ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Under the Radar: Roger Josefsson, Sylwia Kaden, Maja Ruznic <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/64979-roger-josefsson?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=RogerJosefsson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Roger Josefsson &ndash; Stockholm</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/862593?utm_source=RogerJosefsson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/862593/u3azr9/20141026162218-untitled.2._2012._125x125_cm.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/862592?utm_source=RogerJosefsson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/862592/y8wnrh/20141026162201-untitled.1.2012._125x125.cm.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/863837?utm_source=RogerJosefsson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/863837/y8wnrh/20141101170706-untitled.9._2012._55x52_cm.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/658649?utm_source=RogerJosefsson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/658649/y8wnrh/20130203194832-P1000065.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/469782-sylwia-kaden?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=SylwiaKaden&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Sylwia Kaden &ndash; Amsterdam </span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1012491?utm_source= SylwiaKaden&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1012491/u3azr9/20161019064525-18_untilted__A5__pencil__pastel__crayon_on_paper_Sylwia_Kaden.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1012488?utm_source=SylwiaKaden&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1012488/y8wnrh/20161019064135-untilted10_newer.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1012658?utm_source=SylwiaKaden&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1012658/mf2ji7/20161019174756-tumblr_o5qnacBXfB1urw8ifo1_1280.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1012481?utm_source=SylwiaKaden&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1012481/y8wnrh/20161019063704-05_untilted__A4__pencil__pastel_on_paper_Sylwia_Kaden.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/140226-maja-ruznic?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=MajaRuznik&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Maja Ruznic &ndash; Los Angeles</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1030594?utm_source=MajaRuznik&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1030594/u3azr9/20170216171024-The_Wailing_Sisters.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1030593?utm_source=MajaRuznik&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1030593/y8wnrh/20170216171018-One_Last_Look.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1030596?utm_source=MajaRuznik&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1030596/y8wnrh/20170216171029-Twitching_Eye__Self_Portait_.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1030595?utm_source=MajaRuznik&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1030595/y8wnrh/20170216171024-The_Water_Fetcher__My_Mother_.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Sat, 18 Feb 2017 15:13:46 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Abdul Mazid Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/45764-b-stylecolor-333333under-the-radar-larry-yung-abdul-mazid-noelle-malineb" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/251547-abdul-mazid" target="_blank">Abdul Mazid</a>.</em></p> <hr /> <p><br /> <strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>Underneath it all is this interest in upending perception and expectation. Our society is structured in a way that begs us to differentiate, categorize, and now, to isolate. I want to blur categories and ultimately extinguish those barriers. I believe that if we look long enough the patterns and similarities come to the surface.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;m afraid that question is far more complex than I could ever articulate. Currently, the artist&rsquo;s responsibility seems to be unprecedented. Ai Weiwei gets raked across the coals for posing as drowned Syrian refugee, Aylan Kurdi, while Illma Gore is assaulted by a Trump supporter and threatened to be sued for depicting Trump&rsquo;s micro phallus.</p> <p>What is the artist&rsquo;s responsibility in real-time? I honestly don&rsquo;t know! It is evolving moment by moment. I will say that an artist should always be authentic in their studio. That is where their responsibility is to themselves and the work and that alone. Once it leaves the studio, however, that&rsquo;s a different story.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)?</strong></p> <p>Jeesh, I had to log into my Myspace to get this pic. Is it art? Does it matter? To me, this was the greatest thing I ever made because it opened a universe to me that I had never considered: That the basic tools and skills for survival are innately embedded in our DNA and that everything else is just noise.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170215143938-Costa_Rica_2008.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>Those who know me well know that I speak often of creating a new form of currency. The simplified version would be to create a two-part currency that has a decaying function and an accumulation portion yet functions democratically. Of course it sounds good in theory; real world implications may not be so straight forward. That&rsquo;s my white whale.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t? </strong></p> <p>Can I just link you to the artists I follow on Instagram? Seriously, there are so many brilliant artists out there who are just on the cusp of being household names. That being said, here are some badass artists who should be on everyone&rsquo;s radar right now:</p> <p><a href="http://amitismotevalli.com/" target="_blank">Amitis Motevalli</a>, Jessica Wimbley &amp; Chris Christion&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.biomythart.com/" target="_blank">Biomythography Practice</a>, and <a href="http://www.lenawolek.com/" target="_blank">Lena Wolek</a>. Check them out.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div align="center"> <hr align="center" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Abdul Mazid, <em>I am</em>, 2016, Artist&rsquo;s body hair, adhesive, and canvas, 20 x 30 x 2 inches.)</span></p> Mon, 20 Feb 2017 14:41:19 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Facing the Black Mirror: chashama Transforms Unused Properties into Art Venues <p><em>Oscar Wilde famously suggested great art &ldquo;reveal beauty and hide the artist.&rdquo; For the 2017 BLACK MIRROR exhibition at </em><a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" target="_blank"><em>SPRING/BREAK</em></a><em>, more than 100 curators will feature artworks that explore the dance of identity the artist undergoes&mdash;between showing what&rsquo;s unseen and hiding in plain sight&mdash;especially in the face of modern technology, political unrest, and glimmers from ghosts of Art History&rsquo;s past.</em></p> <p><em>ArtSlant will be exhibiting the <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/47340-announcing-the-artslant-prize-2016-winners-and-exhibition-at-springbreak-art-show" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners at SPRING/BREAK</a>. In expectation of this uniquely site-specific, curatorial fair, we&rsquo;re featuring four interviews with participating curators and artists, asking them what they see reflected in the black mirror.</em></p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Arts non-profit <a href="http://www.chashama.org/" target="_blank">chashama</a> is no stranger to exhibiting artwork in unexpected spaces. Since 1995, chashama has worked with property owners across New York City to transform unused real estate into affordable spaces where artists can work, perform, and exhibit. Today, its Workshop Program, which grants more than 100 artists private, subsidized studio space, is the largest non-profit residency program in New York City.</p> <p>When SPRING/BREAK Art Show takes over a former office space at 4 Times Square this Armory Week, chashama will join over 150 curators (and 400+ artists) exhibiting at the fair. The alignment of these two institutions could hardly feel like a more natural partnership; in converting unused properties to support artists and arts professionals, chashama has a clear affinity with the six-year-old fair. At SPRING/BREAK chashama will feature artists from across its studio network, with work responding to the 2017 theme: Black Mirror.</p> <p>Approaching a quarter century in the service of artists, chashama will also be honored by this year&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.artsy.net/auction/spring-slash-break-benefit-auction-2017" target="_blank">Artsy Benefit Auction</a>. &ldquo;Re-thinking what &lsquo;art space&rsquo; means and how to provide artists and art professionals with more has always been their vision, and that vision has changed the city we live in for the better,&rdquo; says SPRING/BREAK cofounder Andrew Gori, describing the tribute. &ldquo;We couldn&rsquo;t think of anyone more fitting to partner with for this year&rsquo;s auction.&rdquo;</p> <p>In the throes of preparation, curator Janusz Jaworksi spoke with us about chashama&rsquo;s art historical approach to the Black Mirror, and offered meaningful pushback against the idea that New York City ever had a &ldquo;traditional arts landscape.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170215135617-Nicholas_Fraser_-____2_APR_11_2015_NIGHTBLOOME____-42x72-crop.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Nicholas Fraser,&nbsp;<em>APR 11 2015 NIGHTBLOOME</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What&rsquo;s your conception of the Black Mirror, and how will that play out in chashama&#39;s SPRING/BREAK presentation?</strong></p> <p>The <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_glass" target="_blank">Claude glass</a>, or black mirror, was something that people would carry around with them in order to see the world differently. It was a low-tech way to break away from the reality around them, and instead see things in a slightly abstracted way&mdash;a softer, more &ldquo;picturesque&rdquo; way. But in the process of using the black mirror, the person would focus on the world behind them, sometimes completely missing what&rsquo;s right in front of them. For chashama&rsquo;s take on the overall SPRING/BREAK 2017 concept of the black mirror&mdash;simultaneously obscuring some features of the artist and thereby enhancing others&mdash;I&#39;ve gone back to how the original black mirrors were used, but instead of focusing on what&rsquo;s behind us spatially, I&rsquo;ve picked work that looks through the black mirror in a temporal way.</p> <p><strong>Tell us more about an artist whose work you think is really emblematic of this exhibition&rsquo;s argument.</strong></p> <p>Danny Licul has built a cardboard model of an amalgamation of his former schools and populated it with students and faculty made of clay. He creates scenes with these clay figures, lights it in a theatrical way, and then paints those scenes. We don&#39;t know what the young Licul&rsquo;s school life was like, but we are given the opportunity to imagine it from the glimpses he brings forward in these works through his current day reflections on that time.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170215135852-Danny_L_-____Sock_Puppet_Presentation__44____12x9.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Danny Licul,&nbsp;<em>Sock Puppet Presentation #44</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What was your process curating this exhibition like? How did you choose the artists?</strong></p> <p>We sent the SPRING/BREAK Art Show 2017 curatorial theme to the 120+ artists in our studio program, and I received 35 responses from artists who felt that their work fit within that theme. Working the the SPRING/BREAK Art Show curators, I started noticing the temporal element in some of the works and the final curation developed from there.</p> <p><strong>SPRING/BREAK and chashama share some of the same goals when it comes to exhibiting art in unexpected and otherwise unused spaces. Can you describe some of the work chashama does, and how you see that shaping or challenging the traditional arts landscape in NYC?</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;m going to challenge the notion that there is/was a traditional arts landscape in NYC. There was one that was branded as such, and I&rsquo;ll get to that in a moment, but there are many arts landscapes in NYC. Their traditions reach back into the history of the city and its people&mdash;and given the large influx of people from around the world into New York City, those traditions extend well beyond our five boroughs.</p> <p>People make and present work in so many ways, and in so many parts of the city, but until the last few decades or so, the only arts landscape that was branded as the city&rsquo;s &ldquo;Traditional Arts Landscape&rdquo; involved works made in studios by Artists (predominately white males), and then exhibited and sold in galleries (usually owned by white males), or presented in museums (see previous parenthetical statements regarding who was in charge of these).</p> <p>The traditions within the predominantly white, predominantly male, art world are changing, and a lot of the time it&rsquo;s been through co-opting and appropriating traditions from other parts of the art world that have been existing side by side, or actively working against that white male world. Fortunately for us all, technologies are making it possible for people to bypass the &ldquo;Traditional Arts Landscape&rdquo; and see/support the work of a multitude of artists.</p> <p>With that as the truer picture of our city&rsquo;s artistic landscape, chashama, in partnership with property owners, opens presentation spaces in various parts of the city and finds people who live and work in those areas who are interested in presenting their work to the public. Some of our spaces look a bit like galleries (white walls and such), but others are simply places made available for artistic expression to be seen. We have a diverse database of artist projects awaiting space, and if even a small fraction of vacant storefront owners would contact chashama, we could work together to transform the visual landscape of this city with art.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170215140039-MASSEY____Artisanal_14____23x20x5_2016.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Christina Massey,&nbsp;<em>Artisanal 14</em>, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>4 Times Square is a unique exhibition space, and chashama&#39;s known for transforming unexpected properties across the city with art. When curating this show, how much did this specific office space play into your decision making?</strong></p> <p>For me, the physical aspects of a presentation venue are always the first part of curating or programming a space. The easiest way to make good art look bad is by putting it in the wrong space (well, that and not lighting it properly). Given that most visitors will be coming from a white box gallery mindset, we&rsquo;re sort of re-creating a bit of that world, albeit a little disjointedly, and also working with the givens of the space.</p> <p>Its past life as an office space didn&rsquo;t figure into my curation at all. For the weeks that we&rsquo;re using it, it&rsquo;s not an office space; it&#39;s an an art space. It&rsquo;ll be an office space again soon enough, so for now we&rsquo;re celebrating this other life it can have. There&rsquo;s a lot of vacant office space in this city (9.2 percent in the third-quarter of 2016, and given that NYC has more than 450 million square feet of office space in Manhattan alone, that&rsquo;s approximately 41 million square feet of space that&rsquo;s vacant just in Manhattan!) Perhaps&mdash;and I know this is a big perhaps&mdash;building owners will see what art can do to transform a space, and in the future having exhibitions in otherwise empty floors of office buildings will be a standard practice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>SPRING/BREAK Art Show will take place at 4 Times Square, from February 28&ndash;March 6, 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Caleb Nussear, Penrose module A, 84 x 44 x 12 inches. All images: Courtesy of the artists and chashama)</span></p> Thu, 16 Feb 2017 08:57:06 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Crafting “Feminine Monsters,” Bonnie Lucas Takes on Growing Up as a Girl <p>On an overcast morning in January, I arrived in Washington D.C. wearing a ratty old t-shirt with the words &ldquo;My Body My Choice&rdquo; emblazoned across the breast, ready to march with hundreds of thousands of women, men, and children. It was a t-shirt handed down to me from my mother, who first wore it in 1989 at a Mobilize for Women&rsquo;s Lives March, organized by NOW. Walking down Independence Avenue almost thirty years later, with scores of protesters brandishing signs and pins and protest t-shirts of their own, I felt a strange mix of pride and sadness: pride that so many of us were continuing the fight our mothers began, and sadness that is pretty much summed up in a sign that read, &ldquo;I can&rsquo;t believe I&rsquo;m still protesting this fucking shit.&rdquo;</p> <p>About a week or two after the Women&rsquo;s March on Washington, I went to see Bonnie Lucas&rsquo; show <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/439802-young-lady" target="_blank">Young Lady</a>,</em> at JTT Gallery, curated by Marie Catalano. I was struck by both the intricacy of the craft, and the potency of its content. Again I felt a sense of prideful excitement tinged with sadness. Pride and excitement that this work, which is from roughly the same era as that My Body My Choice t-shirt, still feels fresh and important; and sadness that still, after thirty years, the discussion of women&rsquo;s bodies, sexuality, and imaginations remains so fraught and regulated.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170214135735-Lb-1986-059-2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Bonnie Lucas, <i>Young Lady</i>, 1986, Assemblage on fabric, 26 x 21 inches. Courtesy of the artist and JTT, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Much like the pink hats that flooded Women&rsquo;s Marches all over the world on January 21, Lucas&rsquo; art is subversively and unapologetically feminine. Her high relief works look like quilted collages, or perhaps collaged quilts, utilizing materials like baby dolls, children&rsquo;s dresses, craft yarn, beads, baby blankets, needles, underwear, and toys. These all fall into a palette ranging from Pepto Bismol to the palest blush, with a primary-colored pop every now and again. But the images that emerge from the deluge of layering and weaving and stitching and sewing reveal a deeper narrative infused with violence and sexuality&mdash;a narrative that dissects the abject underbelly of girlhood.</p> <p><span style="text-align: start;">Lucas twists panties into ragged smiles over meticulously inlaid embroidery floss designs; an explosion of gaudy baubles flood from between the outstretched legs of a baby doll as a patent leather belt looms ominously above, poised for penetration; facile, pastel gauche paintings depict bazar scenes of flesh-like lumps dressed in lingerie secreting babies and sprouting flowers.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170214140536-Lb-1983-101.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Bonnie Lucas,&nbsp;<em>Smiling Girl</em>, 1983, Assemblage on fabric, 30 x 21.5 inches. Courtesy of the artist and JTT, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Penetration and secretion are themes not just in this work&rsquo;s content, but within the craft itself: the poke of a needle, the spilling of beads. And it&rsquo;s precisely this penetration, destruction, and recreation that brings a kind of satisfaction to Lucas. There is something almost sexual about &ldquo;a tutu bent out of shape&hellip;violated by a symbol of femininity,&rdquo; like a pin or pendant, as she says.</p> <p>Lucas&rsquo; work is seeing a reemergence now, but for the majority of her career, the artist was not recognized as a part of the &ldquo;Second Wave feminist&rdquo; canon. The truth was that most card-carrying feminists wanted nothing to do with her intense association with what they saw as oppressive femininity. Even artists like Hannah Wilke and Cindy Sherman, who often skirted the line between objectification and agency, still did so under the serious aesthetic of black and white. Women artists from the &rsquo;60s through the &rsquo;80s categorically denied &ldquo;pink&rdquo; as an idea; pink was lipstick, high heels, homemaking, porn, and everything else that confined women to their cookie-cutter roles of caretaker or homewrecker, desexualized mother or sexual deviant. But rather than rejecting this &ldquo;pink femininity,&rdquo; Lucas wanted to understand why she was at once attracted and repelled by it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170214135923-Lb-1986-041.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Bonnie Lucas, <em>Quality Time</em>, 1986, gouache on paper, 13 x 10 inches. Courtesy of the artist and JTT, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This question drove her decades-long investigation into how the materiality of femininity has been used as a tool of oppression. Moving to New York in 1979, after receiving her Master&rsquo;s from Rutgers University, Lucas found a small studio apartment on the edge of Chinatown and SoHo, where she still lives and works to this day. I met her there, amidst her piles of &ldquo;treasures&rdquo; from Chinatown and the Fashion District, and artworks in various states of completion hung across every open wall, to talk about her process, which she described as &ldquo;buying, crafting, dreaming.&rdquo;</p> <p>There is an element of performance to these highly feminized acts, as well as a self-proclaimed sense of &ldquo;outsiderness.&rdquo; Lucas is participating in the materialist culture that women are so often held to (there are so many<em> things </em>women must to buy to stay &ldquo;women&rdquo;), but she does so in all the wrong ways. She&rsquo;s not buying these beautiful little dresses, or toys, or hair clips, for their intended purpose of being used by a little girl. Rather she&rsquo;s collecting them just to break them apart and rearrange them, and she&rsquo;s doing it with both love and hate: the attraction and repulsion to &ldquo;pink.