Bigindicator

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Heather Dewey-Hagborg Questions DNA as Big Data

by Joel Kuennen
DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid) is often imagined as the key to identity, as the progenitor of who we are. It is nature within us and the scaffolding onto which we are nurtured into who we are. However, through epigenetics, viral transfer, and genetic drift, we are becoming more aware of the superposition of DNA and its ability to change, inherit, mute, and express with degrees of certainty, not certitude. At the same time, DNA extraction and sequencing has never been cheaper or easier. In light of this and the continued reliance on DNA as forensic proof, artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg approache... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 10/31
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Genevieve Gaignard: “You’re Not That, But You’re Not Not That.”

by Alex Anderson
Los Angeles, September 2016: Genevieve Gaignard is a magician. She sees you and she sees you seeing her. Revealing our experience and understanding of race, gender, sexuality, and their complex perceptions under the western heteropatriarchal gaze, the Los Angeles-based artist uses self-portraiture and sculpture to find truth in the abstract aporia of identity. The characters she creates and portrays engage with the aesthetic language of Afropunk, substance chic Hollywood glamor, and the suburban working class of generations past to create layered caricatures of the myriad ways people see her many se... [more]
Posted by Alex Anderson on 9/29
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In Blockchain Tribute, Simon Denny Imagines Future Crypto-Economies

by Olivia B. Murphy
New York, September 2016: This past Thursday, I arrived at Petzel Gallery amidst a flurry of installation activity, scissor lifts backing furtively out of the installed exhibition spaces, and the last of the vinyl lettering still going up on the walls and windows. Simon Denny, the New Zealand-born, Berlin-based artist was speaking fervently to Friedrich Petzel and a few others about his work, visibly excited and engaged about his latest exhibition, Blockchain Future States, due to open that evening. In a walkthrough, Denny eagerly explained each piece in the show, giving the historical and cultural co... [more]
Posted by Olivia B. Murphy on 9/20
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Meleko Mokgosi: On Love in Democratic Intuition

by Andrea Alessi
New York, September 2016: Democratic Intuition—for those preoccupied by a tumultuous election season, the title has a timely ring. But Meleko Mokgosi’s expansive project, now halfway through its eight planned chapters, has little to do with the drama that is U.S. presidential politics. The artist, who painstakingly researches and storyboards his enormous paintings, had mapped out his newest works long before anyone had ever imagined a Trump/Hillary showdown in the cards. Lerato and Comrades II, the latest instalments in Democratic Intuition (2014–present), are currently shown across Jack Shainman Gallery&r... [more]
Posted by Andrea Alessi on 9/8
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Cut, Copy, and Print: Magalie Guérin on Replicating Her Own Paintings

by Bradley Rubenstein
I first met Magalie Guérin in the early 2000s in Greenpoint, Brooklyn—long before Greenpoint was made famous by the TV show Girls. She ran a small gallery called GV/AS, and curated shows that fused serious painting with something personal and quirky (Rodney Dickson's exhibition of paintings of Tanya Roberts still stands out as one of his most interesting exhibitions). One could always find Magalie sitting the gallery and working on drawings—in retrospect, combining elements of art making, collecting, and curating, are all aspects of her present work. Her recent book of studio... [more]
Posted by Bradley Rubenstein on 8/31
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RADIOACTIVE: An Interview with Maria Gaspar

by Tempestt Hazell
Chicago, July 2016: I spoke with artist Maria Gaspar about her upcoming project RADIOACTIVE: Stories from Beyond the Wall on the Fourth of July. We talked about mass incarceration, a central subject of Gaspar’s work, on a day that asks people in the US to reflect on freedom. Days after Gaspar shared her thoughts on art and disruption, names like Alton Sterling and Philando Castile started to break open the stitches of old and new wounds and raise questions about freedom. I couldn’t ignore the timing. In The Face of Human Rights, Carlos Fuentes writes, “perhaps those who lack... [more]
Posted by Tempestt Hazell on 7/11
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The Matter of Molecular Practice: An Interview with Sean Raspet

by Joel Kuennen
We live at a time when an astounding amount of information is available to us at a shocking degree of immediacy. A netizen will regularly take deep-dives down wiki wormholes, eagerly grazing on masses of hyper-specific information related to a singular topic, all the while rhizomatically connected to and through a world of greater knowledge. No longer limited to a vocabulary of the phenomenological, we can pastiche together descriptions, criticisms, and comments that pull from the sciences, visual culture, advertising, etc. This mass availability of the specific makes it difficult to universa... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 6/22
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Louise Fishman: Subverting the Patriarchy with 2-inch Paintings

by Olivia B. Murphy
April 2016, Philadelphia: On a Friday evening in Philadelphia, the ICA teems with people bending down, squinting, and getting up close and personal with the works on view in Louise Fishman’s latest exhibition Paper Louise Tiny Fishman Rock. The one-room show is filled with Fishman’s small-scale work, along with her better known large-scale works, plus collected objects and ephemera from throughout the artist’s impressive, decades-long career. The main grouping of works in the show is installed in the center of the room on freestanding walls and pedestals. Small colorful canvass... [more]
Posted by Olivia B. Murphy on 5/10
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Beyond Beauty: Beatriz Santiago Muñoz On How to Truly Perceive a Place

by Ionit Behar
Chicago, March 2016: Beatriz Santiago Muñoz is interested in questions of place: what do people make of places? How can we represent that? In the San Juan-based artist’s work the sense of place—and the embodied experience of social, ecological, and political histories—asserts itself in powerful ways. Her films and videos have an attachment to a sensorial reality and materiality, as well the imagining of possible futures, elements intrinsic to perceiving places in a new and different way. This March Santiago Muñoz visited Chicago to screen and discuss her recen... [more]
Posted by Ionit Behar on 4/29
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Angela Washko: Talking Feminism in the Spaces Most Hostile to It

by Christian Petersen
We have discussed the rapidly growing intersection between new media art and feminism with a number of artists in previous columns. This week we take a deeper look at that phenomenon in an interview with artist, writer and facilitator Angela Washko who is at the forefront of the movement. She famously interviewed the notorious pick-up-artist Roosh V for her project Banged which resulted in an overload of attention for her, both positive and horribly negative. Washko’s work consistently tackles vital feminist issues in highly creative and intelligent ways. Her latest project, All The Places You'll Go (Women As Place), is a wor... [more]
Posted by Christian Petersen on 4/20