Bigindicator

Loaded: Hunting Culture in America

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Josh-winegarcouplesmallercmyk
Couple, 2007 Gesso, Acrylic, Pencil, Archival Inkjet Print © Josh Winegar
Wedding_ring_copy_4
The Wedding Ring, 2004 Lambda Archival C Print © Erika Larsen
Khart_ladder_prt
Hunting Stand with Unicorn Bait, 2007 Mixed Media © Kimberley Hart
Jenn_wilsonbear_1_lgfile
Bear, 2007 Oil Painting © Jenn Wilson
Lesteberg_brian_hoof_track
Hoof Track with Blood, 2003 Photograph © Brian Lesteberg
Install_image
© Glass Curtain Gallery
Hunting_title_wall
© Glass Curtain Gallery
Duck_hunt
© Glass Curtain Gallery
Duck_decoys_by_bob_lantz
Duck Decoys © Glass Curtain Gallery
Loaded: Hunting Culture in America

1104 S. Wabash Ave, First Floor
Chicago, IL 60605
March 18th, 2009 - April 29th, 2009
Opening: March 18th, 2009 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://colum.edu/deps
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Michigan Ave/Downtown
EMAIL:  
mporter@colum.edu
PHONE:  
312-369-6643
OPEN HOURS:  
Mon,Tues, Wed and Fri 9am-5pm, Thurs 9am-7pm
ARTS ORGANIZATION:  
Department of Exhibition and Performance Spaces
SCHOOL ASSOCIATION:  
Columbia College Chicago
TAGS:  
mixed-media, photography, video-art, landscape, sculpture
COST:  
FREE

DESCRIPTION

In contemporary America, where people no longer need to hunt for survival, hunting culture –– with its roots in notions of American independence, the frontier spirit, dominance over nature, and rugged individualism –– has evolved to become an aesthetic and a lifestyle choice, a sport steeped in regional and family traditions. Many contemporary artists and designers have gravitated toward either the aesthetics or the cultural/social phenomena of hunting as the subject of their work, giving us objects, images, and spaces that range from kitsch to realism and hard-edged social commentary. This group exhibition, "Loaded: Hunting Culture in America," timed to coincide with the college-wide Critical Encounters initiative "Human|Nature," will take a deliberately ambivalent view toward the morality of hunting and address the subject as social, cultural, and artistic phenomenon, ideally nudging viewers to question their own preconceptions regarding hunting.