&rdquo; As she says: &ldquo;I love the pink doll, but I love even more ripping her head off.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170214135340-Lb-1986-010.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Bonnie Lucas,&nbsp;<em>Spoiled</em>, 1986, Assemblage on fabric, 52 x 37 x 5 inches. Courtesy of the artist and JTT, New York</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p>Lucas is dismantling these objects associated with subjugation in order to gain power and agency over them. By breaking apart, refastening, and sewing these feminized objects into new configurations, she recontextualizes the cheap, feminine aspects that are ascribed so little social value. She confronts what goes on beneath the surface. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>When these works were first presented in the &rsquo;80s, many critics seemed to miss out on the abject, implicit horror that is buried under the tawdry, girly, saccharine luster. The symbols were often attributed to humor or satire&mdash;but the work is not so much satire as it is a coded truth telling of the dangerous business of growing up a girl. This truth is filled with contradictions: pleasure and pain, objecthood and self, women&rsquo;s bodies as &ldquo;leaky containers,&rdquo; as curator Marie Catalano so aptly described it. Many of the &ldquo;feminine monsters&rdquo; on view at JTT don&rsquo;t explicitly deal with issues of menstruation, sex, or violence, but the symbols are there to provoke such intonations&mdash;like the tiny red rivulets made from embroidery floss or beads, or the little rubber ballet flat placed right at the crotch of a dress skirt that is being lifted open by ribbons and threads (<em>Jane Baar</em>, 1985). The narrative constructed through these inanimate objects poking, pulling, or revealing themselves, still feels shocking and titillating after all these years. &nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170214135050-Lb-1985-054.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Bonnie Lucas, <em>Jane Baar</em>, 1985, Assemblage on fabric, 50 x 34 x 3 inches. Courtesy of the artist and JTT, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I asked Lucas how she feels about seeing the work on view once again, especially in light of the women&rsquo;s protests and movements that have been rekindled in the wake of the current Republican administration. &ldquo;Everything that I&rsquo;ve been seeing at these marches, we tried in the &rsquo;80s and were marginalized,&rdquo; she says, exasperated. And yet the persistence excites her. Even though we are seeing generations of women fighting arm in arm in what seems to be a Ground Hog&rsquo;s Day of protest against the patriarchy, after thirty years, at least the fight is getting more explicit. Lucas quotes fellow artist Joan Snyder when she says &ldquo;pink is sex,&rdquo; which is why she feels the pussy hats carry such a strong message&mdash;she loves the idea of an army of women angrily knitting pink hats in protest, then taking to the streets wearing their crafted vulvas on their heads.</p> <p>It also excites her to see this work re-shown, especially in the context of a contemporary gallery run by women. For her, it&rsquo;s an opportunity for the work to be seen with fresh eyes, for its onlookers to finally understand how it connects to the feminist art trajectory. It is the chance to be re-written into art history for creating, as she says, &ldquo;a complex, emotional, and pleasurable examination of growing up as a girl in a sexist world.&rdquo;</p> <p><em>Bonnie Lucas&rsquo; </em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/439802-young-lady" target="_blank">Young Lady</a><em> is on view at JTT through February 26, 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452624-olivia-b-murphy?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Olivia B. Murphy</a></p> <p><em>Olivia B. Murphy is a writer and editor based in New York, covering arts and culture. Her work has appeared in various publications both in print and online, including&nbsp;L&#39;Officiel Magazine,&nbsp;Hyperallergic, Freunde Von Freunden,&nbsp;Whitehot,&nbsp;Riot of Perfume,&nbsp;doingbird, and&nbsp;Whitewall Magazine.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Bonnie Lucas, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Young Lady</em>, at JTT, New York, January 25&ndash;February 26, 2017. All images courtesy of the artist and JTT, New York)</span></p> Tue, 14 Feb 2017 16:38:03 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Simona Brinkmann | Ordí Calder | Gabriel Stoian <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468810-simona-brinkmann?utm_source=SimonaBrinkmann&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Simona Brinkmann &ndash; London</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1010835?utm_source=SimonaBrinkmann&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1010835/u3azr9/20161007115923-1473692443bridges-become-doors-2016-300dpi-desaturated_-_Copy_-_Copy.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1010806?utm_source=SimonaBrinkmann&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1010806/mf2ji7/20161007114657-1__Docile_Brutes_IV__low_res.jpeg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1010852?utm_source=SimonaBrinkmann&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1010852/mf2ji7/20161007120756-14494956255-the-making-rubber-rope-close-up.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1010839?utm_source=SimonaBrinkmann&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1010839/mf2ji7/20161007115932-14494939772-the-making-aluminium-parquet-rope-detail_-_Copy_-_Copy.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/462113-ordí-calder?utm_source=OrdiCalder&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Ord&iacute; Calder &ndash; Arma&ccedil;&atilde;o dos B&uacute;zios, Brazil </span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/999893?utm_source= OrdiCalder&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/999893/u3azr9/20160722182224-30x20-string-shadows-by-ordi-calder.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/sp/works/show/1001088?utm_source= OrdiCalder&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1001088/mf2ji7/20160730193321-Vortice-Calder-100-7588.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/sp/works/show/1001061?utm_source= OrdiCalder&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1001061/mf2ji7/20160730162612-ordicalder-thexfactor_co_pia.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/sp/works/show/1001057?utm_source= OrdiCalder&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1001057/mf2ji7/20160730150733-ordicalder-Layers-abstractphotography-sacredgeo-geometrical-abstractphotography-fineartphotography-minimalism-brazil-underlies.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468017-gabriel-stoian?utm_source=GabrielStoian&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Gabriel Stoian &ndash; Frankfurt</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1023643?utm_source= GabrielStoian&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1023643/u3azr9/20170105082820-2.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1008709?utm_source= GabrielStoian&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008709/mf2ji7/20160925060724-IMG_3455.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1008708?utm_source= GabrielStoian&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008708/mf2ji7/20160925060625-Black_screens__oil_on_canvas___mixed_media_attached__200x150cm__2016..jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1008710?utm_source= GabrielStoian&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008710/mf2ji7/20160925060823-Waltz__oil_on_canvas__2x_150x90cm__2016..jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 13 Feb 2017 18:00:07 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Athar Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/44636-bunder-the-radar-athar-jaber-melis-buyruk-pepijn-simonb">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from </em><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/430651-athar?tab=PROFILE"><em>Athar</em></a></em><em>.</em></p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I try to absorb all the information there is within my reach and reflect upon various matters such as human behavior, philosophy, history, politics, general aesthetics and more.</p> <p>Subsequently, I attempt to translate those reflections into sculptural shapes and practices.</p> <p>Lately a recurring theme is the violence that dominates our life and the undeniable concept of entropy, which states that everything is bound to evolve into a state of disorder. &nbsp;This last aspect&mdash;which, for us humans, is typically experienced through death, destruction and decay&mdash;is generally regarded as negative: alongside our lives, even the most durable monuments (generally consisting of stone constructions), will eventually disappear. Either by our own action or by natural phenomena such as erosion. It is a fact that needs to be accepted accordingly.</p> <p>I am not encouraging iconoclastic practices, but nonetheless, they do shake the status quo, confronting us with a harsh aspect of life: the omnipresent violence and the passing away (maybe into another state) of all things.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/986773/u3azr9/20160509225324-Opus_5_nr.10_-_Stone_Head__1_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Athar,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/brx/works/show/986773" target="_blank"><em>Stone Head &ndash; Opus 5 nr.10</em></a>, 2016, Belgian blue stone</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>To maintain the freedom of thought and action that characterizes artistic existence. We owe it to all the people who do not have this privilege.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)?</strong></p> <p>Give me thirty years...</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I dream of carving the face of a mountain.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Damien De Lepeleire, <a href="http://www.yumnaaa.com/" target="_blank">Yumna Al-Arashi</a>, and <a href="http://thanospl.net/" target="_blank">Thanos Polymeneas -Lyontiris</a> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div align="center"> <hr align="center" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Athar,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/brx/works/show/986978" target="_blank"><em>Marble Head &ndash; Opus 5 nr.6</em></a>, 2015, Carrara marble)</span></p> Mon, 13 Feb 2017 13:23:23 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Announcing the ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners and Exhibition at SPRING/BREAK Art Show <table align="center" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">We are pleased to announce the&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456" style="color: rgb(17, 85, 204); background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2016</a><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">&nbsp;exhibition, which will be taking place at <a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" target="_blank">SPRING/BREAK</a>! We are very excited to be a part of this curator-centric, site-specific fair. This year, SPRING/BREAK is setting up shop at&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/439459-springbreak-art-show-2017" style="color: rgb(17, 85, 204); background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;" target="_blank">4 Times Square</a><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">, the neon center of a world on the brink. Get your guest passes&nbsp;<a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.eventbrite.com" target="_blank">here</a>.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">From 1,800 entries over the course of 2016, whittled down</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">&nbsp;by 9 panels of </span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/46537" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;" target="_blank">independent guest jurors</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, the final winners are selected by our editorial staff on the merit of each artist&rsquo;s commitment to their work as well as their engagement with contemporary society and culture.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners:</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;"><strong>FIRST: Brigitta Varadi</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" target="_blank"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/908424/u3azr9/20150425105417-MARKINGS_Noel_Ruane_200-200cm_Brigitta_Varadi_Keith_Nolan_Photography.jpg" style="width: 100%; height: 100%;" /></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;"><strong><span style="text-transform: uppercase;"><em>Artist Statement:</em></span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">As an artist who works predominantly with the biodegradable and renewable medium of pure wool, Varadi communicates in a very direct manner her commitment to sustainability and environmental concerns engaging in projects relating to fracking (to voice the current concern of the local people and to raise the issue of hydraulic fracturing) and more recently in the decline of sheep farming in the North West of Ireland. Working with different types of natural fibers and using techniques such as dyeing, felting, and sculptural manipulation, Varadi searches for pattern and repetition of gesture that relate to the invisible and everyday rituals of working life and the constructed environment.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;"><strong><span style="text-transform: uppercase;"><em>Bio:</em></span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">Brigitta Varadi was born in Hungary and currently divides her time between the County of Leitrim, Ireland, and New York. Brigitta participated in the NYFA IAP Program (2016) and been awarded fellowships by the Wassaic Project (2016), Leitrim Sculpture Centre (2015), Textile Arts Centre Brooklyn (2014), LOCIS, European Cultural Program (2014), and TRADE (2011). She has been artist in residence at the NARS Foundation, NY, Chashama, NY, Tyrone Guthrie Centre, Ireland and KulttuuriKauppila, Finland. She is a recipient of numerous awards from the Arts Council of Ireland, Leitrim County Council and Culture Ireland. Her work has been reviewed in the Irish Times and included in several books.</span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">SECOND: Tiffany Smith</span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/450181-tiffany-smith" target="_blank"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/971007/u3azr9/20160226174955-_84A2965.jpg" style="width: 100%; height: 100%;" /></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;"><strong><span style="text-transform: uppercase;"><em>Artist Statement:</em></span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">Tiffany Smith​ is a visual artist from the Caribbean diaspora who uses photography, video, design, and installation to create conceptually based work focused on identity, cultural ambiguity, and representation&mdash;particularly within minority communities. Her work examines individual narratives pulled from an array of multi-cultural influences, derived from her upbringing between Miami, Florida, Nassau, Bahamas, and Jamaica, and molded by her current home of Brooklyn, NY. Smith&rsquo;s practice searches for new perspectives on dominant historical narratives and aims to provide insight into issues surrounding communities and how they are formed, defined, and identified.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">Smith&rsquo;s current works in progress react to a history of photographic representation of people of color by focusing on how identity is constructed. <em>For Tropical Girls&hellip;</em>​ presents photographic self portraits that question identity constructs and the psychological implications of iconography. Smith&rsquo;s staged ethnographic survey of invented personas who author their own representations of a blended cultural heritage use her own experiences and recalled memories to create performative studies that empower reclamation of representation. <em>A Woman,</em> <em>Phenomenally</em>&nbsp;collects photographic portraits that feature subjects who can be classified generally as &ldquo;women of color&rdquo; despite the specifics of their identity. Through a collaborative process with each woman, a constructed environment is created that empowers each subject to create an idealized image of herself that reclaims agency in &ldquo;performing the other.&rdquo;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">Photographs from the series are presented within contextualizing multi-media installations, creating site specific environments that reference domestic space through cultural signifiers and decor elements recalled from Smith&rsquo;s own memories of a fluid definition of home. Custom-made decor items such as wallpaper, or a decorative screen wall, are paired with readymade objects and both real and artificial plants to extend the photographic plane and provide a pathway for the viewer to more deeply access the narratives of the women depicted.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;"><strong><span style="text-transform: uppercase;"><em>Bio:</em></span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">Smith received a BA in Photography from Savannah College of Art and Design and an MFA in Photo, Video and Related Media from School of Visual Arts, NY. Smith&rsquo;s work has been exhibited internationally and throughout the United States including shows at The National Gallery of Jamaica during the 2014 Jamaica Biennial, Photoville 2015, New York, International Photo Festival, Leiden, Netherlands, and Photo NOLA, New Orleans; public art installations in Newark Penn Station through The Gateway Project and in Marcus Garvey Park during Flux Art Fair, Harlem; and most recently at Long Gallery, Harlem.</span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">THIRD: Sterling Crispin</span></strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20161220034911-Screen_Shot_2016-12-12_at_12.46.11_PM.png" style="width: 100%; height: 100%;" /></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;"><b><span style="text-transform: uppercase;"><em>Artist Statement:</em></span></b></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">Technology is an extension of humanity, an embodiment of the human spirit, rather than an external force that we must mitigate. Yet this distributed life form pulsing on the surface of the earth has its own agency and agenda. My artistic practice explores the relationships between this exponentially growing techno-organism as it relates to our human bodies, minds, and psyches.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">By technology, I mean individual devices and networked systems, like cameras and software, but also what I call the &ldquo;Technological Other,&rdquo; a living global super-organism of all machines and software.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">In my artwork I often misuse or reverse-engineer this technology in order to give form to things that are otherwise formless. I&rsquo;m interested in the creation of new dialogues, signs, and symbols which challenge societal power structures. And I believe that earnestly reaching toward objective beauty and truth in an effort to produce the real, rather than an image of the real, is itself a political act.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">In this spirit I attempt to depict the landscape of our consciousness as it is transformed by the Technological Other, and create objects that embody the conflicting cultural narratives that exist about the future, and thus the present.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;"><b><span style="text-transform: uppercase;"><em>Bio:</em></span></b></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">Sterling Crispin is an artist and technologist born in 1985 in Maui, Hawaii.&nbsp;He received his Master of Fine Arts and Master of Science in Multimedia Engineering from the University of California Santa Barbara.&nbsp;His work has been exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide and has been published in&nbsp;Frieze, Wired, BOMB, Rhizome, Creators Project, Fast Company, Y-Combinator&#39;s Hacker News, and the Post Internet Survival Guide.&nbsp;He was an invited speaker at the first annual Drones and Aerial Robotics Conference in NYC as coauthor of OpenDroneControl, an open source software platform for developing interactive artworks and research projects with aerial robotics.&nbsp;Lectures include Stanford, NYU ITP, LACMA Art + Technology Lab, SFAQ, YouTube LA, and UCLA Art Sci Center.</span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">Honorable Mentions:</span></strong></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">Bex Ilsley</span></strong></p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20161223203347-unnamed__19_.jpg" style="width: 100%; height: 100%;" /></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;"><b><span style="text-transform: uppercase;"><em>Artist Statement:</em></span></b></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">I work primarily within the fields of self-portrait photography, video, and digital performance. Broadly, my work explores concepts of the performed personality in virtual space and the ways in which that practice has the potential to be both more and less honest than the performance of personality in physical space. </span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">All of my work responds in some way to the performativity of being or the predicament of being seen. I use repetition, merchandising strategies and deification to create paradoxical narratives of the self and the Other. These narratives twist in and out of the real and the virtual, the artificial and the authentic, progressing through journeys of discovery, only to end up where they began.