Bigindicator

Packer Schopf Gallery

Venue  |  Exhibitions  |  Reviews
20130412123919-7

Art Review

Kathy has played around with the fiber medium and given it a painting quality treatment. Her subject matter is related to social media and internet. Through embroidery she is attempting to connect the mentality of two different generations (current generation & their parents). . Her works are witty and will make you go ‘LOL’.  http://agnichemburkar.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/too-much-information-tmi-may-24th-july-6th/ [more]
Posted by Agni Chemburkar on 5/25/13
Acs_tycho_magnetic_anomaly_2010

Sparklehorse and a Big Kitty

by Mia DiMeo
If it hasn’t been done already, I’d like to see a major exhibition featuring only artists that bedazzle—literally. A working title would be something like, “Glitter in Contemporary Art,” and it would include macabre, studded embroidery by Angelo Filomeno, a crystallized rock sugar sculpture by Timothy Horne, a sinister glitter paint scene by Jamie Vasta, and, of course, Damien Hirst’s For the Love of God, to give it some hype. The flash that’s currently on view at Packer Schopf Gallery, “Andréa Stanislav: to the Western Lands,” would fit right in to this proposed sparkle-art trajectory... [more]
Posted by Mia DiMeo on 6/21/10
20150110091152-ianweavership280

Review: ian Weaver/Packer Schopf Gallery

APR 05Review: Ian Weaver/Packer Schopf Gallery RECOMMENDED The African-American community of Chicago’s “Black Bottom” neighborhood, dispersed by white “urban renewal” in the 1950s, is presented here in a mix of faux historical documents, artifacts and maps, colliding a repertoire of symbols associating European racial and nationalist mythology withAfrican-American history and nationalism. There is a knight’s helmet, for instance, incorporating a raised Black Power fist in its design. Likewise, the black panther becomes the center of a heraldic tapestry that, in this case, is a quilt. Corporate and... [more]
Posted by Ian Weaver on 4/5/10
Candida

Erik Wenzel's Confession

by Erik Wenzel
      “My verb was ‘transform.’ You can conjugate that however you like,” said Simon Anderson, as he meticulously destroyed a guitar. “39 Verbs,” a one-night exhibition at Packer Schopf Gallery and part of Chicago Artists Month very much had the feel of a carnival or science fair. It is a little unclear, but the event appears to have been a retrospective of sorts for Industry of the Ordinary, the conceptual art duo Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson. The statement for the “happening” reads, “over five years of practice, Industry of the Ordinary has generated projects described by a single line of... [more]
Posted by Erik Wenzel on 10/12/09
School_boy_edit_copy-1

This is Not a Piece of Notebook Paper

by Kathryn Born
In anticipation of the Southern Graphics Council (a major printmaking convention hosted by Columbia College in late March), Packer Schopf is hosting the group print show "Ce n'est pas un spectacle de caracteres (This is not a print show)." But, ah ha, it is a print show.  It has a collection of prints from the artists of White Wings Press and a dozen other print artists. Two things that stood out: Rattail, 2007, by Matthew Schommer and William Strugis features a mouse and snake and boy with a hole through his stomach. My Aunt Rosalie said it looks like Herge's cartoon character Tintin. I googled him a... [more]
Posted by Kathryn Born on 3/1/09
Yellow_72_dpi

Beyond the Hook

by Kathryn Born
  In the lower level of Packer Schopf is an exhibit of the Erector-set art of Michael Thompson, who is most well known for his delightfully subversive fradulent postage stamps. His famous stamps not only portray colorful depictions of everything from Smallpox to genitalia, but have actually been sent through the mail and received the stink eye from the federal government. From there, he's made the natural transition to building replicas of bridges out of Erector sets. I have the upmost respect for any artist who is willing to dilute their brand and abandon any kind of following they may have... [more]
Posted by Kathryn Born on 3/1/09