fabric work, and painting craft was first articulated t... [more]
Posted by Steve Ruiz on 7/4/11
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Crafted Implication

by Robyn Farrell Roulo
“Registry”— the title of Betsy Odom’s solo exhibition at threewalls—plays on the ubiquitous ritual of engaged couples amassing a wish list for their pending nuptial union.  Usual registry items like table linens and a Kitchen-Aid Mix Master are replaced by tooled leather gym shorts and a lead canteen in Ms. Odom’s registry, indicating recurrent themes throughout the artist’s work.  The thirty-two piece inventory reads like a contemporary women’s studies survey as Odom investigates the traditions of craft and its relation to social attitudes about gender and society.  Operating under the guise of this... [more]
Posted by Robyn Farrell Roulo on 6/4/11
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Do you believe in magic?

by Amelia Ishmael
“The underlying assumption of magic is the assertion of will as the primary moving force in this universe—the deep conviction that nothing happens unless somebody or some being wills it to happen. To me this has always seemed self-evident. A chair does not move unless someone moves it. Neither does your physical body, which is composed of much the same materials, move unless you will it to move. Walking across the room is a magical operation. From the viewpoint of magic, no death, no illness, no misfortune, accident, war, or riot is accidental. There are no accidents in the world of magic. And wi... [more]
Posted by Amelia Ishmael on 3/21/11
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Time Out Chicago: Preview Kelly Kaczynski

http://chicago.timeout.com/articles/art-design/88474/kelly-kaczynski-at-threewalls-fall-preview-art-story [more]
Posted by three walls on 8/25/10
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Hope and Inspiration from Ruins

by Marla Seidell
        America is 233 years old. America will turn 234 on July 4, 2010. By contrast, the war in Iraq has resulted in the destruction of thousands of historical and archaeological treasures, many which date back as far as 6,000 years. One such example is the  the ziggurat (the first building structures of the Sumerians) at Ur, built in 2100 B.C., which was damaged during  the first Gulf War. Other ancient treasures that took a hit include a thousand-year-old bridge in Baghdad, a 10th century church in Mosul that was partially destroyed, and Iraq's National Library (which contained historic... [more]
Posted by Marla Seidell on 1/25/10
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The Magic Wand for Iraq

by Abraham Ritchie
          Despite the prevalence of digital manipulation in photography, whether it’s the model on the cover of Vogue or a Jeff Wall photograph, the idea that “photographs don’t lie” still remains strong in the popular consciousness.  What we see of war in wartime is just as controlled and monitored as the cover of a fashion magazine.  It was only several months ago (the end of February) that Defense Secretary Robert Gates lifted the 1991 ban on media access to the Dover Air Force Base, where the flag-draped caskets of America’s fallen soldiers arrive.  It is this control and manipulation of... [more]
Posted by Abraham Ritchie on 6/22/09