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;"><b><span style="text-transform: uppercase;"><em>Bio:</em></span></b></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">I&rsquo;m a recent graduate of Fine Art (Manchester School of Art 2016). I am currently artist-in-residence for Make Liverpool CIC at Elevator Studios, Liverpool, UK. I have exhibited and sold work internationally&mdash;most notably to singer Miley Cyrus. My recent group exhibitions include <em>The New Flesh</em>, VIVO Media Arts Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada (2015), the Woon Foundation Prize shortlist show, BALTIC 39 (2016) and the Recent Graduates exhibition at the Affordable Art Fair, Battersea, London (2016), where I live-streamed a performance for 37.5 hours. My first solo show is upcoming in 2017 at Warrington Museum and Art Gallery, UK.</span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">Zzin (Jinhee) Park</span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" target="_blank"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/969866/u3azr9/20160223222640-FullSizeRender-1.jpg" style="width: 100%; height: 100%;" td="" /></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;"><strong><span style="text-transform: uppercase;"><em>Artist Statement:</em></span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">Drawing upon temporal realities, my painting changes and newly regenerates. Data are gained from observation and literature and reconstructed by my own inference. My experience of staying abroad in New York, Berlin, Seoul and London, and my knowledge of various languages gave more comprehensive viewpoints and made me more like me.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">Spending one year in London and making duvet paintings (2015&ndash;16), my painting has been deconstructed and subdued. Gracefully levitated, London&rsquo;s air concedes to heterogeneous existences, and contemplation. Its controlled yet muted atmosphere is very different from that of New York&rsquo;s boisterous yet systematic one. I have been making works that cross these two different rhythms.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">My works seem to be roaming and changing every moment. However, the palette links them together, as if in a dream. The overall relaxed tone uplifts the nerves; semi-mechanized, I appear to enjoy such contradictions. They have sometimes seemed to represent the male body, as is clear in these recent sculptural paintings. They breath rhythmically between tension and looseness.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">My painting recalls dreamy memories of childhood. One misses this most beloved time, though it is an inherent space already in their consciousness. The works reorganize virtual space inside this faint recollection so one can leap over from a real world. I create a transitional space enabling one to correspond with this archetypal memory.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;"><strong><span style="text-transform: uppercase;"><em>Bio:</em></span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px; font-family:serif; line-height: 30px;">Jinhee Park (b. 1984 in Seoul) is a MA student at Royal College of Art, London, and studied for his BFA at the School of Visual Arts, New York. He has had exhibitions in New York, Berlin, Seoul and London, and was awarded an Art-Uni-On scholarship (funded by Hyundai Motor Company and Seoul National University).&nbsp;</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <hr /> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family: serif; line-height: 24px;"><a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.eventbrite.com" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170209181350-2016_SPRING-BREAK_LOGO_WHITE_CONTOUR__1_.jpg" style="float: left; width: 150px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 10px;" /></a>Oscar Wilde famously suggested great art must &ldquo;reveal beauty and hide the artist.&rdquo; For the 2017 BLACK MIRROR exhibition at SPRING/BREAK, more than 100 curators will feature artworks that explore the dance of identity the artist undergoes&mdash;between showing what&rsquo;s unseen and hiding in plain sight&mdash;especially in the face of modern technology, political unrest, and glimmers from ghosts of Art History&rsquo;s past. </span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="font-family: serif; line-height: 24px;">Guest passes are available <a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.eventbrite.com" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;Proceeds from guest passes help support our initiative to offer free exhibition space to independent curators. We appreciate your continued support of our program!</span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table> </table> Tue, 14 Feb 2017 17:12:46 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Facing the Black Mirror: Jack & Leigh Ruby Cut Up Reality at the Barbershop <p><em>Oscar Wilde famously suggested great art &ldquo;reveal beauty and hide the artist.&rdquo; For the 2017 BLACK MIRROR exhibition at <a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" target="_blank">SPRING/BREAK</a>, more than 100 curators will feature artworks that explore the dance of identity the artist undergoes&mdash;between showing what&rsquo;s unseen and hiding in plain sight&mdash;especially in the face of modern technology, political unrest, and glimmers from ghosts of Art History&rsquo;s past.</em></p> <p><em>ArtSlant will be exhibiting the ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners at SPRING/BREAK. In expectation of this uniquely site-specific, curatorial fair, we&rsquo;re featuring four interviews with participating curators and artists, asking them what they see reflected in the black mirror.</em></p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In a previous life, Jack &amp; Leigh Ruby worked as confidence artists, cleverly fabricating portfolios of fake evidence to perpetrate insurance fraud. Today, the sibling duo makes <a href="https://vimeo.com/126636727" target="_blank">tangled artworks</a> that capitalize on an uncanny ability to complicate film, photography, gestures, and surroundings that might otherwise read as &ldquo;true.&rdquo; Their enigmatic debut, the two-channel video <a href="https://vimeo.com/59268902" target="_blank"><em>Car Wash Incident </em></a>(2013&ndash;2015), produced by fellow artists Eve Sussman and Simon Lee, was a circuitous tour de force in staging, choreography, editing, and sound recording.</p> <p>For SPRING/BREAK the Rubys are back at it, putting on what they&rsquo;re calling a &ldquo;surveillance theatre piece,&rdquo; inspired by CCTV scams they did in the 1980s. <em>Barbershop</em>, which is curated by Sussman and Lee, will feature anonymous actors operating in and out of the art fair&rsquo;s Times Square venue. As these performers chat into their cell phones, viewers&mdash;some clued in, others unsuspecting&mdash;will be party to their one-sided conversations. Whether casually overheard on the street, or monitored from a surveillance control room hidden behind a &ldquo;barbershop,&rdquo; these eavesdropped half-dialogues are part of the contemporary landscape, familiar to us all.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s hard to know when the Rubys reveal their hand, but we can expect them to urge us on, pushing us to question: <em>What&rsquo;s hidden and what&rsquo;s divulged? What&rsquo;s fact or fiction? Who&rsquo;s on the other side of the reflective cell phone screen?</em></p> <p>Leading up to the exhibition, curators Sussman and Lee gave us a preview of <em>Barbershop</em> and shared the artists&rsquo; conception of the Black Mirror.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170209130436-IMG_2408.JPG" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Barbershop </em></strong><strong>has a lot of moving parts. Can you briefly describe the setup and premise of the performance? </strong></p> <p><em>Barbershop </em>is an installation with live actors. The barbershop itself is subterfuge. The premise is that we are engulfed in a myriad of private narratives going on around us as mobile phone conversations proliferate in public. Jack &amp; Leigh Ruby&rsquo;s <em>Barbershop </em>involves a control room hidden at the back of a barber shop, through which the viewer has to pass in order to experience the piece.</p> <p>A rotating cast of characters on cell phones wearing ear buds are being recorded as they speak and follow choreographed routes around the small plaza outside the entrance to the building. A multi-camera surveillance app streams the overheard conversations to the central control room at the back of the barbershop. An agent in the control room alternates between multiple camera views, editing the film live.</p> <p><strong>What does &ldquo;Black Mirror&rdquo; mean to you, and how does this artwork engage with that theme?</strong></p> <p>Jack &amp; Leigh Ruby see the concept of the Black Mirror as simultaneously obscuring and clarifying the facts. A black mirror negates some of the detail in the picture in favor of highlighting other aspects of the picture. A proliferation of one-sided phone conversations likewise negates much of the detail&mdash;and leaves the observer with a halfway accurate, but skewed version of reality (&ldquo;<em>alternative facts</em>&rdquo; from which to cherry pick). In addition <em>Barbershop </em>uses the obvious contemporary black mirror, the iPhone, as the primary device for conveying this story.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170209140629-Room-4122A_Spring-Break-2016_273.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>L-Dope</em>, performance by DOME Theatre, directed by Forrest Gillespie and Dylan Latimer at SPRING/BREAK 2016, Curated by Eve Sussman and Simon Lee. Photo: Samuel Morgan for SPRING/BREAK Art Show</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>The tensions between what&rsquo;s &ldquo;real&rdquo; and what&rsquo;s not is a recurring theme in the Ruby&rsquo;s work. How scripted or choreographed will the performance be, and what will be left to chance? </strong></p> <p>Given the arena that the piece will be playing out in, Times Square, a lot of the action will necessarily be left to chance and improvisation. The performers will be channeling one side of recorded texts and interviews. Likewise they will be carrying out specific tasks and following designated paths and choreographies. Within these given structures quite a lot is left to chance and the whims of the agent in the control room. However, because there will be multiple takes throughout the six days of SPRING/BREAK, we expect that the actors will settle into their roles and develop their characters&mdash;their improvisation on the ever-shifting stage of Times Square is a key element that will be encouraged.</p> <p>When Jack &amp; Leigh saw this question they both burst out laughing and Jack said &ldquo;When have we ever not left things to chance?&rdquo; and Leigh replied a tad wryly: &ldquo;Yeah, thanks for the decade in jail, Jack!&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>What can you tell us about the control room and the role of the &ldquo;agent&rdquo; who&rsquo;s watching and editing? What sort of role do you see the viewers stepping into in this space?</strong></p> <p>The agent is giving directives to technicians running the footage: &ldquo;rewind,&rdquo; &ldquo;zoom in,&rdquo; &ldquo;cut to camera 2&rdquo; might be the kind of things you would encounter upon stepping through the barbershop and into the control room. The agent may also be angry at the technicians&rsquo; failure to capture key moments&mdash;or ecstatic when they do. The viewer joins the investigation in search of what is really happening and in so doing will inevitably make up their own version of reality and the motives behind this complex surveillance.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170209130513-cameras_looking.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Footage, (partial) documentation, and live-editing are central to this piece. Do you anticipate <em>Barbershop </em>having an afterlife? Might the surveillance footage live on in a different guise (in a film &agrave; la <em>Car Wash Incident</em>, for example)?</strong></p> <p>Yes! Jack &amp; Leigh are excited about the possibilities of touring this project and bringing live surveillance and local actors into the mix of material for <em>Barbershop. </em>Footage gathered from Times Square would mix with the next location (Helsinki, for example), creating a site-specific piece made for and from multiple places, the piece growing with each location. The Rubys have a history of transporting their characters from one piece to the next (for instance &ldquo;the two girls in red,&rdquo; who were featured in <em>Car Wash Incident</em>, may well reappear in <em>Barbershop</em>). And if the piece were to move to Helsinki, for instance, then &ldquo;two Finnish girls in red&rdquo; would have to be found.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>SPRING/BREAK Art Show will take place at 4 Times Square, from February 28&ndash;March 6, 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: CCTV still image from a scam the Rubys organized in the 1980s. All images: Jack &amp; Leigh Ruby, Research images for&nbsp;<em>Barbershop</em>, 2017. Courtesy of the artists.)</span></p> Thu, 09 Feb 2017 16:11:45 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Emilie Gervais <p><a href="http://emiliegervais.com" target="_blank">Emilie Gervais</a> is a Canadian artist living in France. Her early recognition of the profound, universal impact of the internet on all our lives has made her a vital voice in new wave of new media art. Gervais reveals the true soul of the internet in her hyper-saturated explosion of glitching colors, vintage computer graphics, and disposable internet ephemera. The spectacle of her sensory overload does not diminish the deeply intelligent heart beating at the center of all her work.</p> <p>The uncompromising nature of her subversive visuals have only made her message stronger. Feminist artists have found <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/47087-in-2016-women-artists-led-the-way-in-new-media" target="_blank">a unique venue for free expression</a> in the internet and Gervais has remained at the leading edge of that movement. She uniquely inverts and distorts the language and aesthetics of the primitive internet to create work that is unquestionably modern and sublimely meaningful.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208105921-a4.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>I&rsquo;m a Member of a Secret Internet Girl Cult</em>, 2015</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What are your first memories of computers?</strong></p> <p><strong>Emilie Gervais:</strong> A very old beige desktop computer my mom brought back home one day along with a box full of floppy disks and a printer. I spent countless hours creating geometric drawings on it. Not long after, my dad bought a Dell computer booting to Windows. My two favorite CD-ROMs were <em>Microsoft Dangerous Creatures</em>&nbsp;and <em>Encarta</em>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208113341-Screen-Shot-2017-02-07-at-10.45.27-PM.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The artist with her first home computer. Via <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BO7TxicA-DD/" target="_blank">Instagram</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first realize that you could use them creatively?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> I&rsquo;ve always used computers creatively, but I consciously realized I could use them both creatively and professionally very late.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How have your parents influenced your creativity?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> They influenced me globally, both differently. My dad introduced me to different ways of approaching, &ldquo;thinking,&rdquo; about the world very early. When I was 11 and bored, he gave me this book to read about Wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic philosophy. I spent a lot of time drawing in his office while he was working on different architectural projects. My mom is very energetic and spontaneous, &ldquo;living in the moment.&rdquo; Around 45 years old, she started playing ice hockey for fun.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208110218-happybirthday.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Happy Birthday</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208115255-donutframe.jpg" /></em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Hit me baby one more time</em>, 2015, <a href="http://gurlfreax.net/vol1.html" target="_blank">g(URL)_FREAX VOL 1</a>, Church of Templehead, Chicago</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first realize you could use the internet as a platform for your ideas?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> I&rsquo;m not sure&mdash;I&rsquo;d say in 2009, but I was much more &ldquo;Post-Internet&rdquo;: affected by internet culture, but not primarily using the internet to create nor to mediate artworks and ideas.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Were there any specific&nbsp;artists or artworks that inspired you?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> There were no specific artists or artworks that inspired me to use the internet as a platform for my ideas. In 2007, I read ETC&rsquo;s number 76 issue, <em><a href="https://www.erudit.org/culture/etc1073425/etc1128309/index.html" target="_blank">Le num&eacute;rique</a></em>. It inspired me. A bit later, I concluded that art made no sense if it didn&rsquo;t take the internet into consideration because the internet was such a big part of our lives. I guess I was more inspired by Craigslist and Montreal&rsquo;s freak folk vibe than anything else.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208110055-nozoomthing.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>No Zoom Thing</em>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.computersclub.org/draw/" target="_blank">Computers Club Drawing Society</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first realize that there was a &ldquo;new media&rdquo; scene that you could&nbsp;be a part of?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> I realized there was an internet-based new media scene when I began using Facebook as a tool in late 2010. Fran&ccedil;oise Gamma introduced me to that scene, amongst other things. Using <a href="http://dump.fm/" target="_blank">Dump.fm</a> and exploring Computers Club&rsquo;s website made me realize the potential of that scene. It made me feel confident about web art.</p> <p><strong>CP: You once said &ldquo;Thinking of net art as a movement is like thinking of phone art as a movement.&rdquo; What did you mean by that?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> Both are forms of art and refer more nowadays to a style than to a movement. Maybe a movement is to come. I believe net art as a movement died in the 90s or somewhere along the lines.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208110116-dirtsider-II.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Dirtsider II</em>, 2016, <a href="https://www.electricobjects.com/collections/155/r-i-p-net-art-by-emilie-gervais" target="_blank">R.I.P. Net Art</a>, Electric Objects</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How do you currently view the notion of net art in comparison to its origins?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> Net art is a misleading archetype based on its origins. What is perceived as net art today is web art to me (www art).&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you think makes something &ldquo;new media&rdquo; as opposed&nbsp;to other types of art? Is there a relevant distinction any more?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> The distinction is relevant from an historical perspective, but I don&rsquo;t think it is otherwise. All art is new media except when it is isolated from its mediated form.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208113448-Screen-Shot-2017-02-07-at-10.45.46-PM.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Via <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BHfl9aGg_YR/" target="_blank">Instagram</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What was your experience of art school like? </strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> It was a great overall experience. 99 percent of the students were not interested in the internet. I didn&rsquo;t make a lot of physical works after the first year, which resulted in me staying home a lot to work directly from my bed. #bedartschool&nbsp;</p> <p>During my last two years, I only went to school for the hypermedia class taught by Douglas Edric Stanley.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You are from Canada but you live in France&mdash;do you notice any difference in their approaches to new media / digital art?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> Yes, it is very confusing. I have not been able, so far, to relate to how people live and understand internet culture here. They seem to think and overthink a lot; they are way less spontaneous in how they interact with everything internet-related.&nbsp;It&rsquo;s probably why my favorite French YouTube video is still and forever will be&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en-GB&amp;q=https://youtu.be/_nCLTk1oy8A&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1486661222190000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEOWEys-dDTyop1p_hU8iqKr-RBRA" href="https://youtu.be/_nCLTk1oy8A" target="_blank"><em>Les cagoles de Marseille (Rap hardcore)</em></a>, uploaded by Tissina aka Vlout aka Nola Shiro, in 2007.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208110010-cumfetish.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><em>Cum Fetish</em>, 2016, Most Famous Girl Online GIF series</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What music and musicians influences your work the most and why?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> I&rsquo;m currently not into any specific musical phase. A couple of months ago, I was really into the Batcave club scene and how it affected&nbsp;the goth and post-punk scene. I&rsquo;m everyday influenced by Joan Jett, same goes for Kathleen Hanna. Creatively, I enjoy using music to hear visual aesthetics. Music either restrains or opens space for creativity. It&rsquo;s a great tool.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What of your project have you been most proud of and most disappointed by?