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And to Think That It Was Found Upside Down

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HOMELAND , 2012 Wood, Plastic Model Houses Variable © Courtesy of the artist and Carrie Secrist Gallery
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Homeland, 2012 Wood, Plastic Model Houses Dimensions Variable © Courtesy the artist and Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago
And to Think That It Was Found Upside Down

835 W. Washington Blvd.
Chicago, IL 60607
October 26th, 2012 - December 8th, 2012
Opening: October 26th, 2012 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.secristgallery.com/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
West Loop/West Town
EMAIL:  
info@secristgallery.com
PHONE:  
312.491.0917
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Fri 10:30-6; Sat 11-5; or by appt
TAGS:  
sculptural installations, mixed-media, modern, sculpture

DESCRIPTION

Carrie Secrist Gallery is pleased to present Dietrich Wegner: And to Think That It Was Found Upside Down from October 26 to December 8, 2012. For his second solo project with the gallery, Wegner exhibits new sculpture, painting, and work on paper.

For And to Think That It Was Found Upside Down, Wegner combines a study of primate evolution and human development with Dr. Seuss-like folklore. By layering found imagery with photographic, painterly, and illustrative techniques, Wegner manipulates the relationship between reality and perception. The resulting pictures of apes and children in precarious landscapes occupy a fantasy space of the artist’s own design.

The sculptural installation Homeland (2012), composed of plastic model houses atop wooden stilts, acts as a backdrop for Wegner’s dystopic narrative imagery. Wegner imagines each of his two-dimensional pictures as scenes within this serene village setting. Invented evolutions, wherein chimps roost on eggs, disregard our known understanding of biological and psychological maturity. As Wegner’s fable unfolds, viewers empathize with his characters, becoming accomplices in his mythology. Inevitably, what we see in And to Think That It Was Found Upside Down is not always true or essential, advancing the exhibition’s premise that the compression of “reality” with both digital and analog methods offers varied meanings.

Dietrich Wegner (American, b. 1978) is Associate Professor of Art at Edinboro University in Pennsylvania. Previous exhibitions include Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue, WA; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA; Weston Art Gallery, Cincinnati, OH; and Robert Berman Gallery, Santa Monica, CA.