Bigindicator

Forget Me NOT

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20100810072516-small_stephen_anderson_-_george_washington
George Washington Tempra on Canvas Board 10” X 7 1/2” © Courtesy of Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art
Forget Me NOT

756 N. Milwaukee Ave.
Chicago, IL 60622
September 10th, 2010 - December 31st, 2010
Opening: September 10th, 2010 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.art.org
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
West Loop/West Town
EMAIL:  
intuit@art.org
PHONE:  
312-243-9088
OPEN HOURS:  
Tuesday through Saturday 11:00am - 6:00pm ; Thursday 11:00am - 7:30pm.

DESCRIPTION

To “capture” in paint, film, wood or stone the human image has challenged artists, both trained and untrained since man began making marks. The portrait remains universal artistic subject matter.

Wealthy 19th century New Englanders engaged itinerant painters, many self-taught, to paint the likenesses of themselves and their families. Beyond documentation, displaying one’s portrait implied status. Popular tastes evolved to displaying portraits of others- statesmen, generals, beauties- until today when any amount of celebrity might make ones’ portrait desirable.

Forget Me NOT
will focus on our continued fascination with our own image. From the self-taught itinerant 19th century painter to the street artist today. The meticulous detail of Ammi Phillips and Drossos Skyllas, the gestural swash of William Hawkins, the boldness of Sam Doyle, the simplicity of Paul Duhen –- kings, movie stars, presidents, bad boys, good girls- all reflecting who we are and how others see us. And how we see ourselves.

Since man began making marks, the portrait remains a universal artistic subject matter. From the self-taught itinerant 19th century painter to the street artist of today, Forget Me NOT will focus on our continued fascination with our own image.

See the meticulous detail of Ammi Phillips and Drossos Skyllas, the gestural swash of William Hawkins, the boldness of Sam Doyle and the simplicity of Paul Duhem. More than 70 works by 49 different artists tell the story of who we are and how others see us.