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> It&rsquo;s hard to say. I&rsquo;m most disappointed by <em><a href="http://museumofinter.net/" target="_blank">Museum of Internet</a></em> because it has a lot more potential than what it currently is. I&rsquo;m most proud of my creative process.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208111947-___-Glitter.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>&hearts;_&hearts; Glitter</em>, 2012, Forever Life GIF series,&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://fa-g.org/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1486627492716000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG3pUTECY8YgApOD1ZBOrZ471W6xg" href="http://fa-g.org/" target="_blank">Fach &amp; Asendorf Gallery</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What are your thoughts on the term&nbsp;&ldquo;post internet&rdquo;? What does it mean to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> I wrote all of my thoughts on the term &quot;post-internet&quot; in <a href="http://emiliegervais.com/writings/a-letter-to-young-internet-artists.html" target="_blank"><em>A Letter to Young Internet Artists</em></a>&nbsp;in 2014. My thoughts on it haven&rsquo;t changed much since. (I stopped thinking about it after writing the letter.)</p> <p><strong>CP: New media art has been embraced by yourself and a whole generation of feminist artists. Why do you think that is?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> There is space to be.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208110927-gervais_teke_care_3.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Take care of your pixels</em>, 2015, <a href="http://www.teletextart.com/" target="_blank">ITAF 2015</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What are some political influences on your work? How will you react creatively to the rapidly changing world we live in?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> There are no direct political influences on my work, but everything I do is crafted upon my political beliefs. I&rsquo;m not sure yet how I&rsquo;ll react creatively to the rapidly changing world we live in. I&rsquo;m currently focused on acquiring a French passport.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Are there any specific works of new media art that you feel make a particularly powerful political or social statement?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> My two favorites are the collective <a href="http://cybertwee.net/" target="_blank">Cybertwee</a> and the collaborative group <a href="http://www.deeplab.net/" target="_blank">Deep Lab</a>. I also enjoy what the <a href="http://www.sadcontent.com/" target="_blank">Sad Asian Girls</a> collective have done so far.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170208112918-14192013_274660616254454_942101100396056072_n.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>spending a moment here (Tumblr homage)</em>, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What else do you do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>EG:</strong> I&rsquo;m currently working on two websites and a new series of visuals for an exhibition in March at <a href="https://www.lunique.info/" target="_blank">L&rsquo;Unique</a>, an art center in Caen, France.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Punching</em>, 2014, <a href="http://panthermodern.org/roomthree.html" target="_blank">Room Three​</a>, Panther Modern)</span></p> Wed, 08 Feb 2017 22:44:01 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list With Climate Under Threat, Artists Look to Virtual Reality <p>The Sundance Film Festival opened its 33rd annual edition in Park City, Utah, on January 19, under one presidential administration. It closed 10 days later under another, very different one. In those portentous intervening days Donald Trump&rsquo;s White House reforms reverberated across the U.S. and beyond&mdash;from an executive order on immigration to the whitewashing of climate change and moves designed to incapacitate environmental agencies. Within moments of Trump&rsquo;s inauguration virtually all mentions of climate change were deleted from the White House website and media blackouts were placed on scientific and environmental agencies.</p> <p>Among the themes explored at Sundance this year, the environmental crisis took center stage in a section entitled The New Climate. The section comprised 14 documentaries and short films, as well as three virtual reality artworks included in <a href="https://www.sundance.org/programs/new-frontier" target="_blank">New Frontier</a>, the festival&rsquo;s platform for art and alternative modes of storytelling. The festival has a legacy of showcasing <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/45050-sundance-report-how-filmmakers-are-using-virtual-reality-to-promote-social-and-environmental-awareness" target="_blank">stories about the environment</a>, and in a world of uncertainty, where climate change is denied by those in power and &ldquo;alternative facts&rdquo; seemingly rival science, these New Climate works have particular poignancy.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170207143601-30502646674_73b0b35e02_z.jpg" width="100%" /></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170207143617-30516519844_0e2c398ca3_z.jpg" width="100%" /></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170207142412-30503135374_cf90102c71_z.jpg" width="100%" /></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170207143626-30503137244_27fe166d5b_z.jpg" width="100%" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Directors (from left): Danfung Dennis (Photo: Sam Wolson), Jeff Orlowski (Photo: Trevor Mendelow), Milica Zec (Photo: Leo Hamelin), Winslow Porter (Photo: Maartin Du Boer)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The three VR works each focus on a specific aspect of the climate crisis: Jeff Orlowski&rsquo;s <em><a href="https://www.sundance.org/projects/chasing-coral-the-vr-experience" target="_blank">Chasing Coral</a></em> documents the effect of rising sea temperatures on coral; Danfung Dennis&rsquo; <em><a href="https://www.sundance.org/projects/melting-ice" target="_blank">Melting Ice</a></em> addresses melting glaciers and related weather disasters; and <em><a href="https://www.sundance.org/projects/tree-79496ca6-8d2d-4913-b497-354e323318f3" target="_blank">Tree</a></em> (Milica Zec and Winslow Porter, with Aleksandar Protic and Jacob Kudsk Steensen) is concerned with rainforest destruction and rising CO2 levels.</p> <p><em>Chasing Coral</em> and <em>Melting Ice</em> use VR to advocate, but also to document, and each plays companion to a documentary feature film shown at the festival: the former pairs with Al Gore&rsquo;s new&nbsp;<a href="https://www.sundance.org/projects/an-inconvenient-sequel" target="_blank">follow-up to <em>An Inconvenient Truth</em></a>, while the latter accompanies an <a href="https://www.sundance.org/projects/chasing-coral" target="_blank">eponymous documentary</a>. The VR works, viewed via a headset with 360-degree visibility, record fast-changing natural environments, and offer proof of the effects of the transforming climate.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170207141756-30517260073_855d97b2d6_h.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">A still from <em>Melting Ice</em> by Danfung Dennis, an official selection of the New Frontier VR Experience program at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by Danfung Dennis</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dennis&rsquo; 10-minute <em>Melting Ice</em> takes us to Greenland&rsquo;s glaciers to observe effects of global warming. The director notes that &ldquo;the ethics of documentary still apply in VR. We&rsquo;re bearing witness to a real event and it&rsquo;s more important than ever in this era of fake news and untruth.&rdquo; He explains that VR is a truthful medium for storytelling, in which the artist &ldquo;has to let go of much of the control, and surrender many editing tools. There is this archival element to placing a VR camera into a space. It lets reality unfold in a completely pure way, and you end up with raw and true documentation of what is happening.&rdquo;</p> <p>Dennis explains that the related documentary, <em>An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power </em>(Bonni Cohen, John Shenk), would &ldquo;cover the hard science and Al Gore&rsquo;s message, while the <em>Melting Ice</em> VR experience would convey the urgency of the climate crisis in a simple, emotional way.&rdquo; In the VR work,&nbsp;after a brief exchange between Gore and a leading glaciologist, the dialogue hushes and we are left to follow the journey of melting ice: crystal blue glacier water rushes past, before running muddy brown and flowing into the open water. Cracks and heaves ring out as parts of the glacier break off, and we drift out to the horizon.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170207141637-31224085331_d4dcc33460_k.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">A still from <em>Chasing Coral: The VR Experience</em> by Jeff Orlowski, an official selection of the New Frontier VR Experiences program at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | Photo: The Ocean Agency / XL Catlin Seaview Survey / Christophe Bailhache</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The central subject of <em>Chasing Coral</em> is the act of observation and record-keeping itself. The six-minute experience welcomes you into the world of passionate scuba diver and researcher Zackery Rago as he documents the devastating coral bleaching at Lizard Island on the Great Barrier Reef off Australia. Rago&rsquo;s narration accompanies us as we join him on a boat, then dive underwater to witness the shocking proof of coral bleaching. Orlowski explains that &ldquo;exploring the ocean is inherently an immersive experience that very few have access to,&rdquo; adding that &ldquo;the VR medium is a great tool to allow people to go on virtual dives, and can transport you into the ocean in a way that is distinct from other traditional forms.&rdquo;</p> <p><em>Chasing Coral</em> is like a behind-the-scenes companion to the feature-length documentary, and partly a portrait of perseverance. We come to understand Rago&rsquo;s dedication as he returns multiple times each day to record changes to the coral bed via time-lapse photography. Orlowski explains that they &ldquo;wanted people to have the experience of diving with Zack, in a way that would be a great complement to the feature [film], but also work as a stand-alone piece.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170207141611-30503133884_6db279a28c_k.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">A still from <em>Tree</em> by Milica Zec and Winslow Porter, an official selection of the New Frontier VR Experiences at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | Photo: Jakob Kudsk Steenson</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Inspired by the threats of deforestation, the message of Milica Zec and Winslow Porter&rsquo;s <em>Tree </em>is embodied in the experience. Unlike the aforementioned films,&nbsp;<em>Tree</em> functions by constructing (rather than documenting) an imperilled environment. Partnering with the Rainforest Alliance, the project description urges that &ldquo;forests are critical to the survival of every living thing on earth. They&rsquo;re a source of air, water, shelter, and medicine.&nbsp;Forests are also our best defense against climate&nbsp;change.&rdquo; But the instruction ends there.</p> <p>Wearing a headset, plus connectors on your forearms and back, you enter an entirely CGI virtual forest and spatial soundscape enhanced with vibration. With your body as trunk and arms as branches, you become a tree in the rainforest, growing from seedling to full form and bearing witness to its fate firsthand. You shoot upwards through the soil, your body vibrates, and then you soar above an imagined landscape, the sounds of the rainforest ringing around you. The creators say the experience is designed to be universal, &ldquo;a narrative without words, for people from all backgrounds and languages&rdquo;&mdash;just as the changing climate affects us all.</p> <p>There is a balance to be struck in portraying the climate crisis so as to inspire activism, not invoke defeatism. The artists channel the immersive capacity of VR to promote awe, empathy, and compassion. The cocooned use of the headset and earphones is very personal, while 360-degree perspective lets you see what another person sees, and walk in their shoes.&nbsp;But even more so, these works taps into the need for action, beyond emotion.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170207142913-30503131324_7820073357_k.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">A still from&nbsp;<em>Tree</em>&nbsp;by Milica Zec and Winslow Porter, an official selection of the New Frontier VR Experiences at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | Photo: Jakob Kudsk Steenson</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p>After the beauty of glacial Greenland, the final scene of <em>Melting Ice</em> drops us into a flooded Florida neighborhood. The intention, says Dennis, is &ldquo;to bring the reality right to our doorsteps, to make that connection that this is coming and that there are these consequences to our actions.&rdquo; The trick is not to inflict so strong an experience as to render a feeling of powerlessness. &ldquo;With such big issues at hand, it is possible to become overwhelmed. But if we can cultivate compassion, [this] involves moving closer to the pain to help.&rdquo;</p> <p>Despite the dire urgency of their subject matter, the parting message of these works is positive. <em>Tree</em>, the second instalment of a trilogy, which will conclude with what Zec describes as &ldquo;an experience centering on human hope.&rdquo;</p> <p>Meanwhile, Dennis reflects on the &ldquo;ancient idea, talked about by the Dalai Lama, by Einstein, that our purpose is to transcend our own first person perspective.&rdquo; He says that VR &ldquo;is a unique language by which we can place people into another person&rsquo;s mind, which will be key to a more evolved society.&rdquo;</p> <p>Orlowski cites the power of these works to bring people to otherwise unreachable places, to see what is invisible: &ldquo;A lot of people don&rsquo;t know what&rsquo;s happening in the ocean because it&rsquo;s out of sight, out of mind. If we can bring the reality to the surface, and provoke audiences to confront the significance of what&rsquo;s happening, our hope is that it&rsquo;ll change the conversation away from debate and towards action.&rdquo;</p> <p>There are&nbsp;<a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/02/virtual-reality-wont-make-you-more-empathetic/515511/" target="_blank">valid debates</a>&nbsp;about whether VR heralds a new age of compassion, whether the device can really function as a so-called &ldquo;<a href="https://www.ted.com/talks/chris_milk_how_virtual_reality_can_create_the_ultimate_empathy_machine" target="_blank">empathy machine</a>.&rdquo; Perhaps it&#39;s more crucial to get films seen by policymakers&mdash;Orlowski&#39;s 2012 documentary,&nbsp;<em>Chasing Ice</em>, for example, was screened for Congress, the Obama White House, and the United Nations.&nbsp;But with melting ice caps and dying reefs, these artists aren&rsquo;t waiting for a verdict. They bring optimism and cutting-edge technology to the task of representing some of the planet&rsquo;s least-accessible places&mdash;places that stand to lose the most in a changing climate.&nbsp;Instead of despairing at urgent global issues, these very personal experiences give us a timely reflection on common understanding, the power of the individual, and the importance of action.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/414240-antonia-ward?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Antonia Ward</a></p> <p><em>Antonia Ward is a Los Angeles-based writer, and regional liaison for global art membership organization The Cultivist.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: A still from Melting Ice by Danfung Dennis, an official selection of the New Frontier VR Experience program at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | Photo: Danfung Dennis)</span></p> Mon, 13 Feb 2017 19:52:11 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Tyler Mitchell | Sarah Allen Eagen | E. Aaron Ross <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/177297-tyler-mitchell?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=TylerMitchell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Tyler Mitchell &ndash; Baltimore</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1025932?utm_source=TylerMitchell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1025932/u3azr9/20170120042656-Snowy_Square_with_Swing.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1025911?utm_source=TylerMitchell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1025911/y8wnrh/20170120034933-The_Birth_of_Color_in_Various_Forms_7.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1025917?utm_source=TylerMitchell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1025917/y8wnrh/20170120040340-Color_Tunnel_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1025915?utm_source=TylerMitchell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1025915/y8wnrh/20170120040145-Somewhere_Over_the_Rainbow.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/475755-sarah-allen-eagen?utm_source=SarahAllenEagen&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Sarah Allen Eagen &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1027246?utm_source= SarahAllenEagen&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027246/u3azr9/20170126024856-2_Eagen_IWishThisScarToHaveBeenGiven_PhotographOnSilk.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1027248?utm_source= SarahAllenEagen&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027248/y8wnrh/20170126024900-4_Eagen_Reach_36x36_PhotographyOnSilk.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1027247?utm_source= SarahAllenEagen&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027247/y8wnrh/20170126024857-1_Eagen_ThankYouForTheSiphilis_MixedMediaOnMylar_42x20.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1027249?utm_source= SarahAllenEagen&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027249/y8wnrh/20170126024913-3_Eagen_DeathBecomesHer_28x34_PhotographyOnSilk.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/394561-e-aaron-ross?utm_source=EAaronRoss&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">E. Aaron Ross &ndash; Chicago</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1018932?utm_source=EAaronRoss&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1018932/u3azr9/20161130014326-1C6A6297-Edit.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1018935?utm_source=EAaronRoss&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1018935/y8wnrh/20161130014327-2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1018937?utm_source=EAaronRoss&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1018937/y8wnrh/20161130014330-asingletear3.gif" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1026910?utm_source=EAaronRoss&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1026910/y8wnrh/20170125054440-11_-_The_Greatest_Adventure.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456" target="_blank"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170119203219-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 06 Feb 2017 14:13:32 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Guanyu Xu Answers 5 Questions <p><em>Welcome to&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we&rsquo;re sending five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/46796-under-the-radar-eleni-mylonas-cecilia-paredes-polack-guanyu-xu">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/387743-guanyu-xu">Guanyu Xu</a>.</em></p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>In short, I use my work to examine the intersectionality of race, sexuality, and citizenship from a perspective of a Chinese gay man who has been living in both Beijing and Chicago.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>Personally, an artist is a person who can creatively&nbsp;use&nbsp;methods to communicate critical concept and theory that closely relate to society.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)?</strong></p> <p>I started an artist-run gallery called <a href="http://www.xuguanyu.com/gallerynoone" target="_blank">gallery no one</a>:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.xuguanyu.com/gallerynoone" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170206123830-Screen_Shot_2017-01-30_at_12.17.05__1_.png" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>Write a novel?</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.nancyvalladares.com/" target="_blank">Nancy Valladares</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://kanthypeng.com/" target="_blank">Kanthy Peng</a>, and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mengdazhang.com/" target="_blank">Mengda Zhang</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div align="center"> <hr align="center" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 06 Feb 2017 13:43:02 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Muslim Women Respond to Shepard Fairey’s American Flag Hijab Poster <p>President Donald Trump&rsquo;s travel ban on refugees and people from seven Muslim-majority countries caused international uproar and chaos over the past week. With Islamophobia on the rise and demonstrably influencing U.S. domestic and foreign policy, a widely-circulated image by Los Angeles artist&nbsp;<a href="https://obeygiant.com/" target="_blank">Shepard Fairey</a>&nbsp;and a related conversation about the representation of Muslim women take on additional urgency.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;We the people are greater than fear&rdquo; is the slogan one of the artist&rsquo;s latest posters, which hit the streets of Washington D.C. last month for the Inauguration and Women&rsquo;s March. Commissioned by the&nbsp;<a href="http://theamplifierfoundation.org/" target="_blank">Amplifier Foundation</a>, the project &ldquo;We The People,&rdquo; which also includes artworks by Ernesto Yerena and Jessica Sabogal, fundraised&nbsp;<a href="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/amplifierfoundation/we-the-people-public-art-for-the-inauguration-and?token=43200cc2" target="_blank">over $1 million</a> in a viral Kickstarter campaign. Over inauguration weekend, the foundation distributed 76,500 of Fairey&rsquo;s posters in Washington alone.