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Corbett vs. Dempsey

Venue  |  Exhibitions  |  Reviews
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Cellar Door

Matt Nichols - Cellar Door With artists like the Yes Men, Ai Weiwei, Jenny Holzer and Alfredo Jaar leading the charge, social practices rooted in political activism, investigative journalism and documentarian strategies have taken center stage. The effects have been palpable with contemporary art criticism focusing on notions of use value, “educational efficacy”, and quotients of truth rather than art’s capacity to “invite us to confront the more complicated considerations of our predicament” (Bishop). Cellar Door, the latest solo show by artist Matt Nichols is an a... [more]
Posted by sqosh12 on 7/8/13
20130616132804-02__61513

Cellar Door

Matt Nichols - Cellar Door With artists like the Yes Men, Ai Weiwei, Jenny Holzer and Alfredo Jaar leading the charge, social practices rooted in political activism, investigative journalism and documentarian strategies have taken center stage. The effects have been palpable with contemporary art criticism focusing on notions of use value, “educational efficacy”, and quotients of truth rather than art’s capacity to “invite us to confront the more complicated considerations of our predicament” (Bishop). Cellar Door, the latest solo show by artist Matt Nichols is an a... [more]
Posted by sqosh12 on 7/8/13
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Seymour Rosofsky and Keiichi Tanaami

by Beth Capper
Seymour Rosofsky’s works are scrutinizing glimpses at the surreal and ominous characters that populate Midwestern cities and suburban towns. Many of these figures are at once familiar and recognizable to us: lonely old ladies supping tea in a late night urban cafe, Christmas Santa Claus impersonators in drab, cheap looking suits – holiday cheer with a slice of desperation and humiliation -- grey men in grey bars. They reveal a city and its outer edges (Chicago perhaps) that despite being urban and expansive is also quiet, cold, austere. It’s a city that, unlike New York, does sleep, and Rosof... [more]
Posted by Beth Capper on 8/13/12
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Seymour Rosofsky and Keiichi Tanaami

by Beth Capper
Seymour Rosofsky’s works are scrutinizing glimpses at the surreal and ominous characters that populate Midwestern cities and suburban towns. Many of these figures are at once familiar and recognizable to us: lonely old ladies supping tea in a late night urban cafe, Christmas Santa Claus impersonators in drab, cheap looking suits – holiday cheer with a slice of desperation and humiliation, grey men in grey bars. They reveal a city and its outer edges (Chicago perhaps) that despite being urban and expansive is also quiet, cold, austere. It’s a city that, unlike New York, does sleep, and Rosofsky... [more]
Posted by Beth Capper on 8/9/12
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Day is done.

by Mia DiMeo
“It’s a mean humor, so it’s a critical joy. You know, it’s negative joy. But that’s art, I think—for me, at least.” Mike Kelley, describing Day is Done to Art21 in 2005   Echoes of mourning for the late Mike Kelley, who died early last week in Los Angeles, were piling up in art columns and Facebook pages as Molly Zuckerman-Hartung’s show opened at Corbett vs. Dempsey, its title and timing, in her words, “a weird and sad and wonderful coincidence.” The emphatic paradox in Kelley’s phrase finds itself in Zuckerman-Hartung’s work, where aggression and elation towards culture, semiotics and avant-garde traditi... [more]
Posted by Mia DiMeo on 2/6/12
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All the Right Möves

by Mia DiMeo
Painting is the zombie of the art world, and artists deal with this fact in two ways: they either run screaming towards other media, or embrace its exhausting tradition, accept the impossibility of killing it completely, and make work with the irreverent openness and plurality that it demands. Albert Oehlen has affection for the latter, having synthesized expressionism, abstraction, and collage with orphic, digital and typographic influences and appropriations in his long career. Emerging in the late 1970s as part of the Neue Wilde painters, the lush German Neo-Expressionism movement that in... [more]
Posted by Mia DiMeo on 10/30/11
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Smooth Jazz

by Erik Wenzel
Christopher Wool grew up in Chicago, but he made his career in New York. And like any good New York abstract painter he is a fan of jazz. “Sound on Sound”, at Corbett vs. Dempsey gets its name from a recording made on an old Sound on Sound reel-to-reel portable tape recorder by underground jazz legend, Joe McPhee. Both Wool and Corbett vs. Dempsey are huge fans of McPhee, and the occasion of the exhibition marks an opportunity to issue the previously unreleased 1968 recording and stage a concert. Or the record’s release is an excuse to have a Christopher Wool show. Wool designed... [more]
Posted by Erik Wenzel on 11/15/10
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Robert Barnes via New City

Review of "Robert Barnes" by Janina Ciezadlo, via New City [more]
Posted by Abraham Ritchie on 6/18/10
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New Kids on the Block

by Robyn Farrell Roulo
        Chicago and its beloved Art Institute carry a reputation of cultivating generations of young, raw talent. Thus, our city has become a magnet for aspiring artists eager to be inspired and create, like so many of those that have passed through on their path to success. Despite this illustrious reputation and art world lore, the contemporary art scene can be difficult to navigate. Many galleries include work by emerging artists, but often I find myself searching for fresh, innovative work. Known for mid-century American works and uncommon objects, Corbett vs. Dempsey would be an otherwis... [more]
Posted by Robyn Farrell Roulo on 8/2/09
Lostutter

Early Girls

by Thea Liberty Nichols
Robert Lostutter’s latest exhibition, which just opened at Corbett vs. Dempsey last week, consists of several small-scale preparatory watercolors made between the late sixties and early seventies. These works depict stylized portraits of bare-breasted, curvy women that tower over the other elements, such as 3-D zigzags and oversized floral blooms, in these tightly controlled compositions. The watercolors themselves were initially intended as studies for larger paintings, and several are adorned with penciled marginalia and swatches of color tests that provide unique glimpses into Lostutter’s ar... [more]
Posted by Thea Liberty Nichols on 12/8/08
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The Other Man of Steel

by Abraham Ritchie
This is the last week to catch Corbett vs. Dempsey’s exhibition “Joseph Goto: Iron Man” featuring the sculpture and painting by the titular Chicago artist (b. 1916-1994).   Unfolding for the visitor at the top of the stairs to the gallery, is a space filled with Goto’s welded steel sculptures.  Of varying sizes, from palm-sized to large and free-standing, Goto’s sculptures are smartly installed, distinct groups are placed together which then dialogue with larger pieces.  Along the walls are Goto’s paintings and print works, together it all equals a kind of posthumous-mini-retrospective.I was lucky enough to walk into the... [more]
Posted by Abraham Ritchie on 11/17/08
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Frank Vavruska

by Thea Liberty Nichols
Corbett vs. Dempsey gallery, a member of the sprawling West Town Gallery Network (which also includes 65GRAND and Roots and Culture) is focused on promoting the paintings, work on paper, and “uncommon objects” of mid-20th century art, chiefly focused on Chicago’s art production from the 1940’s to the 1970’s.Their current exhibition, just about midway through its run, is a prime example of their gallery’s scope, with the main show, "Frank Vavruska: The Horizon is a Circle, Paintings 1942-1956" and the companion exhibition 'Nineteen Sixty-Six" creating a chronolog... [more]
Posted by Thea Liberty Nichols on 8/4/08