&nbsp;Eight years after his iconic &ldquo;Hope&rdquo; portrait of Obama, the artist is using photos of Muslim, Latina, and African-American women in America to inspire hope anew and &ldquo;disrupt the rising tide of hate and fear.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170202143635-amplifier_WTP_amplifier_2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy of Amplifier Foundation</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>One of Fairey&rsquo;s three contributions to the campaign is an almost cartoonish rendering of a Superwoman-looking Muslim woman in red, navy, and beige hues. The image is based on a photo taken by Muslim-American photographer Ridwan Adhami entitled&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.ridwanadhami.com/iamamerica" target="_blank">I Am America</a></em>, which was made in 2007 to commemorate the anniversary of 9/11. &ldquo;I wanted to make a power statement,&rdquo; Adhami wrote, <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BPNIjsbhHDP/?taken-by=ridzdesign&amp;hl=en" target="_blank">posting the photo on Instagram</a>. &ldquo;I wanted to create something that we as a community could be proud of. I wasn&rsquo;t apologizing for anything, I wasn&rsquo;t asking to be accepted, I was merely stating that I too was an American. Wholly and completely and nothing anybody would say could take that away.&rdquo;</p> <p>In recent weeks Fairey&rsquo;s poster has&nbsp;sparked debate in the Muslim community over visibility, representation, and the use of hijab and the American flag as stand-ins for &ldquo;Muslim&rdquo; and &ldquo;American,&rdquo; respectively. Mona Eltahawy, a Muslim Egyptian-American who wrote the book&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18490563-headscarves-and-hymens" target="_blank">Headscarves &amp; Hymens</a></em>, says she doesn&rsquo;t support the poster, as she&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/monaeltahawy/status/820746828060758017" target="_blank">fought for eight years</a>&nbsp;to be free to stop wearing the hijab. She also criticized the non-Muslim women who wore flag hijabs at the Women&rsquo;s Marches last month. &ldquo;Non-Muslim women: in name of all that is good, stop wearing &lsquo;solidarity hijab.&rsquo; Find another way to support &amp; leave hijab to us to argue over,&rdquo; she&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/monaeltahawy/status/823112262089080833" target="_blank">wrote on Twitter</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">I am an Egyptian-American Muslim woman who fought for 8 yrs to stop wearing hijab &amp; I am not celebrating this Shepard Fairey poster. <a href="https://t.co/fL4ERCvWOh">pic.twitter.com/fL4ERCvWOh</a></p> &mdash; Mona Eltahawy (@monaeltahawy) <a href="https://twitter.com/monaeltahawy/status/820746828060758017">January 15, 2017</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Non-Muslim women: in name of all that is good, stop wearing &quot;solidarity hijab.&quot;Find another way to support &amp; leave hijab to us to argue over</p> &mdash; Mona Eltahawy (@monaeltahawy) <a href="https://twitter.com/monaeltahawy/status/823112262089080833">January 22, 2017</a></blockquote> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>One Arab&nbsp;<a href="http://ghazalairshad.com/about/" target="_blank">journalist in New York City, Ghazala Irshad</a>, also finds the posters problematic.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/inaugural-protest-poster-stirs-debate-among-muslim-american-women-1620652102" target="_blank">She says</a>&nbsp;a Muslim woman doesn&rsquo;t need to prove she&rsquo;s American by wearing a flag hijab. &ldquo;I do want the media, or an artist creating a narrative about us to recognize that we don&rsquo;t all wear hijabs, and there is a diversity in this community that is being ignored,&rdquo; said Irshad.</p> <p><a href="http://www.joojooazad.com/" target="_blank">Muslim Iranian fashion blogger Hoda Katebi</a>&nbsp;also points out a hijab-wearing Muslim woman didn&rsquo;t make the artwork. &ldquo;It was created by a white man, Shepard Fairey, artist and founder of the clothing brand OBEY, created this image from a photograph taken by Muslim-American photographer Ridwan Adhami,&rdquo; she&nbsp;<a href="http://www.joojooazad.com/2017/01/keep-your-american-flags-off-my-hijab.html" target="_blank">wrote on her blog</a>. &ldquo;Were we unable to uplift the work of Muslim women instead? Are our images only able to be consumed when they are white-washed and sanitized?&rdquo;</p> <p>Katebi points out that the woman originally photographed for the image, Muslim-American model Munira Ahmed, doesn&rsquo;t actually wear the hijab, &ldquo;and rather just donned it for the purpose of creating this image, which is even more problematic,&rdquo; she writes. &ldquo;Know that the hijab&mdash;for me at least&mdash;represents a rejection of materialism, of capitalism, of euro-centric beauty standards (among other significance) and draping an American flag over it erases almost everything the hijab means to me.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Know that Muslims are tired of having to &lsquo;prove&rsquo; they are American,&rdquo; Katebi continues. &ldquo;But also, know that one does not need to be American to deserve respect, humanity, dignity, equality, rights and freedom from hate and bigotry. An over-emphasis on being American as a prerequisite of deserving respect is harmful for immigrants and refugees.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170202143113-Image.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Saba Ahmed. Courtesy of Saba Ahmed</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>While the image is based on a photo from 2007, it also calls back to November 2015 when Muslim republican lawyer Saba Ahmed&nbsp;<a href="http://nytlive.nytimes.com/womenintheworld/2016/05/11/muslim-woman-who-famously-wore-american-flag-hijab-on-fox-news-supports-trump/" target="_blank">wore a flag hijab on Fox News</a>&nbsp;to show her support for Trump. &ldquo;It best represented my patriotism and faith,&rdquo; she said last week. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m glad to see headscarves being normalized in America. While I disagree with Anti-Trump protestors, I am happy to see them wearing flag scarves.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Other Muslim women also support the flag headscarf.&nbsp;<a href="http://instagram.com/marwafidama" target="_blank">Marwa Fidama</a>, a fashion blogger in Dearborn, Michigan, wore the flag hijab at protests last month. &ldquo;As a second generation American, the flag hijab represents me as a Muslim American and that I&rsquo;m proud to be American,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;I also want to show others that no matter what flag I wear as a hijab [it] shouldn&rsquo;t always be questioned. I feel that it&rsquo;s time for others to understand that America is a melting pot and we come in all races, religions and faiths.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:37.4537037037037% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BPh-Zx1BtOC/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A photo posted by Nour Obeidallah | نور عبيدالله (@nour_mso)</a> on <time datetime="2017-01-21T15:07:23+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jan 21, 2017 at 7:07am PST</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://instagram.com/nour_mso" target="_blank">Nour Obeidallah</a>, a Palestinian-American economics student at New York University, was also wearing a flag headscarf during the women&rsquo;s marches. &ldquo;When I first saw Fairey&rsquo;s work, I immediately thought that I could be just like the girl in the photo,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;I was so shocked at the response I got from people; I couldn&#39;t walk five feet without being stopped for a picture. It was absolutely wild.&rdquo;</p> <p>While other women did wear the flag headscarf at other protest marches, Obeidallah also carried a physical picture frame, which she held around her head to draw a parallel to Fairey&rsquo;s artwork. &ldquo;I&#39;ve never related to a political image before, because nothing has ever been made that could show Muslim women in that light,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p>&ldquo;As someone who does get scared and does shy away from things sometimes, I want to make sure I no longer do that. We as a nation cannot afford to sit back because we are too scared.&nbsp;I&rsquo;ve always known the value of protesting and I will continue to protest and fight for what is right as long as I can.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Posters from the &ldquo;We The People&rdquo; Campaign will be shown alongside the works of local activists and artists in an exhibition opening today called&nbsp;</em><a href="http://cocaseattle.org/exhibitions/upcoming/hear-our-voice/" target="_blank">Hear Our Voice</a><em>&nbsp;at the Center on Contemporary Art in Seattle. The show will feature roughly 100 works of art from the Women&rsquo;s Marches in Washington and Seattle, and runs until February 25.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241816-nadja-sayej?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Nadja Sayej</a></p> <p><em>Nadja Sayej is an arts reporter based in Berlin and the founder of ArtStars*, check out her website at&nbsp;<a href="http://nadjasayej.com/" target="_blank">nadjasayej.com</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Left: Ridwan Adhami; Right: Shepard Fairey. Courtesy of The Amplifier Foundation, Ridwan Adhami, and Shepard Fairey)</span></p> Thu, 02 Feb 2017 20:42:07 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Matthew Craven | Clovis Blackwell | Dani Dodge <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/81443-matthew-cravenr?utm_source=MatthewCraven&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Matthew Craven &ndash; Los Angeles</span></span></a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">, exhibiting at </span><span style="text-decoration: none; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/events/show/438154-art-los-angeles-contemporary-2017" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color:#0066ff;">Art Los Angeles Contemporary</span></a></span><span style="text-decoration: none; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span style="color:#3399cc;">&nbsp;</span>by Asya Geisberg Gallery</span></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/434723?utm_source=MatthewCraven&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="http://s3.otherpeoplespixels.com/sites/18460/assets/G0s0yrR8jAMbcRpv.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/955479?utm_source=MatthewCraven&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/955479/mf2ji7/20151207175214-NECK.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/434721?utm_source=MatthewCraven&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/434721/mf2ji7/20110404200947-site15.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/959330?utm_source=MatthewCraven&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/959330/mf2ji7/20160105202655-QE2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/26240-clovis-blackwell?utm_source=ClovisBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Clovis Blackwell &ndash; Pasadena</span></a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">, exhibiting at </span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/events/show/437897-startup-art-fair-los-angeles-2017" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">stARTup Art Fair LA</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1027423?utm_source= ClovisBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027423/u3azr9/20170126210432-silicatesurf.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1027437?utm_source=ClovisBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027437/mf2ji7/20170126211924-img_0002.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1027422?utm_source=ClovisBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027422/mf2ji7/20170126210427-henandgod.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1027440?utm_source=ClovisBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027440/mf2ji7/20170126211933-img_0010.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/245045-dani-dodge?utm_source=DaniDodge&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Dani Dodge &ndash; Los Angeles</span></a><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">, exhibiting at </span></span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/events/show/437897-startup-art-fair-los-angeles-2017" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">stARTup Art Fair LA</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/901679?utm_source= DaniDodge&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/901679/u3azr9/20150402223621-DaniDodge_Code.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/928615?utm_source= DaniDodge&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/928615/mf2ji7/20150724221036-CONFESS_DaniDodge5.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/944706?utm_source= DaniDodge&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/944706/mf2ji7/20151015102155-unburdened1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/786071?utm_source= DaniDodge&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/786071/mf2ji7/20140227174733-DaniDodge_Message_Ties.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20160210150305-prize-radar-logo-2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 27 Jan 2017 18:59:55 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Nicolas Sassoon <p>Vancouver-based <a href="http://nicolassassoon.com/" target="_blank">Nicolas Sassoon</a> was one of the first artists from the new wave of digital artists whose work I enthusiastically embraced. We clearly shared a love of vintage computer graphics, but his mesmerizing GIFs truly transcended any predictable &ldquo;retro&rdquo; nostalgia. In the years since then Sassoon has expanded and refined his aesthetic and subject matter without compromising his original vision.</p> <p>His art might evoke a specific moment in the history of digital art but it is not defined by it. It is his manipulation of that history that makes the work truly timeless.</p> <p>The mathematical, sculptural, and architectural forms of Sassoon&rsquo;s earlier work have recently evolved into something more painterly, humanistic, and personal. The constant that connects all of his work is his undulating waves of endless hypnotically looping pixels. They give the work an organic warmth that both compliments and contradicts their fundamentally digital nature. These waves are what makes Sassoon&rsquo;s work a beacon of originality in the sometimes predictable world of new media art.</p> <p>We asked Sassoon about his love of early computer graphics, his connection to GIFs, and the challenges of showing digital art in physical spaces.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170125203327-SUMMIT_2015_525x700.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>SUMMIT</em>, 2015</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What are you first memories of computers and the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>Nicolas Sassoon:</strong> First memory of a computer is my father&rsquo;s Apple Macintosh when I was 10. First significant memory of internet is much later, when I was 18 or 19. I was collecting horror movies and would buy them on Priceminister or download them on peer-to-peer file sharing platforms like KaZaA.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first discover GIFs as a format? Did they have an instant impact?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> I got into GIFs when I learned how to make them. In the early 2000s I got a VHS/DVD box that could be plugged into my computer and I started saving sections of films&mdash;mainly the horror movies I was collecting. I was mostly focusing on the &ldquo;filler&rdquo; shots or stock footage: fixed shots of natural landscapes that were looping very nicely.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170125203405-BLOOM_1_2016_525x700.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>BLOOM</em>, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Where does your interest in early computer graphics stem from?</strong> <strong>Was nostalgia a part of the development of your style?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> I became interested in early computer graphics for their materiality on screen, their simplicity, and their level of abstraction&mdash;amongst other things. Screen-based graphics exist on their own plane; they are different from photography or painting, they&rsquo;re made differently and they exist in space differently. I am interested in that, in the uniqueness and limitations of this imagery and the range of experiences which can be generated from it. Some form of nostalgia was an incentive to start but overall it has much more to do with being slightly obsessive and enjoying to work with limitations.</p> <p><strong>CP: What were early influences and inspirations for you in net art?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> Computers Club and other platforms like JstChillin, Rhizome. The work of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/44659-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-laura-brothers" target="_blank">Laura Brothers</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/45621-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-sara-ludy" target="_blank">Sara Ludy</a>, Brenna Murphy, Sylvain Sailly, Rick Silva, Travess Smalley and Krist Wood also had/still has an influence.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170125092549-WVAG_1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>ISLANDS</em>, 2015, with WALLPAPERS, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver BC</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk about how your own relationship with the GIF developed?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> In art school I started making GIFs as birthday cards for my friends. It was more of a hobby and whenever I would show it in class I would get bashed by my teachers so I kept it to myself. After graduating in 2008 I moved to Vancouver from France and began experimenting more with computer animation. I discovered the work of Laura Brothers and started my own blog: Youmakemesohappy. Then I was <a href="http://www.computersclub.org/club/?author=14" target="_blank">invited to join Computers Club</a>; things kept growing from there.</p> <p><strong>CP: Have you ever been frustrated by the technical limitations of GIFs, or do they help define your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> I enjoy working with limitations. Some technical limitations can be challenging but they push me to learn new skills, which is good. If I ever get tired of it I will move on to something else, but I don&rsquo;t think it&rsquo;ll happen. These limitations have been a conscious choice. I was fully aware of what I was getting myself into. I&rsquo;m enjoying GIFs for their practicality, but if another format seems more appropriate I will just switch over.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170125092653-SLAB_1_2016.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>SLAB</em>, 2016</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170125092740-SLAB_6_2015.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>SLAB</em>, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first realize that there was a &ldquo;net art&rdquo; scene that you could&nbsp;be a part of? How has that scene changed since you started making art?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> I discovered net art communities pretty late&mdash;around 2008 when I was invited to join Computers Club. I exchanged with this community very intensely from 2008 to 2013. Since then, some have moved towards a material practice, some others have stopped making art, and some are still publishing works online. It seems natural to me that things have changed. I feel lucky for the experiences I&rsquo;ve had during these years because they&rsquo;ve brought many friendships and significant moments in my career and personal life. The fate of most of these communities has always been tied to the individuals that organized them.</p> <p><strong>CP: Where&nbsp;do you think the general perception of net art stands now, both within</strong> <strong>and outside the art world?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> It depends on who you are talking to and where you are geographically. Net art is pretty specific; it&rsquo;s only going to speak to particular audiences. Many net artists have moved towards a material output and brought elements of their online practice along the way. This has definitely helped to spread a general awareness of net art within a wider audience. I&rsquo;ve also met a lot of younger artists and art students who have completely integrated net-based art in their influences and/or references.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170125092850-HEK_thumbnail.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>LOST HOURS</em>, 2016, Installation view at House of Electronic Arts, Basel</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first start showing your work in physical spaces?</strong> <strong>Was it an easy transition or were there particular challenges for you?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> I began showing my work as projections for music events in Vancouver, and this led to a couple gallery exhibits. My experiences in the music scene really helped to translate my practice at first, especially with projections. With online publication everything is almost instantaneous and it&rsquo;s easy to get things finalized. With material production you have to be patient and learn about the materials and techniques you&rsquo;re dealing with, while not losing track of your primary objectives. This has been the main challenge for me in the beginning.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170125203500-STORM_4_2016_525x700.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>STORM</em>, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How have you approached the issue of monetization in your career?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> It never works out for me to overthink the commercial viability of my projects. I&rsquo;m lucky to have the opportunity to work across various disciplines which has been very helpful financially. If I had an exclusive net-based practice it would be much more difficult. I never expected my art practice to be commercially viable, so I&rsquo;ve always been open to other opportunities aside from the art world.</p> <p><strong>CP: Your past work felt very sculptural but lately it feels more painterly&mdash;do you agree?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> Looking at painting is very influential in my practice; it&rsquo;s a completely different process but there are compositional elements, questions of representations, and plenty of other things that feel related to me. After looking at paintings for so many years maybe it&rsquo;s finally starting to show in my work.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170125203606-VESSEL_1_2017_525x750.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>VESSEL</em>, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What interests you about representing physical objects in a digital space?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> I&rsquo;m drawn to digital space as a platform for sculptural and material experiences, or for experiences emulating a physical presence. The first animations I published online were initially sketches for sculptures and installations. Lately I started referencing existing spaces and environments that are significant to me. It gives me tangible elements to translate in a digital space, within the context of a computer screen. With works like <em><a href="http://nicolassassoon.com/PATTERNS.html" target="_blank">PATTERNS</a></em>, natural forces and atmospheric phenomena are the reference points. Each project brings different elements into play, but it typically has to do with the materialization or dematerialization of something.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170125093044-INDEX_2016_detail.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Detail of <em><a href="http://nicolassassoon.com/INDEX/INDEX.html" target="_blank">INDEX</a></em>, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why are there never any people in the spaces you create?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> In my experience human figures always generate a narrative of some sort, which is why I avoid them: why are they here? What are they doing? What do they look like? I wouldn&rsquo;t know where to start. With recent works like <em><a href="http://nicolassassoon.com/INDEX/INDEX.html" target="_blank">INDEX</a></em>, the piece acts as a record of an existing space and it didn&rsquo;t make sense to have human bodies within it. The work is a space to be filled rather than a stage for specific actions by human figures. I like to keep things very minimal in terms of narrative; I see it as leaving an empty seat for the audience.</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your relationship with and use of color?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> It&rsquo;s pretty experimental; I always do a large amount of color tests and versions before selecting a particular tone. I have endless color variations of most of my works.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170125093127-WINDOW_1_2015.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>WINDOW</em>, 2015</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> We have a new website coming up with <a href="http://www.w-a-l-l-p-a-p-e-r-s.net/" target="_blank">WALLPAPERS</a> (with Sara Ludy &amp; Sylvain Sailly) and a new <em><a href="http://www.nicolassassoon.com/SIGNALS_INSTALLATION.html" target="_blank">SIGNALS</a></em> exhibition with Rick Silva in Belgrade this spring at Resonate Festival. I&rsquo;m working on a large piece to be released with Link Cabinet this spring, and I&rsquo;ll be showing works at NARS Foundation in New York, Peer-to-Space and Cerma.de online, House of Electronic Art in Basel, and Chronus Art Center in Shanghai.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>SIGNALS</em>, with Rick Silva, @ Wil Aballe Art Projects. All images: Courtesy of Nicolas Sassoon)</span></p> Wed, 25 Jan 2017 21:36:56 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Ella Goerner | Matthew Penkala | Ben Pederson <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/474870-ella-goerner?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Ella Goerner &ndash; Berlin</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024137?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024137/u3azr9/20170110165145-Ella_Goerner_room_shave_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_sis.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024147?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024147/mf2ji7/20170110180835-Ella_Goerner_room_dialogue_metals_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_sis_more.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024148?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024148/u3azr9/20170110180933-Ella_Goerner_Nugget_sis_2_8_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024146?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024146/mf2ji7/20170110180632-Ella_Goerner_Better_Than_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/337-matthew-penkala?utm_source=MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Matthew Penkala &ndash; Los Angeles</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869568?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869568/u3azr9/20141130185408-dont_put_me_in_a_box_cosmonaut_web.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869573?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869573/mf2ji7/20141130185752-waiting_for_the_shipwreck_high.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869577?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869577/mf2ji7/20141130191322-crime_i_did_content.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869574?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869574/mf2ji7/20141130185801-the_universal_will_sigh_high.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/397930-benjamin-pederson?utm_source=BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Ben Pederson &ndash; Brooklyn, NY</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840032?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/370f5af81138ccebb73b275188d07c72/tumblr_nkx1ioNA781u07vo6o1_1280.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840035?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840035/mf2ji7/20140812191537-BP11.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840040?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840040/mf2ji7/20140812191609-BP14.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840027?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840027/mf2ji7/20140812191506-BP2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20160210150305-prize-radar-logo-2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Tue, 17 Jan 2017 18:30:28 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In Commanding Prints, Afro-Cuban Artist Belkis Ayón Unites Mythology and Cultural Critique <p><em>Nkame</em>, a salutation that translates to &ldquo;<a href="http://www.fowler.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Nkame-Press-Release_long-FINAL.2.pdf" target="_blank">greeting</a>&rdquo; in the Abaku&aacute;n language, welcomes Belkis Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s first solo show in the United States to the Fowler museum. After Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s death in 1999, the Afro-Cuban artist&rsquo;s body of work was declared a&nbsp;<a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20081205054721/http://www.csupomona.edu/~kellogg_gallery/critics/ayon.html" target="_blank">patrimony</a>&nbsp;by the Cuban government and was not allowed out of the country until recently. Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s mysterious black-and-white prints appear as an obscure treasure that has just been uncovered, so it is fitting that her work be centered on the mythology of the Abaku&aacute;, an Afro-Cuban all-male secret society similar to the Masons.</p> <p>Ay&oacute;n used Abaku&aacute;n myths as the scaffolding for her striking visual universe. The fact that the religious society&rsquo;s stories and rituals were hidden and repressed under communist rule paralleled the overlooked social, gender, and racial inequalities Ay&oacute;n and others like her experienced.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112124046-Belkis.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ay&oacute;n at Havana Galerie, Zurich, August 23, 1999. Photo: Werner Gadliger</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The exhibition plays a video of&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n filmed one year before her tragic death by suicide at the age of 32. She is meticulously crafting a print in a process singular to her, brought on by socioeconomic restraints and her own perfectionism. Because art materials were not readily available to Ay&oacute;n at the height of Cuba&rsquo;s economic crisis, she had to create new methods of printmaking. Her collographs are a mixture of collage and lithography, pastiched from little bits of paper and glue that form the varied textures in her work. She also preferred to combine multiple prints together so she could gain more control over her intricate large-scale works. Contrasting patterns of fish scales, flora, and animal prints create vibrant textures that enrich her dramatic imagery and masterful technique. The work&rsquo;s esoteric subject matter adds another layer to her work.</p> <p>Ay&oacute;n used the mythology of the Abaku&aacute; as the aesthetic language of her work after learning about them in high school. According to her sister, the artist did extensive research into the Abaku&aacute;, but did not adhere to or mean to accurately represent their ideology. Instead, she created her own imagery from the stories of the Abaku&aacute; and combined them with the symbols and structures of Christianity and Catholicism. She also included women in her depictions, subtly making larger social criticisms. &ldquo;The intolerance, sacrifice, impotence, dogmatism, censorship and fear that Belkis portrayed through the Abaku&aacute; myth, however, clearly referenced what she herself experienced, as did those who shared her social, political, and cultural circumstances,&rdquo; Cristina Vives, Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s friend and the guest curator of this show, writes in the catalogue.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125230-93.14.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>Sin t&iacute;tulo (Sik&aacute;n con chivo) (Untitled (Sik&aacute;n with Goat))</em>, 1993, Collograph.&nbsp;Courtesy: Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Many critics of her time mistakenly interpreted&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s work as folkloric illustrations of Abaku&aacute;n myths, but Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s choice of subject matter had nothing to do with her own religious ideology. No other known artist at the time had focused on the secret society, which allowed Ay&oacute;n to freely interpret its stories. Through the language of a society rife with hidden meanings, she was able to meditate on larger issues of sexism and racism.</p> <p>Ay&oacute;n&nbsp;did this by focusing on the female figure of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fowler.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Nkame-Press-Release_long-FINAL.2.pdf">Sik&aacute;n</a>, whom Ayon saw as an alter-ego. Sik&aacute;n, like all of the figures in Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s world, is mouthless, reflecting both the actual myth of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fowler.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Nkame-Press-Release_long-FINAL.2.pdf">Sik&aacute;n</a>&nbsp;and the silencing of Black women in society. Sik&aacute;n was a princess who accidentally captured a fish while drawing water from the river. She heard the fish&rsquo;s loud bellow, an utterance that turned out to be the mystical voice of the deity Abaku&aacute;. Because women were not permitted to hear this sound, Sik&aacute;n was sworn to secrecy. When she told her fianc&eacute; the sacred knowledge, she was condemned to death.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125000-91.08.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>La cena (The Supper)</em>, 1991 Collograph. Courtesy:&nbsp;Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Sik&aacute;n is represented throughout&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s work as a Christlike figure, most notably in <em>La Cena (The Last Supper) </em>(1991) which seats Sik&aacute;n in the center of a long table surrounded by male and female apostles. Other triptychs such as <em>Perfidia (Perfidy)</em> (1998) illustrate her mouthless figures participating in Abaku&aacute;n consecration ceremonies which prepare for but do not depict the sacrifice of Sik&aacute;n.</p> <p>While in Abaku&aacute;n mythology Sik&aacute;n violates a secret of the brotherhood, in Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s world she is a martyr. She allows her heroine to live, albeit trapped in the patriarchal society&rsquo;s rituals. In later works, Sik&aacute;n becomes increasingly fearful of her place in this society, such as the not-so-subtly named <em>Dejame Salir (Let me out!)</em>&nbsp;(1997), a circular print of Sikan being consumed by flames. A goat, a symbol of sacrifice, lurks closely behind. The dread that pervades Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s later works also coincides with the artist transitioning from large to smaller circular prints. &ldquo;The action took place within a structure she had never used before. What was really happening, however, was much deeper: space was closing in on her,&rdquo; writes Cristina Vives.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125409-97.04.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>Dejame salir (Let me Out!)</em>, 1998, Collograph. Courtesy: Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>There is some speculation that Ayon, like Sik&aacute;n, put herself at risk by exposing the secrets of the&nbsp;Abaku&aacute;, though with only 21,000 members, the society did not hold very much religious or political power, especially under the communist leadership of the time. Yet, a woman betraying a patriarchal network does convey something universally fearful. Sik&aacute;n infiltrating the Abaku&aacute; could also be a metaphor for the struggle of an Afro-Cuban woman trying to exist in an art world that excluded and misunderstood her for decades.</p> <p>It is possible to read Sik&aacute;n&rsquo;s tragic journey as parallel to&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s encroaching depression, which she kept secret even to those closest to her, though her life and work still leave many mysteries that are just now beginning to be uncovered. With changing US-Cuba relations, <em>Nkame</em> will hopefully mark the beginning of her work being more widely researched and exhibited.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125822-91.10.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>Nlloro (Weeping)</em>, 1991, Collograph.&nbsp;Courtesy: Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452094-sola-agustsson?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Sola Agustsson</a></p> <p><em>Sola Agustsson is a writer based in Los Angeles. She studied at UC Berkeley and has contributed to Bullett, Flaunt, The Huffington Post, Alternet, Artlog, Konch, and Whitewall Magazine.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Installation view, <em>Nkame: A Retrospective of Cuban Printmaker Belkis Ayón</em>, Fowler Museum at UCLA, 2016. Courtesy the Estate of Belkis Ayón. Photo: Reed Hutchinson)</span></p> Thu, 12 Jan 2017 16:07:34 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Martina Menegon <p><a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/">Martina Menegon</a> is an Italian new media artist and educator currently based in Vienna, Austria. <a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/bio">Her art explores</a> &ldquo;the instability and ephemerality of the human body as well as the alienation from physicality in today&rsquo;s digital age, questioning the gap between real and virtual, flesh and data.&rdquo; Menegon&rsquo;s expression of these ideas range from uncanny scenes of endless, undulating fleshy figures to far more personal depictions of her own digitally distorted physical form. Her work reveals the ever-evolving relationship between all of us and the inescapable digital world, as well as a complex, autobiographical representation of one artist&rsquo;s journey through it.</p> <p>I asked Menegon about her history of using computers to make art, the origins of her fascination with the human body, and the difference between selfies and self-portraits.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111132734-2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>, 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What were your earliest memories of computers?</strong></p> <p><strong>Martina Menegon:</strong> Some years ago my mother was a graphic designer, often freelancing, so as far as I can remember, we always had a computer at home for her to work. Me and my brother were allowed to use it when she didn&rsquo;t need it for work. I remember once I wanted to clean up the desktop and somehow I trashed everything (including the Macintosh HD icon) and the computer never started up again. It was terrifying and I must admit, back then I blamed my little brother (shame on me!).</p> <p><strong>CP: When and why did you first go online?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I honestly cannot remember. It must have been early and probably just because it was finally possible to go online at home. My earliest memory of going online is during my first year of high school, when I opened my first blog where I was writing and posting pictures everyday (back then I was very much into writing little poems or short texts). But I already knew how to use the internet so I must have been online way before this memory.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><br /> <img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131135-3.I_ll_Keep_You_Warm_and_Safe_in_My_People_Zoo__3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131024-5.I_LL-KEEP-YOU-WARM-AND-SAFE-IN-MY-PEOPLE-ZOO-x-Paper-Thin-V2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon, <em>I&rsquo;ll Keep You Warm and Safe in My People Zoo</em>, 2016, VR installation Sounds by&nbsp;Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first think about computers as a creative tool?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I guess it always was for me. My mother&rsquo;s computer only had software she needed for work (Illustrator, Photoshop, etc.) and she also installed for me and my brother the amazing &ldquo;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kid_Pix">Kid-Pix</a>.&rdquo; I was always playing and drawing and creating with it since I can remember. I always treated computers as creative tools somehow.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you start to experiment with 3D?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> It was in 2008 during my study in Visual and Performing Arts at the IUAV University in Venice. I followed a 3D animation class where I learned how to model and animate and render in Cinema4D. It was such a fun experience, and I never stopped working with 3D since then. I think I even repeated the class just for the fun of it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111132915-7.SPLITS-ARE-PARTED.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Splits Are Parted</em>, 2016, Interactive installation,&nbsp;sounds by&nbsp;Stefano D&#39;Alessio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How and why did the human body, and your own body, become such a constant theme in your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I think it always was. I can&rsquo;t say why. I think many different aspects and events of my life brought me to focus a lot on the human body: growing up as a synchronized swimmer, going to art school, experimenting with some performance art, studying performance and interactive art in Venice, being in Second Life, etc.</p> <p>In general I am quite a shy person, always scared of exposing myself publically. This is way I rarely ended up performing in real life. But for some reason, exposing myself in a digital realm does not bother me much. Maybe the only challenge for me is at openings, where people watch or interact with my 3D-scanned body and I am next to it. I sometimes try to blend in with the gallery walls :-P</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131341-1.Virtual_Narcissism_-_making_of.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>&nbsp;(making of), 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How has the digital age changed our relationship with the human body? How do you think the digital age has changed your relationship with your own body?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I will not speak for others, but for me, the digital age gave me the possibility of exploring my body in many different ways: through audio, photo, videos, slow-mo, 3D, etc. It made it possible for me to augment and expand the relationship I had with my body. Sometimes I think it&rsquo;s my body that changed my relationship with the digital age: as I am more and more anxious in memorizing its changes and visualizing its data, I feel the urge to explore different techniques and tools.</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think Virtual Reality will distort this relationship even further? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I think VR is going to create another way for us to relate to our body and it is not going to be necessarily a distortion, just another form. And I am definitely interested in exploring this.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Pzd2UI9_pHg?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your project <em><a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/post/144465199907/virtual-narcissism-various-multimedia" target="_blank">Virtual Narcissism</a></em> feels very autobiographical.</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> <em>Virtual Narcissism</em> is definitely autobiographical. It started as an experiment and ended up being an ongoing project, based on my digital archive of 3D-scanned selfies. In real life, I am generally a very shy person: I feel very uncomfortable being photographed or filmed. When I am alone I am of course less self-conscious, and it&rsquo;s virtually sculpting those moments that interests me the most at the moment.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="360" src="//giphy.com/embed/3o6ZtnBPZyoiR2c9tS" width="480"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>&nbsp;(making of), 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p><strong>CP: What do you think is the difference between a self-portrait and a selfie? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> When I 3D scan myself, I never really think ahead about what kind of pose or where to sit. I usually plug in my Kinect, open the software, and it gives me 10 seconds to find a pose before the scan starts. I want to be as spontaneous as I can, given that a scan takes a bit longer than a photograph to be done. The results are untouched; all my <em>Virtual Narcissism</em> scans are uploaded as the software puts them out. There is no selection. All my scans are going to be uploaded in my Sketchfab account. So if we stick with the common distinction that sees self-portraiture as a representation of a person and a selfie as an insight into a person&rsquo;s life, then I should consider my work as selfies. But I am not sure this distinction is valid anymore.</p> <p><strong>CP: You regularly collaborate with certain artists. Why is collaboration important to you and your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I always loved collaborating with other artists, I think it is a great way to grow artistically as well as share knowledge. I am very fond of this. I never hide my process in art making&mdash;I believe in sharing. I guess this is also why I love teaching. Of the many collaborations I do with artists, two are regular and very important to me and my art. One is with <a href="http://cargocollective.com/stefanodalessio/" target="_blank">Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio</a>, with whom I create interactive installations and some performances. Even when we work separately, I regularly ask him for support in programming or audio design. My collaboration with <a href="http://www.exile.at/ko/" target="_blank">Klaus Obermaier</a> started back in 2010, after I took his <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_(software)" target="_blank">Max/MSP</a> workshop in Venice, where I learned how to create interactive tools for art practice. It was an important event in my artistic career, a major turning point. His works have been influencing me since then.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KzDifurF9wQ?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Klaus Obermaier, Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio, and Martina Menegon, <em>EGO</em>, Interactive installation, 2015</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Tell us about your experience playing Second Life? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> Second Life has been and still is a big and important experience and influence for my art. It was the first place where I experienced tridimensional glitches, the frustration of being stuck in a wall, having an arm passing through my body, etc. It was also the place where I started socializing, as I had a little shop where I was selling clothes and furniture. I was part of a design community that created amazing artistic events, and I was always trying to go to art performances and installations there as well.</p> <p>I was a Second Life resident for almost 10 years, and the only reason I am using the past tense is because I somehow destroyed my poor virtual me for an art project: I wanted to record the result of me attaching everything I owned in Second Life to my avatar (thousands of different hair styles and colors, clothes, shoes, animations, furniture, houses, etc.). I somehow overloaded the system and my avatar started changing, then transformed into a white cloud, and then the software crashed. Since then, whenever I try to open Second Life, the app crashes. I tried some solutions I found online but nothing worked. I will try to contact the Linden Lab soon, because I have to admit, I miss being in Second Life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-ibWVK9QBco?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon, <em>Ouch!</em>, 2014</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How is the new media art scene in Vienna ?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I have to admit most new media works I see here in Vienna are mainly in university exhibitions or small art spaces. In general I have the feeling there is not really a community here for new media, yet. But I guess it&rsquo;s just a matter of time. Just before Christmas, for example, at the Angewandte Innovation Lab (AIL) there was a very nice exhibition, <em><a href="http://www.ailab.at/archive/the-age-of-experience/" target="_blank">The Age of Experience</a></em>, featuring among others <em>The Legible City</em> by Jeffrey Shaw and a great work by Ip Yuk-Yiu, <em>S for Sisyphus</em>. I have to say I felt almost &ldquo;at home&rdquo; while visiting.</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you have coming up in 2017?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> Apart from exhibitions and teaching, I will definitely keep working on new developments in&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>. I am currently working on a VR version of it, struggling around with some intricate scripting in Unity3D. I plan to play around with some augmented reality projects as well, as soon as the VR one is done. In general, I will keep working.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>I&#39;ll Keep You Warm and Safe in My People Zoo #2</em>, 2016, Video loop. All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 11 Jan 2017 17:01:05 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Natalia Zuluaga Kicks Off ArtCenter/South Florida’s Latest Chapter with “An Image” <p>When <a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/" target="_blank"><strong>ArtCenter/South Florida</strong></a> opened on Lincoln Road in 1984, in the heart of South Beach, the street was &ldquo;nearly abandoned and severely dilapidated.&rdquo; Today the center, which hosts exhibitions, classes, and a studio residency program, is credited with kickstarting the revitalization of the mall and its surrounding area. Following the appointment of Natalia Zuluaga as Artistic Director this August, ArtCenter itself is getting something of a revitalization. Dynamic changes are underway as the promising Bard Center for Curatorial Studies graduate begins her tenure with an ambitious exhibition that rethinks the space&#39;s programming structure&mdash;and the very shape of what an exhibition can be.</p> <p>Part of an emerging generation of local creatives that have been actively distinguishing Miami&rsquo;s cultural identity through art&mdash;challenging stereotypes about the city and bringing it visibility outside of the annual art fair invasion&mdash;Zuluaga will oversee programming, education initiatives, and artist residencies. In addition, she works on a variety of collaborative curatorial and publishing projects such as <a href="http://namepublications.org/" target="_blank"><strong>[NAME] Publications</strong></a> and PDP/PLP, a transdisciplinary &ldquo;think tank&rdquo; co-run by <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/334661-alan-gutierrezhttps://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/334661-alan-gutierrez" target="_blank"><strong>Alan Gutierrez</strong>,</a> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/228798-patricia-margarita-hernandez" target="_blank"><strong>Patricia Margarita Hernandez</strong></a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/223455-domingo-castillo" target="_blank"><strong>Domingo Castillo</strong></a>. &nbsp;</p> <p>For her debut ArtCenter exhibition, she worked with Castillo, an artist and co-founding <a href="http://noguchibreton.net/" target="_blank"><strong>Noguchi Breton</strong></a> gallerist, to co-curate <a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/fall2016/animage/" target="_blank"><strong><em>An Image</em></strong></a>, which runs through December 18. Together, they organized an exhibition that deconstructs, subverts, and reasserts notions of <em>the image</em>: what it is, what it could be, and how it functions in culture. The exhibition title is borrowed from Harun Farocki&rsquo;s film, included in the show, and the installation presents a smart selection of video art, objects, performance, and talks.</p> <p>I spoke recently with Zuluaga and Castillo about their conceptual framework and the intricacies of their robust exhibition, which is a must-see during Miami Art Week next month.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180139-ArtCenter_An_Image_Exterior_View.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Exterior view of <em>An Image</em>,&nbsp;ArtCenter South/Florida. Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Audrey Phillips: Natalia, what led to your move to ArtCenter/South Florida and what shape do you see things taking with future exhibitions? &nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Natalia Zuluaga: </strong>My move to ArtCenter was really the result of a confluence of things, and luckily so. I think the institution is going through an interesting transition period and was a great place from which to explore my own interests in &ldquo;institutional forms&rdquo; and programming. So the invitation to come in and re-imagine the way ArtCenter&rsquo;s many pieces fit together (exhibitions, residencies, pedagogy) was particularly exciting for me.</p> <p><em>An Image</em> reflects a way of programming that allowed us to think through ideas over longer periods of time. So, instead of thinking about an exhibition schedule that included 10 exhibitions a year, I figured we could shorten that down to 3-4, and instead unpack the ideas over longer periods of time and through a variety of engagements. This is where the thinking behind an exhibition in the shape of objects, lectures, screenings, and using the exhibition space as the site where most of these things happen came into fruition. So future programs at ArtCenter may not be exhibitions at all, and instead focus on the necessary outputs for the content we want to engage with and breaking with the demands we place on ourselves to produce (or overproduce!) in one particular way.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121181003-ArtCenter_An_Image_Barbara_Kasten__2_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Barbara Kasten,&nbsp;Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: The exhibition seems so thoughtful, even the design of the </strong><a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/fall2016/animage/" target="_blank"><strong>web page</strong></a><strong>&mdash;which is beautiful. I imagine it was also approached as an image in and of itself. Could you talk about the process of selecting works and how they operate in relation to one another?</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>Domingo and I really did want to think about all of the components in the exhibition as images, or as contributing factors to the construction of an image. We wanted to move beyond the representational force of an image which had dominated so much of &ldquo;image&rdquo; discourse/politics and think about the way an image is both imbricated and a catalyst for a number of social/political processes. So yes, the website, and especially the installation was important for this because we knew that the exhibition space as an image would travel further than the amount of people who could possibly access it in person.</p> <p>As a project we like to think that it works on two registers: that the exhibition space itself works as the place where the construction of an image is set to play, and that the public programs were a way of thinking through effects and gamuts of temporalities. In the space you have works by Harun Farocki, Enrique Castro-Cid, Barbara Kasten, and Suzan Pitt as immediate examples bolstered by the exhibition design and by the lighting, which Alan Gutierrez so carefully designed. Each one of these pieces does something slightly different: Farocki gives you the careful construction of desire in an image; Pitt&mdash;the presence of the hand in her very rich imagery; Castro-Cid in the relation between reality, computer-aided design, and painting. &nbsp;</p> <p>I think together the pieces are more than individual images&mdash;and this is important because we weren&rsquo;t interested in <em>importing </em>images; we wanted to create one too.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180257-ArtCenter_An_Image_Alan_Gutierrez.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Alan Gutierrez, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Domingo Castillo:</strong> We looked at <a href="http://arquitectonica.com/blog/portfolio/residential/the-pink-house/" target="_blank">ARQUITECTONICA&rsquo;s Pink House</a> as a case study of a project that literally reprogramed the visual identity of Miami for the 80s and made ARQUITECTONICA an instant global architecture firm. The house, which perfectly exemplifies the &ldquo;post-modern&rdquo; in architecture, won multiple awards before it was even built. The proposal of which was first designed by Laurinda Spear and Rem Koolhaas, showed a return to the hand-painted and romanticized rendering which clearly highlighted their admiration of the Bauhaus thinking but begins to do something else.</p> <p>When the house is finally constructed it&rsquo;s redesigned by the newly established firm. It begins getting highlighted for its five Shades of Pink and it continues to get awards through all the photography-based architectural magazines. Luxury brands use the house as a stage for their advertisements, becoming the actual post-modern moment. The functionality of the house as a house comes second to it functioning as a stage where images are created. Due to the sheer amount of images that are generated through the house and its positioned branding of the image, the City of Miami starts to pivot towards the lifestyle, colors, and aesthetics laid out by the house and the images of its use. That to this day continues informing a &ldquo;luxurious&rdquo; understanding of the city, as per <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKbR7u8J5PU" target="_blank">Pitbull and Chris Brown&rsquo;s &ldquo;Fun&rdquo; music video.</a></p> <p>This is the grounding logic we wanted to work through with the exhibition as a whole. Instead of bringing in archival material, the logic is re-performed and our study of the house gets incorporated into the exhibition design and promotional apparatus of the exhibition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180722-ArtCenter_An_Image_Enrique_Castro_Cid.jpg" style="width: 467px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Enrique Castro-Cid,&nbsp;Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: You mention that the exhibition is &ldquo;an inherent political project&rdquo; that looks at &ldquo;image in relation to power structures and pseudo-agency&rdquo; referencing a &ldquo;history of anxiety,&rdquo; then tie these themes to the image of Miami as &ldquo;colonial fantasies of Latin America&rdquo; in your press release. Further to that, you assert that &ldquo;images are coded by different cosmologies in order to reconfigure the politics of visibility and presence.&rdquo; I&rsquo;m curious to know how or where these different cosmologies exist and am also interested in your thoughts related to these aspects of your statement.</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>Alan Poma&rsquo;s <em>La Victoria Sobre el Sol </em>[Victory Over the Sun], which is the multi-media opera we are presenting at the conclusion of the exhibition that re-appropriates the Russian futurist play by the same name, is a good example of what we mean by the way in which different cosmologies code images. The play translates the opera both visually and linguistically to incorporate both Andean visions of the last moments of the solar system -- a story that has its origins in pre-columbian cultures. This incorporation is not in effect to translate the story, but to reclaim and decolonize the notion of futurity as a narrative that is strictly european in origin and in doing so re-situates the way in which that narrative has a <em>presence</em>, and is made <em>visible</em>; and that is inherently a political act.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s great that you picked up on the &ldquo;colonial fantasies.&rdquo; This was a slight jab at the idea that Miami is the &ldquo;gateway to the Americas&rdquo; or the &ldquo;capital of Latin America.&rdquo; This is language that has been disseminated by economic and tourist development boards in an effort to really sell Miami as that; but for us that idea pointed to a kind of colonial fantasy that doesn&rsquo;t play out through the dispossession of land or the acquisition of it for a nation state, but through a more pervasive form of economic colonialism. One key example that Domingo and I are always talking about is <a href="http://www.verizonenterprise.com/infrastructure/data-centers/north-america/nap/nap-americas.xml" target="_blank">NAP of The Americas</a>. This data site located just north of downtown Miami is where a large amount of internet traffic from the Americas is funneled through. So if you send an email, say, from Brazil to Chile, there&rsquo;s a chance it has to travel up here before reaching its destination. This subtle crossing of territories says more about Miami as a gateway and capital and the power structures that support and propel this vision forward than palm trees and sunsets do.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180826-ArtCenter_An_Image_Installation_shot.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: What makes Miami unique in relation to other &ldquo;art worlds&rdquo;?</strong></p> <p><strong>DC:</strong> Miami is just another node within the larger network of Contemporary Art. A place of constant contestation, natural disasters, racial inequality, financial inequality, constant land (re)development, and the ecological harmony of the Everglades are a few things of many that constantly rub up against each other and have to be constantly negotiated. The politics of the image become almost obvious if we start thinking about the way that art has always been instrumentalized within the creation and development of this city&rsquo;s imagery. When used with this kind of awareness and agency images and art can be used as a great vehicle where one can act and possibly change the course or at least the conversation towards more radicalized and empowered futures.</p> <p><strong>AP: What are your top Miami picks for Art Basel week?</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>To see:&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/events/show/427723-an-image" target="_blank"><em>AN IMAGE</em></a> :) and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433501-sometimes-random" target="_blank">Lynne Golob Gelfman</a> at Noguchi Breton.</p> <p>To eat: <a href="http://www.chefcreole.com/" target="_blank">Chef Creole</a> (200 NW 54th Street in Little Haiti), <a href="http://www.lapalapahondurena.com/" target="_blank">La Palapa</a> (2699 Biscayne Boulevard in Edgewater), and <a href="http://www.lacamaronera.com/" target="_blank">La Camaronera</a> (1952 W Flagler Street in Little Havana).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;Audrey L. Phillips</p> <p><em>Audrey Phillips is a Toronto-based writer. She is a regular contributor to AQNB.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image to top: Installation view of <em>An Image</em> at ArtCenter/South Florida. Harun Farocki and Alan Gutierrez. Photos: Zack Balber. All images courtesy of ArtCenter/South Florida)</span></p> Tue, 29 Nov 2016 19:23:06 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Artist Positioning Himself as Richter’s Crown Prince <p>Next year Eberhard Havekost turns fifty: time to balance the books. The press release for his current solo at KINDL positions Havekost &ldquo;among the most important German artists of his generation.&rdquo; The artist himself probably doesn&rsquo;t agree with an accolade this generic, especially when it&rsquo;s accompanying the kind of self-confident display of painterly power that is <em>Inhalt</em>. The show takes up two full floors and doesn&rsquo;t leave much wall space unused. The works on show are so diverse, they could have been created by three or four different artists.</p> <p>Most recognizable as Havekost&rsquo;s are the flat figurative paintings of everyday objects and scenes. They&rsquo;re based on photographs, either Havekost&rsquo;s own or found footage, which have been digitally enhanced and transferred to canvas with a minimum of depth or visible brushstroke. A lipsticked mouth blowing out smoke, a close-up of a sugar cube, a bent, tanned leg framing the ocean behind. It&rsquo;s imagery with a pop-art charm, somewhere between social and photo realism. And it is what it is. Only occasionally does Havekost allow himself an ironic wink, like in the <em>Transformers</em>-titled depiction of a car wreck.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222950-KINDL_Havekost_01_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 413px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, <em>Baum, B15</em>, 2015, Oil on canvas, 270 x 160 cm.<br /> Courtesy of Galerie Gebr. Lehmann and Anton Kern Gallery. Photo: Werner Lieberknecht</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Havekost&rsquo;s most vacant paintings are of dead screens, of TVs, computers, or mobile phones. The vast pools of grey nothingness hold promises of light and pigment but they turn out to be the dull opposite of everything painterly. In their off mode it&rsquo;s almost impossible to imagine we spend hours every day looking at them, our windows to the world. With sardonic delight Havekost exposes the soul of the virtual world in <em>Baum</em>: the colorful electronic bits inside a cracked iPhone are more real than the numb screen.</p> <p>With a series of iridescent works Havekost bounces to the other side of the spectrum. One triptych is even called <em>Light</em>. It&rsquo;s a depiction of basic physics but the result is both kitschy and hysterical. Havekost offsets these luminary explosions with measured color schemes, rhythmic compositions of six shades of secondary colors with titles such as <em>Copy + Property</em> or <em>Sch&ouml;ner Wohnen</em>. Here, the natural force of light and reflection has been categorized and domesticated.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222918-KINDL_Havekost_M1_02_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 518px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, Installation view of <em>Inhalt</em> at KINDL&rsquo;s Power House (first floor, M1). Photo: Jens Ziehe, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Up to this point the works in <em>Inhalt </em>can somehow be linked together, however diverse they may be. But Havekost rudely breaks this logic by adding half a dozen semi-abstract expressionist paintings, scattered across the walls, often right next to the flattest images in the presentation. The palette is geared towards contrast, the paint seems to have been forcefully smeared onto the canvas, attacked with sharp objects. To see <em>Zimmerpflanze</em> (House plants), a violent clash of sweeping greens, blacks, and yellows, right next to the perfectly realistic flowers in <em>Poison</em>, is nothing short of shocking.</p> <p><em>Inhalt</em> is Havekost flexing his painterly muscles. He obviously feels the need to showcase the full range of his skills. And he is explicitly competing with Gerhard Richter, the greatest German painter alive today, the best of not just his own but of all generations. The color schemes, the abstract work, the photorealistic images&mdash;they echo Richter&rsquo;s multi-faceted oeuvre. The standoff between the now 84-year-old Nestor and his would-be crown prince doesn&rsquo;t end favorably for Havekost, though. As Frieze critic Kristy Bell noticed in her review of his 2006 show at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg: &ldquo;Richter described the process of painting from photographs as being about making the banal &lsquo;more than just banal,&rsquo; but the problem with Havekost&rsquo;s paintings is that the banal just becomes more banal.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222822-KINDL_Havekost_02_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 391px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, <em>Gef&uuml;hl, B15</em>, 2015, Oil on canvas, 80 x 45 cm.<br /> Courtesy of Galerie Gebr. Lehmann and Anton Kern Gallery. Photo: Werner Lieberknecht</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>What holds true for Havekost&rsquo;s photographically inspired paintings, applies to his entire body of work. Richter&rsquo;s works are about history and painting, memory and painting, identity and painting, a lot of different subjects combined with painting. Havekost&rsquo;s are only about painting. His subject matter is of secondary concern; the images are first and foremost shapes and colors. His large-scale reproduction of an illustration from a history book he received as a child might inspire mild bewilderment but his decision to paint it seems random. In that light the show&rsquo;s title, <em>Inhalt</em> (Content), feels deeply ironic. To be counted amongst the truly greatest painters of his age, however, Havekost needs to go beyond his noncommittal game of half-hearted references.</p> <p><em>Eberhard Havekost&rsquo;s </em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433413-inhalt" target="_blank">Inhalt</a><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433413-inhalt" target="_blank"> </a>is on display at KINDL &ndash; Zentrum f&uuml;r zeitgen&ouml;ssische Kunst, Berlin, until February 19. 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Eberhard Havekost, Installation view of <em>Inhalt</em> at KINDL&rsquo;s Power House (second floor, M2). Photo: Jens Ziehe, 2016)</span></p> Sat, 26 Nov 2016 18:13:28 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Relentlessly Dissecting Beauty, Marilyn Minter Gets at the Guts of Glamour <p><em>October saw the launch of&nbsp;A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The series&rsquo; first two exhibitions honor two unique feminisms. Today, we&rsquo;re taking a look at them both: Beverly Buchanan&rsquo;s&nbsp;</em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46824-beverly-buchanan">Ruins and Rituals&nbsp;</a><em>and Marilyn Minter&rsquo;s&nbsp;</em>Pretty/Dirty<em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A woman just beginning to show the signs of a life well-worn, with deeply impressed laugh lines and a made-up face sagging ever so slightly, stares almost seductively, or maybe placidly at you from her bed. A cigarette burns in her liver-spotted hand, the strap of her nightgown barely hangs on to one shoulder. The photograph is titled <em>Coral Ridge Towers (Mom Smoking) </em>(1969/1995), and as titled, along with the eight other photos in the series, it depicts the artist&rsquo;s mother in her Florida home. But there is a reason it took Marilyn Minter over twenty years to print and show this series.</p> <p>On a walk-through of her recently opened retrospective at Brooklyn Museum, Minter stops at the Coral Ridge Tower series, which begins the show, to recall how she didn&rsquo;t feel there was anything special about these photos when she took them&mdash;she was simply snapping photos of her mother in her apartment, doing the things she usually did. But upon showing them to some classmates, she realized that what she&rsquo;d captured was something entirely different. She saw what they saw: a woman defeated by the patriarchal standards of femininity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130743-Coral_Ridge_Towers__Mom_Smoking_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 543px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Coral Ridge Towers (Mom Smoking)</em>, 1969/1995, Gelatin silver print. Collection of Beth Rudin DeWoody</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Pretty/Dirty</em>, Minter&rsquo;s first major retrospective, explores this idea of abject beauty that we see running throughout her entire oeuvre&mdash;from her first student photographs, to her current paintings and videos. As a show, it is concise and clear cut, taking a few choice samples from each era of the artist&rsquo;s history in order to create a trajectory to understanding more fully how she arrived at her current work: the glossy, high production value, artificial colored, painted lips and lacquered nails&mdash;all resulting in what looks almost like Maybelline advertisements on acid.</p> <p>But the early works play an important role in understanding this largely misunderstood artist, because we see that there is a desire throughout to give agency to the unspoken, the overlooked, the scoffed, the embarrassing. Through the photographs, paintings, and videos she dissects this idea of beauty, a beauty that has been forced down the throats of women like her mother, a beauty that she herself would not be consumed by, rather she would turn in on itself, revealing the guts of glamour.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130636-Big_Girls.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 508px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Big Girls</em>, 1986, Enamel on canvas, 2 panels. Collection of Bill Contente, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The first real hint of this after the early photographs is <em>Little Girls #1 </em>(1986) and <em>Big Girls </em>(1986), both of which depict a deconstruction of women&rsquo;s bodies via the media they are most widely represented in: magazines. Each painting is constructed from source images ripped apart and put back together, representing the scrutiny women&rsquo;s bodies are put through on a daily basis. This is the beginning of Minter&rsquo;s interest in reclaiming oppressive images from the media for her own feminist agenda.</p> <p>Included as well are her photorealist paintings of floors and sinks, mostly taken from her home and in her studio. Here, in a collision of the domestic realm with the workspace, we see that she trained her photorealist eye on the mundane, turning the ordinary into something beautiful, something to look at or even objectify. It&rsquo;s not until later in her career that she brings this technique back, focusing instead on the absurdity of realism&mdash;the freckles the fashion industry takes such pains to erase (<em>Blue Poles,</em> 2007), the stubble still visible in freshly shaved underarms (<em>Armpit</em>, 2006), the unsightly marks binding clothes leave on bodies (<em>Sock</em>, 2005). Even the close-up shots in <em>Plush </em>(2016) are beautiful, taking a kind of professional care to make each individual bush look like a star&mdash;a head shot for your vulva.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130547-Armpit.jpg" style="width: 467px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Armpit</em>, 2006, C-print. Courtesy of the artist, Salon 94, New York, and Regen Projects, Los Angeles</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This sort of sexual glorification is also visible in her first hardcore porn paintings, like <em>Porn Grid </em>(1989). To a contemporary audience the paintings might seem quaint, portrayed in bright colors, with an almost cartoonish halftone dot matrix, which was actually a laborious hand-painted effect. In fact, the depictions may not even register as &ldquo;hardcore porn&rdquo; anymore, as we see things almost as graphic on HBO these days. But it&rsquo;s important to note that these paintings were coming out of a time wrought with identity politics, and just by daring to go tackle the issue of porn had established Minter as something of a feminist-outcast, a traitor to the rhetoric of the time, shunned as a perceived accomplice of oppression.</p> <p>Looking back we can see that she was taking a feminist stance that was way ahead of her time with these paintings. Minter, as a heterosexual woman, was reclaiming the oppressive images from porn in hopes to turn them on their head with a female sex-positive message. Porn has been a reality of our culture for longer than most like to admit, so by co-opting these images of consensual sex, she was giving women agency over their sexuality, agency to enjoy and indulge in their sexuality. Plus, she noted, &ldquo;no one has PC fantasies, anyways,&rdquo; so we might as well get it all out there in the open. She was also searching for subject matter that would indeed shock and alarm for the very fact that a woman was dealing with it, noting that &ldquo;if Mike Kelley could mine 13-year-old girl culture of mall culture, unicorns, crushes&hellip;&rdquo; the equivalent would be her mining hardcore porn.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130449-Orange_Crush.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 420px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Orange Crush</em>, 2009, Enamel on metal, 108 x 180 in. Private collection</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Her practice and eye have certainly grown and evolved along with the available technology, now incorporating higher production photo shoots, from which she constructs Photoshopped images, called &ldquo;cobbles,&rdquo; to create the perfect source image, from which she then makes her signature photorealistic enamel on metal paintings. She has moved away from the explicitly sexual, and back into a world of opulent sensuality. In the video <em>Meltdown</em> (2011), a silver-heeled and bejeweled foot dripping in metallic silver, kicks through an invisible plane of glass in slow motion. And paintings like <em>Drizzle (Wangechi Mutu)</em> (2010) and <em>Orange Crush</em> (2009) display similar dripping, metallic, almost ravenous mouths pouring over with glimmering substances.</p> <p>There&rsquo;s something insatiable about these paintings and videos. They contain a force that draws you in and pushes you away at the very same time, imploring you to consume them, much like their subjects slurp and taste and lick. Minter is creating seductive, yet off-putting steamy, frosty, wet, crystalized, shiny gem-filled fantasy worlds. You look in and look in, until you pull back, for fear of being consumed. This is the power of subverting the patriarchal gaze, the confinement and rule of imposed femininity&mdash;that the beauty and lust can linger along with the abject and repellent.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452624-olivia-b-murphy?tab=REVIEWS">Olivia B. Murphy</a></p> <p><em>Olivia Murphy is a writer and editor based in New York, covering arts and culture. Her work has appeared in various publications both in print and online, including&nbsp;</em>L&#39;Officiel Magazine<em>,&nbsp;</em>Freunde Von Freunden<em>,&nbsp;</em>Whitehot<em>,&nbsp;</em>Riot of Perfume<em>,&nbsp;</em>doingbird<em>, and&nbsp;</em>Whitewall Magazine<em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Marilyn Minter, <em>Blue Poles</em>, 2007, Enamel on metal. Private collection, Switzerland)</span></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2016 13:21:50 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Beverly Buchanan and the Architecture of Blackness <p><em>October saw the launch of&nbsp;A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The series&rsquo; first two exhibitions honor two unique feminisms. Today, we&rsquo;re taking a look at them both:&nbsp;Beverly Buchanan&rsquo;s </em>Ruins and Rituals<em> and Marilyn Minter&rsquo;s </em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46826-relentlessly-dissecting-beauty-marilyn-minter-gets-at-the-guts-of-glamour">Pretty/Dirty</a><em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>How might we understand a spatial and architectural discourse that marks a black subjectivity? This is the question that lingers in my thoughts as I reflect on <em>Ruins and Rituals</em>, a retrospective exhibition presenting the work of the late Beverly Buchanan, now on view at the Brooklyn Museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Sackler Family Curator Catherine Morris considers Buchanan a game changer, which is not untrue; I would consider Buchanan a witness.</p> <p>Beverly Buchanan was a black Southern woman. As a black Southern woman myself, many of those in my personal circles ascribe to this positionality a type of unspoken power. However, as <a href="http://4columns.org/d-souza-aruna/beverly-buchanan">critics</a> have already rightfully articulated, within the parameters of the mainstream (read: New York City) art world during the 1970s, 80s, and early 90s&mdash;the periods during which Buchanan was most active&mdash;to be Southern and black and woman often resulted in an overlooking. Buchanan worked anyway, creating a repository of site-specific earthworks, sculptures, self-portraits, and other assemblage objects that move across the schools of conceptual and land art, while responding to the idiosyncrasies of the geographies in which she lived. So, as the artist traversed multiple landscapes, so too did her ever evolving canon traverse the political histories of the land, which often revolved explicitly around blackness(es).</p> <p>Organized by guest curators Jennifer Burris and Park McArthur, <em>Ruins and Rituals </em>points a critical, unprecedented eye towards Buchanan&rsquo;s multi-disciplined oeuvre. (Full disclosure: I am now employed at the organization where McArthur was once an artist-in-residence.) The exhibition is divided among three galleries, resisting a chronological viewing experience while still offering an obvious thread of conceptual connectivity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110165731-Untitled__Slab-Works_1_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 560px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Untitled (Slab Works 1)</em>, circa 1978&ndash;80, Black-and-white photograph of cast concrete sculptures with acrylic paint in artist studio. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Upon entering the Sackler Center, one is drawn towards Buchanan&rsquo;s <em>Frustuala</em> series: small, concrete blocks and columns the artist utilized as markers of presence, or, in some cases, the withering away of that which once was. When she began the series in the late 70s, Buchanan was employed in the public health field in New York and New Jersey. She used the stones to respond to the urban decay she was encountering, acutely aware that the materials she used to compose the works were also subject to weathering and aging. In a document on view in the archival section of the exhibition, Buchanan writes that she was &ldquo;...interested in urban walls when they [were] in various stages of decay; walls as part of a landscape.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Buchanan&rsquo;s topographical engagement embodies critic (and close friend of the artist) Lucy Lippard&rsquo;s meditations on place&mdash;that is, a location in which space meets memory. <em>Marsh Ruins</em> (1981), for example, marks the memory of a group of Igbo slaves who drowned themselves off the coast of St. Simons Island, Georgia, as a way of resisting enslavement. Buchanan built these ruins in the marshes of Glynn, in Brunswick, Georgia, and in the show we encounter them via a video created by Burris, McArthur, and Jason Hirata. <em>Marsh Ruins</em> is a material reckoning with the earth in which its stone are planted, certainly, but also a physical (perhaps even spiritual) negotiation through unseen remnants of time.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170452-Shack_Stories__Part_I_.jpg" style="width: 531px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, with poet Alice Lovelace, <em>Shack Stories (Part I)</em>, 1990, Unpublished handmade book of ink and crayon drawings with watercolor and collaged typewritten text. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The same might be said of Buchanan&rsquo;s small shack sculptures. It is in these works that we see the artist most vividly address a Southern, black, architectural vernacular. That is to say, the shack, in Buchanan&rsquo;s hands, is not merely a signifier of social status, but rather a framework&mdash;literally and figuratively&mdash;through which we might understand the nuances of black Southern life. The form represents an important site of social and familial interactions such as weddings, births, and religious gatherings. The centering of the shack as structure<em>&nbsp;but also&nbsp;</em>cultural idiom places blackness within the frame of reference for spatial inclusion, as architect Mario Gooden describes in his book&nbsp;<em><a href="https://www.arch.columbia.edu/books/catalog/3-dark-space-architecture-representation-black-identity">Dark Space: Architecture, Representation, Black Identity</a></em>. Through these loaded forms, Buchanan speaks to the particularities of a black Southern subjectivity, past and present.&nbsp;<em>Low Country House</em>&nbsp;(date unknown), a small, unpainted wood shack, is an eloquent illustration of Buchanan&rsquo;s deftness for the subtle processes of commemoration.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170038-Low_Country_House.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Low Country House</em>, date unknown, Wood. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan, courtesy of Jane Bridges. Photo: Adam Reich, courtesy of Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In the 90s, Buchanan also began to make assemblage pieces, often dedicated to or named after close friends, once again embodying experience and memory within material form. In the final gallery we see the bulk of this later work alongside a trove of photos, letters, and other textual ephemera produced by Buchanan throughout her life. In this room, though full of works ostensibly different in form, we still encounter Buchanan&rsquo;s entanglement with space, object, and memory. Here, the artist turns inward, tracing a personal relationship to the people she loved and the spaces she called home. In one black and white photograph, <em>Hunger and Hardship Creek</em> (1977/1994), Buchanan grips a sign pole with her right arm while staring intently at the camera. In an untitled, undated photocopied business card, she has drawn an image of herself as working artist/good cook/drama queen/safe driver. She is naming herself.</p> <p>McArthur and Burris have gifted us with a well-deserved exhibition that offers a full picture of the prolific artist. The curatorial narrative surrounding the exhibition is concise and direct, some may argue approaching the didactic. But, for me, the texts and exhibition materials feel extremely important as a narrative tool, especially when Buchanan is unfamiliar to many who will first encounter her story through this exhibition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170211-Untitled__The_Doctor_will__if_you_re_lucky__see_you__now_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Untitled (&ldquo;The doctor will, if you&rsquo;re lucky, see you, now.&rdquo;)</em>, July 1993, Unpublished writing in notebook. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In <em>Dark Space</em> Gooden goes on to remark that &ldquo;...the black female body occupies a space within the matrix of subjectivities and bodies, and as such, its spatial praxes, whether visible or invisible, yield its potential agency to reference its own self.&rdquo; Gooden makes this statement with specific regard to the ways blackness has (or has not) tended to operate within spatial and architectural theories and dialogues. Buchanan then, it can be argued, transgresses the boundaries of seen and unseen in order to map a non-linear grid, a dark <em>place</em>, to borrow again from Lippard, where blackness is represented through memory, structure, or through her own image, her body.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/417193-jessica-lynne?tab=REVIEWS">Jessica Lynne</a>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Jessica Lynne is co-editor of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.arts.black/">ARTS.BLACK</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Beverly Buchanan,&nbsp;<em>Untitled (Double Portrait of Artist with Frustula Sculpture) (detail)</em>, n.d. Black-and-white Photograph With Original Paint Marks, 8&frac12; x 11 in. Private Collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan)</span></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2016 13:22:37 +0100 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list